Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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Pick of the Day


,harlotte Sun f,
AND WEEKLY
HERALn

WINSTON LEARNS FATE TODAY RADIOACTIVE THEFT THE
With the investigation complete, the prosecutor is expected A missing shipment of radioactive cobalt-60 was found WIRE
to reveal the findings at 2 p.m. Wednesday near where the stolen truck was abandoned. PAGE 1


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY DECEMBER 5, 2013


Sky kennel, $50

In Today's
Classifieds!


$1.00


PUBLISHER'S INBOX


Obamacare
My friend Mitch contacted me
recently. What in the heck is
going on? His health insurance
premiums for his little software com-
pany were going up
38 percent for the
new year. There is
no way he can afford
i that. I laughed at my
Friend, the liberal
/ Democrat from
Philadelphia, and
said, "Welcome to
Daid Mitch says the
David fault lies not with
DUNN-RANKIN Obama, butwith
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER those greedy health
insurance compa-
nies taking advantage of the chaos in
the market to stick it to us again. Well,
I have to partially agree with him. In
Obamacare, big insurance companies
and big government, if not married
at the hip, sure cohabit the same
apartment.
What in the heck is a company to do?
Well, in Mitch's case, he is probably giv-
ing most everyone a raise for the dollar
amount of health insurance the compa-
ny was providing. The employees then
will go purchase subsidized insurance
on the exchanges. A huge advantage of
this strategy is Mitch's little technology
company mostly will be out of the health
insurance business for good.
Mitch asked what our company was
going to do. I said I wasn't sure yet. We've
been to multiple seminars put on by
attorneys, health care companies and
benefit consultants often with directly
conflicting advice about what to do.
We hired an outside consulting firm to
help us navigate the shoals. The cost of
the consultant is about $300 per employ-
ee. That's a lot of money. I don't want to
say it is a great waste of money, because
the consulting firm is great. Let's just
say the investment is an unfortunate
diversion of money from more produc-
tive uses.
We were fortunate to be able to hire
a consulting firm. I feel sorry for the
small companies and individuals that
are dealing with this challenge. Make a
bad decision, and, if you are on a modest
income, you could be in a world of hurt.
Our company is proceeding on multi-
ple levels to navigate through the health
care rapids. We think our paperwork
will be in order, and we likely will make
some changes to our health care plan in
the new year, designed to attack the two
areas that have the highest impact on
our health care costs: urgent care visits
and chronic care.
Our overall health care cost to cover a
family is now more than $20,000 a year.
It was $10,000 a year seven years ago,
and $5,000 a year seven years before
that. In seven years, the costs are likely
to be $40,000 a year for family insurance,
if nothing changes.
We asked at the seminars and queried
our consultant what other companies
are doing to adjust to both Obamacare
and the long-term trend of spiking pric-
es. Almost universally we are told most
companies are gradually getting out of
company-paid spouse and family health
insurance coverage. Employee-only
health insurance coverage by businesses
may be what is left after the dust settles.
Neither the Republicans nor the
Democrats have a plan to solve the
growing health care and insurance cost
spiral. My friend Mitch deserves better.
America deserves better.
David Dunn-Rankin is publisher and
president of the Sun Newspapers. Email
him at daviddr@sun-herald.com.

CORRECTION
The Englewood Area Fire Control District will hold
an estate-garage sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday at the district's administration office,
516 Paul Morris Drive (off South River Road),
Englewood. The sale will benefit scholarships to
student firefighters. For information, call 941-474-
3311. An story in Wednesday's Englewood and
Charlotte papers misstated the days of the sale.


Tempers boil over project


Charlotte's water authority rep: Litigation imminent


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR
BRADENTON In a brief but
heated exchange, Sarasota County
Commissioner Nora Patterson told
Charlotte County Commissioner Chris
Constance there's no legitimate beef
over an estimated $7 million that
water users in his county must pay
for repairs and upgrades to the Peace
River/Manasota RegionalWater Supply
Authority plant.
"My back is getting a little up,"
Patterson, who chairs the water board,
told fellow member Constance during
Wednesday's authority meeting in
Manatee County. "To say we blindly
are following (the authority's recom-
mendations) is an insult. Give us a
little more credit on this end ... I have
not taken a single action without
getting staff to weigh in. I spent an


enormous amount of effort learning,
and know you do not have a legitimate
beef... intelligent people can disagree.
Lawyers can get involved. God bless
you and go forward (with a lawsuit)."
Patterson's challenge came after
Constance read a statement to the
board. He was the lone vote against
the four-member authority signing
a $12.8 million contract to rebuild
portions of the water plant, located in
DeSoto County, that was built in the
late 1970s.
Charlotte, Sarasota, Manatee and
DeSoto counties, along with the city of
North Port, draw millions of gallons of
water from the plant each year. All must
pay different amounts for the rebuild,
based on usage. Charlotte which
uses about 90 percent of the plant's
capacity will pay about $8.5 million;
Sarasota, $1.2 million; North Port,
$869,892; and DeSoto, $213,124.


The water authority also is kicking in
about $900,000 from its General Fund.
The counties and city can use money
left over (credited by the authority)
toward paying the bill from other
plant-related projects that came in
under budget. Charlotte is owed about
$2.2 million; Sarasota, $4.8 million;
North Port, $3.6 million; and DeSoto,
$61,965.
Constance said an independent
engineer studied the rebuild project
and told Charlotte officials fewer than
half of the proposed plant repairs need
to be done immediately.
Constance said Charlotte's portion,
which must be paid to the authority
by next October or be bonded over
20 years through the authority, will
create a hardship for the county's
60,000 water users.

WATER 16


Appreciating nature at an early age


SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSS


Katherine Lawrence, 3, and her father Brandon played with small objects found in nature like shells,
pebbles, twigs, and stone crab claws on Wednesday at the Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center.


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA Parents like
Jennifer Deke took their children
to the Alligator Creek Preserve
on Wednesday to enjoy the great
outdoors.
They joined the Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center's Young
Children in Nature program. The
program, which is for children
ages 2 to 5, combines early child-
hood development activities with
hands-on nature lessons and
outdoor activities once a month.
When Deke heard about the Young
Children and Nature program, she
thought it would be a "good oppor-
tunity to get (her daughters) out
of their princess dresses and into
nature."
Splitting their time between the
screened lanai that served as the
lesson room and the preserve's
trails and visitor center, the children
had lessons in numbers, grouping,
animals and local plants.
Eileen Tramontana, the environ-
mental program coordinator who
led the activities, said the outdoors
provides an excellent setting for
children in this age range to learn.
"A lot of kids really respond to using
nature in lessons," Tramontana said.
She also said research shows
that being in nature helps children
with autism and attention-deficit
disorder to focus, and reasons that
it probably does the same for all
children.
Deke agreed that getting her
children away from the distractions
was a good thing. "The biggest part is
getting them unplugged and unglued
from the iPad and TV," she said.
NATURE16


Thieves take Christmas trees from LBHS


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD Just a few days into
December, some Grinch is trying to
steal Christmas already.
About two dozen Christmas trees
were stolen from a fundraising proj-
ect at Lemon Bay High School. The
incident was reported Tuesday.
"It's heartbreaking," said Beth
Harrison, the school's Project
Graduation treasurer.
The Christmas tree sale serves as a
major fundraiser split equally between
Lemon Bay's Project Graduation and
TREES16


SUN PHOTO BY
STEVE REILLY
Lemon Bay High
School Navy
Junior ROTC instructor
William Rennie and
principal Bob Bedford
have nothing to look
at under a tent that
should be housing
Christmas trees.
Someone stole more
than 20 Christmas
trees that the NJROTC
and Lemon Bay's
Project Graduation
sell as part of a major
fundraiser.


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 3,6 Obituaries 5 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 91 Legals 11 1 THE WIRE: Nation 2,81 State 3 World 51 Business 6-71 Weather 8 SPORTS: Lotto 2 LASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 1TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1.00 :F -rw-, Look insidefor valuable coupons -.-4: CHARLIE SAYS .
Daily Ed1111ition$1.00 i 11g Low :" 1 l This year's savings to dat i C USA "H
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W TTHE WIRE
US-China: Talks but no consensus on air zone row PAGE 1


AN EDITION OF THE SI
VOL.121 NO.339


www.sunnewspapers.net





:OurTown Page 2 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun/Thursday, December 5, 2013


HAVE YOU SEEN THE LIGHTS?
Email a location (street address and town/area),
along with a brief description of your featured
attractions, to Marion Putman, assistant Charlotte
editor, at marionmputman@gmail.com, or call
941-206-1183. You can even email a photo, and
we'll try to get it in the paper.

Port Charlotte area
Collingswood Boulevard at Godwin Avenue,
Port Charlotte: Lights on block from 6 p.m. to
10 p.m. daily.
1552 Eppinger Drive: 75,000-80,000 lights,
12 inflatables, many other decorations.

Punta Gorda area
Lakewood Village, 5601 Duncan Road (U.S. 17):
Entrance decorated with Santa with sleigh, pack-
ages, Christmas trees, candy canes, snowmen.


Plus, Thursday,


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ITEM
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El


Gulfview Road cul-de-sac, PGI: A neighbor-
hood effort for two decades; easily viewed driving
by or while enjoying the boat tour.

North Port area
4525 Avanti Circle: Music, animation, thou-
sands of lights.
2866 Escambia Circle: Multicolored light
display synchronized to music.
House on Chamberlain Boulevard, heading
toward Cranberry Boulevard: Yard full of displays,
and two other houses along with them.
Chamberlain Boulevard and Boca Chica
Avenue.
5364 Greenhouse Ave.
2399 Oracle Lane (off Chamberlain Boulevard,
take Snowflake Lane to Cynthia Terrace, and then
to Oracle).
Gerona Terrace, off North Cranberry Boulevard.
S1553 Log Lane, off South Cranberry Boulevard.


who are deaf or hard of hearing.
Contact: 941-743-8347 or hipkgaut@yahoo.com.
Monday through Wednesday, and Dec. 15
- Church of the Good Shepherd
The Church of the Good Shepherd, 401 W. Henry
St., Punta Gorda, welcomes everyone.
Contact: Sheila Stidham at 941-766-1367 or
sheila33980@hotmail.com; fliers will be available
after church services.
Dec. 14 Meals on Wheels of Charlotte
County Inc.
Prepares and delivers hot, nutritious meals to
the homebound or those who otherwise require
assistance.
Contact: Henry Ereth at 941-625-4343 or at the
MOW office, 3082 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte.
Dec. 16- Temple Shalom
Temple Shalom is a welcoming reform Jewish
congregation at 23190 Utica Ave., Port Charlotte, that
strives to meet the spiritual, educational, cultural and
social needs of its members.
Contact: Joyce Gelfand at jteachu@yahoo.com.
Dec. 28 Cultural Center of Charlotte
County-Cul Cen Productions Musical Theater
Cul-Cen Productions is an all-volunteer, nonprofit
group that produces an annual variety show raising
funds for the Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St., Port
Charlotte.
Contact: http://theculturalcenter.com/ccp.html.


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All Clearance
Merchandise.
NO LIMITS!


CHARLOTTE
EVENTS

*GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
Beaches and Shores,
Advisory Committee meeting, 9 a.m.,
18400 Murdock Circle, PC. 764-4909.
Marine Advisory,
Committee Pre-Agenda meeting,
9:30 a.m., 18500 Murdock Circle,
Bldg. B, Room 106-B, PC. 764-4909.
Board of County,
Commissioners Pre-Agenda meeting,
1:30 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg.
B, Room 106-B, PC. 743-1944.
Construction, Industry
Licensing Board meeting, 6 p.m.,
18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC.
743-1245.

* EVENTS
* TODAY
American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch Thu-Sun
7a-2p Public invited. Help us support
our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd PG 639-6337.
Sierra Club Hike, Sierra
Club Prairie Shell Creek Preserve Hike
8:30-11 with master naturalists.
Reserve required: 941-639-7468.
Project Linus, Make and quilt
blankets for kids every Thurs 9-11am
Hucky's Softball Training 17426 Abbott
Ave., Nancy 627-4364.

I ENGLEWOOD
EVENTS

*GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
South Gulf Cove, Waterway
Benefit Unit Advisory Committee
meeting, 10 a.m., 6874 San Casa Dr.,
Englewood. 575-3656.

* EVENTS
* TODAY
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533.
Ewd Country Liners, 9:30-
11:30 AM, Christ Lutheran Church, 701
N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed. line
dances. Open to all. Nancy 474-6027.
Line Dancing(Beg), 10:00 to
12:00 at Dance Etc. Oaks Plaza, South
McCall Rd. Phone Eve 941-697-8733.
Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a
plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample
to be identified @ New Englewood
Library, 3450 S McCall, 475-6903.
Bingo mania, 11-1,20225
Kenilworth Blvd., PC Elks, Join the
Fun, & help the CC Homeless Coalition,


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events
Family Fun Fest, Today,5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., games, food, silent
auctions, holiday store, cake walk, prizes. Murdock Middle School, 17325 Mariner
Way, PC,941-255-7525.
Faithful Friends Service Dec. 8,10 AM, Suncoast Christian
Church is a small group of believers in Christ. Join us for a special service. Our intent
is to build on our acreage in North Port Currently meeting at the Port Charlotte
Elks, 20225 Kenilworth Ave. (Veterans Blvd. to Atwater N., L. on Kenilworth). Dec.
8,10 am. Info: 204-9805.
The Many Sides of Glass Art, Dec. 10,10am-2pm. Mary
Cavanagh, accomplished glass artist, will showyou the steps needed to create
wearable art, serving pieces, musical delights and decorative ideas. Free; open to
the public. Gifted Gator Boutique, PGICA, 2001 Shreve St., PG. www.pgica.org or
941-637-1655.
PG Garden Club Holly Days Home Tour, 11 am- 4 pm. Dec.
6 & 7. Tour 4 festively decorated Historic Dist homes & 1 church. Poinsettia Market &
cookies at 1 st United Methodist Church, 507 W. Marion Ave, PG., $15. Proceeds fund
club scholarships & community projects. Call 575-4653 or go to www.pggc.org.
Ring Bells for Sandy Hook Children, Public may gather Dec.
14 at 11 a.m. at Gilchrist Park, 400 W. Retta Esplanade, PG, for a one year memorial
reading of the names of the children killed in Newtown, Ct Please bring bells to
ring! Religious leaders are invited. For info, call 941-347-8738.
Peace River Republican Women's Forum, Wed., Dec. 11,
at 11:30 a.m., at Isles Yacht Club, 1780 W. Marion Ave., PG. Join us for our Annual
Luncheon Meeting and election of officers. Members $17; guests $20. Contact
Martha at 456-6558 by noon Fri., Dec. 6 to register.
PG Tea Party General Meeting, The meeting will be held Dec. 5,
at 6:30 PM, at 420 Pompano Terrace, Punta Gorda. Guest speaker: Captain Matt
Bruce, Radio Personality and strong Tea Party Supporter. Open to public; no charge;
bring a friend and enjoy. For info, call 941-655-8627.
Peace River Baptist Church choir sings, The Peace River
choir will sing the Christmas musical,'Come, Messiah King,"at 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 6, at
Fishermen's Village center court, 1200W. Retta Esplanade, PG. Call 941-628-9789
for more info.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Christmas Bazaar, The Brook to Bay Mobile Home Park will hold its
annual Christmas Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Sat, Dec. 7, in the clubhouse
at 1891 Englewood Rd., Englewood. There will be crafts, gifts, raffles, baked
goods, and lunch will be available for purchase. For info, call 474-5295.


RUBY TUESDAY
GIVEBACK EVENTS
Ruby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte
Town Center mall offers a Community GiveBack
Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and
others. This is a great way to raise money for your
cause while enjoying lunch or dinner, organizers
say. Ruby Tuesday gives back 20 percent of net sales
to each organization.
The following organizations have GiveBack
events scheduled for this month. If you are
interested in supporting any of these, visit the orga-
nization's website for a flier or contact the group/
individual and request a flier to attend.
Today and Friday Charlotte County
Concert Band
The fundraiser is for scholarships for high school
students' music equipment. The Concert Band is
comprised of adult musicians and qualified high
school students. It promotes music in the commu-
nity and provides adult musicians the opportunity
to perform.
Contact: Peggy Mock at 941-625-0170 or
peggymltuba@gmail.com.
Saturday and Sunday Hearing Impaired
Persons of Charlotte County
HIP is a service and resource center to help those


Legion Fish Fry, Mike &
Carol's Famous Fish Fry, 1/2 Rst.
Chicken or burgers. Post 113, Indiana
Rd. 697-3616. Music by: Just Duet.
Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church
at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00
423-2427.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, "Fish Fry or Wings"5 to
7 p.m. Music in the lounge by"Henry"
5-8 p.m., Public Welcome 475-7516.
VFW Seafood Night,
VFW10476 3725 CapeHaze Dr 5-8 The
best fresh haddock shrimp or scallops
in the area $10+ 697-1123.

* SATURDAY
FC Men's Breakfast, Prayer
Brkfst @ 8:00am @ Church prop.
corner of Parade & Rot. W. Blvd. All
men are invited, 475-7447.


SUBSCRIPTIONS I NORTH PORT EVENTS


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.
Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months..........................$113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.
Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call or visit your local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120 W. Dearborn St
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
PortCharlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


*GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
County Commission, Retreat,
9am,Twin Lakes Park, Green Room, 6700
Clark Road, Sarasota. 861-5000.
DRC meeting, Development
Review Committee, 9am, Conference
Room 2,1001 Sarasota Center Blvd.,
Sarasota. 861-5000.
Planning & Zoning,
Advisory Board meeting, 9am, North
Port City Hall Chambers, 4970 City Hall
Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000.
ESLOC meeting, Enviro
Sensitive Lands Oversight Committee,
2:30pm,3rd floor ThinkTank, Admin Ctr,
1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. 539-4083.
Planning Commission,
meeting, 6:30pm, commission chambers,
R.L. Anderson Admin Center, 4000 S.
Tamiami Trail, South Venice. 861-5000.

* EVENTS
* TODAY
Table tennis, 9:00-11:00 am,
North Port Senior Center, 4940 Pan
American Blvd., equipment, provided,
$2.00,426-6276.
Currant Events/Conve,
10-11:30am NP Senior Center, 4940
Pan American Blvd., 426-2204 Bring a
topic/joke join in the discussion.
North Port Moose, 112:30
Lunch. Liver/Onions, Burgers, Philly's
5-7., meat bingo 7:30. Member/Qualified


Guest, 14156Tamiami 426-2126.
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat,
Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy
Enjoy great food & special in canteen.
NARFE Chapter 1713,
Christmas Party, Officer
Installation 1:30 am Olde World
Restaurant, 240-6127 for info.
Mexican Dominos,12-3pm
NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American
Blvd 426-2204 Come learn the game
& join all the fun.
Bridge Club, Duplicate
Bridge. 1Ipm, Temple Beth El, 3840
S. Biscayne Dr., North Port, $6.00 pp.
Includes The Common Game.
AMVETS 2000 Dinner,
LAUX Meatloaf 4-7pm $6. Members
& guests welcome. QOH @ 7pm. 401
Ortiz Blvd., NP, 941-429-1999.
Italian nite, Spaghetti dinner
6-8 pm meatball, salad, garlic toast,
desert. $6.00, info.Brenda 941-258-6550.
Tree Lighting, Ceremony at
City Hall Thursday, from 6-7pm. Call
941-429-7275 for more information.

* FRIDAY
North Port Moose, 11-2
Lunch. Fish,Prime Rib 5-8. Bad Moon
Karaoke 7-11. Member/Qualified
Guest 14156, Tamiami 426-2126.
Basic Exercise, $40/8wks
or $2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center,
4940 Pan American Blvd., Marcelle
235-0346 Join/feel better.


SUN NEWSPAPERS
--_ Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


Every Tues., Thurs. and Fri.
Story Time, Thursdays 11 am
Stories, rhymes, music & play for
children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library,
100 W Dearborn 861-5000.
Englewood Bridge Cl,
Contract bridge is played every Thurs &
Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 atThe Hills Rest.
RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood,"Rib Night"5-7 p.m. Dance
to the Music of"Two Fifths Band"
5-8 p.m.!, Public Welcome. 474-7516.
Legion Cornhole, Indoor
Cornhole Games 7 pm, light menu
5-7 pm. Smoke free Post Indiana Rd,
Rotonda 697-3616.

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:The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net ENC OurTown Page 3


Woman charged after toddlers found living in filth


VENICE -Authorities
went looking for a
registered sex offender
Tuesday and instead
found two small children
living in deplorable con-
ditions, according to the
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office, which claims the
children's mother was
high on prescription med-
ication and not caring for
her kids.
Donnalee Elizabeth
Ballard, 22, invited
deputies into her trailer
around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
to wait for James Russell
Denegall, 36, who had
violated his probation on
lewd or lascivious and
sexual battery charges,
and was living with
Ballard.
But as authorities
stepped into the trailer
they found something
else entirely: The floor
was covered in garbage,
rotting food and dirty
clothes, while the kitchen
sink was overflowing with
dirty dishes and moldy
food. They also found
used feminine hygiene
products on the kitchen


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


floor, according to a
report, although Ballard
later would claim they
were not hers.
In the middle of all of
this, two toddlers came
wandering into the room
among the filth, them-
selves covered in dirt, the
report states. Both chil-
dren, ages 1 and 2, walked
barefoot across the floor,
which was soiled with
dirty diapers, garbage and
used needle caps.
The children's rooms
were an equal mess, the
report states, as their beds
were dirty, had no clean
sheets and were littered
with empty beer cans.
There was also a lighter in
the bed where the 2-year-
old slept, the report states.
Ballard told authorities
the mess had just taken
place, but they did not
believe her story. She
also told them she had
just injected 30 mg of


OxyContin, and she
did not have a job. She
provided for the children
by asking people for food
and money, but did not
currently have any cash,
the report states, despite
having $160 in her bra,
authorities later would
discover.
The state Department
of Children and Families
placed the toddlers in
foster care, pending an
investigation. Ballard was
charged with two counts
of child neglect, and was
taken into custody. She
was transported to the
Sarasota County Jail,
where she remains on
$5,000 bond.
Denegall also was
located and arrested
Tuesday. He violated his
probation stemming
from a 2005 incident in
which he had sex with a
15-year-old girl in North
Port, according to court


records. It's unknown how
he violated his probation.
He also remains jailed
without bond.

Report: Man
threatens bouncers
with knife
PORT CHARLOTTE
- A homeless man has
been accused of threat-
ening two bouncers
with a knife after he was
kicked out of a local bar
earlyWednesday, accord-
ing to a Charlotte County
Sheriff's report.
Christopher Glen
Gilbert, 30, was cut
off from drinking late
Tuesday by a bartender
at the Portside Tavern in
Port Charlotte. The pa-
tron allegedly had been
drinking for most of the
night and was belligerent
and spilling drinks. He
was asked to leave.
A pair of bouncers
escorted Gilbert out, but
he was physical with
them, the report shows.
A folding knife with a
6-inch blade fell out of
Gilbert's pocket during a


scuffle. Gilbert allegedly
grabbed it, flipped it
open, and threatened the
bouncers with it.
The knife was wres-
tled away from the
suspect and thrown
across the parking lot,
the report shows, but
Gilbert retrieved it and
returned to threaten
the bouncers again.
Authorities responded
around 12:30 a.m. and
saw Gilbert arguing with
the men.
Gilbert was charged
with two counts of
aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon, and one
count each of carrying a
concealed weapon and
resisting an officer af-
ter reportedly struggling
with deputies who were
trying to handcuff him.
Once detained, Gilbert
allegedly told authorities,


"I'm a felon, and I'm
going to (expletive) some-
one up when I get to jail."
The suspect's background
then was checked, and
he was found to be a
convicted felon in Texas.
Gilbert additionally
was charged with failure
to register as a convicted
felon and possession of
a concealed weapon by a
convicted felon.
He was held at the
Charlotte County Jail
Wednesday on $52,500
bond. He has been
ordered to not drink
alcohol if he bonds out.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
SSteven Ronald Hensel, 38,
27000 block of Curitiba Road, Punta
Gorda. Charge: battery. Bond: none.

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'Safe Sleep' campaign wants infants


to rest easy


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY-
State and county officials
claim that 150 infants
have died in Florida this
year from sleep-related
accidents. Its often due to
suffocation, either from
blankets or at the hands
of caregivers who make
deadly mistakes. Two of
those deaths took place in
Sarasota County.
In an effort to combat
what many fear is a
growing trend, the Sheriffs
Office, state Department of
Children and Families, and
the Healthy Start Coalition
are partnering for the "Safe
Sleep" campaign, an educa-
tion effort that aims to also
provide new portable cribs
or playpens to families who
need them.
Sheriff Tom Knight said
during a press conference
Wednesday that anyone,
at any time, can drop off a
new portable crib or play-
pen at the Sheriff's Office in
downtown Sarasota.
The agency will then
work with DCF and
Healthy Start to distrib-
ute the cribs to families
who might not have the
financial means to buy one
themselves. Knight hopes
the community rallies
behind the cause.
"It's a simple solution for
the people who might not
have the means," Knight
said. 'And it can help


families avoid a senseless
tragedy."
Mike Carroll, a regional
director for DCF, said
families often rely on
"generational knowledge"
when it comes to raising
kids. He said it was often
well-intentioned, citing his
own mother's technique of
laying him on his stomach
in his crib as a baby, a tech-
nique that has since proven
fatal in some cases.
Carroll said it was
important for new parents
to bond with their baby, but
it was more important to
keep the child safe. Having
a crib that is clutter-free and
ensuring the infant is laid
to rest on his back will go a
long way toward ensuring
the child doesn't suffocate.
"There's nothing wrong
with wanting to bond with
your child, but its not safe
to sleep with the child,"
he added. A sleeping adult
could roll over and uninten-
tionally smother an infant.
Jennifer Highland from
Healthy Start offered some
simple reminders for
parents:
All kids under a year
old should be kept in a
"safe sleep environment,"
meaning laying the child on
his back.
Don't keep blankets in
the crib with the baby.
Don't get caught up
in "pretty cribs" as they're
displayed in stores. Cribs
should be empty, Highland
said.


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DCF Regional Managing Director Mike Carroll, left, Healthy
Start Executive Director Jennifer Highland, and Sarasota
County Sheriff Tom Knight announce the "Safe Sleep" campaign
Wednesday in Sarasota.


All parents need to be
vigilant in making sure their
baby sleeps in a crib, not
with them.
'A parent might do it
right 99 times," Highland
said. "But it's that one time
out of a hundred when


mistakes happen."
For more information
on the campaign, visit
www.MyFlFamilies.com/
SafeSleep or contact the
SCSO Community Affairs
Office at 941-861-4005.
Email: dwinichester@sun-heraldxom


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:OurTown Page 4 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


Teachers get high evaluation marks


By ANNE KLOCKENKEMPER
STAFF WRITER

Nearly 100 percent
of teachers in both
Charlotte and Sarasota
counties are effective
educators, according
to preliminary statis-
tics released by the
Florida Department of
Education this week.
As of Nov. 25,
163,986 of nearly
190,000 Florida class-
room teachers had been
evaluated. In Charlotte
County, 97.2 percent of
district teachers were
ranked either "highly
effective" or "effec-
tive." The percentage
was slightly higher in
Sarasota County, with
98.1 percent achiev-
ing a highly effective
or effective rating.
Statewide, 97.9 percent
of teachers were effec-
tive or better.
This is the second
year the state has re-
leased evaluation data.
This year's ratings are
similar to 2012 results,
but the ratings and
the method of arriv-
ing at them varied
widely. Asked about
the discrepancy, state


education officials
noted districts have
flexibility in how to
evaluate teachers. An
updated report will be
released in January.
Despite high num-
bers, Charlotte County
Public Schools Assistant
Superintendent for
Human Resources
Barbara Melanson cau-
tioned against reading
too much into them.
"Right now, what
I see is just data. ...
What we will be doing
is looking at it a little
more closely," she
said Wednesday. "The
evaluation systems are
still works in progress,
and our teachers are
still learning."
Charlotte teachers are
evaluated on 60 ele-
ments, and Melanson
said the district is
taking them in "digest-
ible bites."
"For example, this
year, we're keying in
on 17 of those. And as
we're training teachers
in the elements, we're
also continuing the
training of our admin-
istrators in how to go in
and evaluate," she said.
Charlotte County


HOW TEACHERS IN AREA COUNTIES STACK UP


Location
Charlotte
Sarasota
DeSoto
Florida


Highly Effective
22.8 percent
50.5 percent
4.8 percent
32.3 percent


Effective
74.4 percent
47.6 percent
32.6 percent
65.6 percent


Needs Improvement
2.4 percent
1.3 percent
44.0 percent
1.4 percent


3 Years-Developing
0.0 percent
0.5 percent
17.5 percent
0.6 percent


Unsatisfactory
0.3 percent
0.1 percent
1.0 percent
0.2 percent


According to the Florida Department of Education:
A performance evaluation must be conducted for each instructional employee and school administrator at least once a year, and twice a year for
newly hired classroom teachers in their first year of teaching in the district.
District evaluation systems must be based upon sound educational principles and contemporary research in effective educational practices, and
must support continuous improvement of effective instruction and student learning growth.
Evaluation procedures for instructional personnel and school administrators shall be based on the performance of students assigned to their
classrooms or schools, as appropriate.
Source: Florida Department of Education


Schools superintendent
Doug Whittaker echoed
Melanson, questioning
the scores' reliability.
"We're still looking
at five people who go
in and do observa-
tions and give three
different scores ... (on)
the same lesson being
taught by the same
teacher," he said. "We
want their ratings to
be similar.... We know
who our poor-func-
tioning teachers are,
and we have a system
of improvement. We
have 16-plus teachers
on improvement plans
around the district."
Kelly Ellington,
director of professional


development and
teacher evaluation for
the Sarasota School
District, was pleased
with the preliminary
numbers county teach-
ers posted. Her district
uses a hybrid of two
evaluation platforms to
assess teachers across
24 competency areas,
adding there are four
domains the district
looks at, and each one
encompasses several
competencies.
"If I'm a principal
watching a teacher, in
domain one I'm looking
at a what they've done
to set up the classroom,
their rules and expecta-
tions and procedures,"


Ellington said. "In two,
I'm looking at how the
teacher planned. ...
In three, I'm actually
looking at the instruc-
tion and (student)
assessment are the
students engaged, is
the teaching asking
high-quality questions
... The fourth domain
is ... professional
behavior."
In DeSoto County,
only 37.4 percent of
teachers were scored
effective or better,
and 44 percent need
improvement.
Assistant
Superintendent
Christina Britton said,
"Our No. 1 goal is


student achievement.
As that improves, these
scores will also ... We
believe our teachers
and kids are working
very hard."
All three counties
saw only three teachers
rated "unsatisfactory."
Some newer teach-
ers also were rated
"3 years-developing."
In the first three years
of their careers, they
aren't subject to the
evaluation methods like
their more experienced
peers.
Arcadian Editor
Susan E. Hoffman and
the Associated Press con-
tributed to this report.
Email: annek@sun-herald.com


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I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Applications
accepted for
holiday help
Applications are avail-
able for Toys for Tots.
Households must be
Charlotte County residents,
and must provide proof of
residency and ID, as well as
proof of the last four weeks
of income with the applica-
tion. All applications will be
put in a database, screened
and have the information
verified. Also, applicants
must have a working
phone number or email
address so the family can
be contacted by their spon-
sors. There is no guarantee
of assistance. Applications
will be available at the
Department of Children
and Families lobby, and
at Pilgrim United Church
of Christ and many other
area churches. Elementary
school students who

FINALLY

IN PORT

CHARLOTTI

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receive free or reduced
lunch will bring home an
application, and those
applications should be
returned to their school.
Each family can be spon-
sored by only one sponsor,
and this process is in
place to avoid duplication.
Many more sponsors still
are needed to help make
this 2013 holiday season
successful. Organizations
or individuals who are
interested in sponsoring
a family for the holiday
are asked to contact Carol
Pickford, the Charlotte
County Holiday Assistance
intake coordinator, at
941-626-6215 or carol@
carolpickford.net.


Auto sh
supports'
for Tot
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1464 Market Circ


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Implants Cosmetic Nitrous Oxide
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Port Charlotte, is giving
away free brake pads
in exchange for new,
unwrapped toys that will
be donated to the Marine
Corps League's Toys
for Tots program, until
Dec. 12. Labor costs are
required if a brake job is
completed, typically $85
plus sales tax. A & E Auto
is also an official Toys for
Tots drop site for those
individuals whose cars do
not require brake work.
For more information, or
to make an appointment,
call 941-627-3111.

Men's senior
softball


op Open practice sessions
for the men's senior
Toys softball league are at
S 8:30 a.m. every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at
)air, the adult softball fields
le, at the Englewood Sports
Complex, 1300 S. River
Road, Englewood. The
league starts in January
and runs through the
...- middle of March. There
are two divisions -
Division 1 (over 60 years
old) and Division 2 (over
70 years old). You are
..: encouraged to come out
to practice, meet the
)KS players, sharpen your
softball skills, and have
some fun. Registration
forms for the 2014
season are available at
the Englewood Sports
Complex office building.
For more information,
:harlotte call 941-460-9645.


Not Evaluated
6.9 percent
15.4 percent
10.7 percent
13.7 percent


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The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net ENC OurTown Page 5


Lemon Bay



Conservancy



calls for



water testers


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD-The
Lemon Bay Conservancy
hopes to recruit water
testers for itsWildflower
Preserve.
Working with the
University of Florida's Lake
Watch program, the con-
servancy has been testing
water in Lemon Creek and
the ponds on the defunct
80-acreWildflower golf-
course-tumed-preserve
on Placida Road. Since
taking over the preserve,
the conservancy discov-
ered that Lemon Creek is a
haven for juvenile tarpon.
The conservancy now
has three individuals who
regularly test water in the
creek and ponds, said Eva
Fumer, the conservancy
member overseeing the
water testing. However at
least six to nine individu-
als are needed for the test-
ing. Also, the conservancy
hopes to have year-round
volunteers.
Volunteers need to
devote three hours once
a month for the testing.
They should be willing to
take water samples using
a kayak launched into
the ponds, and to analyze
samples onshore.
The water samples are
analyzed for nitrogen,
phosphorous, chlorophyll
and trophic state. The
conservancy expects the


results to help it assess
water quality over time,
and to plan changes
to improve the aquatic
habitat.
The actual testing is
done by Lake Watch.
Lake Watch is a
statewide volunteer
water-quality monitoring
program. Locally, Lake
Watch also tests water
samples from the Rotonda
West Association's canals.
More information can be
found on Lake Watch's
website, http: //lakewatch.
ifas.ufl.edu.
Because of the diverse
geology and soils through-
out Florida, Lake Watch
coordinator DanWillis
said, "Every area has a
different water chemistry"
Lake Watch operates
with a state budget of
$285,000 representing
a 40 percent cut from
previous years and has
five lab technicians testing
from 500 to 1,500 water
samples a month.
According to its website,
Lake Watch samples water
from more than 600 lakes,
rivers and coastal sites
in more than 40 Florida
counties.
To volunteer for the
Wildflower Lake Watch,
or for more information,
contact the Lemon Bay
Conservancy at 941-830-
8922 or lbconservancy@
comcast.net.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.aom


Charlotte closes lid


on carts delivery


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

The delivery of 84,000
new residential recy-
cling carts throughout
Charlotte County is
complete three weeks
ahead of schedule.
The 64-gallon, yel-
low-lidded carts were
provided at no cost to res-
idents beginning Nov. 4.
The roll-out wrapped
up this week, prompting
Waste Management and
Charlotte County Solid
Waste officials to claim
success with the program.
"It went off without any
major issues, concerns
or delays," said Richard
Allen, county solid waste
operations manager.
Allen added that the
public seemed to wel-
come the new carts.
"The people I've talked
to say it's about time," he
said. "Overall, people are
happy."
Compared with the pre-
vious 18-gallon bins, the
wheeled carts are more
convenient and easier
to manage for residents,
officials said.
Todd Peres, senior
district manager for Waste


Management, hopes this
will help increase the
residential recycling rate,
conserving resources
and preserving landfill
capacity.
Currently, recyclable
materials account for
39 percent of all the
household trash collected
in Charlotte County. The
federal government has
set a recycling goal of
75 percent by 2020.
"These new carts
provide a great oppor-
tunity for the residents
of Charlotte County to
recycle more," Peres said.
"Our next step in this pro-
cess is more educational
outreach to our residents
to reduce contamination
of items that do not be-
long in the recycling carts
such as garden hoses,
plastic bags, batteries and
medical sharps that pose
a serious safety hazard to
our employees."
If residents did not
receive their recycling
cart, or there was an issue
with delivery, they should
call 941-629-1106, or visit
CharlotteCountyFL.gov
to submit a replacement
request.
Email:groberts@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


'Medicare
Assistance &
More' today
Medicare Assistance &
More" is held from 10 a.m.
to noon Thursdays in
the North Port Library
conference room, 13800
S. Tamiami Trail.
The library offers
one-on-one Medicare
counseling sessions with
a trained counselor.
All services are free
and unbiased. Review
your Medicare Part
D, Advantage and/or
Medigap plans. To make


an appointment, call
1-866-413-5337.

Bluegrass band
to perform
The Banyon Bluegrass
Band will perform a free
concert from 2 p.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday on the
historic Train Dock,
1009 Taylor Road,
Punta Gorda. Bring a
chair, and sit back and
enjoy the music. The
Depot Museum and
Mall will be open. For
more information, call
941-639-6774.


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Paula E. Adams
Paula E. Adams, 66,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
died Monday, Dec. 2,
2013, in Port Charlotte.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Marvin Wayne
Coulter Jr.
Marvin "Wayne"
Coulter Jr., 55, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed away
-- Saturday,
Nov. 30,
2013, this
home.
Wayne
was born
Feb. 28,
1958, in
Volga, S.D.
.. He grew up
in the Sioux
S Falls, S.D.,
and graduated
from Hills Beaver Creek
H.S. in Minnesota in
1976. Wayne served in
the U.S. Air Force and
met his future wife
Christine "Chris" while
they both were stationed
in Okinawa, Japan. He
retired from MacDill in
1994, and then worked for
the Punta Gorda Airport
as the Airport Security
Director. He was a Harley-
Davidson enthusiast for
many years, and enjoyed
nothing better than going
on weekend excursions
or long vacations with his
wife on their Harley.
Wayne will be greatly
missed by his wife of
26 years, Chris; father,
Marvin Wayne; step-
mother, Betty Coulter of
Sioux Falls; sister, Brenda
Rappaport of Tampa,
Fla.; sons, Brandon
W (Lauren Borchardt)
Coulter of Vacaville, Calif.,
Daniel B. Lamb-Coulter
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
and DustinW. (fiancee,
Rebecca Gooding) Coulter
of Lewisville, Texas;
grandchildren, Hayden
Rae, Aiden Michael
and Avry Lee Coulter;
and many loving aunts,
uncles, cousins and
family friends. He was
preceded in death by his
mother, Joyce Griffin; and
grandparents, Florence
Sheppard, Lee James
Hanner, and George W
and Elsie R. Coulter.
Visitation will be from
11 a.m. until a service to
celebrate Wayne's life at
1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7,
2013, at Larry Taylor
Funeral and Cremation
Services. Burial will be at
11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 9,
2013, at Sarasota National
Cemetery in Sarasota,
Fla. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may
be made to the American
Cancer Society, with
emphasis on head and
neck cancer research. To
express condolences to
the family, please visit
www. Ltaylorfuneral. com
and sign the online guest
book.

Wayne M. Irons Sr.

Wayne M. Irons Sr.,
72, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away
Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD


Mary Jean Bauer


Mary Jean "Bummie"
(nee Haberberger) Bauer,
88, of Cape Haze, Fla.,
passed from
this world
Monday,
Dec. 2, 2013,
at Tidewell
Hospice
House in
Venice, Fla.


She was born Jan. 4,
1925, in St. Louis, Mo.
Bummie is survived
and lovingly remembered
by her children, Richard
Bauer of Wheaton, Ill.,
and Susan Bauer of
Chicago, Ill.; grand-
son, Graham Rosby of
Andover, Mass.; lifelong
friend, Millie Soldano;
cousin, Jean Schutt of
St. Louis; daughter-in-
law, Donna Bauer; and
son-in-law, Sam Rosby.
For those who wish to
memorialize Bummie,
donations may be made
to the Suncoast Humane
Society, 6781 San Casa
Drive, Englewood, FL
34224.

Raymond
Foster Harris
Raymond Foster "Bud"
Harris, 88, died Saturday,
Nov. 23, 2013, at his home
in Rotonda
West, Fla.
", -;.;..:. He was born
May 16, 1925, in
Streator, Ill., to
Raymond and Josephine
Harris.
His family moved
shortly afterward to
Kansas. He joined the
U.S. Navy in 1943, serving
in the Pacific Theater
during World War II.
He loved playing golf
and watching football.
Bud was very friendly;
everyone liked his humor
and smiling face. He had
a great heart. Bud was
loved by all because of
his quick wit and winning
smile. He will be missed
dearly.
Bud and his first wife,
Cheryl Dereck, now de-
ceased, had two children,
Todd (Rhonda) Harris
and Leslie Gomez. He
and his wife of 32 years,
Beverly, were blessed with
a family of eight children;
she is the mother of six
children, Marijon (Ralph),
Jeanne (Bill), Francine
(Richard), Robert,
Daniel and Ronald,
now deceased; and they
are grandparents to
19 grandchildren and
12 great-grandchildren.
Memorial services
will be held at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 12,
2013, at Hope Lutheran
Church in Gulf Cove
(Port Charlotte), Fla.
In lieu of flowers, me-
morials in Bud's name
would be appreciated to
Hope Lutheran Church,
14200 Hopewell Ave., Port
Charlotte, FL 33981.

Judith A. Pearce
Judith A. Pearce, 71, of
RotondaWest, Fla., died
Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home Inc., with
Private Crematory.

NORTH PORT


Patricia S. King
Patricia S. "Patty" King,
48, of North Port, Fla.,
died Thursday, Nov. 14,
2013, after a tough two-
year battle she fought
with cancer.
Patty was born May 20,
1965, in San Jose, Calif.
She was the very popu-
lar shop manager at Nicks
Auto Clinic. Patty grew up
in Sarasota, Fla., and was
married for 31 years.
She is survived by
her husband, Nick
King; children, Kirk and
Cassie, all of North Port;
brother, Steve Laskowsky
of Oklahoma; and her
parents, Pete and Monica
Laskowsky of Murphy,
N.C.
A service will be held at
3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7,
2013, at Lighthouse


Baptist Church, 14251
Chancellor Blvd., Port
Charlotte (near North
Port), Fla., followed by a
get together at the King
household. Anybody
wishing to make a
donation, please give to


Lighthouse Baptist, for
their work with the local
youth; or your local no-
kill animal shelter.

DESOTO


Clement E. Hutzel
Clement E. Hutzel, 94,
of Arcadia, Fla., passed
awayWednesday, Dec. 4,
2013.
He was born
.',;:.k Aug. 28, 1919,
in Deer Park,
Ohio, to Joseph
and Ida Speller Hutzel,
the last living of eight
siblings.
Clement joined the
U.S. Army and served
as a Medic in the South
Pacific, including the
Philippines, during World
War II. During his Tour
of Duty, he received four
Bronze Stars, a Combat
Medical Badge, a Victory
Medal, the Asiatic Pacific
Theater Ribbon, the
Philippine Liberation
Ribbon and the American
Theater Ribbon. His
service to the people of
the South Pacific spanned
decades and blessed
him with many friends
along the way. After his
service to our country,
he returned to Ohio and
became a Dairy Farmer
(Hutzel's Farms) and
Breeder of Jersey Cattle
for 49 years. Clement was
a member of the VFW, the
Knights of Columbus, the
American Legion and the
American Jersey Cattle
Club. When he found
time, he enjoyed golfing.
Clement is survived
by his beloved wife of
40 years, Fern Logan
Hutzel; sisters-in-law,
Betty Hutzel and Patricia
Hutzel, both of Ohio; and
numerous nieces and
nephews.
A visitation will be held
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
with a Rosary beginning
at 7 p.m., Friday, Dec. 6,
2013, at Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home.
The Funeral Mass will be
held at 9 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 7, 2013, at St. Paul's
Catholic Church, with
Father Vincent Clemente
officiating. Burial will
follow at Joshua Creek
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers,
donations in Clement's
name may be made to
either: Typhoon Fund,
c/o Diocese of Venice,
1000 Pinebrook Road,
Venice, FL 34285; or
to St. Joseph's Indian
School, 1301 N. Main St.,
Chamberlain, SD 57325.
Online condolences can
be made at www.ponger
kaysgrady.com.
Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home, Arcadia.
Words of Comfort
Every ending is a
new beginning.
anluny11l0LIS
Thiaiik God wc haLve u new
beginning in heaven.
Michael Dunn-Rankin


A'


Yes, you can, and the cost is still free for the
cemetery lot, marker, vault, and opening/
closing. We believe in giving straight answers to
your questions.
Nobody likes unexpected surprises.
Nol
Old FAshiONEdT SERVICE .
AT A PRICE YOU CAN AffoRd ,--

TAYLOR FUNERAL (941) 833-0600o
1515 Tamimi Tri Ii
and Cremation Services PuntaGorda, FL33950o
BwLal orFuneral i omi NoIwAi[a[iBilabet o 4 ADyA orCl.nvielllJ.Ie[nce~m


Thomas
Newport Sr.
Thomas Newport Sr,
88, of Lake Suzy, Fla.,
and formerly of Punta
Gorda, Fla.,
passed away
Monday,
Dec. 2, 2013,
at his home.
He
Thma was born
Aug. 29,
1925, in
Bloomfield,
N.J., the son
of Walter and
Mary Newport.
Thomas formerly resid-
ed in the Blairstown, N.J.,
area. He served proudly
in the U.S. Navy during
World War II. Thomas
retired from Hoffmann-
LaRoche in Belvidere,
N.J., after 18 years
of service as a Safety
specialist. Prior to that he
was a dairy farmer.
He is survived by his
loving wife of 65 years,
Helen Pat; daughter,
Virginia (Raymond)
Davis of Blairstown; son,
Thomas (Joyce) Newport
Jr. of Hardwick, N.J.;
brother, Robert Newport
of Toms River, N.J.; five
grandchildren; and seven
great-grandchildren.
Thomas was preceded
in death by his sister,
Elizabeth Buckenmyer;
and his parents.
Services will be held
at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 6,
2013, at San Antonio
Catholic Church. In lieu
of flowers, donations can
be made to San Antonio
Catholic Church, St.
Vincent de Paul Society,
24445 Rampart Blvd.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980;
or the American Cancer
Society, 922 Tamiami
Trail, Unit C-2, Port
Charlotte, FL 33953.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte,
Fla.
Words of Comfort
When we recall the past. we
usually find that it is the
simplest things- not the great
occasions- that in retrospect
give off the greatest glow of
happiness.
Bob Hope
May the memory of
your loved ones who
have journeyed
through your life
bring you comfort and
happiness*
Michael Dunn-Rankin



Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must be
received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday through
Friday publication. For Saturday through
Monday publication deadline is noon on
Friday The American flag accompanying
an obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
o (941) 206-2223


(Isk Lwrry:
r.Na vete, but am we
ctdlus Nat&onal C* tos
A if msw&e A"fst?





OurTown Page 6 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Behavioral Health
seeks guardian
advocates
Charlotte Behavioral
Health Care Crisis
Stabilization Unit is in
extreme need of guardian
advocates. GAs will be
appointed by the court to
act as an informed deci-
sion maker for a person
who has been deemed
incompetent to consent
to his own mental health
treatment. They will serve
on a voluntary basis as
needed for patients who
do not have a close family
member willing or able to
make medical and psychi-
atric treatment decisions
on their behalf.
GAs usually are granted
authority to provide or
revoke consent for general
medical and psychiatric
medications. They will
seek to provide informed
decisions regarding a
patient's treatment, and
protect the patient's
rights. GAs are required to
be trained in duties and
submit to a background
investigation. They serve
approximately three
to four hours monthly,


WATER

FROM PAGE 1

Constance said the
authority has a healthy
reserve fund and should
draw money from it to
pay for repairs. He said
the water authority
wants Charlotte to pay
a much higher rate
through the rebuild
project in order to force
the county into a new
"common-rate" system.
Currently, Charlotte pays
a lower rate than other
municipalities because
it has been there the



NATURE

FROM PAGE 1

With nary an elec-
tronic in sight, except
for parents' cell phones
out for picture-taking,
tactile objects took
center stage. Things
like pebbles, seashells,
feathers and stone crab
claws were provided in
the screened classroom,
along with magnifying
glasses.
When it was time to
move the class outside,
the children became the
tour leaders.
"Look what I found!"
"What's that?" Those
words became the battle
cries of the day as the
group moved out into the
preserve, picking up sea
grape leaves and pointing
out their observations.
Martha Clemente, a nat-
uralist at the center, said
she enjoys experiencing


depending on the client's
needs. For more informa-
tion, call Jessica K. Boles at
941-347-6407.

Wading trips
gear up
The Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center Inc.
will conduct free Seagrass
Adventure EstuaryWading
Trips at Cedar Point
Environmental Park, 2300
Placida Road, Englewood.
The trips are set for 9 a.m.
today and Wednesday,
and Dec. 26 and 31. After
an introductory program
about aquatic environ-
ments, participants will
walk a short distance to
Lemon Bay where, using
dip nets and hand viewers,
they will wade into the
shallow waters in search
of the plants and animals
that reside there. This
hands-on activity is both
educational and fun for
people of all ages.
Participation is limited,
therefore preregistration
is necessary for this free
program. All children must
be accompanied by an
adult. For more informa-
tion and to register, call
941-475-0769. Visit www.

longest and contributed
the most. Sarasota users
pay a higher rate to draw
water from the plant.
Creating a common-
rate system would make
both rates meet in the
middle. Constance
maintains it would be
an unfair increase for
Charlotte water users,
who already have paid
millions.
Constance said his
commission recently
voted not to participate
in any discussions about
common rates until
issues with the rebuild
project are addressed.
The authority set three


nature with young chil-
dren, because "kids this
age see things that we
don't really notice."
By far the favorites of
the day were the gumbo
limbo tree, which drew


ChecFlorida.org for addi-
tional wading trip dates in
2014. Seagrass Adventures
are made available with
funding support from
the Mosaic Company
Foundation, in cooperation
with Charlotte County
Parks, Recreation and
Cultural Resources, and are
conducted by CHEC.

Sandy Claws
Beach Run set
The Sarasota County
Parks and Recreation-
sponsored 37th annual
Sandy Claws Beach Run
is scheduled for Dec. 14 at
Siesta Beach, 948 Beach
Road, Sarasota. Race-day
registration is $30 for the
5K race and $20 for the fun
run. Race-day registration
begins at 7 a.m. The fun
run begins at 8 a.m., with
the 5K starting at 8:20 a.m.
The event, sanctioned
and co-sponsored by the
Manasota Track Club,
will use MyLaps bib
timing. Those interested in
participating may prereg-
ister online at parksonline.
scgov.net or complete and
return a registration form
available at any county

workshops to hash out
common rates. Patterson
urged Charlotte County
to send representatives
to those workshops
because it may help the
situation.
However Constance
said after the meeting,
"They have given us
no other way out than
litigation (as Charlotte
previously threatened to
do).
Patrick Lehman,
authority executive
director, who was given
a 3 percent raise by the
board during the meet-
ing, said Charlotte could
use its $2.2 million in


recreation center, library
or government building.
Awards will be presented
to first- through sixth-
place finishers in each
age group. First- through
third-place finishers will
receive trophies ,and
fourth- through sixth-
place finishers will receive
ribbons. All registered 5K
participants will be en-
tered into a raffle drawing
for prizes.
For more information,
call the Sarasota County
Call Center at 941-861-5000
or visit www.scgov.net.

Current events
conversation
A "Current Events/
Cultural Commingle
Conversation Group"
meets from 10 a.m. to noon
Thursday in the North
Port Library Juliano Room,
13800 S. Tamiami Trail.
On the first, second and
third Thursdays of the
month, bring a news article
you would like to discuss,
or just come catch up with
what's going on in the
world, in a fun setting. On
the fourth Thursday, come
share what you're reading,


credits from the authori-
ty, and the cost would be
only about $5 million for


the children to it almost people out here experi-
magnetically with its encing nature because
peeling bark and tall nowadays, it's all com-
exposed roots, and a puters and phones,"
gopher tortoise burrow said Jim Thomson, chief
under a rock. executive officer for the
"I love seeing young center.


a film or PBS show you're
enthused about, or a recent
trip you've taken. The
group always ends with a
joke, so you can bring one
of those too. Moderated by
Pat Petersmark. Open to
all. For more information,
call 941-423-0598.

'Oh, Just Sit!'
The H2U (Health to You)
program at Englewood
Community Hospital
will offer "Oh, Just Sit"
chair exercise classes at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday and
Thursday at the Suncoast
Auditorium, 779 Medical
Drive, Englewood. Flex,
stretch, and tone your
muscles to music. The half-
hour activity is peppy and
energetic, yet cane- and
walker-friendly. For more
information and to register
for the class, call Consult-
A-Nurse at 941-473-3919.

Time to
decorate cookies
The Punta Gorda
Historical Society will play
host to a cookie-decorating
event from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Sunday at the


the facility repairs.
"If you divide that out
over 20 years, it's only


History Park, 501 Shreve
St., Punta Gorda. Santa will
be on-site at this event,
which will be held in
the historic Price House.
Admission is free, and the
public is welcome. For
more information, call
941-380-6814.

'Wreaths
Across America'
Almost 6,800 wreaths
are set to be placed on
veterans' graves Dec. 14
at the Sarasota National
Cemetery for "Wreaths
Across America."
Members of AMVETS
Post 312 in North Port are
inviting others to meet at
the post, 7050 Chancellor
Blvd., at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 14
and car pool to the
location (in uniform if
you have served) to help.
Post 312 sponsored 200
wreaths; 100 through the
post's recent golf outing
and 100 from the Sons of
AMVETS Post 312.Wreaths
will arrive at 9:30 a.m.
and placement begins
immediately. A ceremony
will follow the placement.
For more information, call
941-429-5403.


pennies a day," Lehman
said.
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSS
Left: Mother and daughter Allison and Haven Turner, 2,
glue animal cutouts into a booklet at the Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center. Haven is learning to classify animals
based on whether they are arboreal, aquatic or terrestrial.

YOUNG CHILDREN AND NATURE DATES
What: A nature lesson and morning of activities for children ages
2 to 5 and their parents.
When: The second Tuesday of every month at 10 a.m. from January
through May.
Where: Alligator Creek Preserve, 10941 Burnt Store Road, Punta Gorda.
Cost: Participation is free, but preregistration is requested so the
center can prepare materials for the children.
Register: http://childrenandnature.eventbrite.com or 941-575-5435.


Thomson said the
center has a variety of
programs for people of
all ages that it provides
for free. The center's ac-
tivities are sponsored by
a grant from the Mosaic
Co. Foundation.
"Without them we'd
really be shorthanded in
providing these services
to the community,"
Thomson said.
Tramontana said
she has room for more


parents with toddlers to
take advantage of Youth
Children and Nature
- which will happen
at 10 a.m. the second
Tuesday of the each
month, from January
through May.
The program is free, but
parents should register
in advance by going to
http: / / childrenandnature.
eventbrite.com, or calling
941-575-5435.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


TREES

FROM PAGE 1

the Navy Junior ROTC
program.
"I'm not sure how
many years we've been
doing the Christmas tree
sale," Harrison said. "But
it's been a long time,
and we've never had any
problems."
The Fraser firs are
purchased and shipped
in from North Carolina.
They range in height
from 3 to 13 feet, and
go for between $25 and
$250. Officials estimate


the theft to have cost
fundraisers around
$1,000.
"That's probably con-
servative," Lemon Bay
principal Bob Bedford
said of the estimated
loss. "Sales were doing
well."
NJROTC instructor
William Rennie said he
was surprised when he
heard of the theft.
"This is a third of the
profit for the ROTC," he
said. "We'll have to find
other fundraisers. We will
do it somehow."
Nov. 26, the fundrais-
ing group received the
first shipment of trees.


All 130 were accounted
for when they arrived
to the sales lot on the
school's campus.
The lot was closed
Nov. 27 and 28, but has
been in business since
then.
Sunday, a second tree
count was taken fac-
toring in units sold -
and at least 21 trees were
found to be missing.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office investigat-
ed. Authorities said they
found no sign of forced
entry into a locked,
fenced-in area where the
trees were kept. There
were no witnesses.


CCSO spokeswoman
Debbie Bowe said
Wednesday afternoon
she hadn't heard of
any of the trees being
recovered.
The school had almost
sold out or been
robbed of- the first
130 trees, so a shipment
of about 170 more
arrived Wednesday
afternoon to replenish
the lot.
Customers can pur-
chase a Christmas tree
by visiting the tent near
the tennis courts at the
school, 2201 Placida
Road, Englewood. The
tent is open from 4 p.m.


to 7 p.m. Monday to
Friday, and 9 a.m. to
7 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
Anyone with infor-
mation concerning the
tree theft should call
the Sheriff's Office at
941-639-2101, or Crime
Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS
(8477).


Anyone who would like
to donate to the fund-
raising effort can mail a
check to LBHS Project
Graduation, PO. Box 191,
Englewood, FL 34295;
or call the school at
941-474-7702.
Staff writer Steve Reilly
conIi tiItI'ied to this report.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


ARRESTS
FROM PAGE 3

*Jonathan David Hubbard, 31,
1200 block of Price Circle NW, Port
Charlotte. Charges: two counts of
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $6,000.


Jason Tymauldin Dunlap, 31,
of Naples. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of less than 3 grams of
synthetic marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and violation of a
county ordinance. Bond: $3,250.
Courtney Lashay-Marie Dennis,
23, of Miramar, Fla. Charge: battery.
Bond:none.
John Keith Ewing, 49, 23100
block of Seneca Ave., Port Charlotte.


Charge: disorderly intoxication. Bond:
$500.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
Heather Michelle Russell, 41,
4100 block of Pomeroy St., North
Port. Charges: grand theft and
contempt (original charge: driving
without a vaild license). Bond:
$2,000.


The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
William Edward Hoatson Jr., 60,
of Venice. Charge: open container.
Bond: $120.
Thomas Nestor Jr., 28, 400 block
of Bayside Lane, Nokomis. Charge:
possession of narcotic equipment.
Bond:$500.
Sean Albinski, 20, 2100 block of
Chenille Cort, Venice. Charge: violation


of probation (original charges:
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and possession
of drug paraphernalia). Bond: none.
Joshua Jade Barmes, 28,19400
block of McMullin St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: contempt (original charge:
driving with a suspended license -
second conviction). Bond: $2,000.
Joshua James Correa, 25, 5100
block of Melbourne St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: Charlotte County warrant for


driving with an expired license for
more than six months. Bond: $2,000.
Katie Lyn Atwood, 27, 900 block
ofW. Xanadu Ave., Venice. Charge:
violation of probation (original
charges: possession of cocaine and
petty theft). Bond: none.
Christopher Zebley, 27,100
block of Lakeview Lane, Englewood.
Charge: assault. Bond: $10,000.
Compiled by Adam Kreger
and Drew Winchester


PROTECTING NORTH PORT'S INTERESTS
During public comment in Wednesday's meeting, Mayor Jim Blucher of North Port a nonvoting member
of the Peace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority addressed board members about a the city's
amended contract with the authority. The document was revised several times and agreed upon by attorneys only
just before the meeting began. The agreement secured the city's $3.6 million in credits from the authority. The
North Port City Commission could choose to use that money toward the $869,892 it owes for the rebuild project.
"We wanted to make sure that money was not used for anyone but North Port water users," Blucher said.
The city does not have a seat on the water authority, but monitors the board's activities closely because it
impacts North Port. "If the board voted to move forward with the rebuild contract before resolving the issue
with North Port, it would have violated the interlocal agreement with (the city)," Blucher said.
He thanked the board for taking care of North Port first.
"I applaud the city manager and his staff for catching this back in September," Blucher said. "We see the
struggles Charlotte County is going through. We're glad we have resolved our issue. Otherwise, we were ready
for a dispute resolution with the board'."
North Port City Commissioner Cheryl Cook, who is Blucher's alternate representing the city, attended the
meeting in Bradenton, along with City Manager Jonathan Lewis.


HOW TO HELP
Buy a tree: Visit the tent from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday,
and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at the school, near the
tennis courts, at 2201 Placida Road, Englewood.
Send a check: LBHS Project Graduation, P.O. Box 191, Englewood,
FL 34295; or call 941-474-7702 for more info.
Turn in the thieves: Call the Charlotte County Sheriff's Office at
941-639-2101, or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477).





The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


Officials discuss Punta



Gorda Airport noise


By BRENDA BARBOS
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA-
some folks, there's no
sweeter sound than t
roar of commercials
landing and taking ot
from the Punta Gord
Airport.
City Councilwoma
Nancy Prakfe and a
group of residents in
the Seminole Lakes a
Burnt Store Meadows
communities aren't p
of that group.
"There are some pc
who say, 'I love the s(
of money,'" Prafke sa
"But when you hear.
those planes right ov
your house, it's not sc
pleasant."
Prafke, who lives ir
Burnt Store Isles, sup
ports the airport bec,
of the many benefits
brings to the city. Bui
also understands the
gitimate gripes reside
have with noise that
only potentially impa
their property values
also directly impacts
quality of life.
"We need to be adv
cates for the airport.
huge economic engil
our community," Pra
said at City Council
meeting Wednesday.
we need to work with
the airport to achieve(
win-win situation so
(residents) feel (airpo
officials) are listening
We need to be workir
together."
"What I don't want
to see happen is ups(


SA residents trying to create
havoc when, in fact, if
we're partners together
For working through the
situation, we can try to
he achieve the best possible
jets solution," she said.
ff In September, after
a months of complaining
from area residents,
n airport officials entered
into an agreement with
the Federal Aviation
ind Administration control
S tower in Fort Myers, to
)art redirect traffic around the
residential communities
people of Burnt Store Meadows
)und and Seminole Lakes.
id. Punta Gorda Airport
... Executive Director Gary
er Quill said that hasn't
0 been happening in the
last two weeks. Airport
A officials will have a
private meeting with
ause FAA officials from Fort
it Myers Monday to discuss
t she the reasons why, and
le- expect to update the City
cents Council next month.
not "Our preference for
icts take-off, candidly-
, but when they can do it is
their (for aircraft) to take off
southwest, turn to the
vo- left, and go up the middle
It's a of the state," Quill said. "It
nie for dodges everywhere we
fke think it's a touchdown."
"I will tell you we will
"But be following up on this,"
h Quill told council mem-
e a bers during an update on
that the noise-control issue.
)rt "There's two aspects
g. to this," he said. "One is
nig to continually monitor
compliance and, when
S there are issues, try to
et find out why."


The other, he said, is to
see if there is an alterna-
tive to flying in over the
two subdivisions.
"I will tell you, I'm not
real optimistic, because
of some criteria called
stabilized approach," he
said. "But we are going to
have our noise consultant
evaluate that. The nature
of airports is they do
create noise."
At the rate the airport
is growing, some resi-
dents worry the noise
will get worse with time.
As it stands, as many as
20 airplanes depart from
and land at the airport
each day.
Bob Rioux, a retired
Delta Airlines pilot and
former Burnt Store Isles
resident, believes a solu-
tion is not only possible,
but necessary for the
future of the airport.
"I think the airport is
good, but we can stop
this noise," Rioux said.
He has met with Quill
and other airport officials,
as well as with home-
owners associations,
to present them with
what he says is a no-cost
solution to an avoidable
problem. To date, he said,
his proposals have fallen
on deaf ears.
"We can fix this and
everybody will win," he
said. "And you wouldn't
care if United Airlines
decided to fly 737s in and
out of here if these poli-
cies are followed, because
it wouldn't be over your
rooftop."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


'12 Days of Giving'
still underway in
North Port
There's still time to make
a donation during the city
of North Port's seventh
annual 12 Days of Giving,
an annual food and toy
drive to help local families.
The drive started Nov. 25
and will run through the
rest of this week, ending at
5 p.m. Friday.
Residents, organiza-
tions and businesses are
encouraged to join city
employees as they give
back to the community
by donating toys, non-
perishable food items
and toiletries that will
be distributed to North
Porters in need.
Toys appropriate for in-
fants to age 14 should be
new and unwrapped. No
stuffed animals please.
All toys will be distributed
to North Port families
through a partnership


between the city's Toy
Chest Program and the
U.S. Marine Corps' Toys
for Tots. Contact the city's
Social Service Division
at 941-429-3700 for
more information about
registration.
Nonperishable food
items are needed to fill the
St. Vincent de Paul pantry
to be distributed to North
Port families. Suggested
donations include: canned
goods (meats/fruits/vege-
tables/soups), pasta/rice/
beans, spaghetti sauce
and spaghetti, peanut but-
ter and jelly, cereals, juices
(canned/boxed), cake mix
and frosting, baby food/
formula, diapers/baby
wipes, paper products
(towels/toilet paper/
cups/plates) and plastic
products (zip-top bags/
plastic wrap/disposable
containers).
Personal toiletry items,
bicycles (new or used),
backpacks and school
supplies are needed for


the North Port Coalition
for Homeless/Needy
Children (aka the Back
Pack Angels), which helps
local homeless students.
Donations may also
be dropped off through
Friday in the first-floor
lobby of North Port
City Hall, off Sumter
Boulevard, from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. daily. At 8:30 a.m.
Monday, the items will be
taken for delivery.

Road closed
for repair
Kenilworth Boulevard,
between Porter Street and
Yorkshire Road, in Port
Charlotte, is closed due to
a roadway collapse. This
section of road will remain
closed for approximately
12 months or until repairs
can be made. Motorists and
pedestrians are encouraged
to exercise caution while
traveling through this area.
For more information, call
941-575-3642.


www.sunnewspapers.net ENC OurTown Page 7


I NewsayCrosswo


ACROSS
1 FedEx
alternative
5 Unruly bunch
8 Friars Club
functions
14 moss
15 Barnyard
mama
16 Beyond belief
17 Person held for
questioning
19 Fine point
20 To Kill a
Mockingbird
lawyer
22 Over yonder
23 Driver's prop
24 "See ya!"
27 Always, in
verse
28 With 3 Down,
rhythm of the
rain
32 Hunted beast
33 One-
dimensional
34 Plain writing
35 Pirates of the
Caribbean hero
37 Hue and cry
39 Prime-time
category
40 Congressional
aide
41 Study more
closely
42 Prefix for
chemistry
45 "Six-pack"
muscles
46 Prefix like atm-
47 Knock over
49 "The Legend of
Sleepy Hollow"
schoolteacher
53 Lady of Spain
56 Bar orders


57 Makes an
address
58 Doctor of sci-fi
59 Goes astray
60 Midwest river
61 Have some
dinner
62 Prefix for
bucks

DOWN
1 Software
revision
2 Feel fury
3 See 28 Across
4 Way up or down
5 List of
alternatives
6 Has debts due
7 Complaint
8 Hallway rug
9 Keeping cool,
as Cabernet


FICTIONAL FLIERS by Carolyn Stewart
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
10 Part of a foot 37 Health club
11 Figure out 38 Running bill
12 Parlor product, 41 Discuss again
for short 42 Brownie
13 Underhanded topper
18 Chipping tool 43 Baseball
21 Echo segment
24 Facial feature 44 Ukrainian
25 "Definitely!" seaport
26 Stare at 46 Much land
29 Squid's spray 48 Cut-glass
30 Small mosaic form
tile 49 Tiny amount
31 Hoglike 50 German
mammal exports
32 High-school 51 Home of Pearl
event Harbor
33 Swimmer's 52 Bit of a
assignment beverage
34 Part of GNP 53 Spread seeds
35 Lively dances 54 Time period
36 DVD player 55 Take into
brand custody


CREATORS SYNDICATE 2013 STANLEY NEWMAN STANXWORDS@AOL.COM 1:


Look for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

section.

................................................


Answer to previous puzzle
CLODS M|AMAFAIDEl
HENRI AHAB AXES
EATAT TELL CLAP
IFRIOM S TEM TOISTIEIRNI
AABT EAOL A

WHO yMC A MORSEL
A I DIE P U T M I AIM i


E E R I
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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Rewards for
waiting
5 Sauce finisher,
often
10 Bit of Halloween
makeup
14 Gray subj.
15 Expansive
16 Parting words
17 Family nickname
18 Parting word
19 Erelong
20" "
23 Presidential
nickname
24 Inflationary fig.?
25 Drive off
26 Language of
Pakistan
28 Peak on the
1,000-yen note
31 Language suffix
32 -Julie, Quebec
33 Nail-biting way to
win
36" "
40 Jerks
41 Morse code
letter after dit-dit-
dit
42 Outlaw Clanton
45 Get rid of
46 Gorilla trained to
use sign
language
47 Holiday air
49 Mao -tung
51 Ten-cent pres.
53" '
58 Designer
Schiaparelli
59 The Joe in
Detroit, for one
60 Superb
61 Tallow source
62 Huge
63 Earthworm
habitat
64 Stun, in a way
65 Bout of retail
"therapy"
66 Fine subject?

DOWN
1 "Lost" actress
Raymonde


By Steve Blais 12/5/13


2 How soldiers
may lie
3 Gratify the baser
side of
4 Have the lead
5 Shellfish
morsels
6 Lines from the
center
7 33-Down's
homeland
8 Open-mouthed
9 Western
landform
10 Clich6d
11 Happy hour
morsel
12 Makes amends
13 Rub the wrong
way
21 Manjula's
husband on 'The
Simpsons"
22 Like autumn
mornings
27 Like morning
grass
28 Made-up
29 Loosen, as laces
30 Enroll
33 U2 frontman


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
AIMIOIRIB EIPEPISlK I P S



Z L AuNT s N NIK ORTS
RE EAR
Z P Hrf AS_- AF L E
GREA R S TSME
LESSOR TUT YED

ET i P SSIAP=
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THEZOMB I E S EZRA
M0 TEL L 0 G EIA LT0
S P E NIDI ETIO NIR E BS
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC 12/5/13
34 Belly laughs 46 Alpine parrot
35 Prefix with 48 Roundish
morph 49 1,000 kilograms
37 Pixar title robot 50 Kerry's
38 Hardwood department
option 52 Projection room
39 Mystery stack
42 Most distant 54 Badgers
43 Black Russian 55 It may be round
component 56 Stuff in a
44 Fulfills a takeout backpack
order? 57 Jose's home


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


FIA-Z- I ITI1I


YET E|ISIT S
12/5/13


SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTS


Fuel cleanup squeezes traffic

Florida Department of Transportation crews were busy all day Wednesday cleaning up the
mess left by Monday's four-vehicle crash, which ruptured a dump truck's gas tank, spilling
about 80 gallons of diesel fuel just off U.S. 41 on West Tarpon Boulevard. Workers first had
to scrape off the asphalt that absorbed the fuel, which causes it to soften over time. Then
they grind up the material before loading it onto a conveyor belt into waiting trucks to haul
it away. A new patch of asphalt then is laid. The cleanup, which created traffic backups on
southbound U.S. 41, should be finished by today.


I


I






Our Town Page 8 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 5,2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Don't extend

bully tactics

to local politics

OUR POSITION: The national
style of political intimidation is
offensive to local voters.
Message to the
deep-pocketed bullies
of Americans for
Prosperity:
Lay off Sen. Nancy Detert,
R-Venice.
Your campaign to discredit
her and intimidate other
moderate Florida Republicans
is ignorant and dishonest. We
are offended. Local voters of all
parties in her district should
be offended. Take your smear
tactics back home ASAP.
Detert was targeted recently
by the conservative-libertarian
political action group begun
by the billionaire industrial-
ists Charles and David Koch.
Americans for Prosperity is
a 501(c) (4) "social welfare"
nonprofit under the U.S. tax
codes and advocates for limited
government and free markets.
Nationally, Americans
for Prosperity spent
$122 million in 2012 on
"issue ads" that primarily
opposed President Obama
and congressional Democrats.
But Republicans deemed
not- conservative- enough
also have been targeted, and
Americans for Prosperity has
spread its money liberally to
influence state and local affairs.
The campaign against Detert
has involved direct mailings,
TV commercials and Web ads.
Earlier mailings criticized her
position on charter schools
and state pensions. Last
week, a mailing criticized her
vote on expanding Medicaid
coverage in Florida. Or, as
the group spun it, support-
ing "Obamacare's Medicaid
Expansion."
Detert was, in fact, one of
38 state senators who voted in
favor of extending coverage to
another 1 million Floridians
using federal Medicaid dollars.
Only one senator voted against
it. Conservative stalwart Gov.
Rick Scott also supported the
measure, which failed in the
House.
So why Detert?
"I'm bewildered, and so are
my voters here," Detert said
this week. "It's like they're
taking every national issue and
sticking my face on it."
At a big price tag, thanks to
New York billionaires. Detert
reportedly estimated the cam-
paign against her was costing
as much as $100,000.
She added, "Maybe they are
advertising to find an opponent
to me."
Maybe. But more likely
the group just wants to force
Detert and other Republicans
to look over their shoulders
when voting. The politics of
intimidation.
Good luck to that, though.
Detert is a clear-headed and
strong-willed Republican
veteran, hardly a liberal.
"The only problem is, have
you met me?" Detert asked.
Even from a GOP-centric
perspective, Detert said, "This
is like sending the troops to
Afghanistan, and the Marines
start shooting at the Army."
Tactically, she said, "They
are trying to push (legislators)
over and trying to influence
the rightward drift. We normal
Republicans hope they would
start their own party."
We agree. We also think
Detert is wise to take a low-key
approach to the smear tactics.
"I'm deliberatively saving my
little pittance. The election is a
year away, I have no opponent
and people don't want to get
political mailings (especially,
during the Christmas season)."
We also agree with another of
Detert's assessments:


"To make it so political, they
don't know the community and
it's not going to work."


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Thanks to all
for T-Day meal

Editor:
Thank you to First United
Methodist Church of Punta
Gorda for once again hosting
a wonderful free Thanksgiving
dinner for all the community.
It was so nice to see John
Davidson and his family of
boys from AMI Crossroads
escorting guests to their tables
and being so polite and helpful
to all.
Also, thank you to Chris
Wilkens and Sherri O'Connell
(and about a hundred volun-
teers) for organizing and seeing
that this huge endeavor runs
as smooth as it does. Also, a
big thank-you to the Liberty
Elementary School students
who hand-drew beautiful place
mats for all the guests.
Thank you to Joe DePetro, as
well as Patti and Jerry DePetro
who kept the kitchen running
smoothly and making it a
well-oiled machine. Also, thank
you to Burnt Store Grille and
Publix for all of their donations.
Last, but not last, thank you
to everyone who makes this
happen year after year. You are
all appreciated!
Barbara, Jerry Durham
Punta Gorda


Don't cast stone
at Rep. Radel

Editor:
I was very appalled to see
on the front page of the paper
this morning (Nov. 27) that
Judy Jones wants Trey Radel
to donate his salary to her
mission. He has a wife and
child to support. Who does
she think she is? All she does is
beg, beg, beg. Mr. Radel made
a very bad mistake, but he who
is out there without a mistake
"cast the first stone."
Audrey Heard
Punta Gorda

We need to clean
up our harbor

Editor:
First, thanks to WaterLine
having the guts to address
controversial issues. While
I strongly support your one
contributor on no power
boat zones, may I suggest if
WaterLine can rally support for
five larger initiatives.
Cease saying we do not un-
derstand red tide and also say


it occurs where there is a high
use of nitrates in your same
articles. Eliminate nitrates and
at least we eliminate man's
contribution to red tide.
Rally support for the state
to spend all its surplus finds to
rapidly open Alligator Alley to-
ward overflow into Everglades,
as nature intended.
Let's cease calling Charlotte
Harbor a fishing haven, as
poop flowing into the harbor
and nitrates are in control and
accepted by city and county
officials. Consider that last
July 4 swim across the harbor
was just a few hundred yards
from a closed beach due to
poop, nasty truth.
Our harbor is not healthy
and getting sicker each year;
let's face the truth and get this
as a very high budget item.
We do not need studies saying
keeping poop and nitrates is
good for safety, tourism and
key to our future; and no white
horse from state, Feds or BP is
coming responsibility starts
at home.
Civic leaders need the pres-
tige and skillset of Mote Marine
to serve the role as unbiased
science-based solutions.
Aquarium can come or go, but
we need the leadership and
science of Mote Marine.
Bob and Sallie Lumsden
Punta Gorda

Bring all troops
back home now

Editor:
With national elections well
behind us, we now see another
"political broken promise."
Presidential election rhetoric
that all U.S. troops will be out
of Afghanistan at the end of
2014.
A new plan would allow
another decade of U.S. troops
to remain and train Afghan
troops. The plan will "provide
a legal basis" for the troops to
remain and "use bases" that we
built. How nice!
After the sacrifice of so many
U.S. troops, not only physically,
but the untold numbers deal-
ing with PTSD and the billions
of dollars spent and will be
spent, Afghan will provide a
"legal basis." President Karzai
recently told his people that
"my trust with America is not
good." That quote in and of
itself should have derailed
any extension of U.S. troop
involvement. Regardless of the
numbers, they'll still get shot
at, and again as in Vietnam,
the troops will "fight" with one
hand politically tied behind
their backs.
It's interesting to note that a
young high school graduate in


the U.S. can be trained and in
a war zone within six months.
Maybe it's time for Afghanistan
to pick up the pace and protect
their own country- legally, of
course! Bring our troops and
our monies home. God only
knows that the monies can be
used to help our own. Shame
on not only the president but
Secretary of State Kerry and
Secretary of Defense Hagel,
bothVietnam vets, for enter-
taining this plan.
James R. Martin
Port Charlotte

Don't mess with
Thanksgiving

Editor:
Yes, they are being taken
away from us on Thanksgiving
Day.
The stores were open so
people can shop. My under-
standing was that this "special
day" was a time when the
family got together to enjoy
each other's company; to be
thankful for all that we have,
and to enjoy a family tradition
with a good meal.
Are we losing it or what? I
am afraid that we are headed
in that direction. Therefore, it
is time to let big business know
that we are not happy with
their decision, and not to mess
with Thanksgiving anymore.
Rich Regan
North Port

Stop spending
government money

Editor:
The well has run dry. More
live on government transfer
payments than pay taxes. The
tax, spend and print money
mantra is extreme, fueled by
every crazy whim championed
by those spending other peo-
ple's money. Public servants
comprise a good portion of the
economy; they get the highest
salaries and the best benefits
and cry for more. Who can
afford it?
Government spending does
not produce wealth. Americans
are great spenders. We con-
sume what others produce;
stimulus stimulates China. We
import illegals to work for us.
Every bleeding heart idea
has a cost and those paying
the costs are shrinking and
suffering. The middle class
is on a treadmill to nowhere,
their quality of life taxed away.
Most money funnels into
banking and insurance; they
work with the Federal Reserve
to increase the money supply
and enrich themselves while


raising costs to those on
stagnant incomes. Florida
real estate is moribund, while
California and Nevada boom
because of outlandish insur-
ance rates. I pay more insur-
ance than taxes. If you include
medical, it sucks $21,000 out of
the economy and my pocket.
Obamacare is another
mismanaged transfer payment.
We can no longer afford
military adventurism, absurd
waste, killing, destruction and
perverted greedy minds. We
should pack up the empire, the
800 bases and come home to
develop our resources and care
for our people.
Anyone advocating rational,
realistic approaches to the
disaster is a hero.
Xavier Narutowicz
Punta Gorda

Dogs are cleaner
than kids, money

Editor:
This is in response to the
letter "Put dogs in their places".
Theresa, firstly, service animals
come in all shapes, sizes and
colors, they are not limited to
large dogs. I think it is rather
impertinent of you to think
that you can decide who needs
a service animal and what they
should look like. The size of the
animal does not dictate their
usefulness to their owners.
Secondly, dogs are not allowed
inside restaurants. They are
only allowed to be at outdoor
seating. Also, service dogs shed
just as much as those "pet"
dogs. Perhaps if you are so
disturbed by the presence of
dogs in restaurants you should
avoid those establishments.
Thirdly, personally I would
rather use a store cart that a
dog has been sitting in rather
than one that a baby with a
soiled diaper has occupied.
And lastly, don't forget to wash
your hands after handling
money which outdoes dogs for
dirt.
Pat Venuto
Port Charlotte

Two points
about the news

Editor:
Two comments regarding
articles in the Our Town on
Saturday Nov. 30.
Voting Rules. "In a state
where voting by mail has
become increasingly popular,
it is unreasonable to restrict
ballot drop-off locations to
just supervisors of elections
offices," says Deirdre Macnab,
President of Florida League of
Women Voters. My comment:
Is it not unreasonable to
expect any and all voters who
cannot make it to the super-
visor's offices to use a Forever
Stamp and vote by mail?
The League could promote
"100 percent vote by mail" by
handing out stamps instead of
using the "anti-voter" inflam-
matory language and not
thinking in a positive manner.
Subjective journalism. A
couple weeks ago this paper
wrote a news article about
a young man who died in a
traffic accident. This was a sad
time for his family and friends.
It was unconscionable for you
to provide details of his life
that were not relevant to the
accident. This past Saturday,
an inflammatory headline
was used to direct readers to a
Police Beat incident.
Denigrating an individual
using a four-paragraph article
when two lines would have
sufficed. The "incident report"
could have been in the "small
black print" and still have
met the requirements of your
reporting.
Judith A. Vozka
Punta Gorda


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013





The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net ENC OurTown Page 9


Teff Bezos and our robot future


eff Bezos has seen
the future of retail
delivery, and it is the
drone.
When the storied
CEO of Amazon told
"60 Minutes" that he's
working on 30-minute
delivery by tiny un-
manned octocopter, it
prompted an instant
wave of disbelief and
derision. One wag
on Twitter joked that
Amazon would offer
free shipping to all
military-aged Muslim
males.
Our culture is primed
to celebrate the new and
marvel at technological
innovation except
when it comes to the
drone. Then, the first
reaction of many peo-
ple is to muse about
shooting the newfangled
contraptions out of the
sky. If the country is to
be kept safe, evidently, all
aircraft within the United
States must always and


forevermore be manned.
The root of the drone's
image problem is obvi-
ously its outsized role in
the war on terror, where
it is a highly effective
tool of surveillance
and assassination. That
doesn't mean it's exclu-
sively a tool of warfare
or inherently nefarious,
any more than that is
true of airplanes, guns,
helicopters, barbed wire,
sandbags or tracked
vehicles all of which
play their part in horrific
wars, and are still useful
civilian tools.
Certainly, nothing
could be more blissfully


pacific than the promo-
tional video for Amazon
Prime Air. It shows a
drone picking a small
package up from a
warehouse conveyor belt
- where it was placed
by a human and then
taking it on a pleasant
jaunt in the air before
dropping it outside a
satisfied customer's door.
It's not going to be that
easy, of course. Imagine
the lawsuit the first time
an Amazon drone hits
someone or crashes
into someone's roof.
And good luck getting
the Federal Aviation
Administration to play
along. In its wisdom,
the agency issued an
advisory against the
commercial use of
drones back in 2007.
Full-blown certification
of unmanned aircraft
may not start until 2020.
Bezos is nonetheless
onto something, as he
has been before. (It once


would have seemed a
fantasy that you could
sit at a computer and
order with 1-Click"
goods to be delivered to
your home the next day.)
Drone technology still
needs to mature, but it
will. Over time, drones
will become cheaper,
more precise and more
robust.
As Derek Thompson
of The Atlantic points
out, Bezos is wise to be
thinking ahead, given
how rapidly dominant
retailers are overtaken
by more nimble compet-
itors. As of 1982, accord-
ing to Thompson, Sears
was still the biggest
retailer in America. Soon
enough, it would be a
fraction of the size of
Walmart. In imagining
a drone future, Bezos
is honoring the prime
directive of retail: Get
people what they want,
cheaper and faster, using
the latest technology.


He's not the first
to think about drone
delivery. Domino's in
Britain flew a demon-
stration pizza-delivery
flight earlier this year.
Fred Smith of FedEx has
talked of switching the
company's fleet over
to drones. A futuristic
"blended wing" design
that doesn't distinguish
clearly between body
and wing would allow
more room for cargo,
according to Chris
Anderson, the former
editor of Wired and now
the CEO of 3D Robotics.
Assuming the FAA gets
out of the way, drones
could have a variety of
applications that don't
involve spying or firing
missiles at terrorists.
They could be used to
monitor power lines and
pipelines. They could
be used in search-and-
rescue. They could be
used in making movies
and promotional videos.


They could be used to
evaluate storm damage.
And they could be
valuable to farmers.
Chris Anderson
believes drones may be
the future of agriculture,
allowing farmers to
monitor large fields
more carefully, and use
water and pesticide with
greater precision and
care. Japan has realized
this for a long time. Its
ministry of agriculture
began promoting the use
of drones in the early
1980s. Now, 40 percent
of Japan's rice crop is
sprayed by unmanned
aircraft.
Scoff at Jeff Bezos, if
you like. But our robot
future is already here,
and it will inevitably
take flight.
Rich Lowry is the
editor of the National
Review. Readers may
reach him at comments.
lowry@nationalreview.
com.


Does the punishment fit the crime?


recently Florida
announced that
it would reopen
some of the prisons it
closed a year ago due to
projections of a growing
inmate population.
In 2012, Gov. Rick
Scott announced prison
facility closures as a
cost-saving measure.
It seems those closures
were premature.
The Department
of Corrections is now
asking for $59 million
to reopen nine of those
facilities, including two
prisons, five work camps
and two re-entry centers.
In all, the department is
requesting $124 million
in additional funding for
the upcoming budget
year.
Florida went through a
period in the late 1990s
and early 2000s when
we passed a number of
"tough on crime" policy
initiatives. While all were
meritorious, some have
resulted in unintended
consequences and have
left little room for judi-
cial discretion to address
unusual or extenuating
circumstances.
The laws also led to an
explosion in our inmate
population.


Two tough new laws
-10-20-Life and Three
Strikes set minimum
mandatory sentences
that join Florida's
already prescriptive
minimum mandatory
sentence requirements.
Additionally, two rules
further lengthen the time
inmates and probation
violators spend in prison:
85 percent time served
and zero tolerance.
While the crime rate
continues to decline,
a good thing, the time
spent in our state prisons
was going up at an av-
erage cost of $18,000 per
inmate per year.
Besides longer
mandatory sentences
for violent offenders,
our prisons are getting
filled with nonviolent
offenders, now roughly
47 percent of the inmate
population.
In 2008, the Florida


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Legislature passed
SB 2000, legislation that
created the Correctional
Policy Advisory Council.
It was scheduled to
"sunset," or cease
functioning, in 2011 after
the 10-member council
made recommendations
to the state on how to re-
vise laws that govern the
criminal justice system.
The commission was
not funded and never
met. While some justice
experts were appointed
to the commission, other
board slots were left
vacant. This was not only
a missed opportunity
but a dereliction of duty
that will continue to have
a detrimental impact
on the integrity of our
justice system.
Just who is in our state
prisons?
We have 100,844 in-
mates ranging in age
from 14 to 93. Males
make up 93 percent of
the inmate population;
7 percent are female.
This doesn't include
those in jails or juvenile
justice facilities. Only
53 percent of our prison
inmates are incarcerated
for a violent primary
offense.
Drug offenses make


up almost 17 percent of
the prison population or
roughly 17,150 inmates.
At an annual cost of
$17,973 to house and
feed, that is a cost of
more than $308 million
to Florida taxpayers. Why
not decriminalize pos-
session of small amounts
of certain drugs? Or
focus financial resources
on rehab and job training
to help those addicted to
have a better chance of
success?
We also house 564 in-
mates for the offense of
driving with a suspended
license. In many of these
cases the underlying of-
fense for suspending the
license was failure to pay
a fee or fine much like
with the debtor prisons
of the 1800s.
While we are techni-
cally incarcerating them
for driving while their
licenses are suspended,
their real crime is being
poor. Annual cost to
taxpayers to incarcerate
is more than $10 million.
And what happens to
their families while the
head of household is in
prison? Some children
are placed in state custo-
dy. Others access public
assistance programs,


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such as food stamps,
welfare and Medicaid,
at additional cost to
taxpayers and with a
further degradation of
family cohesion and
self-sufficiency.
How is this good
public policy? How is
suspending someone's
license going to help
that individual earn the
funds necessary to meet
his financial obligations,
support his family or
lead a productive life?
What should we do in-
stead? Some suggestions:
Set up payment plans
to keep the family intact
and the debtor working.
Require the offender
to work off the debt in
jobs that we've been
told no one will take
such as picking crops.
And in cases where they
have repeatedly failed to
pay, send them to work
camps until the debt is
repaid in full.
While it might be
necessary to reopen


facilities to deal with
estimated growth in the
prison population, we
should explore smart
justice proposals that
would reduce the need
to build more facilities
and to warehouse people
who are nonviolent and
do not pose a threat to
the safety of our citizens.
One such change is
to abolish minimum
mandatory sentences for
nonviolent crimes.
Those who break the
law should be punished.
But we need to take a
serious look at current
laws, their corresponding
sentences and the need
for judicial discretion to
ensure that the punish-
ment does in fact fit the
crime.
Paula Dockery is a
syndicated columnist
who served in the Florida
Legislature for 16 years
as a Republican from
Lakeland. Readers may
reach her at paula
dockery@aol. com.


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Kids get crafty at the North Port Y


SUN PHOTOS BYTAMI GARCIA


Eli Landrum, 7, colors the feathers of a turkey during school release day at the
North Port YMCA last week for children ages 4-12. Children who attended the
program took part in games, arts and crafts and fitness activities.


Yen seed lSenthwelrt Refida's NL/Y
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Isabella Bernal, 6, smiles while she colors a turkey at the North
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Q0 -. -i' :-- :' "-?' ,. ,
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Janice Ortiz, left, and Emily Schwalm, both 9, make Thanks-
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OurTown Page 10 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


A


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS







The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net ENC Our Town Page 11


I NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I I FORECLOSURE
^^ 312^^^^^ 3122^^


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
L 3112 ^


12/5/13

NOTICE OF ACTION
L 3116 ^


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
Case No.: 13-3429-CA
Division:
THOMAS SCOTT BELL
Petitioner
and
TONYA LYNN BELL
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DIVORCE
TO: Tonya Lynn Bell
1010 Robinhood Dr.
Punta Gorda, FL 33982
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for divorce has been filed
against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Thomas Scott Bell whose
address is 1010 Robinhood Dr.
Punta Gorda, FL 33982 on or
before 12/27/2013, and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court at 350 E. Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in
this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: November 20, 2013
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 11/30/13, 12/5/13,
12/12/13, 12/19/13
339038 2971255

L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-005495-CA
BANK OF AMERICA N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VADIM KOT, ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN A SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, INTER-
EST OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;,
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., IRINA
KOT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POS-
SESSION #1. UNKNOWN TENANT
IN POSSESSION #2, UNKNOWN
TENANT IN POSSESSION #3,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION #4,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure filed July 1,
2013 entered in Civil Case No.
09-005495-CA of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Punta Gorda, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com in accordance with
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes at
11:00 AM on the 16 day of Janu-
ary, 2014 on the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment:
LOT 9. BLOCK 3736, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 65, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE
3A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY
FLORIDA.


Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated this 7 day of October,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-


tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance Please con-
tact Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950, and whose telephone
number is (941) 637-2110, at
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
Publish: 11/28/13 and 12/5/13
338038 2971371

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 10002205CA
CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO
MORTGAGE GROUP, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT L. WOODSIDE, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated
10/8/13, and entered in Case
No, 10002205CA of the Circuit
Court of the TWENTIETH Judicial
Circuit in and for CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITI-
MORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO
MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., is Plain-
tiff, and ROBERT L. WOODSIDE,
et al are Defendants, the clerk will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash, beginning at 11:00 am
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45,
Florida Statutes, on the 16 day of
January, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 13, BLOCK 3719 OF
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDIVI-
SION, SECTION 63, A SUBDI-
VISION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES
77A THROUGH 77G, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than, the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 18
day of October, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact the Adminis-
trative Services Manager
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Publish: 11/28/13 and 12/5/13
336737 2971345
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 11001217CA
WELLS FARGO BANK. NA,
Plaintiff
vs.
KRISTINA L. CHIALDA;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KRISTINA
L. CHIALDA; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE
SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND
URBAN DEVELOPMENT;
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE PROPERTY;
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in
accordance with the Default Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
September 24, 2013, in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at
https://www.charlotte. realfore-
close.comr in accordance with
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, at
11:00 a.m. on January 24. 2014
the following described property.
LOT 17, BLOCK 492, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 9, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGES 19A THROUGH
19D INCLUSIVE, IN THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.


Property Address: 3497
GREAT NECK STREET.
PORT CHARLOTTE, FLORI-
DA 33952, Charlotte
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS


OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
http://www.ca.ciis20.org/
home/main/adarequest.asp
If you are an individual with a
disability who needs an
accommodation in order to
participate in a court pro-
ceeding or other court ser-
vice, program, or activity, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Requests for
accommodations may be pre-
sented on the form below, in
another written format, or
orally. Please complete the
form below (choose the form
for the county where the
accommodation is being
requested) and return it as far
in advance as possible, but
preferably at least seven (7)
days before your scheduled
court appearance or other
court activity. Please see con-
tact information below and
select the contact from the
county where the accommo-
dation is being requested.
To download the correct
Accommodation form, please
choose the County your court
proceeding or other court ser-
vice, program or activity cov-
ered by Title II of the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act is in
so we can route your request
to the appropriate contact:
Charlotte County ADA Title II
Request for Accommodations
Form
WITNESS my hand on 15 day of
October, 2013
Kristy P.
Deputy Clerk of Court,
Charlotte County
Publish: December 5 & 12, 2013
322095 2973369
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-2012-CA-002735
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff.
VS.
JAMES E. GEIS; DORIE R. GElS
N/K/A DORIE R. FISER; et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that sale will be made pursuant to
an Order or Final Summary Judg-
ment. Final Judgment was award-
ed on October 14, 2013 in Civil
Case No. 08-2012-CA-002735.
of the Circuit Court of the TWEN-
TIETH Judicial Circuit in and for
CHARLOTTE County, Florida,
wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA is the Plaintiff and JAMES E.
GEIS; DORIE R. GElS N/K/A
DORIE R. FISER; WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA.; UNKNOWN TENANT
#1 N/K/A KATRINA M.
HECHAVARRIA; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 N/K/A LAURIE PIERCE
are Defendants.
The clerk of the court, Bar-
bara T. Scott will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash by electronic
sale beginning at 11:00 AM on
the prescribed date at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com at 11:00
a.m. on the 27 day of January,
2014, the following described
real property as set forth in said
Final Summary Judgment, to wit:
THE N 1/2 OF LOT 8 AND
ALL OF LOT 9, BLOCK
1386, PORT CHARLOTTE
SUBDIVISION, SECTION
28, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 21, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 21 day of October,
2013.
By: M. B. White
Publish: December 5 & 12, 2013
334261 2973404
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-2012-CA-001147
Division No.
U.S. BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK
OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE MLMI TRUST, MORTGAGE
LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006-FM1
Plaintiff(s),
vs.
ELAINE SMITH, et. al.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order dated October
28, 2013, and entered in Case
No. 08-2012-CA-001147 of the
Circuit Court of the 20TH Judicial
Circuit in and for CHARLOTTE
County, Florida, wherein U.S.
BANK. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.., AS
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
LASALLE BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST,
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-FM1 is the Plaintiff and
ELAINE SMITH; and THOMAS W.
SMITH; and OAK HOLLOW PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC; and MORTGAGE ELECTRON-
IC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,


INC., ACTING SOLELY AS A NOM-
INEE FOR FREMONT INVEST-
MENT & LOAN ENDFIELD the
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, the Clerk's website for on-line
auctions, at 11:00 A.M. on the
27th day of January, 2014, the
following described property as
set forth in said Order of Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 43, BLOCK 5303, PORT
CHARLOTTE, SECTION 96, 1ST
REPLAT, A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 15, PAGES 52-A THRU 52-
F, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIM-
ING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAIN-
ING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK
OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU
FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL
NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60
DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF
RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF
THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
DATED at CHARLOTTE County,
Florida, this 1 day of November,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT, Clerk
CHARLOTTE County, Florida
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
"In accordance with the Ameri-
cans With Disabilities Act, per-
sons in need of a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding shall, within seven (7)
days prior to any proceeding,
contact the Administrative Office
of the Court, CHARLOTTE County,
350 EAST MARION AVENUE,
PUNTA GORDA FL 33950-, Coun-
ty Phone: 941-637-2113 TDD 1-
800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-
8770 via Florida Relay Service".
"Apre ako ki fet avek Americans
With Disabilies Act, tout moun kin
ginyin yun bezwen spesiyal pou
akomodasiyon pou yo patisipe
nan program sa-a dwe, nan yun
tan rezonab an ninpot aranjman
kapab fet, yo dwe kontakte
Administrative Office Of The
Court i nan nimero, CHARLOTTE
County, 350 EAST MARION
AVENUE, PUNTA GORDA FL
33950-, County Phone: 941-637-
2113 TDD 1-800-955-8771
oubyen 1-800-955-8770 i pasan
pa Florida Relay Service."
"En accordance avec la Loi des
"Americans With Disabilities". Les
Personnes en besoin d'une acco-
modation special pour participer
a ces procedures doivent, dans
un temps raisonable, avante d'en-
treprendre aucune autre
demarche, contacter I'office
administrative de la Court situe
au, CHARLOTTE County, 350
EAST MARION AVENUE, PUNTA
GORDA FL 33950-, County
Phone: 941-637-2113 TDD 1-
800-955-8771 ou 1-800-955-
8770 Via Florida Relay Service."
"De acuerdo con el Acto o Decre-
to de los Americanos con Impedi-
mentos, Inhabilitados, personas
en necesidad del servicio espe-
cial para participar en este pro-
cedimiento debran, dentro de un
tiempo razonable, antes de
cualquier procedimiento ponerse
en contact con la oficina Admin-
istrativa de la Corte, CHARLOTTE
County, 350 EAST MARION
AVENUE, PUNTA GORDA FL
33590-, County Phone: 941-637-
2113 TDD 1-800-955-8770o 1-
800-955-8771 Via Florida Relay
Service".
Publish: December 5 & 12, 2013
109440 2973387

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 13000658CA
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III
Plaintiff,
vs.
HENRY J. CREUTZ; KAROLE A.
CREUTZ; AND UNKNOWN OCCU-
PANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS,
AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES,
including, if a named defendant is
deceased, the personal represen-
tatives, the surviving spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, credi-
tors, and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or against
that defendant, and all claimants,
persons or parties, natural or cor-
porate, or whose exact legal sta-
tus is unknown, claiming under
any of the above named or
described defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the order or Final Judg-
ment entered in this cause, in the
Circuit Court of Charlotte County,
Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uated in Charlotte County, Florida,
described as:
LOT 3, BLOCK 2204, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 37, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN THE PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 41A THRU 41H, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY. FLORI-
DA.
Property Address:
18162 Robinson Avenue,
Port Charlotte, Florida 33948
Parcel I.D.: 402230126023
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, on line at
www.charlotte. realforeclose.com


, in accordance with Ch. 45 Flori-
da Statute, at 11:00 a.m. on Jan-
uarv 22, 2014.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK OF COURT WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED this 17 day of October,
2013.
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk


I NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I I FORECLOSURE
^^ 312^^^^^ 3122^^


Publish: December 5 & 12, 2013
107024 2973329

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 08-2013-CA-000741
SUN-TRUST BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
GEORGE M. SCHWARTZ, JR.,
et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Judgment dated
October 8, 2013, entered in Civil
Case Number 08-2013-CA-
000741 in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, wherein
SUNTRUST BANK is the Plaintiff,
and GEORGE M. SCHWARTZ, JR.,
et al., are the Defendants, Char-
lotte County Clerk of Court will
sell the property situated in Char-
lotte County, Florida, described
as:
LOT 1, BLOCK 836, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 26, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
19A THRU 19E, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com, at 11:00
AM, on the 16 day of January,
2014. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim with-
in 60 days after the sale.
Dated: October 18. 2013.
Charlotte County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: M. B. White
"In accordance with the Ameri-
cans With Disabilities Act, per-
sons in need of a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding shall, within seven (7)
days prior to any proceeding,
contact the Administrative Office
of the Court, Charlotte County
Justice Center, 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL 33950,
telephone (941) 637-2113, TDD
1 800 955 8771 or 1 800 955
8770 via Florida Relay Service".
apre ako ki fet avek Americans
With Disabilites Act, tout moun kin
ginyin yun bezwen spesiyal pou
akomodasiyon pou yo patisipe
nan program sa a dwe, nan yun
tan rezonab an ninpot aranjman
kapab fet, yo dwe kontakte
Administrative Office Of The
Court i nan nimero Charlotte
County Justice Center, 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL
33950, telefon nam se (941)
637-2133, oubyen TDD 1 800
955 8771 oubyen 1 800 955
8770 i pasan pa Florida Relay
Service.
En accordance avec la Loi des
"Americans With Disabilities". Les
personnel en besoin d'une acco-
modation special pour participer
a ces procedures doivent, dans
un temps raisonable, avante d'en-
treprendre aucune autre
demarche, contacter I'office
administrative de la Court situe
an Charlotte County Justice Cen-
ter, 350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, FL 33950, le telephone
(941) 637-2113 TDD 1 800 955
8771 ou 1 800 955 8770 Via
Florida Relay Service.
"De acuerdo con el Acto o Decre-
to de los Americanos con Impedi-
mentos, Inhabilitados, personas
en necesidad del servicio espe-
cial para participar en este pro-
cedimiento debran, dentro de un
tiempo razonable, antes de
cualquier procedimiento, ponerse
en contact con la oficina Admin-
istrativa de la Corte Charlotte
County Justice Center, 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL
33950, Telefono (941) 637-2113
, TDD 1 800 955 8770 o 1 800
955 8771 Via Florida Relay Ser-
vice".
Publish: 11/28/13 and 12/5/13
276862 2971072
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 13-CA-366
BANK OF AMERICA. N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOANEL CLERJUSTE AND
ESTHER CLERJUSTE, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated April 30, 2013,
entered in Civil Case No.: 13-CA-
366 of the 20th Judicial Circuit in
Punta Gorda, Charlotte County,
Florida, Barbara T. Scott the
Clerk of the Court, will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cashonline at WWW.CHAR-
LOTTE.REALFORECLOSE.CO
M at 11:00 A.M. EST on the 12
day of December, 2013 the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 12, BLOCK 2289, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 20, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 1OA
THROUGH 1OF, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens. must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.


Dated this 25 day of November,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Kristy P.
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY


ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT THE ADMINIS-
TRATIVE SERVICES MANAGER,
WHOSE OFFICE IS LOCATED AT
350 E. MARION AVENUE, PUNTA
GORDA, FLORIDA 33950, AND
WHOSE TELEPHONE NUMBER IS
(941) 637-2281, WITHIN TWO
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OR
PLEADING; IF YOU ARE HEARING
OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
Publish: 11/28/13 and 12/5/13
322180 2971004


MEETING
WO 3126^

Charlotte County
Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning
Organization
CALENDAR
Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory
Committee (BPAC) Meeting
Thursday, December 12,
2013, 3:00 p.m., at the Cul-
tural Center of Charlotte
County, President's Room,
2280 Aaron Street, Port Char-
lotte, Florida.
No stenographic record by a cer-
tified court reporter is made of
these meetings. Accordingly, any-
one seeking to appeal any deci-
sions involving the matters herein
will be responsible for making a
verbatim record of the
meeting/testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal is to be
based. (SEE.F.S. 286.0105)
Any person requiring special
accommodations to participate in
this meeting, should contact the
Charlotte County-Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning Organiza-
tion at least forty-eight (48) hours
prior to the meeting by calling
(941) 883-3535; if you are hear-
ing or speech impaired, call (800)
955-8770 Voice/(800) 955-8771
TDD.
The MPO's planning process is
conducted in accordance with
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 and related statutes. Any
person or beneficiary who
believes he or she has been dis-
criminated against because of
race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or famil-
ial status may file a complaint
with the Florida Department of
Transportation District One Title
VI Coordinator Robin Parrish at
(863) 519-2675 or by writing her
at Post Office Box 1249, Bartow,
Florida 33831.
For more information call:
Charlotte County
Punta Gorda MPO
25550 Harbor View Road,
Suite 4,
Port Charlotte, Florida
33980
Tel: (941) 883-3535
www.ccmpo.com
Publish: December 5, 2013
163352 2973302

A Bargain

Hunters

Delight

Check the

Classifieds

first!

A Whole

Marketplace

of shopping

is right at

your

fingertips!



NOTICE OF SALE
:: 3130 ^

PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 12/23/13
AT 10:00 AM
1998 DODGE
VIN# 4B3AU52NOWE123467
Publish: December 5, 2013
103614 2973312
NOTICE OF SALE / AUCTION
Per FL Statute 713.78
Time of Sale 10:00 am
Location of Sale: Al Auto Body,
23309 Harborview Rd.
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980
Date of Sale: 12/20/13
VEHICLE DESCRIPTION:
VIN: LFGTCKPM581010506
2008 CHUL
VIN: 3C8FY4BB81T319366
2001 Chrysler
VIN: 1GNCT18W62K146176
2002 Chevy
Publish: December 5, 2013
130547 2973317

[ OTHER NOTICES



PUBLIC NOTICE
Holiday Park, Park and Recreation Dis-
trict has scheduled a Regular Meeting
for December 12, 2013 at 7:00 pm at
Phase 1, Main Hall, located at 5401


Holiday Park Blvd., North Port, FL
34287.
PUBLISH: December 5, 2013
150177 2967196


NEED CASH?


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net ENC OurTown Page 11





:OurTown Page 12 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun IThursday, December 5,2013


Celebrating



Hanukkah
SUN PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Left: Glenn Pomerantz performed the traditional lighting of the
menorah.


Chabad of Charlotte County held its ninth annual Hanukkah
celebration Tuesday near Dillard's at the Port Charlotte Town
Center mall. The event, open to the public, has become a
Southwest Florida tradition. Here, Klezmania on the Gulf starts
the evening off with lively music from around the world.


Right:
Charley
Burch and
Stanley
Rosen take
part in the
Hanukkah
celebration.


Right: Glenn Pomerantz and
his son, Marc, 12, join in the
celebration.


LOCAL SEVEN DAYS A
IF Yo Spend Here It Stays Here .
www.pungorxShambercom U 4E


Dozens of children and some adults stand with the giant
dreidel, a Jewish holiday toy.


Bonnie Yonker and her daughter, Maya, with Karyl Katz at the
celebration.


Sheina Jacobson, wife of Rabbi Simon Jacobson, opens the
celebration.


at theCharlotte County

Chamber of Commerce's


1 -3 '-.'I A. nnual C hristm as P a a-d" e! ;*- t ". ,$ '..0,. *f .;a, /.^ ^, ,*- ovr. 4
B',a s"~.., ;*.-.., ..,-',t ;

CF'(
4cr 4L. V
"Christmas through the ccs of a child"
is our theme this year
Dazzle the crowd in downtown Punta Gorda with your very
best float, decorated car or performance with a marching unit
Noon Saturday, December 14,
at Taylor Road, downtown Punta Gorda
Awards will be presented to first, second and third place
winners in a variety of categories
RESERVE YOUR SPACE IN THE PARADE
IBY CALLING 941-627-2222 TODAY
o ,_______________


Left: Abbie
Banks and
Kathleen
Floyd
dancing to
the music of
Klezmania
on the Gulf.


H.:lrl:i Cl:1 I- ['ate^
I-, ..' ,:1 ,:_ r. ;,- i.:,.i r~l-,,:i : ,L..^ .

Tirn~l- inTIis -^ -11
Feout'e Poge Publishes
Sunday, December 15, 2012
Eoch od is 3-1/4" wide x 2"
The Cost is $43 per ad.



NEWSPAPERS
Ameca's BEST Community Daily
Call today to reserve your space:
941-429-3110


:OurTown Page 12 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Newtown 911 call
recordings released


Newtown dispatchers urged
panicked callers to take cover,
mobilized help and asked about
the welfare of the children as
gunshots could be heard.
Page 2 -


EU fines global
banks $2.3B for
market rigging


The European Commission has
fined a group of major global
banks a total of 1.7 billion euros
for colluding to profit from the
manipulation of key interest rates.

Page 5 -


10 things to know

1. Xi, Biden clash
in Beijing
After 5/2 hours of talks between the
two leaders, there's no sign of progress
toward defusing tension over China's
new air defense zone in the East China
Sea. Seepage 1.

2. Radioactive
material stolen
The extremely hazardous shipment of
cobalt-60 is later found in an empty lot
in Mexico, not far from the abandoned
truck. Seepage 1.

3. Report: Student
debt up in 2012
Seven in 10 of bachelor's degree
graduates in 2012 had an average
debt of 29,400, the report claims.
Seepage8.

4. What caused NYC
train engineer's 'daze'?
A phenomenon called "highway
hypnosis"can lull long-distance
drivers on monotonous routes into a
semi-trance. Seepage2.

5. Hezbollah
under assault
Wednesday's killing of a commander,
an assassination that reverberated
across the Mideast, is only the latest in
a series of recent attacks against the
group. See page 5.

6. Obama eyes
economic gap
The growing gap between America's
rich and poor is a "defining challenge
of our time;' he declares. Seepage2.

7. Pilot whales
stranded in Everglades
Several have died and the challenges
of rescuing the others in the
dangerous shallow waters are "very,
very difficult'a wildlife worker says.
Seepage 1.

8. Healthcare.gov
enrollments jump
About 29,000 people enrolled in the
first two days of this week.
Seepage8.

9. Civil War still lives
in some hearts
A proposal to add a monument to
Union soldiers at a Civil War site angers
some. Seepage 3.

10. Who's $100,000
poorer
Steelers coach Mike Tomlin is fined
for interfering with a Baltimore
player on a kickoff return during
Pittsburgh's 22-20 loss to the Ravens
on Thanksgiving night.
See Sports page 4.


I'IN



heWire re


1rhe iplire^www. sunnewspapers. net
THURSDAY DECEMBER 5, 2013



Biden, Xi talk air defense


No indication of progress in territorial


By JOSH LEDERMAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITrrER
BEIJING -Giving
no ground, Chinese
President Xi Jinping
and U.S. Vice President
Joe Biden traded strong
arguments Wednesday
over China's conten-
tious new air defense
zone, with no indica-
tion of progress toward
defusing a situation
that is raising anxi-
eties across Asia and
beyond.
Though Biden made
clear the deep concern


of the U.S. and other
countries during the
5 1/2 hours of talks -
themselves highly un-
usual for an American
vice president and
Chinese president Xi
vigorously made his
case, too, for China's
declaration of new
rules concerning a
strip of airspace more
than 600 miles long
above disputed islands
in the East China Sea.
The U.S. worries that
China's demand that
pilots entering the air-
space file flight plans


dispute with China


with Beijing could lead
to an accident or a
confrontation spiraling.
dangerously out of
control. Now it is up
to the Chinese to take
steps to lower tensions, I
and "it's a question of
behavior and action,"
said a U.S. official, who
briefed reporters on
the private talks.
The official was not
authorized to be quot-
ed by name and spoke AP PHOTO
only on condition of
anonymity. Vice President Joe Biden, center, listens during his meeting
with Chinese President Xi Jinping inside the Great Hall of
BIDEN 14 the People, Wednesday, in Beijing, China.


AP PHOTOS
In this Tuesday photo provided by the National Park Service, pilot whales are positioned in shallow waters just off a beach in a remote area of the
western portion of Everglades National Park, Fla. Federal officials said some whales have died. The marine mammals are known to normally inhabit
deep water.



10 whales dead in Everglades


Wildlife workers struggle to try


BySUZETTE LABOY
and CHRISTINE ARMARIO
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
EVERGLADES NATIONAL
PARK -Wildlife workers in
boats struggled unsuccessful-
lyWednesday to coax nearly
four dozen pilot whales out of
dangerous shallow waters in
Florida's Everglades National


Park, hoping to spare them
the fate of 10 others that
already had died.
The workers suspended
their efforts after dark, but
planned to return Thursday
morning to try again, said
Kim Amendola, spokes-
woman for the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, which is


to save four dozen pilot whales


taking part in the effort.
Six of the whales were
found dead, and four of the
whales had to be euthanized
Wednesday, said Blair Mase,
coordinator for NOAAs
marine mammal stranding
network. At least three could
be seen on the beach, out of
the water.
The whales are stranded in


a remote area near Highland
Beach, the western boundary
of Everglades National Park
and about 20 miles east of
where they normally live.
It takes more than an hour
to reach the spot from the
nearest boat ramp and there
is no cellphone service,
WHALES|4


"- 'In this Tuesday photo provided by the National Park Service, pilot whales
Dozens of pilot whales are shown stranded in shallow water in a remote are stranded on a beach in a remote area of the western portion of Ever-
area of Florida's Everglades National Park, Wednesday. glades National Park.


Stolen cobalt-60 found

abandoned in Mexico
By OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
MEXICO CITY A
missing shipment of
radioactive cobalt-60 was
found Wednesday near
where the stolen truck
transporting the material *
was abandoned in central
Mexico, the country's h
nuclear safety director
said.
The highly radioactive
material had been re-
moved from its container,
officials said, and one
predicted that anyone in-
volved in opening the box
could be in grave danger This image released Wednesday by the National Con
of dying within days. on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards of Mexico's Energ)
The cobalt-60 was left (CNSNS) shows a piece of machinery that is part of ti
in a rural area about 2f ctnlnn trurk ha.ulinn medical nnuinmnnt with en


AP PHOTO
mission
y Secretary
ie cargo
'tvrmnelv


dangerous radioactive material, in Tepojaco, Hidalgo state,
COBALT 14 north of Mexico City.


Fla. man kills

wife, son with

crossbow

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WESTON, Fla. -A South Florida man
used a crossbow to kill his wife and
teenage son in their townhouse, tried
to kill a second son who is a student at
Florida State University and wound up
dead in a motel bathroom, authorities
said Wednesday.
Broward Sheriff's Office deputies said
the body of Pedro Jose Maldonado Sr.,
53, of Weston was found inside the motel
room near Lake City. He apparently died
by slitting his own throat, investigators
said.
Before that, deputies said Maldonado
called a friend to say he had killed his
wife, 47-year-old Monica Narvaez-
Maldonado, and younger son Pedro Jose

CROSSBOW 14





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 5,2013


NYC train derailment airs queries


about technology


YONKERS, N.Y. (AP) -
The revelation that a New
York City commuter train
derailed while barreling
around a sharp curve at
nearly three times the
speed limit is fueling
questions about whether
automated crash-avoid-
ance technology could
have prevented the
carnage.
Safety officials for
decades have champi-
oned what's known as
positive train control
technology, which uses
GPS, wireless radio and
computers to monitor
trains and stop them
from colliding, derailing
or going the wrong way.
But the railroad industry
has sought to postpone
having to install the
systems because of the
high cost and technologi-
cal issues.
Investigators haven't
yet determined whether
the weekend wreck,
which killed four peo-
ple and injured more
than 60 others, was the
result of human error
or mechanical trouble.
But some safety experts
said the tragedy might
not have happened if
Metro-North Railroad
had the technology, and
a lawmaker said the
derailment underscored
the need for it.
"This incident, if
anything, heightens the
importance of additional


AP PHOTO
In this Dec. 1 photo provided by the National Transportation Safety Board, NTSB investigator
George Haralampopoulous hands a data recorder down to Mike Hiller from the derailed Metro-
North train in the Bronx borough of New York.


safety measures, like
that one," said U.S. Sen.
Richard Blumenthal,
a Democrat from
Connecticut, which also
is served by Metro-North.
"I'd be very loath to be
more flexible or grant
more time."
The train was going
82 mph as it entered a
30 mph turn Sunday
morning and ran off
the track, National
Transportation Safety
Board member Earl
Weener said Monday. He
cited information extract-
ed from the train's two
data recorders; investiga-
tors also began interview-
ing the train's crew.


The speed stunned
officials- "I gulped,"
said U.S. Sen. Charles
Schumer, D-N.Y.
"Certainly we want to
make sure that that oper-
ator is disciplined in an
appropriate way. There's
such a gross deviation
from the norm, that there
may be other agencies
that also want to take
a look at his behavior
in operating the train,"
Gov. Andrew Cuomo said
Tuesday. "That amount
of speed is certainly
unjustifiable."
Union leader Anthony
Bottalico said he was
confident the investiga-
tion would reveal there


was no criminal intent.
"At this point in time,
we can't tell" whether the
answer is faulty brakes
or a human mistake,
Weener said.
Investigators began
talking to the train's
engineer Monday but
were unlikely to contin-
ue the interview until
Wednesday, National
Transportation Safety
Board spokesman
Keith Holloway said
Tuesday. He said he had
no information on the
reason; Bottalico said
it was because William
Rockefeller hadn't slept
in almost 24 hours and
was "very distraught."


Newtown 911 call recordings released


HARTFORD, Conn.
(AP) Recordings of
911 calls from the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shooting that were
released Wednesday
show town dispatchers
urged panicked callers
to take cover, mobilized
help and asked about the
welfare of the children
as gunshots could be
heard at times in the
background.
One caller told police
in a trembling, breathless
voice that a gunman
was shooting inside the
building.
"I caught a glimpse of
somebody. They're run-
ning down the hallway.
Oh, they're still running
and still shooting. Sandy
Hook school, please,"
the woman said.
In the minutes that
followed, staff mem-
bers inside the school
pleaded for help as
Newtown police juggled



Wags,

LOS ANGELES (AP)-
Wags and barks speak
volumes when it comes
to understanding what
a dog is saying, but
there are also clues in a
dog's eyes, ears, nose or
the tilt of its head. Are
humans getting the right
messages?
Dr. GaryWeitzman,
president of the San
Diego Humane Society
and former CEO of the
Washington Animal
Rescue League, has
worked with tens of
thousands of stray dogs
over the last quarter
century and says there is
no question that pets and
people communicate, but
some are getting more
out of it than others.
"Dogs want to be with
us and they want to do
the right thing. Nothing
is ever done by a dog for
spite or revenge. That's
a human quality. Dogs
just want to please us,"
Weitzman said. "So don't
misunderstand what dogs
are saying."
Jerry Ericksen of Los
Angeles has two dogs and
they have different needs


~~- (Yncr n l100"tb 0


This Oct. 28 aerial photo shows the Sandy Hook Ele
School in the former Chaulk Hill School building in
Conn., where it was relocated from Newtown, Coni


the barrage of calls.
The calls were posted
on the town's website
under a court order
after a lengthy effort by
The Associated Press to
have them released for
review.
Another call came
from a custodian, Rick
Thorne, who said that a
window at the front of


the school was
and that he kep
shooting. While
line with Thorr
dispatcher told
body off the ca
everyone you c
down there."
Thorne rema
the phone for s
minutes.
"There's still,


*^H^B goin on, "l piease!/ Lnle
custodian pleaded to
Newtown's 911 dispatch-
er, as six or seven shots
could be heard booming
in the background. "Still,
it's still going on!"
The gunman,
r 20-year-old Adam
Lanza, shot his way
into the school the
morning of Dec. 14
and killed 20 children
and six educators with
AP PHOTO a semi-automatic rifle.
emetr ~He also killed his moth-
ementary ..
Monroe, er in their Newtown
Mn. home before driving to
the school, and he corn-
shattered emitted suicide as police
)t hearing arrived at the scene.
e on the Seven recordings
ie, the of landline calls from
Ssome- inside the school to
11: "Get Newtown police were
an going posted. Calls that were
routed to state police are
ined on the subject of a separate,
severall pending freedom of
information request by
shooting the AP.


barks speak volumes to dogs


that require different
languages. Forest, a pit
bull that was abused and
starved before Ericksen
got him, is still super
timid and spends his time
at the dog park hiding
under Ericksen's chair.
"I talk to him in a
smooth, gentle voice. He's
very cooperative. He's
very content," Ericksen
said.
Buster is a 90-pound
blind boxer. "When I call
him, I yell out his name
and keep clapping so he
can zero in on where I
am," Ericksen said. "If he
starts to walk into some-
thing, I will yell 'stop' and
he will change direction."
Buster has only been
around Forest for six
months, but they com-
municate, too.
"When we come home
from the dog park, Forest
will go in first, walk 10
feet and wait. When I take
the collar and leash off
Buster, Forest takes over
and guides him to the
yard," Ericksen said.
Weitzman's book, "How
to Speak Dog," was just
released by the National


Geographic Society and
the veterinarian hopes
it will help people better
grasp what their dogs
are saying so they can
respond better.
When man first meets
mutt, it is up to the
person to eliminate hos-
tility. In the exam room,
Weitzman will often get
on the floor with a dog to
reduce any threats.
That has certainly
worked for 1-year-old
Van Leifer-Nau of San
Diego. That's where he
sits, sleeps, plays and
dotes on 1-year-old
Neiko, a yellow Lab and
Saluki mix, said mom
Tamara Leifer-Nau.
"Neiko loves this baby,
it's like Van is his baby.
They love each other
and Neiko goes in for as
many kisses as he can
get. They are inseparable.
They are communicating
at a completely different
level," Leifer-Nau said.
"Dogs read lips and
body language. They can
see your facial expression.
Some animals respond to
how we look, not what we
say. Their inherent ability


to read facial expressions
is a whole lot better than
ours," Weitzman said.
The other dog in the
Leifer-Nau house is
Oakley, a border collie
mix the family rescued
13 years ago this month.
He goes to the door and
literally talks dog when
he wants out, Leifer-Nau
said.
You have to make sure
a dog can hear when
you talk, Weitzman said.
Some dogs are born deaf
or go deaf with age. Long
ears make hearing more
of a chore. Those dogs
also don't have the ability
to talk with their ears
because they can't prick
them, cock them or pin
them back.
"Every once in a
while, a dog will come
along that just seems
to 'get' you. You think it
even reads your mind,"
Weitzman said.
"I really think these
animals are soul mates. I
had a dog I know was my
soul mate. I understood
her with a look and she
understood me with a
look back."


I NATION


Obama: Income
inequality a
defining challenge
WASHINGTON (AP)
President Barack
Obama turned his
focus Wednesday to the
pocketbook issues that
Americans consistently
rank as a top concern,
arguing that the dream of
upward economic mobil-
ity is breaking down and
the growing income gap
is a "defining challenge of
our time."
"The basic bargain at
the heart of our economy
has frayed," the president
said in remarks at a
nonprofit community
center a short drive
from the White House
in one of Washington's
most impoverished
neighborhoods.
The president vowed
to focus the last three
years of his presidency on
addressing the discrepan-
cy and a rapidly growing
deficit of opportunity that
he said is a bigger threat
than the fiscal deficit.

Paul Walker died
of injuries, burns
'within seconds'

LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) "Fast and
Furious" star Paul Walker
died from a combination
of traumatic injuries and
burns after the Porsche
he was riding in crashed
and erupted in flames,
according to autopsy re-
sults released Wednesday
by the Los Angeles
County
coCoroner's
office.
The car's
driver,
38-year-old
Roger Rodas,
Died from
WALKER traumatic
injuries,
coroner's officials said.
Coroner Ed Winter said
the men died "within sec-
onds" of the crash. More
details will be available
when the final autopsy is
released, Winter said.
The deaths have been
ruled an accident, with
the injuries occurring as
the result of "auto versus
fixed object." Although
witnesses confirmed
that Rodas and Walker
were in the car, the men
were positively identified
through dental records.

Family of Navy
Yard shooting
victim files lawsuit
TAMPA (AP) -The
Florida family of a
woman slain during the
mass shooting at the
Washington Navy Yard is
the first to file a lawsuit
against the government
and defense contractors,
alleging that officials
ignored red flags about
the killer's deteriorating
mental health.
The suit on behalf
of the family of Mary
DeLorenzo Knight was
filed Tuesday morning in
federal court in Tampa.
The lawsuit named the
Navy, the Department of
Veterans Affairs and two
defense contractors as
defendants. It's seeking
at least $37.5 million in
damages.

15-cent increase
in federal gas tax
proposed
WASHINGTON
(Washington Post) -
With Congress facing a
major shortfall in trans-
portation funding next
year, a House bill intro-
duced Wednesday would
raise the federal gas tax


by 15 cents per gallon to
close the gap.
Rep. Earl Blumenauer,
D-Ore., announced the
proposed increase at a
news conference, flanked
by an array of labor, con-
struction and business


leaders. It would raise
the federal tax on gas to
33.4 cents per gallon and
on diesel to 42.8 cents.
"Every credible inde-
pendent report indicates
that we are not meeting
the demands of our
stressed and decaying
infrastructure system
- roads, bridges and
transit," Blumenauer said.
The tax has not been
increased since 1993, and
the Highway Trust Fund
into which the revenue
flows has suffered be-
cause the tax has not kept
pace with inflation, and
better car mileage has re-
duced fuel consumption.


Poll:Youth breaking
with Obama on
health care
CHICAGO (Bloomberg)
- The nation's youth, a
group that twice rallied
behind President Barack
Obama at the ballot
box, is failing to support
his signature domestic
achievement and increas-
ingly disillusioned with
his presidency.
More than half of those
18 to 29 years old say they
disapprove of Obamacare
and half expect it will
increase their health care
costs, a survey by Harvard
University's Institute of
Politics shows. Four in 10
say they anticipate the
quality of their coverage
will get worse because of
the law.
In a finding perhaps
even more troubling for
the White House, almost
half in that age group, the
so-called millennials, say
they're unlikely to enroll
in insurance through a
government exchange,
even if eligible. That
could put at risk the
economics of the Patient
Protection and Affordable
Care Act, which needs
young, healthy people to
enroll in large numbers
to offset the costs of
caring for older, sicker
Americans.

Clinton: Spying
damaged relations
with allies
WASHINGTON -
Former President Bill
Clinton said allegations
that the National Security
Agency spied on world
leaders have damaged
relations with U.S. allies
and show the need for
stricter rules on intelli-
gence gathering.
Clinton said that while
he was president, from
1993 to
2001, he had
"serious res-
Servations"
't v about eaves-
dropping
on other
leaders'
CLINTON commu-
CLINTON nications.
Even so, "we didn't have
the capability then to
do a lot of what's being
done today" by U.S.
intelligence agencies,
he said in an interview
broadcast Tuesday night
on the Fusion television
network.

6% of U.S.
teenagers take
psychiatric drugs
(Bloomberg) About
6 percent of U.S. teen-
agers report using a psy-
chiatric medicine, such
as an antidepressant or
attention-deficit treat-
ment, as drug therapy for
the conditions remains
steady, a government
survey found.
Boys were more likely
than girls to be given
stimulant medications
such as Ritalin for atten-


tion deficit hyperactivity
disorder, according to
the report Wednesday
from the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention. Girls were
more likely to use
antidepressants.





SThe Sun/Thursday, December 5,2013


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


Proposed Civil War monument sparks outrage


TALLAHASSEE -The
state parks system is on
the hot seat and a House
leader is calling for action
over a proposed monu-
ment to Union soldiers
at the site of the biggest
Civil War battle fought in
Florida.
The bid to add a Union
monument to the Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park near Lake City has
drawn a furious response,
with about 100 people
attending a Monday night
public hearing at the
Columbia County School
District Auditorium.
Representatives of the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
which oversees the state
parks, moderated the
hearing.
Passions ran high, at
one point erupting in a
spontaneous chorus of
"Dixie" led by a black
man, H.K. Edgerton, who
called Union soldiers
rapists and wielded his


large Confederate flag like
a conductor's baton as the
audience sang.
Speakers blasted the
proposal as disturbing
hallowed ground in a
rural community where
most families stay for
generations.
"Putting a Union
monument at Olustee
would be like placing a
memorial to Jane Fonda
at the entrance to the
Vietnam memorial," said
Leon Duke, a wounded
veteran.
"Men died there. Let
their spirits rest in peace,"
said Nansea Marham
Miller, who is descended
from a Confederate sol-
dier who died at Olustee.
"Let my grandfather rest
in peace."
The park is in the
Osceola National
Forest, 50 miles west of
Jacksonville and 15 miles
east of Lake City. It was
the site of a four-hour
battle on Feb. 20, 1864, in


which Union forces were
routed by Confederate
troops.
In 1909, the Florida
Legislature acquired three
acres there to build a
memorial. In 1912, Olustee
became the first state
park in Florida, and each
February, a re-enactment
of the battle is staged there.
There was heavy debate
during Monday's meet-
ing about whether the
already-existing memorial
is a Confederate memorial
or is broader in scope.
Last February, DEP
received a proposal
from the Sons of Union
Veterans of the CivilWar
to add a memorial specif-
ically for Union officers
and soldiers. The agency
vetted the proposal and
scheduled Monday's
public hearing to discuss
possible locations at the
park for the memorial.
But the discussion never
got that far.
Many of the speakers


identified themselves as
descendants of soldiers
who lost their lives at the
Battle of Olustee. Many
said they participated
regularly in Civil War
re-enactments. Many
began their speeches by
stating how many genera-
tions of their families had
lived in Florida.
Jeff Grzelak of Orlando,
a Civil War historian
whose business card
depicts him in a Union
uniform, said a Union
marker had been placed
in the cemetery at Olustee
23 years before.
Mike Farrell, a member
of the Sons of Union
Veterans of the Civil War,
is also descended from
a soldier who died at
Olustee. Farrell said he's
been a historical exhib-
itor at the park for years
and proposed the new
memorial as a result.
"I always have the
visiting public approach
me and ask me where the


Union monument is on
the battlefield, and I often
tell them, 'There isn't any.'
I'm not talking about what
Jeff was talking about,
which was a cemetery
marker to the dead. What
I'm talking about is a
battlefield monument,"
Farrell said.
That prompted dis-
agreement from audience
members, and moderator
Lew Scruggs, DEP's chief
of park planning, called
for them to let Farrell
finish.
Many speakers said the
land on which the current
memorial is placed was
originally secured by the
United Daughters of the
Confederacy, which gen-
erated donations to match
the state's contribution.
The United Daughters
of the Confederacy also
administered the site until
1949, when the state took
over.
Jamie Likins, president
general of the United


Daughters of the
Confederacy and a
fifth-generation Floridian,
noted that the idea for
the monument had come
from a member of her
group whose husband
had fought at Olustee.
"The Olustee monu-
ment is to the Battle of
Olustee and honors all,
both, Confederate and
Union soldiers," Likins
said.
Agreed Susan
McKinney, also a member
of group: "Either abide by
the agreement or give the
land back."
House Judiciary
Chairman Dennis Baxley,
R-Ocala, said he was
concerned that no elected
body had reviewed the
proposal.
"There is a sacred trust
that's being violated when
you go in and change an
historic site from the way
it was commemorated
by those who established
(it)," Baxley said.


I OTHER HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Suspect in
custody after
school shooting
WINTER GARDEN
(AP) Officials say an
Orlando-area student
who was shot at his
high school is expect-
ed to survive and a
17-year-old suspect
has been taken into
custody.
School officials said
Wednesday the shooting
took place after the two
teenage boys got into
a fight at a bus pickup
area atWest Orange High
School. The wounded
15-year-old student had
injuries to his face and
stomach but was alert
when he was taken to a
hospital.
Orange County Sheriff
Jerry Demings said at
a news conference the
shooting took place
shortly before 1:30 p.m.
as students were being
dismissed for the day.
Sheriff's office spokes-
woman Jane Watrel says
the shooter was also
a student at the high
school.

Vehicle strikes,
kills black bear in
Panhandle
MIRAMAR BEACH (AP)
- A 200-pound black
bear died Tuesday after
being hit by a vehicle on
Emerald Coast Parkway
near FortWalton Beach in
the Florida Panhandle.
Stan Kirkland, a spokes-
man for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, told the
Northwest Florida Daily
News that a passing
motorist saw the bear and
called authorities around
7 a.m. Tuesday.
Kirkland said officials
don't know when the bear
was hit. The bear was a
male, and didn't have an
ID tag.
The agency will dispose
of the bear's remains in
an area closed to public
access.


Fla. man pleads
not guilty in
Facebook killing
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Medina's wife, 26-year-old
Jennifer Alfonso, was in
the home at the time, but
was not harmed.
No decision has been
made on whether the
state will seek the death
penalty, said Assistant
State Attorney J. Scott
Dunn. Miami-Dade
Circuit Judge Yvonne
Colodny set a Jan. 29 sta-
tus hearing to discuss the
potential death penalty
and scheduled a tentative
trial date for March 17.


Fla. cities lead
nation in high-end
foreclosures
ORLANDO (AP) -Two
Florida cities lead the
nation in foreclosures
of high-end properties
worth $5 million or
more.
The research firm
RealtyTrac said in a
report Wednesday that
Miami and Orlando
were at the top of
the list of foreclosure
activity on homes in the
$5 million-plus range.
Other cities with high
numbers of foreclosure
activity on high-priced
homes included the
Los Angeles area, metro
Atlanta and metro New
York City.
At the state level,
Florida and California
made up 60 percent of
the high-end foreclo-
sures this year.
The number of high-
end foreclosures is
relatively small only
about 200 compared to
the 1.2 million proper-
ties that had foreclosure
activity this year.
But while overall fore-
closure activity is down
this year, it is up for the
high-priced homes.


PORT CHARLOTTE
DENTAL CARE
P" '_1, ; ll l ... '


City of Tampa
places strip club
on probation
TAMPA (AP) -Tampa
city officials have placed
a strip club on probation
for the next year in an
attempt to clean up the
criminal activity that
prompted the city to
declare the club a public
nuisance.
The Tampa Tribune
reports that the owners of
Flash Dancers must meet
a long list of requirements
to avoid another trip to
the Nuisance Abatement
Board and potentially
further fines and
restrictions.
The deal with the city
requires Flash Dancers to
install video cameras, use
wand-type metal detec-
tors to inspect clients
as they enter the club in
an effort to keep guns,
knives and other weapons
out and dismantle aVIP
room that had become a
place for lewd and illegal
activities.

Officials lift Martin
County dengue
fever advisory
JENSEN BEACH (AP)
- State health officials
have lifted a dengue
fever advisory in Martin
County.
No new cases of the
mosquito-borne illness
have been reported in the
Rio-Jensen Beach area
since September. Health
officials lifted the adviso-
ry on Tuesday.
Over a five-month
period, 22 people in the
area developed the signs
of the illness, which
include high fever and
aching bones.
Health officials issued


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the alert during the
summer after officials
confirmed cases of the
illness. It is spread by
mosquito and officials say
the risk goes down as the
temperatures get cooler
and the insects are not as
much of a concern.

Accused robber
shoots self
GAINESVILLE (AP)-A
suspected robber is in criti-
cal condition after shooting
himself in the chest when
police came to take him
into custody.
Deputy U.S. Marshal


Bryon Carroll says the
shooting occurred as a
fugitive task force arrived at
a Gainesville apartment on
Tuesday to arrest 42-year-
old Miker Debose.
Carroll told the
Gainesville Sun members
of the task force noticed
movement inside the
apartment. A short time lat-
er a gunshot was heard and
a woman ran out saying
Debose had shot himself.
Debose is accused of an
armed robbery in Marion
County and was wanted
on a federal warrant for
violation of conditions of
supervised release.


Christian Slater
marries girlfriend
LOS ANGELES (AP)
- Christian Slater has
married his girlfriend in
an impromptu ceremony.
Slater's spokeswoman
says the 44-year-old actor
wed his girlfriend of three
years, Brittany Lopez, on
Monday at the courthouse
in Coral Gables, Fla.
The nuptials were
first reported by People
magazine.
The "Heathers" and
"True Romance" star was
previously married to
Ryan Haddon.


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 5,2013 FROM PAGE ONE


WASHINGTON (AP)
-The National Security
Agency tracks the loca-
tions of nearly 5 billion
cellphones every day
overseas, including those
belonging to Americans
abroad, The Washington
Post reported Wednesday.
The NSA inadvertently
gathers the location
records of "tens of millions
of Americans who travel
abroad" annually, along
with the billions of
other records it collects by
tapping into worldwide
mobile network cables,
the newspaper said in a
report on its website.
Such data means the
NSA can track the move-
ments of almost any cell-
phone around the world,
and map the relationships
of the cellphone user. The
Post said a powerful an-
alytic computer program
called CO-TRAVELER
crunches the data of
billions of unsuspecting
people, building patterns
of relationships between
them by where their
phones go. That can reveal


BIDEN
FROM PAGE 1

Though Biden ex-
pressed no disappoint-
ment in public remarks,
the outcome of his visit
was not what the U.S.
might have hoped for.
A day earlier, the vice
president had stood
shoulder to shoulder in
Tokyo with the leader of
Japan, China's regional
rival, pledging to raise
Washington's concerns
with Xi directly. But as
he arrived in Beijing, an
editorial in the state-run
China Daily charged
Washington with "turn-
ing a blind eye to Tokyo's
provocations," warning
that Biden would hit
a dead end should
he come "simply to
repeat his government's


WHALES
FROM PAGE 1

complicating rescue
efforts.
"We want to set the
expectation low, because
the challenges are very,
very difficult," Mase said.
Park spokeswoman
Linda Friar said rescuers
were trying to surround
the whales, which were
in roughly 3 feet of salt
water about 75 feet from
shore, and herd them
back to sea.
"They are not cooper-
ating," Friar said.
Workers also tried to


COBALT
FROM PAGE 1

a half a mile from
Hueypoxtla, an agricul-
tural town of about 4,000
people, but it posed no
threat or a need for an
evacuation, said Juan
Eibenschutz, director
general of the National
Commission of Nuclear
Safety and Safeguards.
"Fortunately there are
no people where the
source of radioactivity
is," Eibenschutz said.
Commission physicist
Mardonio Jimenez said
it was the first time
material like this had
been stolen and extract-
ed from its container.
The only threat was to



CROSSBOW
FROM PAGE 1

Maldonado Jr., 17. Both
had been shot with what
deputies described as a
handheld crossbow that
fires small darts.


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Oct. 31 file photo, a man looks at his cellphone as he walks on the street in downtown Madrid.
The National Security Agency tracks the locations of nearly 5 billion cellphones every day overseas,
including those belonging to Americans abroad, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.


a previously unknown
terrorist suspect, in guilt
by cellphone-location
association, for instance.
As the NSA doesn't
know which part of the
data it might need, the
agency keeps up to 27


previous erroneous and
one-sided remarks."
Late Wednesday in
Washington, Defense
Secretary Chuck
Hagel called China's
announcement of the
zone "destabilizing" and
complained that it had
come "so unilaterally and
so immediately without
any consultation."
"That's not a wise
course of action to take
for any country," Hagel
said at a Pentagon news
conference.
Neither Biden nor Xi
mentioned the dispute
as they appeared briefly
before reporters at the
end of their first round of
talks. But in private, the
issue came up at length
at the beginning and
again near the end of the
long-planned meeting,
senior Obama adminis-
tration officials said.

nudge the whales out
to sea earlier in the day
with no success.
The short-finned pilot
whales typically live in
very deep water. Even
if rescuers were able
to begin nudging the
41 remaining whales
out to sea, Mase said
they would encounter
a series of sandbars
and patches of shallow
water along the way.
This particular whale
species is also known
for its close-knit social
groups, meaning if
one whale gets stuck
or stays behind, the
others are likely to stay
behind or even beach

whoever opened the box
and later discarded the
pellets of high-intensity
radioactive material that
was being transported
to a waste site. It had
been used in medical
equipment for radiation
therapy.
"The person or people
who took this out are in
very great risk of dying,"
Jimenez said, adding
that the normal survival
rate would be between
one and three days.
He said there was no
word so far of anyone
reporting to area
hospitals with radiation
exposure. He said those
who exposed them-
selves to the pellets
could not contaminate
others.
Federal police and

Authorities believe they
were killed sometime
Monday. After that,
they said, Maldonado
drove to Tallahassee and
rented a motel room. Just
after 7 a.m. Tuesday, he
apparently attacked his
older son, 21-year-old
Jose Maldonado, with the


terabytes, or more than
double the text content of
the Library of Congress'
print collection, the Post
said. A 2012 internal
NSA document said the
volumes of data from the
location program were


"outpacing our ability to
ingest, process and store"
it, the newspaper said.
The program is detailed
in documents given to the
newspaper by former NSA
systems analyst Edward
Snowden. The Post also


AP PHOTO


Chinese Vice President Li Yuanchao, right, and U.S. Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden, left, review an honor guard during a welcome
ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China,
Wednesday.
The typically upbeat as of yet been unable to
Biden appeared subdued bridge.
as he reflected on the "This new model of
complexity of the rela- major-country cooper-
tionship between China ation ultimately has to
and the U.S., two world be based on trust, and a
powers seeking closer positive notion about the
ties despite wide ideo- motive of one another,"
logical gulfs they have Biden said, flanked by


themselves as well.
"It would be very
difficult for the whales
to navigate out on their
own," Mase said.
Federal officials
were notified about
the whales Tuesday
around 4 p.m. Because
of the remote location,
workers were unable to
access the site before
dark. They arrived
Wednesday morning
and discovered 45
whales still alive.
"There were some
that were very compro-
mised and in very poor
condition," Mase said.
Four were euthanized
with sedatives, and

military units on the
scene put up a cordon
of yards around the site.
The cargo truck
hauling the cobalt-60
was stolen from a gas
station early Tuesday in
the neighboring state
of Hidalgo, about 24
miles from where the
material was recov-
ered, Jimenez said.
Authorities had put out
an alert in six central
states and the capital
looking for it.
The truck was taking
the cobalt to a nuclear
waste facility in the
state of Mexico, which is
adjacent to Mexico City
The material was used
in obsolete radiation
therapy equipment
that is being replaced
throughout Mexico's

crossbow but the dart
just grazed the son's ear.
Deputies say the father
tried to choke the son, but
the younger Maldonado
managed to escape.
Authorities had
responded to the
Maldonado home
Tuesday with a SWAT


more could be put down
Thursday if their condi-
tion deteriorates, Mase
said. She described the
remaining whales as
swimming and mobile
but said scientists don't
know how long they
have been out of the
deep, colder water they
are accustomed to and
could be impacted by
secondary consequenc-
es, such as dehydration.
"I don't think we have
a lot of time," Mase
said.
Necropsies were be-
ing done Wednesday on
the deceased whales.
Scientists will look for
disease or other signs

public health system.
It was coming from the
general hospital in the
northern border city
of Tijuana, Eibenshutz
said.
Before the container
was found, he said
the thieves most likely
wanted the white 2007
Volkswagen cargo
vehicle with a moveable
platform and crane.
Eibenschutz said
there was nothing to
indicate the theft of the
cobalt was intentional
or in any way intended
for an act of terrorism.
On average, a half
dozen thefts of radio-
active materials are
reported in Mexico each
year and none have
proven to be aimed at
the cargo itself, he said.

team after the man's
friend telephoned about
his confession to the
killings. After finding
the bodies, they learned
through unspecified
means that Maldonado
was staying at a motel
near Lake City, east of
Tallahassee and hundreds


quotes unidentified NSA
officials, saying they spoke
with the permission of
their agency.
Shawn Turner, a
spokesman for the Office
of the Director of National
Intelligence, declined to
comment on the report.
The DNI's general
counsel, Robert Litt, has
said that NSA does not
intentionally gather bulk
location data on U.S.
cellphones inside the U.S.
- but NSA Director Keith
Alexander testified before
Congress his agency ran
tests in 2010 and 2011 on
"samples" of U.S. cell-site
data to see if it was techni-
cally possible to plug such
data into NSA analysis
systems. Alexander said
that the information was
never used for intelligence
purposes and that the
testing was reported to
congressional intelligence
committees. He said it
was determined to be of
little "operational value,"
so the NSA did not ask for
permission to gather such
data.


Report: NSA tracks billions of cellphones


top advisers in a resplen-
dent meeting room steps
away from Tiananmen
Square.
The calibrated public
comments played down
the deep strains perme-
ating the relationship
between the world's two
largest economies.
Earlier, however, Biden
told Chinese youngsters
waiting to get visitor vi-
sas processed at the U.S.
Embassy that American
children are rewarded
rather than punished
for challenging the
status quo, an implicit
criticism of the Chinese
government's authoritar-
ian rule.
"I hope you learn that
innovation can only
occur where you can
breathe free, challenge
the government, chal-
lenge religious leaders."
Biden said.

to indicate how whales
got stuck in the shallow
Everglades waters.
As workers tried to
coax the animals to
deeper water, at least
one could be seen a few
feet from shore floating
upside down with its
head bobbing up and
down. Three to four
more could be seen on
the beach bleeding.
Twenty-two pilot
whales became strand-
ed in Florida's Avalon
State Park in Fort Pierce
in 2012. Residents, state
and national officials
attempted to rescue
them, but only five
could be saved.

According to the
complaint of this
theft, a truck marked
"Transportes Ortiz"
left Tijuana on Nov. 28
and was headed to the
storage facility when the
driver stopped to rest at
a gas station in Tepojaco,
in Hidalgo state north of
Mexico City.
The driver, Valentin
Escamilla Ortiz, told
authorities he was
sleeping in the truck
when two men with a
gun approached about
1:30 a.m. Tuesday. They
made him get out, tied
his hands and feet and
left him in a vacant lot
nearby.
When he was able to
free himself, he ran back
to the gas station to get
help.

of miles north of the
original crime scene.
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office deputies
found Maldonado dead
about 2 a.m. Wednesday.
No information
was provided about a
possible motive for the
rampage.


ALMANAC
Today is Thursday, Dec. 5,
the 339th day of 2013. There
are 26 days left in the year.
Today in history
On Dec. 5,1933, national
Prohibition came to an end as
Utah became the 36th state to
ratify the 21st Amendment to
the Constitution, repealing the
18th Amendment.
On this date
In 1776, the first scholastic
fraternity in America, Phi Beta
Kappa, was organized at the
College of William and Mary in
Williamsburg, Va.
In 1782, the eighth
president of the United States,
Martin Van Buren, was born in
Kinderhook, N.Y.; he was the
first chief executive to be born
after American independence.
In 1791, composer Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart died in
Vienna, Austria, at age 35.
In 1792, George Washington
was re-elected president; John
Adams was re-elected vice
president.
In 1831, former President
John Quincy Adams took his
seat as a member of the U.S.
House of Representatives.
In 1848, President James K.
Polk triggered the Gold Rush of
'49 by confirming that gold had
been discovered in California.
In 1932, German physicist
Albert Einstein was granted a
visa, making it possible for him
to travel to the United States.
In 1955, the American
Federation of Labor and
the Congress of Industrial
Organizations merged to form
the AFL-CIO under its first
president, George Meany.
In 1979, feminist Sonia
Johnson was formally
excommunicated bythe
Mormon Church because
of her outspoken support
for the proposed Equal
Rights Amendment to the
Constitution.
In 1991, Richard Speck,
who'd murdered eight student
nurses in Chicago in 1966, died
in prison a day short of his 50th
birthday.
In 1994, Republicans chose
Newt Gingrich to be the first
GOP speaker of the House in
four decades.
In 2003, The two makers
of flu shots in the United
States, Chiron and Aventis
Pasteur, announced they had
run out of vaccine and would
not be able to meet a surge in
demand. A suicide bombing on
a commuter train in southern
Russia killed 44 people, two
days before the nation's
parliamentary elections.
In 2008, The Labor
Department reported that
an alarming half-million jobs
had vanished in Nov. 2008 as
unemployment hit a 15-year
high of 6.7 percent. A judge
in Las Vegas sentenced O.J.
Simpson to 33 years in prison
(with eligibility for parole after
nine) for an armed robbery at a
hotel room.
Today's birthdays
Singer Little Richard is
81. Author Joan Didion is 79.
Author Calvin Trillin is 78.
Actor Jeroen Krabbe is 69.
Opera singer Jose Carreras is
67. Pop singer Jim Messina
is 66. College Football Hall of
Famer Jim Plunkett is 66.
World Golf Hall of Famer Lanny
Wadkins is 64. Actress Morgan
Brittany is 62. Actor Brian
Backer is 57. Pro Football
Hall of Famer Art Monk is 56.
Country singer Ty England is
50. Rock singer-musician John
Rzeznik (The Goo Goo Dolls)
is 48. Country singer Gary
Allan is 46. Comedian-actress
Margaret Cho is 45. Writer-


director Morgan J. Freeman is
44. Actress Alex Kapp Homrner
is 44. Rock musician Regina
Zernay (Cowboy Mouth) is 41.
Actress Paula Patton is 38.
Actress Amy Acker is 37. Actor
Nick Stahl is 34. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Keri Hilson is 31.
Actor Frankie Muniz is 28.
Actor Ross Bagley is 25.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


I


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun/Thursday, December 5,2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


I WORLD

Germany launches
probe into
unsolved killings
BERLIN (AP)-
Hundreds of unsolved
killings and attempted
killings in Germany over
the past two decades may
have been committed
by far-right extremists,
officials said Wednesday.
The stark admission
comes two years after
police acknowledged that
a series of murders they
had initially linked to
immigrant criminal groups
was likely the work of a
secretive neo-Nazi group.
The case prompted
a fundamental review
of Germany's security
services, including the way
they classify crimes.
An Interior Ministry
spokesman said author-
ities have completed an
initial review of more
than 3,300 unsolved cases
between 1990 and 2011,
looking for signs of a
possible far-right motive.

US halts truck
shipments through
Pakistan
PESHAWAR,
Pakistan (LA Times)
- Demonstrators at a
protest camp cheered
and chanted Wednesday
as word spread that the
Pentagon was suspending
all truck shipments to and
from Afghanistan through
Pakistan following the
activists' weeklong efforts
to disrupt the trade.
"Our workers protest
has forced the U.S. to
stop shipment of goods
through Pakistan," Khalid
Masood, provincial general
secretary of the Tehreek-e-
Insaf party that has led the
campaign, said as he sat
at the camp set up at a toll
plaza on the main highway
in Peshawar.
The activists over the
past week have stopped
big rigs bearing shipping
containers, demanding
that drivers show them
customs documents to en-
sure the shipments aren't
linked to the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.
Party workers have seized
on the shipments as a way
to protest the U.S drone
program, which is highly
controversial in Pakistan.
Many see it as a violation of
sovereignty and a means of
attack that kills unaccept-
able numbers of civilians.

Nelson Mandela
not well but still
teaching lessons
JOHANNESBURG (LA
Times) Nelson Mandela,
the former freedom fighter
and South Africa's first
democratically elected
president, now lives
at home in a sterilized
bedroom rigged as an
intensive care unit. A team
of doctors attends to him
around the clock.
And in a stark reminder
of Mandela's ongoing
health crisis, grandson
Ndaba Mandela and
daughter Makaziwe
Mandela told South African
journalists Tuesday that the
95-year-old was struggling.
"He is still with us, al-
though he is not doing well
at home in bed," Ndaba
Mandela said.
Makaziwe Mandela told
state-owned television net-
work SABC that her father
was teaching the family
life lessons from what she
termed his "deathbed."

Iran's talk of oil
export boost fuels
sanction debate


NEWYORK
(Bloomberg) Iran's
announcement this
week that it expects to
increase oil exports and
discuss new deals with
energy companies is the
latest salvo in a debate
over easing economic
sanctions on the Islamic
Republic.


A six-month agreement
struck last month among
Iran and six world powers
lifts some trade sanctions
on Iran in exchange for
the Islamic Republic
curtailing its disputed
nuclear program, with the
aim of reaching a com-
prehensive agreement
next year.
While the sanctions on
oil and banking remain,
the six countries that
still import Iranian oil
- China, India, Japan,
South Korea, Taiwan and
Turkey will be allowed
to continue buying at
current levels instead of
making further cuts.


Watchdog: France's
58 nuclear pools
must be safer
PARIS (Bloomberg) -
At each of Electricite de
France's 58 nuclear reac-
tors, there's a water tank
that stores spent atomic
fuel rods, keeping them
cool and trapping deadly
radiation. The country's
atomic watchdog is
concerned they aren't safe
enough.
"Significant safety
improvements have
to be made," Thomas
Houdre, director of
reactors at Autorite de
Surete Nucleaire, said
in an interview, making
the regulator's strongest
comments on the issue
so far. "There is no way
of managing an accident
in a spent-fuel pool. We
want the possibility of
this happening to be
practically eliminated."

Kim Jong Un's
uncle unharmed in
North Korea purge
SEOUL, South Korea
(Bloomberg) Jang
Song Thaek, the uncle
and de facto deputy of
North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un, is safe even as
it appears he has been
removed from his post,
a South Korean minister
said Wednesday.
Jang, a vice chairman
of the National Defense
Commission led by
Kim, remains physically
unharmed, Unification
Minister Ryoo Kihl Jae
told a parliamentary
hearing Wednesday in
Seoul, local television
networks reported. The
Unification Ministry later
confirmed the remarks.
"Purges are continuing
in North Korea," Ryoo
told lawmakers, without
saying how he obtained
the information.

Hong Kong
pollution surges
to toxic levels
HONG KONG
(Bloomberg) Nitrogen
dioxide readings
jumped in Hong Kong at
two roadside pollution
monitoring stations,
reaching concentrations
at which it becomes a
toxic gas.
The reading in the
downtown district
of Central was 231.8
micrograms per
cubic meter at 3 p.m.
local time, data from
the Environmental
Protection Department
show. The gas can cause
significant inflamma-
tion of the airways once
concentration levels
exceed 200 micrograms,
according to the
Geneva-based World
Health Organization.
Hong Kong is seeking
to replace old diesel
vehicles as aging buses
and trucks have led to a
worsening in air quality
since 2007. Sunny, drier
weather with milder


wind has contributed
to the build-up of
pollution in the past few
days, said Simon Ng,
head of transport and
sustainability research
at independent think-
tank Civic Exchange.


AMSTERDAM
(AP) -The European
Commission has fined
a group of major global
banks a total of 1.7 billion
euros ($2.3 billion) for
colluding to profit from
the manipulation of key
interest rates.
The banks that received
fines, which include
JPMorgan, Citigroup
and Deutsche Bank, are
accused of manipulating
for years European and
Japanese benchmark
interest rates that affect
hundreds of billions of dol-
lars in contracts globally,
from mortgages to credit
card bills.
Switzerland's UBS bank
escaped a whopping
2.5 billion-euro fine only
because it informed the
Commission, the EU's
executive arm, of a cartel's
existence and cooperated
with the subsequent
investigation.
"We want to send a
clear message that we are


In this July 30 photo the headquarters of Deutsche Bank are
pictured in Frankfurt Germany. The European Commission has
fined a group of major global banks 1.7 billion euros ($2.3 billion)
for colluding to profit from the interest rates market.


determined to find and
punish these cartels,"
competition commissioner
Joaquin Almunia said
Wednesday.
The Commission is
only the latest to punish
banks for profiting from
manipulating interest
rates, after similar cases
brought by U.S. and
national European market


regulators.
The banks regularly
contribute data to help
compile market interest
rates, which are then used
as benchmarks for loans
in the wider economy. The
banks are thought to have
profited by cooperating
to fix the rates higher
or lower depending on
whether they or their


clients held investments
in derivatives that stood to
gain.
In a first cartel, which
operated from 2005 to
2008 and was focused
on euro-denominated
derivatives, Deutsche Bank
received the largest fine, of
468 million euros, followed
by Societe Generale with
445 million euros. Royal
Bank of Scotland was fined
131 million euros.
Deutsche Bank Chief
Executive Juergen Fitschen
referred to the euro cartel
as a "legacy issue" caused
by "past practices of
individuals" at the bank.
Fitschen has worked there
since 1987 and became
CEO in 2012.
He acknowledged partic-
ipating in the cartel had
been a "gross violation" of
the bank's ethics. But he
said the fine wouldn't hurt
the bank's profits as it has
already made provisions
for fines it deems likely
from regulators.


Hezbollah commander killed at home


BEIRUT (AP)-
Gunmen assassinated a
senior Hezbollah com-
mander after he parked
his car in his apartment
building's garage
Wednesday in Lebanon's
capital, a major breach of
the Shiite militant group's
security as it struggles to
maintain multiple fronts
while it fights alongside
President Bashar Assad's
forces in Syria.
The killing of Hassan
al-Laqis, 53, was the
latest in a series of
attacks against the
Iranian-backed group
whose heavy-handed and
very open involvement
in the civil war next
door has enraged the
overwhelmingly Sunni
rebels seeking to oust
Assad and fueled sectar-
ian tensions across the
region.
The militant group


quickly blamed its main
enemy Israel, which has
a history of taking out
Hezbollah leaders but
denied any responsibili-
ty. Suspicion also fell on
Sunni rivals who have
claimed responsibility
for recent deadly car
bombings in Hezbollah
strongholds and a
double suicide attack
targeting the Iranian
Embassy in Beirut last
month.
Al-Laqis' killing came
shortly after Hezbollah
leader Sheik Hassan
Nasrallah accused Saudi
Arabia of being behind
the embassy bombings,
which killed 23 people,
in a three-hour interview
with a local television sta-
tion. Nasrallah indirectly
suggested an alliance
between Israel and Saudi
Arabia was trying to
destabilize the group.


The killing and other
attacks underscored
how the Shiite militia
has found itself mired
into fronts: Shoring up
Assad's rule in Syria,
and against the Jewish
state. Hezbollah's fight
in Syria marked a strate-
gic shift for the fiercely
anti-Israel group, one
that some of its most
loyal supporters in
the Shiite community
have been reluctant to
embrace.
It has emboldened
the group's critics in
the Arab world and its
Western-backed political
opponents in Lebanon
who blame it for
dragging Lebanon into
Syria's war, which pits
the mainly Sunni rebels
against Assad, who
belongs to the Alawite
sect, a Shiite offshoot.
The fighting has


stoked Lebanon's Sunni-
Shiite tensions, as each
community in Lebanon
lines up in support of
its brethren on the rival
sides in Syria. That has
fueled predictions that
the country, still recover-
ing from its 15-year civil
war that ended in 1990,
is on the brink of col-
lapsing into full-blown
sectarian bloodletting of
its own.
In Lebanon's sec-
ond-largest city, Tripoli,
bloody street battles
between rival sides has
become a near-daily
affair, with at least 12
people killed over three
days last week.
Al-Laqis, described as
a founding member of
the group, was killed as
he returned home from
work about midnight,
Hezbollah said in a
statement.


Argentina grapples with most polluted river


BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina (AP) -The pic-
turesque La Boca district
draws hordes of tourists
to stroll its narrow streets
lined with colorful build-
ings and eat at outdoor
restaurants. Now it has
a new, unwanted claim
to fame: The Riachuelo
river flowing through the
neighborhood has been
named one of the planet's
10 dirtiest places.
Thousands of people
live along the river, and
environmentalists say a
court-ordered cleanup
of decades of industrial
pollution and sewage has
made little progress in five
years. Many residents still
need to be relocated under
the court ruling, and toxic
substances are still empty-
ing into the Riachuelo.
On a recent day, tourists
ambled along the Caminito
walkway full of souvenir
shops and cafes amid the
funk emanating from the
river about 700 feet away.
Although the odor of the
brown-gray river can be


Drs. McCormick, Laird
& Danielson

Welcome
PODIATRIST
Dr. Barbara Buckley


overpowering some days,
the historic district, which
is known as a tango hotspot
and home of the popular
soccer team Boca Juniors,
remains one of Buenos
Aires' top tourist draws.
"I smell it from my
home, just a few blocks
away, and I often have to
keep the windows closed,"
said Edgardo Gomez.
"When are they going to
finish this cleanup plan?"
Many are asking the
same question. About
3.5 million people live
in the southern districts
of Buenos Aires and the
14 nearby municipalities
as the river flows some
40 miles from Buenos
Aires province to just
south of the capital.
A report by the envi-
ronmental activist groups
Blacksmith Institute and
Green Cross of Switzerland
stirred up Argentines by
ranking the river as the
eighth most polluted place
in the world.
The study says makers
of chemical products are


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responsible for more than
a third of the contamina-
tion, and says tests indicate
80 percent of water taken
from wells near the river is
not safe.
The study does say
several cleanup programs
are making some "prog-
ress" with support from
the World Bank About
20,000 people live near
the river basin, while
15,000 industries discharge
effluent into the river, the
report says.
Environment Secretary
Juan Jose Mussi last week
accused the media and
the report of exaggerating
the river's condition. But


he also concedes the
pollution problem is "not
solved."
Can the Riachuelo be
saved? Experts say yes,
although much needs to
be done.
"There's a long-term,
high-cost solution that
could take decades," said
Raul Estrada Oyuela, a
member of Argentina's
Environmental Sciences
Academy.
"This requires political
will and thorough mea-
sures," Estrada Oyuela
said. One of the measures
would be a strict restriction
on dumping pollutants
and raw sewage.


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Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, December 5,2013


December stocks trudge amid



contrasting economic news


NEWYORK(AP) -The
stock market continued its
sluggish start to the month
onWednesday.
The broader market fell
for the fourth straight day,
its longest losing streak in
more than two months. A
payroll company reported
that U.S. businesses last
month added the most
jobs in a year, and investors
worried that the latest sign
of growth could mean the
Fed begins pulling back on
its stimulus sooner than
expected.
Sears fell sharply after its
CEO reduced his stake in
the department store chain.
The latest bout of
investor anxiety about
the Fed's plans comes
ahead of the government's
closely watched monthly
employment report on


Friday The Fed's $85 billion
in monthly bond purchases
have supported financial
markets and given inves-
tors an incentive to buy
stocks by making bonds
seem relatively expensive.
After surging this year,
stocks have had a slow start
to December, usually one
of the strongest months for
the market. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index has
dropped 0.7 percent so far,
paring its gain for the year
to 25.7 percent. Even so,
the market's surge has left
some investors nervous.
They don't want to add to
their holdings when the
market may have reached
a peak.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 24.85 points, or
0.2 percent, to 15,889.77.
The S&P 500 index fell


2.34 points, or 0.1 percent,
to 1,792.81. The Nasdaq
composite edged up 0.80
point to 4,038.
As stocks slumped,
the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to its
highest level in more than
two months.
"Things have been
up and down," said Bob
Gavlak, a wealth adviser
with Strategic Wealth
Partners. "There's some
general angst about wheth-
er the market is overvalued
and when is it going to
come back down."
Sears fell $4.63, or
8.3 percent, to $50.92
after the company's CEO,
billionaire hedge-fund
manager Eddie Lampert,
reduced his stake in the
department store chain to
less than half.


I BUSINESS BRIEFS

Private-sector Researcher sees Microsoft reports
job growth tablet market record Xbox One
surprisingly strong growth dropoff sales since Nov. 22


(LA Times) The pri-
vate-sector labor market
heated up significantly
last month as companies
added 215,000 jobs, the
most in a year, in a sur-
prisingly positive sign for
the economic recovery,
payroll processor ADP
said Wednesday.
The figure beat econ-
omists' expectations of
185,000 net new pri-
vate-sector jobs.
Job growth for October
also was revised up
significantly to 184,000,
from ADP's initial re-
port of a disappointing
130,000, indicating that
companies' ability to
weather the partial feder-
al government shutdown
and the political battle
over raising the debt limit
that month was better
than expected.


(Bloomberg) -Apple
Inc.'s iPads and other tablet
computers are flying off the
shelf this holiday season.
Starting next year, growth is
expected to slow.
Tablet shipments will
climb 54 percent this year
to 221.3 million, before
decelerating to 22 percent
growth in 2014 and less than
10 percent in 2017, research-
er IDC saidWednesday
The popularity of smart-
phones with bigger screens
and the market saturation
of tablets will spur the
slowdown, said IDC, which
previously estimated 2013
shipments of 227.4 million.
This year, tablets are among
the most popular holiday
gift items after Apple,
Samsung Electronics and
Amazon.com introduced
new devices in time for the
shopping rush.


(Bloomberg) SAN
FRANCISCO -
Microsoft said it's selling
every Xbox One player it
can make, after intro-
ducing the new game
console on Nov. 22.
Sales are setting
records, the Redmond,
Wash.-based software
maker said Tuesday in a
statement, without being
more specific. Users
have already spent more
than 50 million hours
on games and entertain-
ment, Microsoft said.
"Demand is far
exceeding supply in
the 13 countries we've
launched and we are
sold out at retailers
around the world," Yusuf
Mehdi, vice president of
strategy and marketing
for Xbox, said in the
statement.


Online sho


dangers to avoil


If mall parking lots are
your waking nightmare
this time of year, you're
probably planning to do at
least some of your holiday
shopping online. But Con-
sumer Reports warns that
there are risks that come
with the convenience.
Rip-off retailers, faulty
merchandise, ID theft
- last Christmas, online
shoppers griped about
those and other problems,
according to the Plum Tree
Group, an e-commerce
consulting company, and
Infegy, a market research
company.
Consumer Reports
notes some of the most
serious online shopping
dangers and how to avoid
them:
The website is shady.
Just because a website
looks legitimate doesn't
mean it is. Some are scams
set up to steal your identi-
ty, your credit card infor-
mation or both. Others sell
counterfeit goods. And still
others engage in unethical
practices, such as luring
you in with low prices they
honor only if you buy extra
items, or quietly adding
unexpected charges based
on fine print disclosures
they know you won't read.
What to do: Before
shopping with an un-
familiar online retailer,
look it up at the Better
Business Bureau (bbb.org).
Check its rating, look for
complaints made against
it and confirm that it
has an address. See what
others are saying about
the business by searching
the Internet with the
website name and such
terms as "complaints" and
"reviews." Use a credit
card rather than a debit
card so that you can more


Consumer

Reports


easily dispute a charge if
there are any shenanigans.
And read the retailer's
conditions carefully.
The goods you get are
defective. The fine print
on retail websites typically
says that all products are
sold as is, something that's
rarely seen in walk-in
stores. That means the
sites are disclaiming the
so-called implied warranty
of merchantability, an
unwritten assurance that
generally gives you the
right to reject defective
merchandise, even
months after purchase.
Many sites that
Consumer Reports
checked say that custom-
ers can return defective
items during the stated
return period, often 30
days. After that, many
tell you to deal directly
with the manufacturer,
which may make you
ship the item back at
your own expense and
wait perhaps weeks for a
refurbished replacement.
Another concern is
that a website may not
be an authorized dealer
for the products it sells.
Those "gray market"
items probably aren't
covered by a manufac-
turer's warranty.
What to do: Verify that
the site is an authorized
dealer by reading the
product description and
terms and conditions,
or by asking the manu-
facturer. The only way to
ensure that you'll receive
your full warranty rights
is to shop in a walk-in
store, but if you buy


online and discover a
defect late, contact the
retailer anyway. The store
might not want to lose
your future business,
even if it means stretch-
ing the limits of its policy.
The site is
loosey-goosey with your
personal info. After
buying a product online,
the last thing you want
is a lot of spam from
the merchant or from
companies to which it
sold your info.
What to do: Before
giving personal data,
read the site's privacy
policy. Many retailers
let you elect to receive
offers or have your info
shared. But others make
the agreement auto-
matic unless you take
action, such as clearing
checked boxes. So be
observant. And limit
the info you provide to
what's critical for com-
pleting the purchase.
Your payments are
intercepted or your
computer catches a virus.
Providing credit card infor-
mation over an unsecured
connection or surfing the
Web with an unprotected
computer or smartphone
is asking for trouble.
What to do: Verify that
the retailer is using a
secured connection by
making sure that its Web
address starts with the
"https" prefix (note the
"s") and that there is a
locked padlock icon on
your browser's status
bar. That's especially
important if you're using
aWi-Fi hot spot, though
you are better off not
sending financial or
personal information via
hot spots or on public
computers.


MutualFunds


3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 19.36 -.04 +9.3
EqGrow b 32.25 -.05 +11.8
Retinc b 8.62 -.03 +3.9
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.69 -.01 +12.6
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 51.89 +.05 +18.9
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 35.04 -.15 +18.2
Alpine
DynBal d 12.50 -.05 +7.6
DynDiv d 3.79 +.04 +3.7
Amana
Growth b 31.91 -.04 +9.5
Income b 42.79 -.12 +12.9
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 28.35 -.02 +16.3
American Century
CapVallv 8.72 -.02 +16.0
Eqlnclnv 9.01 -.01 +11.6
HiYldMu 8.78 -.03 +5.4
InTTxFBInv 11.19 -.02 +3.5
InvGrlnv 33.49 +.01 +12.8
Ultralnv 34.29 ... +15.7
American Funds
AMCAPA m 28.12 -.09 +16.2
BalA m 23.92 -.04 +12.9
BondA m 12.45 -.03 +3.3
CaplncBuA m 57.57 -.17 +9.4
CapWdBdA m 20.23 -.04 +2.6
CpWIdGrIA m 44.12 -.17 +10.5
EurPacGrA m 47.77 -.33 +6.6
FnlnvA m 51.11 -.08 +14.3
GIbBalA m 30.28 -.07 NA
GrthAmA m 44.29 -.05 +14.8
HilncA m 11.32 ... +7.7
IncAmerA m 20.30 -.04 +11.5
IntBdAmA m 13.48 -.02 +1.6
InvCoAmA m 38.10 -.08 +14.2
MutualA m 34.71 -.09 +14.3
NewEconA m 39.34 -.10 +18.1
NewPerspA m 38.24 -.16 +11.7
NwWrldA m 58.81 -.29 +3.8
SmCpWldA m 50.40 -.13 +10.4
TaxEBdAmA m 12.38 -.03 +4.6
WAMutlnvA m 39.27 -.08 +16.4
Artisan
Intl d 29.32 -.18 +12.0
IntlVal d 35.51 -.23 +14.1
MdCpVal 26.23 -.11 +16.4
MidCap 45.70 -.05 +16.1
BBH
TaxEffEq d 21.46 -.02 +16.6
Baron
Asset b 59.69 +.02 +15.2
Growth b 69.90 -.19 +18.1
Partners b 32.01 -.13 +17.8
Berkshire
Focus d 19.48 +.15 +15.2
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.95 -.08 -1.7
EqDivA m 23.57 -.05 +13.4
EqDivl 23.63 -.05 +13.7
GlobAIcA m 21.94 -.04 +6.4
GlobAlcC m 20.35 -.04 +5.6
GlobAlcl 22.06 -.04 +6.7
HiYldBdls 8.29 ... +10.0
HiYldSvc b 8.29 ... +9.7
Bruce
Bruce 456.55 -1.89 +11.3
CGM
Focus 38.06 +.03 +3.7
Clipper
Clipper 89.20 -.10 +15.3


Cohen & Steers
Realty 64.96 +.38 +8.7
Columbia
AcornlntZ 47.66 -.11 +8.1
AcornZ 37.86 ... +13.4
DivlncZ 18.11 -.04 +15.1
IntlVIB m 14.59 -.07 +5.3
Mar21CB m 16.70 +.01 +11.0
MarGrlA m 27.77 ... +13.5
DFA
lYrFixInI 10.33 +.6
2YrGIbFII 10.07 +.8
5YrGIbFII 11.14 -.01 +2.8
EmMkCrEql 19.40 -.08 -1.8
EmMktVall 28.00 -.12 -4.4
IntCorEql 12.40 -.05 +7.3
IntSmCapl 19.87 -.07 +10.3
IntlSCol 19.21 -.06 +8.9
IntlValul 19.13 -.10 +5.5
RelEstScI 26.22 +.13 +9.6
USCorEqll 16.12 -.02 +16.5
USCorEq21 16.01 -.02 +16.7
USLgCo 14.19 -.02 +15.9
USLgVall 30.72 -.06 +18.9
USMicrol 20.25 -.07 +18.4
USSmVall 35.66 -.09 +17.1
USSmaII 30.87 -.08 +17.6
USTgtVallnst 23.30 -.03 +17.0
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.36 ... +1.9
EqDivB m 41.71 +.01 +10.9
GIbOA m 46.96 -.13 +10.9
GIbOB m 41.52 -.13 +10.0
GIbOC m 41.81 -.12 +10.0
GIbOS d 48.54 -.14 +11.2
GrlncS 23.92 -.03 +16.0
HlthCareS d 37.25 -.16 +23.4
LAEqS d 28.69 -.27 -7.5
LC2020S 15.32 -.04 +7.8
StrHiYldTxFS 11.82 -.04 +4.5
Davis
NYVentA m 41.67 -.06 +12.7
NYVentY 42.20 -.05 +13.0
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.31 -.02 +3.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 96.42 -.08 +14.4
Income 13.60 -.03 +4.4
IntlStk 41.94 -.35 +7.7
Stock 163.50 -.08 +18.0
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.89 ... +6.0
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 51.07 -.17 +12.7
MidCapldx 37.11 -.04 +14.6
MuniBd 11.16 -.02 +4.0
NYTaxEBd 14.33 -.04 +3.1
ShTrmlncD 10.66 -.01 +2.0
SmCoVal 38.66 ... +15.4
Driehaus
Actrvelnc 10.79 +.01 +2.3
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 13.09 -.01 +13.0
TMSmCaB m 20.01 -.05 +12.0
FMI
CommStk 30.43 -.04 +14.5
LgCap 21.46 -.03 +14.5
FPA
Capital d 47.49 +.07 +10.9
Cres d 33.45 -.02 +11.5
Newlnc d 10.36 ... +1.7
Fairholme Funds
Farhome d 41.37 -.17 +9.0
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.84 -.01 +8.7
IntSmMCoA m 47.56 -.16 +8.5
KaufmanA m 6.79 ... +11.9
MDTMdCpGrStB m41.49-.12 +10.9
StrVall x 5.73 -.05 +14.4


Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.54 -.02 +4.8
AstMgr50 18.18 -.03 +7.9
Bal 22.58 -.01 +11.2
BIChGrow 62.50 +.06 +16.1
Canada d 57.15 -.37 +1.1
CapApr 38.38 -.05 +16.3
Caplnc d 9.83 -.01 +7.9
Contra 99.77 -.04 +14.9
DryGrow 35.38 -.05 +12.9
Drrlntl d 35.88 -.17 +7.9
EmergAsia d 30.81 -.19 +2.2
EmgMkt d 23.67 -.21 -2.2
Eqlnc 57.52 -.14 +13.0
Eqlnc II 23.96 -.05 +13.2
FF2015 12.87 -.02 +7.1
FF2035 13.53 -.02 +9.4
FF2040 9.53 -.01 +9.5
Fidelity 42.57 -.02 +13.7
FRtRtHiln d 9.99 ... +4.4
FocStk 20.01 +.03 +16.7
FourlnOne 35.33 -.07 +12.0
Free2000 12.69 -.02 +4.3
Free2010 15.41 -.02 +6.9
Free2020 15.78 -.02 +7.6
Free2025 13.42 -.02 +8.6
Free2030 16.29 -.03 +8.8
GNMA 11.24 -.03 +2.7
GrowGo 124.30 +.18 +17.1
Growlnc 27.21 -.06 +17.2
Hilnc d 9.42 ... +8.4
Indepndnc 34.84 ... +13.1
IntRelEst d 10.22 -.02 +8.9
IntlDisc d 39.45 -.26 +7.9
InvGrdBd 7.70 -.02 +4.0
LatinAm d 37.24 -.34 -10.4
LevCoSt d 41.77 -.06 +16.2
LowPnriStk d 49.42 -.03 +17.0
Magellan 95.80 ... +11.9
MeCpSto 15.29 -.02 +17.8
MidCap d 38.80 -.11 +15.7
Munilnc d 12.70 -.03 +4.4
NewMlle 39.87 -.07 +16.9
NewMktln d 15.63 -.04 +5.8
OTC 77.54 +.31 +16.6
Overseas d 38.98 -.24 +8.9
Puritan 21.23 -.02 +11.1
ShTmBond 8.60 ... +1.6
SmCapDisc d 31.56 -.08 +20.8
Stratinc 10.99 -.02 +5.2
TaxFrB d 10.97 -.03 +4.6
TotalBd 10.47 -.02 +4.3
USBdldx 11.41 -.02 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.41 -.02 +3.0
Value 100.72 -.13 +15.7
ValueDis 21.26 -.02 +16.0
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 71.61 +.20 +14.5
IntlCapAB m 12.56 -.08 +7.7
LmtdTermBondA m 11.48-.01 +3.2
LmtdTermBondB m 11.46-.02 +2.4
LrgCapA m 27.92 -.05 +18.3
LrgCapB m 26.06 -.04 +17.4
NewlnsA m 29.14 -.02 +13.9
Newlnsl 29.56 -.02 +14.2
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 177.27 -.09 +39.7
Electron d 59.49 +.05 +8.2
Energy d 62.03 -.06 +8.5
Gold d 17.73 +.42 -29.7
HealtCar d 197.59 -1.30 +26.8
Leisure d 135.03 -.11 +17.0
Materials d 83.34 +.32 +10.4
MedDeliv d 74.61 -.37 +18.1
MedEqSys d 37.65 -.42 +16.7
NatGas d 38.06 -.20 +6.7
NatRes d 37.51 -.02 +4.7
Wireless d 10.16 -.02 +13.2
Fidelity Spartan
5001cdxbAdvtg 63.78 -.06 +16.0
5001dxlnstl 63.78 -.07 NA
5001dxlnv 63.77 -.07 +15.9
ExtMktldAg d 52.67 -.03 +15.9
IntlldxAdg d 40.24 -.21 +7.8


TotMktldAg d 53.04
First Eagle
GIbA m 54.53
OverseasA m 24.02
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.40
TotalRetA m 19.26
Firsthand
e-Comm 8.06
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.73


-.05 +16.0

-.21 +8.7
-.16 +6.4

-.03 +9.0
-.04 +11.8

+.06 +9.9
-.03 +4.5


FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 6.91 -.02 +4.7
EqlnA m 22.35 ... +13.5
FLTFA m 10.81 -.04 +2.8
GrOppA m 28.95 +.02 +12.9
GrowthA m 63.07 -.08 +13.3
HYTFA m 9.82 -.03 +4.4
Income C m 2.40 ... +9.7
IncomeA m 2.38 ... +10.4
IncomeAdv 2.36 ... +10.4
NYTFA m 11.17 -.02 +3.1
RisDvA m 47.25 -.17 +14.9
StrlncA m 10.54 -.01 +6.1
TotalRetA m 9.94 -.03 +4.2
USGovA m 6.48 -.02 +2.2
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 35.00 -.08 +11.4
DiscovA m 34.44 -.09 +11.1
SharesZ 27.97 -.06 +13.5
SharesA m 27.69 -.06 +13.1
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBond C m 13.06 ... +4.4
GIBondA m 13.03 ... +4.8
GIBondAdv 12.99 ... +5.1
GrowthA m 24.55 -.10 +13.9
WorldA m 19.84 -.11 +13.6
GE
S&SUSEq 58.20 -.03 +15.3
GMO
EmgMktsVl d 10.93 -.07 -2.7
IntltVllV 25.04 -.07 +8.0
Quill 26.93 -.03 +16.1
QuVI 26.96 -.03 +16.3
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 65.83 -.14 +14.5
EqlncomeAAA m 27.77 -.05 +14.1
Value m 19.36 -.03 +14.8
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.37 -.01 +8.8
MidCpVals 50.50 -.01 +13.8
ShDuGovA m 10.19 ... +.4
Harbor
Bond 12.18 -.04 +3.7
CapAplnst 56.03 +.02 +15.5
Intllnstl 69.59 -.27 +7.3
Intllnv b 68.71 -.27 +6.9
Hartford
CapAprA m 46.99 -.07 +12.6
CpApHLSIA 58.09 -.08 +13.0
SmallCoB m 21.50 -.06 +14.2
Heartland
ValuePlus m 37.92 -.22 +12.0
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 16.15 -.07 +13.7
Hodges
Hodges m 35.06 -.16 +17.1
INVESCO
CharterA m 22.36 -.02 +13.1
ComstockA m 23.09 -.03 +16.4
Divlnclnv b 18.60 -.03 +12.8
EnergyA m 44.93 -.13 +3.7
Energylnv b 44.77 -.13 +3.7
EqlncomeA m 11.07 -.02 +11.7
EuroGrA m 38.82 -.20 +11.2
GIbGrB m 27.83 -.10 +9.6
GrowlncA m 26.92 -.07 +14.6
GrwthAIIA m 13.49 -.03 +9.3
PacGrowB m 22.12 -.11 +.9
SmCapEqA m 17.40 -.01 +15.4
Techlnv b 39.33 +.17 +9.1
USMortA m 12.37 -.05 +2.6


Ivy
AssetSTrB m 29.75
AssetStrA m 30.86
AssetStrC m 29.90
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.61
CoreBondA m 11.61
CoreBondSelect 11.60
HighYldSel 8.20
LgCapGrA m 30.51
LgCapGrSelect 30.51
MidCpVall 35.78
ShDurBndSel 10.92
USLCpCrPS 29.25
Janus
BalC m 30.14
ContrT 20.27
EntrprsT 83.28
FlexBdS b 10.51
GIbValT d 14.54
HiYIdT 9.37
OverseasT 37.50
PerkinsMCVL 26.47
PerkinsMCVT 26.18
PerkinsSCVL 26.71
ShTmBdT 3.08
T 40.01
USCrT 20.13
VentureT 73.30
John Hancock
AfBal b 15.27
AfGrl b 16.04
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d 19.03
Litman Gregory
MaslntllntIl 17.57
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 32.91
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 15.16
BdR b 15.09
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 15.27
BondDebA m 8.27
ShDurlncA m 4.57
ShDurlncC m 4.60
MFS
IslntlEq 21.98
MAInvB m 26.51
TotRetA m 17.39
ValueA m 32.70
Valuel 32.86
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 6.05
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 108.89
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 14.17
PBMaxTrmS 21.09
WrldOppA 8.90
Marsico
21stCent m 19.23
HexCap m 19.30
Merger
Merger b 16.28
Meridian
MeridnGr d 35.74
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.63
TotRtBd b 10.64
Midas Funds
Magic m 24.70
Midas m 1.36
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 47.39
MdCpGrl 46.06
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 67.87
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.19
LSStratlncA m 16.21


-.14 +8.5
-.15 +9.3
-.14 +8.5

-.03 +3.6
-.02 +3.2
-.03 +3.4
... +8.4
-.05 +14.1
-.05 +14.3
-.08 +17.5
-.01 +1.1
-.01 +15.7
-.06 +9.6
-.06 +12.1
-.14 +14.5
-.02 +4.4
-.05 +11.7
-.01 +8.5
-.06 -5.8
-.04 +10.8
-.04 +10.6
-.09 +10.6
... +2.0
-.12 +12.2
-.05 +16.9
-.12 +18.3
-.02 +8.9
-.02 +10.1
-.16

-.15 +6.4
-.04 +14.5

-.03 +8.0
-.04 +7.7

-.02 +12.6
... +8.3
.. +3.8
+.. 3.1
-.13 +8.9
-.03 +14.2
-.04 +10.4
-.09 +16.1
-.09 +16.4

-.01 +8.4
-.19 +18.2

-.02 +6.0
-.02 +10.6
-.05 +5.1
+.02 +11.9
... +16.2

... +2.7

-.07 +13.0
-.03 +5.7
-.02 +5.5
-.05 +18.8
+.03 -36.8
+11 +13.9
+.06 +11.1
+.01 +12.1

-.04 +6.0
-.03 +8.8


LSStratlncC m 16.31 -.02 +8.0
Needham
Growth m 43.45 -.12 +10.6
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 64.47 -.12 +16.5
SmCpGrlnv 26.84 -.01 +15.1
Northeast Investors
Growth 20.20 ... +8.9


Northern
HYFixlnc d 7.62
Stkldx 22.34
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.44
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.73
HlthSinces 19.39
PinOakEq 44.43
RedOakTec 14.20
Oakmark
EqlncI 34.43
Global I 30.35
Intl I 26.23
Oakmark I 64.21
Select I 40.89
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp 17.45
LgCpStr 12.16
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 37.36
DevMktY 37.04
FdMuniA m 14.55
GlobA m 78.42
IntlBondA m 6.05
IntlGrY 36.61
ManStrA m 46.57
SrFItRatA m 8.41
StrlncA m 4.12
Osterweis
OsterStrlnc d 11.94
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.20
AIIAssetl 12.27
AIIAuthIn 10.20
ComRIRStl 5.59
Divlnclnst 11.54
EMktCurl 10.09
EmMktslns 10.99
ForBdlnstl 10.65
HiYldls 9.61
LowDrls 10.37
RealRet 11.11
ShtTermls 9.88
TotRetA m 10.83
TotRetAdm b 10.83
TotRetC m 10.83
TotRetls 10.83
TotRetrnD b 10.83
TotlRetnP 10.83


... +8.9
-.02 +15.9
-.02 +3.5

+.01 +6.8
-.17 +20.3
-.09 +17.1
... +16.4

-.09 +10.7
-.18 +12.1
-.19 +12.7
-.12 +18.2
+.04 +18.3

-.06 +10.3
-.03 +6.5

-.08 +2.6
-.07 +3.0
-.06 +3.3
-.33 +10.8
-.01 +1.9
-.10 +11.5
-.04 +14.7
... +5.9
... +4.6

-.01 +6.4

-.02 +4.5
-.03 +6.0
-.02 +4.6
+.02 -4.4
-.02 +5.9
... +.3
-.02 +4.4
-.01 +6.2
... +8.3
... +2.7
-.07 +3.5
... +1.5
-.03 +3.8
-.03 +3.9
-.03 +3.0
-.03 +4.2
-.03 +3.9
-.03 +4.1


PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 29.45 -.11 +22.8
Growth 23.67 -.05 +16.4
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 35.60 -.09 +16.7
Permanent
Portfolio 47.31 +.31 +2.6
Pioneer
PioneerA m 37.98 -.10 +14.7
Principal
LJT20201 14.30 -.04 +9.3
LCGrllnst 12.99 -.01 +15.8
SAMConGrA m 17.67 -.05 +11.1
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 23.84 -.02 +12.5
IntlEqtyC m 7.00 -.03 +7.0
JenMidCapGrZ 40.03 -.08 +14.0
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.23 +.01 +2.9
GrowlncA m 19.34 ... +15.5
IntlNewB m 17.04 -.10 +5.6
SmCpValA m 14.91 -.03 +15.3


Stocks of Local Interest


Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 33.11
Reynolds
BlueChip b 74.92
Royce
PAMutlnv d 14.94
Premierlnv d 23.41
ValueSvc m 13.99
Rydex
Electrlnv 60.75
HlthCrAdv b 23.60
NsdqlOOlv 20.71
Schwab
1000l1nv d 49.34
S&P500Sel d 28.42
Scout
Internal 36.09
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 42.94
Sequoia
Sequoia 212.90
State Farm
Growth 67.11
Stratton
SmCapVal d 72.75
T Rowe Price
Balanced 23.71
BIChpGr 61.90
CapApprec 26.61
Corplnc 9.66
EmMktStk d 32.18
Eqlndex d 48.47
Eqtylnc 32.92
FinSer 19.95
GIbTech 13.40
GrowStk 50.38
HealthSc 60.76
HiYield d 7.15
InsLgCpGr 26.14
IntlBnd d 9.51
IntlEqldx d 13.38
IntlGrlnc d 15.32
IntlStk d 15.90
MediaTele 71.62
MidCapVa 30.42
MidCpGr 74.28
NJTaxFBd 11.45
NewAmGro 47.52
NewAsia d 16.65
NewEra 46.82
NewHornz 47.35
Newlncome 9.39
OrseaStk d 9.96
R2015 14.53
R2025 15.42
R2035 16.19
Rtmt2010 18.12
Rtmt2020 20.61
Rtmt2030 22.62
Rtmt2040 23.28
SciTech 36.88
ShTmBond 4.79
SmCpStk 45.14
SmCpVal d 50.16
SpecGrow 24.07
Speclnc 12.90
SumGNMA 9.55
SumMulnc 11.14
TaxEfMult d 20.02
TaxFShlnt 5.64
Value 35.09
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.07
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 13.94
IntlE d 19.06
Target
SmCapVal 28.12
Templeton
InFEqSeS 22.66
Third Avenue
Value d 57.96


-.04 +16.3
-.08 +11.9

-.04 +13.6
-.04 +11.8
-.02 +8.6
+.01 +2.4
-.13 +19.9
+.02 +16.7
-.04 +15.6
-.03 +15.9

-.26 +5.8
-.09 +14.7

-.85 +19.0
+.01 +11.3

+.08 +17.0
-.05 +10.8
-.04 +17.9
-.03 +13.3
-.03 +5.6
-.19 -2.4
-.05 +15.7
... +15.1
-.03 +14.9
+.02 +17.0
-.06 +16.5
-.27 +31.0
... +9.3
+.01 +17.6
-.03 +1.8
-.08 +7.2
-.09 +7.4
-.06 +5.4
+.08 +18.8
-.04 +14.3
-.13 +14.7
-.03 +4.1
-.02 +15.4
-.11 +2.6
... +.7
-.02 +22.4
-.01 +3.2
-.07 +8.4
-.03 +9.2
-.03 +10.9
-.04 +12.0
-.03 +8.1
-.04 +10.1
-.04 +11.6
-.05 +12.3
+.20 +12.5
-.01 +1.4
-.08 +17.4
-.14 +15.8
-.05 +13.1
-.02 +5.8
-.03 +2.2
-.03 +4.6
-.02 +15.0
-.01 +2.2
-.04 +17.5

-.01 +6.3
-.02 +16.0
-.09 +7.8
-.07 +15.3
-.17 +7.7
-.24 +6.5


Thompson
LargeCap 46.01 -.05 +15.0
Thornburg
IncBldA m 20.38 -.09 +8.8
IncBldC m 20.38 -.08 +8.1
IntlValA m 30.51 -.24 +4.4
IntlVall 31.18 -.25 +4.8
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.00 -.03 +5.3
MidCapGrA m 21.72 -.02 +9.7
Tocqueville
Gold m 32.69 +.87 -26.9
Turner
SmCapGr 45.98 ... +14.0
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 27.00 -.17 +10.7
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 5.83 +.08 -30.0
GlobRes m 9.50 ... -4.4
USAA
CorstnMod 14.79 -.02 +6.7
GNMA 9.90 -.02 +2.0
Growlnc 21.08 -.01 +13.8
HYOpp d 8.84 -.01 +9.3
PrcMtlMin 12.91 +34 -30.3
SciTffech 19.97 +.02 +17.4
TaxELgTm 13.01 -.04 +5.3
TgtRt2040 13.25 -.04 +8.6
TgtRt2050 12.99 -.03 +8.6
WorldGro 26.47 -.15 +13.8
Unified
Winlnv m 17.15 -.07 +7.7
Value Line
PremGro b 35.21 -.09 +15.1
Vanguard
500Adml 165.93 -.17 +16.0
5001nv 165.90 -.17 +15.8
BalldxAdm 27.14 -.04 +11.0
Balldxlns 27.14 -.04 +11.1
CAITAdml 11.29 -.02 +4.8
CapOp 46.70 -.15 +16.2
CapOpAdml 107.91 -.33 +16.2
Convrt 14.55 +.01 +8.5
DevMktsldxlP 118.53 -.60 +7.8
DivGr 21.01 -.09 +16.5
EmMktlAdm 33.80 -.16 -2.4
EnergyAdm 127.30 -.53 +6.6
Eqlnc 29.86 -.06 +17.6
EqlncAdml 62.60 -.13 +17.8
ExplAdml 102.27 -.17 +17.1
Explr 109.80 -.18 +16.9
ExtdldAdm 61.01 -.02 +16.2
Extdldlst 61.02 -.01 +16.2
ExtdMktldxlP 150.60 -.05 NA
FAWeUSIns 97.14 -.47 +5.0
FAWeUSInv 19.44 -.10 +4.8
GNMA 10.46 -.03 +2.5
GNMAAdml 10.46 -.03 +2.6
GIbEq 22.91 -.11 +10.9
Grolnc 38.61 -.05 +16.5
GrthldAdm 46.20 -.04 +15.6
Grthlstld 46.20 -.04 +15.6
GrthlstSg 42.78 -.04 +15.6
HYCorAdml 6.03 -.01 +8.8
HItCrAdml 82.21 -.50 +22.2
HlthCare 194.80 -1.17 +22.2
MTBondAdm 11.28 -.03 +4.4
ITGradeAd 9.82 -.02 +4.9
InfPrtAdm 25.87 -.14 +3.4
InfPrtl 10.54 -.05 +3.4
InflaPro 13.17 -.07 +3.3
Instldxl 164.84 -.17 +16.0
InstPlus 164.85 -.18 +16.0
InstTStPI 41.14 -.04 +16.2
IntlGr 22.71 -.08 +7.4
IntlGrAdm 72.30 -.27 +7.5
IntlStklcbdxAdm 27.38 -.13 +4.9
IntlStkldxl 109.51 -.52 +5.0
IntlStkldxlPIs 109.53 -.52 +5.0
IntlStkldxlSgn 32.85 -.15 +4.9
IntlVal 36.66 -.18 +7.1
LTGradeAd 9.68 -.05 +7.6
LgCpldxlnv 33.30 -.03 +15.7


52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 -0- 20.19 19.18 +.10 +0.5 V A A +34.9 +49.5 dd
Arkansas Bst ABFS 8.11 34.11 34.39 +.65 +1.9 A A A +260.1 +307.0 dd 0.12
Bank of America BAC 9.77 15.98 15.63 +.10 +0.6 V A A +34.6 +58.9 21 0.04
Beam Inc BEAM 56.03 -- 70.63 66.65 -.15 -0.2 V V A +9.1 +19.7 27 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 31.44 39.95 35.55 -.30 -0.8 V V A -3.3 -2.7 25 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 -- 19.95 18.72 -.05 -0.3 A A A +1.4 +1.5 19 0.30f
Cracker Barrel CBRL 60.17 -- 118.63 105.58 -.99 -0.9 V V A +64.3 +78.9 21 3.00
Disney DIS 48.55 71.69 69.97 +.07 +0.1 V A A +40.5 +43.3 20 0.86f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 50.74 -0- 73.44 70.30 -.86 -1.2 V A A +29.8 +42.4 19 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 28.43 -0- 44.49 41.75 -.40 -0.9 V V A +42.9 +42.7 31 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 3.77 3.78 +.28 +8.0 A A A +16.0 +7.0 dd
Harris Corp HRS 41.08- 0 65.87 64.72 +.51 +0.8 A A A +32.2 +41.7 22 1.68
HIth MgmtAsc HMA 7.25 17.28 13.10 -.04 -0.3 A A A +40.6 +75.2 cc
iShsU.S. Pfd PFF 36.93 --- 41.09 37.69 -.13 -0.3 V V v -4.9 +0.7 q 2.01e
KC Southern KSU 76.00 -0- 125.96 119.98 -1.04 -0.9 V V A +43.7 +59.5 40 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 --- 44.40 34.52 -.79 -2.2 V V -10.7 -6.2 18 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 2.13 3.46 2.90 -.06 -2.0 V A V -11.3 -11.6 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 67.75 89.75 84.21 +.16 +0.2 V V A +21.7 +26.9 19 2.64
Office Depot ODP 3.18 6.10 5.43 -.02 -0.4 V A A +65.5 +64.7 42
PGTInc PGTI 4.19 11.69 9.56 -.12 -1.2 V V V +112.4 +120.0 20


52-WK RANGE CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

Panera Bread Co PNRA 150.33 194.77 176.30 +.15 +0.1 V A A +11.0 +10.6 27
Pembina Pipeline PBA 27.61 --- 34.70 32.21 -.21 -0.6 A V V +12.5 +20.7 39 1.68
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.04 --- 22.72 19.09 +.02 +0.1 A V A -2.7 +2.3 18 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 21.52 -0- 57.98 52.44 +.90 +1.7 V A A +112.1 +109.1 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 36.37 48.88 48.30 +.24 +0.5 A A A +25.4 +29.4 18 0.64f
Reliance Steel Alu RS 55.74 -0- 76.78 73.42 +.49 +0.7 V V A +18.2 +32.2 16 1.32
Ryder R 46.72 70.35 68.81 -.28 -0.4 V A A +37.8 +48.5 16 1.36
St Joe Co JOE 16.82 --- 24.44 17.95 -.02 -0.1 A V V -22.2 -18.9 dd
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 23.14 31.86 27.87 +.04 +0.1 V A A +18.2 +11.3 19
Simon Property Gp SPG 142.47 --- 182.45 149.36 +.49 +0.3 V V A -5.5 +0.5 37 4.80f
Stein Mart SMRT 6.84 -- 16.17 14.27 -.02 -0.1 V V A +89.3 +80.0 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 25.99 36.99 35.09 -.34 -1.0 V A A +23.8 +34.4 13 0.40
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 -0- 16.97 15.66 -.51 -3.2 A A A +36.8 +41.9 19 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.15 19.22 17.40 +.23 +1.3 A V A +3.8 +8.4 19 0.88
Tech Data TECD 43.02 --- 54.60 51.10 -.24 -0.5 V V A +12.2 +17.3 9
Wendys Co WEN 4.60-- 9.51 8.54 -.05 -0.6 V V A +81.7 +90.2 85 0.20
World Fuel Svcs INT 34.57 45.20 40.15 +.16 +0.4 A A A -2.5 +4.8 15 0.15


LifeCon 18.03
LifeGro 27.24
LifeMod 22.97
MidCapldxlP 145.03
MidCp 29.30
MidCpAdml 133.10
MidCplst 29.40
MidCpSgl 42.00
Morg 25.78
MorgAdml 79.99
MuHYAdml 10.52
Mulnt 13.74
MulntAdml 13.74
MuLTAdml 11.02
MuLtdAdml 11.03
MuShtAdml 15.86
Prmcp 94.65
PrmcpAdml 98.25
PrmcpCorl 19.74
REITIcbdxAd 92.48
STBondAdm 10.55
STBondSgl 10.55
STCor 10.75
STGradeAd 10.75
STIGradel 10.75
STsryAdml 10.72
SelValu 28.73
SmCapldx 51.33
SmCpldAdm 51.42
SmCpldlst 51.42
SmCplndxSgnl 46.32
SmVlldlst 22.88
Star 23.78
StratgcEq 29.13
TgtRe2010 26.01
TgtRe2015 14.88
TgtRe2020 27.06
TgtRe2030 27.48
TgtRe2035 16.84
TgtRe2040 27.99
TgtRe2045 17.57
TgtRe2050 27.88
TgtRetInc 12.65
Tgtet2025 15.70
TotBdAdml 10.61
TotBdlnst 10.61
TotBdMklnv 10.61
TotBdMkSig 10.61
Totlntl 16.37
TotStlAdm 45.39
TotStllns 45.39
TotStlSig 43.80
TotStldx 45.36
TxMCapAdm 91.95
ValldxAdm 29.17
Valldxlns 29.17
Wellsl 25.41
WellslAdm 61.56
Welltn 38.89
WelltnAdm 67.18
WndsllAdm 65.61
Wndsr 19.74
WndsrAdml 66.62
Wndsrll 36.96
Victory
SpecValA m 20.26
Virtus
EmgMktsls 9.52
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 17.62
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 34.53
Growlnv 51.17
Outk2010Adm 13.48
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.85
Yacktman
Focused d 25.59
Yacktman d 23.94


-.05 +6.6
-.05 +10.5
-.05 +8.8
-.19 NA
-.04 +14.8
-.17 +15.0
-.04 +15.0
-.05 +15.0
-.02 +13.9
-.06 +14.1
-.03 +4.9
-.02 +4.0
-.02 +4.0
-.03 +4.4
-.01 +1.9
... +1.0
-.31 +16.6
-.32 +16.7
-.08 +15.5
+.41 +10.0
-.01 +1.7
-.01 +1.7
... +2.5
... +2.6
... +2.6
... +1.0
-.06 +17.8
-.07 +16.3
-.07 +16.5
-.07 +16.5
-.07 +16.5
-.06 +15.7
-.06 +10.3
-.08 +18.5
-.06 +7.5
-.03 +8.5
-.07 +9.3
-.06 +10.7
-.03 +11.3
-.06 +11.7
-.04 +11.7
-.06 +11.7
-.03 +6.4
-.04 +10.0
-.03 +3.1
-.03 +3.1
-.03 +2.9
-.03 +3.1
-.08 +4.9
-.04 +16.1
-.04 +16.1
-.04 +16.1
-.04 +15.9
-.06 +16.1
-.02 +16.1
-.02 +16.2
-.05 +9.5
-.13 +9.5
-.08 +11.8
-.14 +11.9
-.15 +16.4
-.04 +16.4
-.15 +16.5
-.09 +16.3

-.06 +8.3

-.03 +3.0

-.01 +11.0

-.02 +17.3
-.11 +17.9
-.03 +3.9

-.04 +5.0

-.05 +14.6
-.04 +15.1






The Sun /Thursday, December 5,2013 www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 7




STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
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S&P 500 -234 NASDAQ + 80 8DOW 4 -2485 6-MO T-BILLS 4 -.01 30-YR T-BONDS +.05 CRUDE OIL +1.16 EURO -.0004 GOLD +26.50
1,792.81 4,038.00 15,889.77 .09% V 3.90% $97.20 $1.3587 $1,248.20 +



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
AES AESCorp 15.31 +.43
AFL AFLAC 65.71 +.17
GAS AGLRes 45.29 -.81
AKS AK Steel 5.98 +.24
ABIO ARCAbirs 1.80 +.36
ASMI ASM Intl 33.20 +.11
T AT&Tl Inc 34.60 -.14
AVG AVGTech 16.67 -.42
ABT AbtLab s 37.36 -.24
ABBV AbbVie n 49.67 -.30
ANF AberFitc 35.69 -.30
FAX AbdAsPac 5.93 -.07
ACN Accenture 76.07 -1.02
ACMP AccessMid 51.82 -2.19
ARAY Accuray 7.74 +.03
ACHN Achillion 3.42 +.16
ACT Actavis 161.05 -1.57
ATVI ActivsBliz 17.25 +.13
ADBE AdobeSy 56.05 -.35
AEIS AdvEnld 22.97 -.19
AMD AMD 3.57 -.05
ABCO AdvisoryBd 61.42 -1.14
ACM AecomTch 28.64 -.33
ARO Aeropostl 9.36 -.38
AET Aetna 66.29 -1.35
A Agilent 53.58 +.65
AEM Agnicog 26.38 +.80
AYR Aircastle 18.16 +.23
ARG Airgas 107.79 +.31
AKAM AkamaiT 45.86 +.21
ALSK AlaskCom 2.17 -.02
ALU AlcatelLuc 4.35 -.07
AA Alcoa 9.36 -.06
ATI AllegTch 32.44 +.05
ALLE Allegion n 41.83 -1.07
AGN Allergan 95.92 -.07
ALE Allete 48.36 -.06
ARLP AllnceRes 76.01 +1.49
ACG AlliBInco 7.06 -.05
AB AlliBern 22.64 +.24
LNT AlliantEgy 52.01 +.19
ANV AlldNevG 3.24 +.16
MDRXAIIscriptH 15.14 +.14
ALL Allstate 53.57 +.06
ANR AlphaNRs 6.73 -.19
AOD AlpTotDiv 4.09 +.02
AMLP AIpAlerMLP 17.36 -.15
ALTR AlteraCplIf 31.97 +.09
MO Altria 37.23 +.06
AMRNAmarin 1.94 -.01
AMZN Amazon 385.96 +1.30
ABEV Ambev n 7.09 -.21
AEE Ameren 36.55 +.24
AMX AMovilL 22.61 -.24
AGNCACapAgy 19.75 -.09
ACAS AmOapLtd 15.01 -.07
AEO AEagleOut 16.13 -.39
AEP AEP 46.86 -.01
AXP AmExp 84.50 -.11
AIG AmlntlGrp 48.94 +.29
ARCP ARItCapPr 13.17 -.09
AWR AmStWtr s 27.49 -.34
AMT AmTower 77.43 -.28
AWK AmWtrWks 41.62 -.05
APU Amerigas 42.51 +.34
AMP Ameriprise 107.01 +.11
ABC AmeriBrgn 69.46 -1.11
AME Ametek 49.13 +.47
AMGNAmgen 113.07 -.38
APH Amphenol 85.16 -.18
APC Anadarko 88.61 -.89
ADI AnalogDev 48.77 -.45
ANEN Anaren 27.98 -.03
AU AnglogldA 12.73 +.36
BUD ABInBev 101.50 -.24
NLY Annaly 10.05 -.01
ANH Anworth 4.40
AIV Aptlnv 25.83 +.83
APOL ApolloEdu 26.09 -.45
APO ApolloGM 30.02 +.64
AINV Apollolnv 8.79
AAPL Apple Inc 565.00 -1.32
AMAT ApldMatI 16.61 -.51
WTR AquaAms 23.49 +.16
MT ArcelorMit 17.07 +.18
ACI ArchCoal 4.29
ADM ArchDan 41.73 +.63
ARNA ArenaPhm 6.53 -.07
ARCC AresOap 18.19 +.10
ARIA AriadP 4.84 +.01
ABFS ArkBest 34.39 +.65
ARR ArmourRsd 3.78 -.03
ARRY ArrayBio 6.06 +.07
ARRS Arris 20.80 +.28
ARW ArrowEl 51.26 +.15
ASH Ashland 92.72 +1.09
AGO AssuredG 24.65 +.66
AZN AstraZen 56.73 -.62
APL AtlasPpln 34.72 -.21
ATML Atmel 7.57 -.05
ATO ATMOS 43.94 -.44
AUQ AuRicog 3.72 +.16
ADSK Autodesk 46.29 +.53
ADP AutoData 79.33 -1.01
AUXL Auxilium 18.23 -1.32
AVGO AvagoTch 44.50 -.28
AVY AveryD 49.09 +.06
CAR AvisBudg 36.07 -.08
AVA Avista 27.09 +.09
AVP Avon 17.79 +.02
BTG B2gold g 1.98 +.08
BBT BB&TCp 34.80 +.51
BCE BCEg 43.70 -.13
BGCP BGC Ptrs 5.82 +.03
BBL BHPBiIlplc 59.72 +.53
BP BP PLC 46.77 +.19
BPT BP Pru 76.03 +.19
BRE BRE 59.11 +5.74
BIDU Baidu 168.26 +1.21
BHI BakrHu 54.70 -1.95
BLL BallCorp 49.63 -.09
BLDP BallardPw 1.49 +.21
BBD BcoBradpf 12.33 -.19
SAN BcoSantSA 8.64 -.11
BSBR BcoSBrasil 6.04 -.09
BKMU BankMutl 6.96 -.08
BAC BkofAm 15.63 +.10
BMO BkMontg 65.48 -.45
BK BkNYMel 33.37 +.17
BNS BkNovag 59.61 -.63
VXX BiPVixrs 46.49 -.36
BCR Bard 137.21 -.95
BKS BarnesNob 16.30 -.15
ABX BarrickG 15.68 +.17
BAX Baxter 66.77 -.09
BEAM Beam Inc 66.65 -.15
BZH BeazerHm 20.52 +.10
BBBY BedBath 77.03 -1.11
BMS Bemis 38.57 -.10
BRK/BBerkH B 115.30 +.51
BBY BestBuy 42.80 +.80


Interestrates





on
The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose
to 2.83 percent
Wednesday.
Yields affect
rates on mort-
gages and other
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


BIG BigLots 37.16 -1.80
BCRX Biocryst 6.08
BIIB Biogenldc 285.82 -1.94
BEAT BioTelem 8.55 -2.13
BBRY BlackBerry 6.14 -.16
BME BIkHIthSci 33.96 -.03
BX Blackstone 28.17 -.36
BOBE BobEvans 52.32 -2.78
BA Boeing 131.50 -.50
BWA BorgWam 104.30 -.27
SAM BostBeer 233.72 -.96
BSX BostonSci 11.31 -.51
BYD BoydGm 11.34 +.30
BGG BrigStrat 19.52 -.12
EAT Brinker 45.93 -.60
BMY BrMySq 51.08 +.12
BRCM Broadcom 26.87 -.10
BRCD BrcdeCm 8.60 +.07
BIP Brkflnfra 37.72 -.17
BPL Buckeye 67.25 -.89
BVN Buenavent 11.30 +.36
CA CA Inc 32.63 -.09
CBG CBREGrp 24.66 +.25
CBS CBS B 58.09 -.37
CF CFInds 237.07+22.88
CHRWCH Robins 58.25 +.11
CME CMEGrp 80.06 -.91
CMS CMSEng 26.57 +.06
CNHI CNH Indl 10.76 +.02
CSX CSX 27.20 -.21
CVRR CVR Rfgn 22.92 -.50
CVS CVSCare 66.12 -.63
CYS CYS Invest 7.52 -.22
CVC CblvsnNY 16.29 +.13
COG CabotOG s 34.42 -.12
CDNS Cadence 13.61 +.23
CALM Cal-Maine 55.06 -.25
CHY CalaCvHi 12.82 -.05
CCC Calgon 20.12 +.01
CWT CalifWtr 22.07 -.04
CPN Calpine 19.69 +.35
CLMT CalumetSp 26.19 -1.04
CARI CamcoF 6.37 +.09
CPT CamdenPT 60.56 +1.80
CAM Cameron 55.38 -.06
CPB CampSp 40.04 +1.23
CAMT Camtekh 4.68 +.10
CNI CdnNRgs 55.64 -1.12
CNQ CdnNRsgs 32.43 -.13
CSIQ CdnSolar 30.28 +.82
COF CapOne 72.35 +.72
CSU CapSenL 22.40 -.02
CMO CapsteadM 12.09 -.01
CPST CpstnTurb 1.22 +.06
CAH CardnlHIth 63.20 -1.53
CFN CareFusion 39.41 -.26
CKEC Carmike 23.46 -.31
CCL Carnival 35.55 -.30
CRS CarpTech 60.78 +.69
CRZO Carrizo 41.12 +.42
CAT Caterpillar 83.97 +.10
FUN CedarF 47.08 -.85
CLDX CelldexTh 26.16 -.98
CX Cemex 11.15 +.28
CIG Cemigpf 7.95 -.15
CNP CenterPnt 23.09 +.04
CTL CntryUink 30.84 +.47
CVO Cenveo 3.26 -.04
CKP Checkpnt 14.21 +.22
CHFC ChemFinl 30.42 -.40
CHK ChesEng 27.10 +.09
CVX Chevron 121.77 -.75
CBI ChicB&l 76.60 +1.29
CHS Chicos 18.72 -.05
CIM Chimera 2.97 +.02
CHD ChurchDwt 66.03 -.07
CIEN CienaCorp 22.80 +1.38
CBB CinciBell 3.20 +.10
CINF CinnFin 51.68 -.18
CRUS Cirrus 20.31
CSCO Cisco 21.25 -.01
C Citigroup 52.04 -.09
CTXS CitrixSys 60.00 +1.84
CLNE CleanEngy 12.15
CLF CliffsNRs 25.45 +.36
CLX Clorox 93.83 +.54
COH Coach 56.47 +.16
CIE CobaltlEn 17.72 +.21
KO CocaCola 40.37 +.02
CCE CocaCE 42.72 +.23
RQI CohStQIR 9.39 -.02
PSF CohStSelPf 23.62 +.04
COLE ColeREIn 14.28 -.09
CL ColgPalm s 65.04 -.33
COBK ColonialFS 13.35
CMCSAComcast 48.88 +.11
CMCSKComc spcl 47.23 -.07
CMA Comerica 45.26 +.31
CTG CmpTask 18.51 +.05
CPWRCompuwre 10.81 +.04
CMTL Comtech 31.04 -.41
CAG ConAgra 32.88 -.06
CTWS ConnWtrSv 33.23 -.40
COP ConocoPhil 71.41 -1.06
CNSL ConsolCom 19.14 +.23
ED ConEd 55.55 +.25
CTB CooperTire 23.90 -.04
CSOD CorOnDem 48.09 +.14
GLW Corning 16.78
OFC CorpOffP 21.85 +.06
COST Costco 122.97 -.85
COTYCotyn 16.06 -.14
CVA CovantaH 17.16 -.19
XIV CSVeIIVST 31.99 +.32
TVIX CSVxShtrs 9.06 -.12
CEQP CrestwdEq 15.11 +.12
CROX Crocs 13.48 -.03
XTEX CrosstxLP 26.23 -.31
CCI CrwnCstle 74.51 -.65
CCK CrownHold 43.82 -.44
CTRP Otrip.com 47.44 -.05
CMI Cummins 129.02 -1.01
CYBE CybrOpt 5.25 +.01
CY CypSemi 9.45 +.07
CYTR CvytRx 2.49 +.13
D-E-F
DCT DCT Indl 7.35 +.03
DDR DDRCorp 15.84 -.01
DNP DNP Selct 9.54 -.09
DHI DRHorton 19.08 -.05
DTE DTE 66.83 -.02
DTZ DTEEn61 24.20 -.22
DRI Darden 52.22 +.02
DV DeVryEd 35.27 +.15
DF DeanFdsrs 18.31 +.22
DECK DeckrsOut 85.25 -.84
DE Deere 85.38 +2.67
DAL DeltaAir 27.61 -.44
DNR DenburyR 16.60 -.16
DNDN Dndreon 3.05 +.08
DVN DevonE 60.81 -.64
DEO Diageo 125.98 +.22
DO DiaOffs 60.24 +.50


TREASURIES YEST PVS


1,840 ................................. S& P 500
1 .,O,, o ~-moo Close: 1,792.81
Change: -2.34 (-0.1%)
1,760 ........ 10 DAYS .........

1,840 ..................
1,840 ........... ... ......................... ... .. ....................... ...






1 8 0 J.................. ... ...... ....... .. ...... .... ......... ........
1,600 ...oo .. ... ...... ...... ... ... ..... ... ......... .


1,520 .....,j ............ j "............ X, ........... S............ b ...........N .......


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,538 1,842
Pvs. Volume 3,364 1,792
Advanced 1172 1073
Declined 1907 1482
New Highs 64 87
New Lows 95 18


DBD Diebold 33.29
DGII Digilntl 11.67
DLR DigitalRlt 45.00
DDS Dillards 90.98
DTV DirecTV 65.75
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 27.63
FAZ DxFinBr rs 23.97
TZA DxSCBrrs 19.24
EDC DxEMBIIs 27.19
FAS DxFnBulls 81.97
DUST DirDGdBr s 47.05
TNA DxSCBull s 70.60
SPXL DxSPBuIIs 58.04
DFS Discover 52.11
DISH DishNetwh 53.56
DIS Disney 69.97
DG DollarGen 56.37
DLTR DollarTree 54.90
D DomRescs 64.13
DPZ Dominos 68.71
RRD DonlleyRR 19.26
DOW DowChm 38.89
LEO DryStrt 7.54
DRYS DryShips 3.40
DD DuPont 60.26
DUC DufPUC 10.13
DUK DukeEngy 69.92
DRE DukeRlty 15.00
DVAX Dynavax 1.73
EJ E-House 11.97
ETFC E-Trade 18.05
EBAY eBay 51.09
EMC EMC Cp 23.82
EOG EOGRes 167.13
ELNK ErthUink 5.19
ETN Eaton 70.30
EOS EV EEq2 12.46
EXG EVTxMGIo 9.80
ECL Ecolab 103.41
EW EdwLfSci 64.87
EPB EIPasoPpI 36.52
EGO EldorGIdg 5.69
EA ElectArts 22.34
EDE EmpDist 22.39
EEP EnbrdgEPt 29.44
ENB Enbridge 40.50
ECA EnCanag 18.95
ENR Energizer 110.64
ETP EngyTsfr 54.49
EBF Ennis Inc 18.01
ESV ENSCO 60.19
ETR Entergy 62.16
ETRM EnteroMed 1.94
EPD EntPrPt 62.05
EQR EqtyRsd 52.93
EAC EricksnAC 18.04
ERIC Ericsson 12.33
EL EsteeLdr 73.10
XCO ExcoRes 5.17
EXC Exelon 27.70
EXPR Express 19.00
ESRX ExpScripts 67.18
XOM ExxonMbl 94.67
FFIV F5Netwks 82.81
FTI FMCTech 49.29
FNB FNBCp PA 12.30
FB Facebook 48.62
FDO FamilyDIr 69.14
FAST Fastenal 46.75
FDX FedExCp 138.71
FNHC FedNatHId 13.71
FGP Ferrellgs 23.45
FNF FidlNFin 28.78
FSC FifthStFin 9.43
FITB FifthThird 19.88
FNSR Finisar 20.54
FHN FstHorizon 11.01
FNFG FstNiagara 10.94
FSLR FstSolar 60.80
FE FirstEngy 32.52
FMER FstMerit 22.42
FLEX Flextrn 7.33
FLO RowrsFds 21.50
FLR Ruor 76.82
F FordM 16.62
FST ForestOil 4.02
FTNT Fortinet 17.54
FBHS FBHmSec 41.75
FRAN Francesca 18.10
FREE FrSeas rs 1.18
FCX FMCG 34.54
FTR FrontierCm 4.64
FRO Frontline 3.78
FCEL FuelCellE 1.51
FIO Fusion-io 9.47
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 25.06
GTAT GTAdvTc 8.92
GDV GabDvlnc 21.18
GGT GabMultT 11.38
GUT GabUtil 6.35
GFA GafisaSA 2.70
GALE GalenaBio 4.54
GME GameStop 45.77
GLPI Gam&Lsrn 46.43
GCI Gannett 25.35
GPS Gap 40.90
GRMNGarmin 47.16
GKNT Geeknet 18.66
GAM GAInv 34.23
GD GenDynam 89.48
GE GenElec 26.64
GGP GenGrPrp 20.28
GIS GenMills 50.71
GM GenMotors 38.71
GEL GenesisEn 50.21
GNTX Gentex 29.56


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .09
6-month T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.11 +0.01 .16
2-year T-note .29 0.29 .. .25
5-year T-note 1.44 1.40 +0.04 .62
10-year T-note 2.83 2.78 +0.05 1.60
30-year T-bond 3.90 3.85 +0.05 2.78


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.69 3.62 +0.07 2.47
Bond Buyer Muni ldx 5.14 5.11 +0.03 3.89
Barclays USAggregate 2.37 2.38 -0.01 1.71
Barclays US High Yield 5.61 5.60 +0.01 6.42
Moodys AMAA Corp Idx 4.65 4.62 +0.03 3.59
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.69 1.67 +0.02 .92
Barclays US Corp 3.18 3.20 -0.02 2.69


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GNW Genworth 15.25
GGB Gerdau 7.53
GERN GeronCp 5.74
GILD GileadScis 72.47 .
GSK GlaxoSKIn 52.11
GRT GlimchRt 9.36
GOGOGogo n 34.34 -
GFI GoldFLtd 3.60
GG Goldcrpg 21.49
GS GoldmanS 168.70 -
GT Goodyear 21.29
GOOGGoogle 1058.18 +.
GRA vjGrace 96.41
GPT GramrcyP 5.22
GPK GraphPkg 9.12 .
GNI GNIron 74.80 -
GXP GtPlainEn 23.93
GMORGreenMtC 70.05 +
GEF Greif A 54.07
GRIF Griffin h 32.82
GRPN Groupon 9.09
BSMX GpFnSnMx 13.92
GSH GuangRy 24.22
HCP HCP Inc 36.49 -
HAIN HainCel 82.54 +
HK HalconRes 3.82 .
HAL Hallibrtn 50.62 -
HBI Hanesbrds 69.79
THG Hanoverlns 59.25
HOG HarleyD 66.48
HMY HarmonyG 2.63 -
HPOL Harrislntl 2.00
HSC Harsco 27.00
HIG HartfdFn 35.59 -
HAS Hasbro 52.07
HTS HatterasF 16.73 -
HE HawaiiEl 25.48 -
HCN HItCrREIT 55.11
HCSG HlthCSvc 27.98
HMA HItMgmt 13.10
HTA HlthcreTr 10.15
HL HeclaM 2.83 -
HLF Herbalife 75.93
HERO HercOffsh 6.42
HSY Hershey 96.74
HTZ Hertz 24.26
HES Hess 82.21 +
HPQ HewlettP 28.13 -
HSH Hillshire 33.10
HTH HilltopH 23.49
HIMX HimaxTch 10.96
HFC HollyFront 45.80 -;
HOLX Hologic 22.26
HD HomeDp 78.40
AWAY HomeAway 38.31
HMC Honda 41.41
HON HonwIllntI 86.83
HRL Hormel 45.89
HPT HospPT 26.84
HST HostHotls 18.15 .
HOV HovnanE 4.97
HNP HuanPwr 38.04 .
HUB/BHubbelB 106.12
HCBK HudsCity 9.13
HBAN HuntBncsh 9.12 .
HII Huntgtnlng 82.77
HUN Huntsmn 23.14
lAG IAMGId g 4.05 .
IBN ICICI Bk 36.62 +"
IGTE iGateCorp 33.56
ING ING 12.69
IAU iShGold 12.06
EWZ iShBrazil 44.51
EZU iShEMU 39.22
EWG iShGerm 29.75
EWI iShltaly 14.80
EWJ iShJapan 11.89
EWY iSh SKor 62.70
EWW iShMexico 66.76
EWT iSTaiwn 14.32 .
EWU iSh UK 20.09
SLV iShSilver 19.00
DVY iShSelDiv 69.88
FXI iShChinaLC 39.64
IVV iSCorSP500180.67
EEM iShEMkts 41.27
TLT iSh20yrT 102.72
EFA iS Eafe 64.94
HYG iShiBxHYB 92.67
IWM iShR2K 111.53
HDV iShHiDiv 69.84
SHV iShShtTrB 110.24 .
PFF iShUSPfd 37.69
IYR iShREst 62.84
ITB iShHmCnst 22.40
IDA Idacorp 51.67
ITW ITW 78.12
IBCP IndBkMI 11.00
IR IngerRd 55.90
INGR Ingredion 69.05
IRC InlandRE 10.46
TEG IntegrysE 54.33
INTO Intel 23.74
ICPT InterceptP 56.62 +
INAP InterNAP 7.22 .
IBM IBM 175.74
IGT IntlGame 17.78 -
IP IntPap 46.01
IPG Interpublic 16.99 -
INTX Intersectns 7.49 -
ISRG IntSurg 370.68 -;
IVZ Invesco 34.92
IRM IronMtn 28.41 .
ITUB ItauUnibH 13.19
J-K-L
JDSU JDS Uniph 12.25
JPM JPMorgCh 57.19


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar
retreated
against the euro,
British pound
and other
currencies as
traders balanced
positive
economic data
with concerns
about the Fed
cutting back on
monetary
stimulus.


9M


HIGH
15960.36
7204.52
489.27
10095.49
4051.74
1799.80
1303.15
19126.11
1128.97


4,0 80 ... ............ ...



3,880 ........ 10 DAYS ....


Nasdaq composite
Close: 4,038.00
Change: 0.80 (flat)


4,200 ...............
4 ,2 0 0 ........... ............. ............. ............ ............. ............. "



3 ,8 0 0 . ..- .. . !. .. . .. .... .. .... .
3 ,6 0 0 . . .. .. .. . ..

3 ,4 0 0 ............ ........... .. .. ............. i ............


3 ,20 0 .... ........... 3".. ....". ........... X ........... 0 ............ N .. ..


LOW
15791.29
7084.85
483.28
9990.58
4004.76
1779.09
1287.00
18906.00
1111.63


JBL Jabil 19.93
JEC JacobsEng 58.06
JNS JanusCap 10.82
JBLU JetBlue 8.41
JNJ JohnJn 93.63
JCI JohnsnOCl 49.90
JNPR JnprNtwk 20.84
KBH KB Home 17.26
KFN KKR Fn 9.46
KFH KKRFn41 26.84
KLAC KLA Tnc 61.93
KSU KCSouthn 119.98
K Kellogg 60.90
KERX KeryxBio 14.68
KEG KeyEngy 8.15
KEY Keycorp 12.84
KMB KimbCIk 104.20
KIM Kimco 20.70
KMP KindME 80.12
KMI KindMorg 33.43
KMIWSKindrMwt 4.05
KGC Kinross g 4.62
KOG KodiakOg 11.86
KSS Kohls 54.38
KRFT KraftFGp 52.81
KTOS KratosDef 6.69
KKD KrispKrm 20.21
KR Kroger 41.52
KLIC Kulicke 12.01
LB L Brands 63.25
LLL L-3Com 101.58
LSI LSI Corp 7.99
LTC LTC Prp 37.38
LRCX LamResrch 51.25
LSTR Landstar 55.63
LPI LaredoPet 27.42
LVS LVSands 74.51
LHO LaSalleH 30.13
LEG LeggPlat 29.35
LEN LennarA 34.52
LVLT Level3 30.21
USA LbtyASE 5.69
LRY UbtProp 33.07
LIFE UfeTech 75.65
LFVN Uifevantge 1.85
LLY UllyEli 49.87
LLTC UinearTch 43.52
LINE UnnEngy 30.95
LGF UonsGtg 31.11
LYG UoydBkg 5.05
LMT LockhdM 136.23
LO Lorillard s 50.98
LPX LaPac 15.89
LOW Lowes 46.86
LUX Luxotica 49.40
LYB LyonBasA 76.56
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 113.41
MBI MBIA 12.86
MCGC MCG Cap 4.66
MDC MDC 28.93
MDU MDU Res 29.43
MFA MFAFncI 7.19
MTG MGIC 8.10
MGM MGM Rsts 19.71
M Macys 52.04
MHR MagHRes 6.77
MTW Manitowoc 20.71
MNKD MannKd 4.99
MFC Manulifeg 18.85
MRO MarathnO 36.74
MPC MarathPet 83.26
GDX MktVGold 21.22
OIH MVOilSvc 48.11
SMH MVSemi 41.03
RSX MktVRus 27.77
PRB MVPreRMu 24.57
MWE MarkWest 66.87
MMLP MartinMid 41.54
MRVL MarvellT 14.21
MAS Masco 21.54
MAT Mattel 45.57
MDR McDrmlnt 7.87
MCD McDnlds 95.71
MHFI McGrwH 73.94
MUX McEwenM 1.89
MWV MeadWvco 35.03
MDGN Medgenics 6.39
MPW MedProp 12.75
MDT Medtrnic 56.93
MPEL MelcoCrwn 36.44
MRK Merck 49.31
MCY MercGn 48.09
MDP Meredith 51.82
MTOR Meritor 7.86
MACK MerrimkP 4.60
MET MetLife 51.27
KORS MKors 80.76
MU MicronT 21.76
MSFT Microsoft 38.94
MVIS Microvis 1.29
MIDD Middleby 218.55
MSEX MdsxWatr 21.41
MBT MobileTele 20.35
MOLX Molex 38.66
MOLXA MolexA 38.66
MCP Molycorp 4.99
MDLZ Mondelez 34.27
MNST MonstrBev 62.49
MWW MonstrWw 5.31
MS MorgStan 31.13
MOS Mosaic 47.93
MYL Mylan 42.97
MYGN MyriadG 25.92
NCR NCR Corp 32.73
NIHD NIl Hldg 2.30
NPSP NPS Phm 25.10


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.6379
Canadian Dollar 1.0683
USD per Euro 1.3587
Japanese Yen 102.14
Mexican Peso 13.0526


CLOSE
15889.77
7157.93
488.89
10064.86
4038.00
1792.81
1297.60
19053.87
1121.38


%CHG.
-0.16%
-0.36%
+0.19%
-0.22%
+0.02%
-0.13%
-0.12%
-0.10%
-0.21%


NQ NO Mobile 13.73 +.45
NRG NRGEgy 27.95 +.55
DCM NTEDOCO 16.07 -.07
NVE NV Energy 23.64 -.02
NBR Nabors 16.82 +.04
NBG NBGrcers 5.91 -.11
NFG NatFuGas 68.23 +.12
NGG NatGrid 61.26 -.20
NHI NtHlthlnv 57.61 +.05
NAVB NavideaBio 1.83 +.17
NKTR NektarTh 11.65 -.19
NEOG Neogen s 48.90 -.89
NTAP NetApp 40.67 -.07
NFLX Netflix 356.27 -6.67
NGD NwGoldg 4.96 +.25
NJR NJ Rscs 44.27 -.83
EDU NewOriEd 29.99 +.08
NRZ NewResdn 6.31 +.28
NYCB NY CmtyB 16.32 -.09
NYMT NYMtgTr 7.03 +.06
NCT Newcastle 5.32 -.01
NWL NewellRub 30.40 +.37
NEM NewmtM 23.88 +.50
NWSA NewsCpA n 17.58 +.08
NEE NextEraEn 84.21 +.16
NI NiSource 31.77 +.11
NLSN NielsenH 42.85 +.17
NKE NikeBs 78.82 -.31
NTT NipponTT 25.23 +.17
NE NobleCorp 38.36 -.12
NBL NobleEns 69.64 +.13
NOK NokiaCp 7.90 +.09
NAT NordicAm 8.37 +.32
NSC NorfkSo 87.19 -.60
NU NoestUt 41.12 +.16
NTI NthnTEn 23.67 -.55
NOC NorthropG 110.49 -2.03
NRF NStarRlt 9.91 +.24
NWBI NwstBcsh 14.79 -.09
NWN NwstNG 41.25 -.20
NCLH NorwCrLn 33.24 -.31
NG NovaGldg 2.35 +.12
NVS Novartis 78.05 -.48
NVAX Novavax 4.01 +.03
NVO NovoNord 176.56 -2.95
NUAN NuanceCm 14.15 +.64
NAD NuvDivA 12.40 -.13
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.44 -.02
NIO NuvMuOpp 12.58 -.09
NQM NvlQI 13.12 -.04
NMA NvMAd 11.95 -.08
NUW NvAMT-Fr 14.78 +.12
NNP NvNYP 13.14 -.13
NPP NuvPP 12.95 -.02
JPC NvPfdlnco 8.59 -.05
NPF NvPMI 12.10 +.03
NPI NuvPI 12.16 -.09
NPM NuvPI2 12.26 -.09
NPT NuvPI4 11.59 +.04
NQU NuvQInc 12.09 -.11
NVDA Nvidia 15.96 +.22
NXTM NxStageMd 10.01 +.18
OCZ OCZTech .13 -.03
OGE OGEEgys 34.21 +.14
ORLY OReillyAu 121.08 -3.28
OAS OasisPet 45.90 -.86
OXY OcciPet 94.59 +.29
OCFC OceanFst 17.58 +.18
OCLS Oculus rsh 4.74 +2.41
OCN OcwenFn 56.98 +1.23
ODP OfficeDpt 5.43 -.02
OIBR OiSA 1.72 +.14
ONB OldNBcp 15.03 -.02
ORI OldRepub 16.60 -.06
OLN Olin 26.35 -.18
OHI OmegaHlt 31.68 -.08
OME OmegaP 13.46 +.51
OVTI OmniVisn 15.52 -.47
ONNN OnSmcnd 7.40 +.14
OMEDOncoMed n 29.65 +1.95
OGXI OncoGenex 7.98 +.08
OKS OneokPtrs 52.42 -.18
OPK OpkoHlth 10.53 +.07
OPLK OplinkC 16.58 +.17
ORCL Oracle 35.07
ORBK Orbotch 13.73 -.06
OREX Orexigen 5.99 -.13
ONVO Organovo 9.22 -.05
OFIX Orthfx 20.93 -.04
OSK OshkoshCp 48.42 -.22
OV7R OtterTail 28.55 -.06
P-Q-R
PDLI PDL Bio 8.36 -.48
PCG PG&ECp 40.71 -.09
PNC PNC 75.72 +.10
PNM PNM Res 23.23 +.27
PKX POSCO 79.01 +.17
PPG PPG 182.95 +1.29
PPL PPLCorp 30.85 +.11
PCAR Paccar 55.53 -.77
PAAS PanASIv 10.54 +.46
P Pandora 29.41 +1.14
PNRA PaneraBrd 176.30 +.15
PAMT ParametS 11.39 -.37
PKD ParkDrl 8.00 +.28
PH ParkerHan 116.71 +.17
PTEN PattUTI 24.45 +.44
PAYX Paychex 43.48 -.25
BTU PeabdyE 18.31 -.13
PBA Pembinag 32.21 -.21
PENN PnnNGm 14.07 +.03
PVA PennVa 10.94 -.05
PWE PennWstg 8.55 +.01
PNNT PennantPk 11.87 +.06
JCP Penney 9.66 -.45
PAG Penske 44.54 +.11
PNR Pentair 69.78 -.21


C
-.0
+.C
-.c

-.6


EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.5257 -.0
Norwegian Krone 6.1549 -.0
South African Rand 10.4437 -.0
Swedish Krona 6.5073 +.0
Swiss Franc .9026 +.0


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1075
6.0915
7.7529
62.075
1.2546
1061.20
29.58


HG
3017
I034
I004
-.21
3684

3005
3015
3009
3002
3025


3132
'003
3005
.314
3024
-.60
+.02


%CHG
-.10%
+.32%
-.03%
-.21%
-.52%

-.18%
-.92%
-.94%
+.13%
+.23%


+1.19%
-.00%
+.01%
-.51%
+.19%
-.06%
+.07%


1YR.
AGO
1.6106
.9928
1.3101
81.84
12.9476

3.8089
5.6184
8.7932
6.5937
.9260


.9547
6.2303
7.7501
54.685
1.2175
1084.98
29.11


YTD
+21.26%
+34.88%
+7.90%
+19.20%
+33.73%
+25.71%
+27.16%
+27.07%
+32.04%


PBCT PeopUtdF 14.91
PBY PepBoy 13.32
POM PepcoHold 19.09
PEP PepsiCo 82.65
PRGO Perrigo 154.89
PETM PetSmart 72.57
PBR/A PetrbrsA 14.80
PBR Petrobras 14.02
PFE Pfizer 31.27
PCYC Pharmacyc 130.38
PM PhilipMor 85.91
PHG PhilipsNV 34.78
PSX Phillips66 69.59
PNX PhoenxCos 52.44
PNY PiedNG 32.54
PFN PimlncStr2 10.00
PNW PinWst 53.24
PXD PioNtri 185.27
PBI PitnyBw 22.52
PAA PlainsAAP 50.01
PLUG PlugPowrh 1.27
PCL PlumCrk 44.00
PII Polaris 133.88
PLCM Polycom 10.80
PPS PostPrp 44.85
POT Potash 32.20
DBC PwshDB 25.68
BKLN PSSrLoan 24.83
QQQ PwShs QQQ85.49
PX Praxair 123.62
PCP PrecCastpt 253.83
PCLN priceline 1181.67
PFG PrinFncl 49.48
PRA ProAssurs 48.22
SH ProShtS&P 26.09
QLD ProUItQQQ 93.67
QID PrUShQQQ 16.01
SSO ProUItSP 96.30
UPRO PUItSP500 s87.62
UVXY PrUVxSTrs 20.19
UCO PrUltCrude 31.38
SCO PrUShCrde 32.58
AGQ ProUltSilv 16.31
PG ProctGam 83.35
PGNX PrognicsPh 4.62
PGR ProgsvCp 27.45
SDS ProUShSP 31.76
TBT ProUShL20 78.71
SPXU PUSSP500 16.73
SQQQ PrUPShQQQ15.84
PSEC ProspctCap 11.11
PRU Prudentl 87.76
PEG PSEG 32.68
PSA PubStrg 151.93
PHM PulteGrp 18.35
PMM PMMI 6.62
QEP QEPRes 32.17
QCOMQualcom 73.18
DGX QstDiag 60.86
STR Questar 22.45
KWK QksilvRes 3.04
RAS RAIT RFin 8.51
RFMD RF MicD 5.26
RAX Rackspace 34.52
RDN RadianGrp 14.45
RSH RadioShk 2.96
RL RLauren 173.63
RAVN Ravenlnds 39.32
RYN Rayonier 44.28
RTN Raytheon 86.05
0 Rltylnco 36.87
RWT RedwdTr 18.43
RGP RegncyEn 24.30
RF RegionsFn 9.67
RS RelStlAI 73.42
SOL ReneSola 4.53
RTK Rentech 1.75
RGEN Replgn 13.24
RMD ResMed 47.20
RSO ResrceCap 5.88
ROIC RetailOpp 14.63
RAI ReynAmer 50.63
RIGL RigelPh 2.70
RIO RioTinto 53.61
RAD RiteAid 6.00
ROK RockwIAut 108.89
COL RockColl 72.66
ROG Rogers 62.11
ROP Roper 127.57
ROST RossStrs 72.68
RY RoyalBk g 64.61
RCL RylCarb 43.26
RDS/B RoyDShllB 68.76
RYL Ryland 37.96
S-T-U
STBA S&T Bcp 24.80
SCG SCANA 47.61
SKM SKTlcm 23.62
SLM SLM Cp 26.55
SM SM Energy 91.49
DIA SpdrDJIA 158.76
GLD SpdrGold 119.96
FEZ SpdrEuro50 39.96
SPY S&P500ETF179.73
XHB SpdrHome 30.98
JNK SpdrLehHY 40.37
XRT SpdrRetl 87.02
XOP SpdrOGEx 67.43
XME SpdrMetM 39.20
SBR SabnR 51.49
SWY Safeway 34.21
SAIA Saia Inc s 33.24
JOE StJoe 17.95
STJ StJude 58.37
CRM Salesforcs 52.27
SLXP SalixPhm 84.69
SBH SallyBty 27.87


Commodities
The price of oil
rose for the
fourth day in a
row as the
government
reported the
first drop in
crude oil
supplies in 11
weeks. Silver
led a broad gain
among metals.
Wheat rose.


SJT SJuanB 16.92 -.16
SNDK SanDisk 67.40 -.50
SD SandRdge 5.62 +.04
SNY Sanofi 50.91 +.21
SNTS Santarus 31.97 +.04
SLB Schlmbrg 87.28 -.36
SCHW Schwab 24.62 -.05
SDRL SeadrillLtd 41.42 -.42
SDLP Seadrill 29.75 +.25
STX SeagateT 49.96 +.32
SHLD SearsHldgs 50.92 -4.63
SRE SempraEn 87.99 -.31
SNH SenHous 22.27
SHW Sherwin 181.08 +1.27
SFL ShipFin 16.72 +.21
SID SiderurNac 5.13 +.08
SLW SilvWhtng 20.00 +.59
SPG SimonProp 149.36 +.49
SINA Sina 79.97 +2.97
SIRI SiriusXM 3.72 -.02
SWKS SkywksSol 27.63 +.05
SMSI SmithMicr 1.32
SJM Smucker 104.75 -.23
SNA SnapOn 104.52 -.88
SODA SodaStrm 55.14 -.62
SLRC SolarCap 22.75 +.02
SCTY SolarCityn 52.17 -.29
SON SonocoP 39.58 -.22
SNE SonyCp 17.89 -.52
SOR SourcC 64.23 +.24
SJI SoJerlnd 55.28 -.59
SO SouthnCo 41.09 +.21
LUV SwstAirl 17.90 -.38
SWN SwstnEngy 38.20 -.64
SSS SovranSS 66.11 -.03
SE SpectraEn 33.38 -.28
SRC SpiritRC n 9.83
S Sprint n 7.95 -.09
PHYS SprottGold 10.30 +.21
XLB SP Matlis 43.92 +.21
XLV SP HIthC 54.61 -.19
XLP SPCnSt 42.89 -.10
XLY SP Consum 64.52 -.15
XLE SP Engy 86.43 -.28
XLF SPDRFncl 21.30 +.05
XLI SPInds 49.56 -.20
XLK SPTech 34.69 +.03
XLU SP Util 38.23 +.17
SPF StdPac 8.10 +.03
SWK StanBlkDk 79.59 +.27
SPLS Staples 15.40 -.15
SGU StarGas 5.50 +.03
SBUX Starbucks 79.50 -1.05
ST7 StateStr 70.83 -.67
STLD StlDynam 18.65 +.52
SPH SubPpne 44.69 -.73
SUBK SuffolkBcp 19.38 -.19
SNHY SunHydrl 40.95 -.06
SU Suncorgs 34.75 -.56
SUNE SunEdison 13.49 +.21
SHO SunstnHtl 12.56 +.01
STI SunTrst 35.09 -.34
SVU Supvalu 6.46 +.01
RJI SwERCmTR 8.16 +.06
SWFT SwiftTrans 23.01 +.36
SYMC Symantec 22.46 -.08
SNV Synovus 3.45 +.04
SYY Sysco 33.63 -.06
TMUS T-MoblUS n 26.92 -.06
TCP TC PpLn 46.33 -.69
TE TECO 17.40 +.23
TJX TJX 62.61 +.16
TSM TaiwSemi 17.54 +.01
TLM TalismEg 11.93 -.08
TGT Target 63.31 +.49
TOO Taubmn 65.37 +.12
TEN Tenneco 55.95 +.02
TDC Teradata 42.53 -2.82
TER Teradyn 16.80 -.11
TNH TerraNitro 168.33+14.08
TSLA TeslaMot 138.95 -5.75
TSO Tesoro 55.78 -1.64
TEVA TevaPhrm 40.03 -.17
TXN Texlnst 42.43 -.41
TXRH TexRdhse 27.39 -.06
TGH Textainer 37.82 +.44
TXT Textron 32.26 -.37
TC ThomCrk g 2.33 -.25
DDD 3DSyss 77.64 -.38
MMM 3MCo 126.46 -.14
TIBX TibcoSft 24.12 +.61
THI THortong 57.78 -.87
TWO TW Cable 132.20 -1.94
TWX TimeWarn 65.44 -.02
TKR Timken 51.52 +.57
TIVO TiVoInc 12.66 -.09
TOL TollBros 32.97 -.21
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 75.77 +.53
TD TorDBkg 89.64 -.62
TOT Total SA 58.84 -.56
TSS TotalSys 30.63 -.69
RIG Transocn 50.29 +.19
TRV Travelers 88.61 -.42
TY TriContl 19.40
TYp TriCntl pf 44.90
TSL TrinaSolar 14.39 +.44
TRN Trinity 49.88 -.96
TRST TrstNY 7.16 +.05
TUP Tuppwre 90.35 -.15
TRQ TurqHillRs 3.41 +.04
FOXA 21stCFoxA 32.91 -.31
TWTR Twitter n 43.69 +2.32
TWO TwoHrblnv 9.06 -.03
TYC Tycolntl 37.51 -.35
TSN Tyson 33.36 +.52
UDR UDR 24.11 +.14
UGI UGICorp 40.18 -.55
UIL UlLHold 37.29 -.06


UNS UNSEngy 47.23
LCC USAirwy 21.87
USG USG 25.58
UPL UltraPt g 19.90
UA UnderArmr 80.49
UNF UniFirst 99.95
UNIS Unilife 4.86
UNP UnionPac 161.39
UNT Unit 50.47
UAL UtdContl 37.57
UPS UPSB 101.72
URI UtdRentals 68.51
USB US Bancrp 39.00
UNG USNGas 19.36
USO US OilFd 34.88
X USSteel 27.06
UTX UtdTech 108.94
UNH UtdhlthGp 73.65
UVV UnvslOp 51.71
UNM UnumGrp 33.91
UEC UraniumEn 1.80
URBN UrbanOut 36.63

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VF Cp 233.55
VALE ValeSA 14.91
VALE/P Vale SApf 13.69
VLO ValeroE 45.02
VLY VlyNBcp 10.02
VVTV ValVis A 6.41
VNDA VandaPhm 10.14
VTI VangTSM 93.17
VNQ VangREIT 65.23
VIG VangDivAp 73.45
VWO VangEmg 40.56
VGK VangEur 56.03
VEA VangFTSE 40.28
VAR VarianMed 79.84
VVC Vectren 34.54
VELT Velti h .07
VTR Ventas 56.21
VE VeoliaEnv 15.39
VRSN Verisign 56.83
VZ VerizonCm 49.37
VIAB ViacomB 81.53
VVI ViadCorp 25.87
VPHM ViroPhrm 49.72
V Visa 202.74
VSH Vishaylnt 12.34
VMW VMware 83.70
VOD Vodafone 36.79
VMC VulcanM 54.45
WDFC WD 40 73.69
WPC WP Carey 61.84
WMT WalMart 80.22
WAG Walgrn 57.57
WLT WalterEn 14.68
WRE WREIT 23.48
WM WsteMInc 44.56
WAT Waters 99.20
WFT Weathflntl 15.31
WBS WebsterFn 29.15
WRI WeinRlt 28.05
WLP WellPoint 91.59
WFC WellsFargo 43.75
WEN Wendys Co 8.54
WR WestarEn 31.97
EMD WAstEMkt 11.86
WIA WAstlnfSc 11.39
WDC WDigital 77.56
WNR WstnRefin 37.15
WU WstnUnion 16.68
WBK Westpac s 29.30
WY Weyerhsr 29.41
WHR Whrlpl 148.08
WFM WholeFds 56.16
WMB WmsCos 36.78
WIN Windstrm 8.25
WEC WiscEngy 41.41
DXJ WTJpHedg 49.39
EPI WT India 16.96
WWD Woodward 42.88
WWE WIdW Ent 14.36
XL XL Grp 30.67
XOMAXOMA 6.11
XEL XcelEngy 27.98
XRX Xerox 11.08
YHOO Yahoo 38.13
AUY Yamanag 8.80
YELP Yelp 63.07
YGE YingliGrn 5.34
YORWYorkWater 20.63
YOKU YoukuTud 29.95
YUM YumBrnds 75.66
ZAGG Zagg 3.97
ZMH Zimmer 90.07
ZTS Zoetis n 31.21
ZF ZweigFd 14.55
ZNGA Zynga 4.07


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price, rt Right to buy security at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown, r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distnbution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown, cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available, p previous day's net asset value, s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.20
Ethanol (gal) 2.48
Heating Oil (gal) 3.06
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.96
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.72

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1248.20
Silver (oz) 19.77
Platinum (oz) 1376.00
Copper (Ib) 3.27
Palladium (oz) 728.60

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.33
Coffee (Ib) 1.08
Corn (bu) 4.26
Cotton (Ib) 0.78
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 350.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.36
Soybeans (bu) 13.30
Wheat (bu) 6.47


PVS.
96.04
2.35
3.07
3.98
2.72

PVS.
1221.70
19.01
1355.80
3.20
714.05

PVS.
1.33
1.10
4.22
0.77
353.20
1.36
13.20
6.54


%CHG
+1.21

-0.20
-0.40
-0.17

%CHG
+2.17
+4.01
+1.49
+2.20
+2.04

%CHG
+0.15
-1.60
+0.83
+0.79
-0.68
-0.70
+0.74
-0.99


%YTD
+5.9
+13.2
+0.5
+18.2
-3.3

%YTD
-25.5
-34.5
-10.6
-10.2
+3.7

%YTD
+2.2
-25.0
-39.1
+3.8
-6.2
+16.8
-6.3
-16.8


+.C
-.c
+.C

+.C






-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 5,2013


TODAY




Comfortable; plenty
of sun

830 / 630
0% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperatureg Today

5.:
1 3 3.1, 0

CC 70 CC 9 C B8 77


FRIDAY


Mostly sunny


840 / 630
0% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 84/66 sun none
Sarasota 82/65 sun none

SUN AND MOON


S I j ?U1 U& hSun Rise Set
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6p.m. T S Ret
ThehighertheAccuWeather.comUVIndex" number, Today 7:03 a.m. 5:35 p.m.
thegreaterthe need foreye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; Friday 7:04 a.m. 5:35 p.m.
3.5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The Moon Rise Set
RealFeelTemperature is the exclusive Today 9:29 am 845 pm
AccuWealther.com composite of effective temperature Fday :29a.m. 8:45 p.m.
based on eight weather factors. Friday 10:20 a.m. 9:51 p.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX First Full Last New
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday j i


32
0 50 100150 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov. net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees %
Grass .o
Weeds *'*"a
Molds:::*
absent low moderate hip veryhig
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 85/62
Normal High/Low 78/560
Record High 870 (1994)
Record Low 350 (1989)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday 0.00"
Month to date Trace
Normal month to date 0.23"
Year to date 52.13"
Normal year to date 49.10"
Record 2.21" (2009)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. Trace 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 52.13 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


I Vrw
Dec9 Dec 17 Dec 25 Jan 1

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 7:30a 1:15a 8:00p 1:45p
Fri. 8:36a 2:21a 9:04p 2:50p
Sat. 9:38a 3:25a 10:05p 3:52p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 3:06a
Fri. 3:59a
Englewood
Today 1:43a
Fri. 2:36a
Boca Grande
Today 12:48a
Fri. 1:41a
El Jobean
Today 3:38a
Fri. 4:31a
Venice
Today 3:17p
Fri. 12:51a


Low High Low

11:31a 6:25p 9:56p
12:21p 7:l1lp 11:07p

9:47a 5:02p 8:12p
10:37a 5:48p 9:23p

8:08a 4:07p 6:33p
8:58a 4:53p 7:44p

12:00p 6:57p 10:25p
12:50p 7:43p 11:36p

8:26a --- 6:51p
9:16a 4:03p 8:02p


SATURDAY


Mostly sunny


840 / 640
0% chance of rain


Clearwaterl
82/66
.] .


Tampa
83/66


SUNDAY


Times of clouds and
sun

840 / 670
10% chance of rain


4Brand.
85 63


Plant City
%84#63

on 1
3


Fort Myers
84/66

Cape Coral
83/65


A
Sanibel
82/70


MONDAY THE NATION


Partly sunny


83 / 660
20% chance of rain


Winter Haven
S82, 64
Raio' % .*:' ...:.:
Bartoo
82 63


St. Petersburg
82/66 Apollo Beach ,
82/66 4 Ft. Meade
8 682'/64j 83/61

*;. ,i?

Wauchula ,
Bmradenton 84 64
82/66
Longboat Key M_____ Myakka City 'Limestone
83/68 65
8 Samsota% 8463
82/65 *46-

Osprey Arcadia
82/66 84,64 :*.jf


I-10s I -Os 10s 2 30s I 40s I 50s I 60s I 70s 804 90s~
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
_- .'.. x t.'. G,:',,.h','''.w .


SBilling 7 MoneI
S-2/-16 M.nr poi.s 48/1l W16/32
10/-4
IDelymh il TO' 1rono NYorw
/ i C n c a q oAgo 2 5" 6 O' 5 8
/ r .c / 3.1 ',, / i ,'
Sen Franciscover "S
50143\Dn hllIl
S50/43\ / "'1me Karsas.Clh q '"' Washipgip
\ .osl \ % ,o ,2,1 r i,
.LosAngeles
61/45 f ** Ai'ant

SPa Hoii:HonA
\ \ ii i\/. i. ^ ^'** *
-\ Ch ihu a Mi' ami
omerr~ey 82/72
\J S ____ _M \\ ...... ,, M m

Fronts Precipitation
-* A -v -fr, 1 T^^ 1^ M = ^ 77 J-* F---
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ........................ 86 at Laredo,TX


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston,WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
38 23 sf
32 31 sn
72 63 sh
66 54 c
-2 -16 pc
76 63 sh
22 13 pc
56 48 c
56 32 sh
49 33 sh
68 43 r
70 60 c
34 18 c
61 31 r
58 30 sh
77 61 c
60 32 sh
47 38 sh
39 25 r
10 -9 c
20 5 pc
46 26 c
11 -7 c
23 19 c
4 -13 c
54 46 c
2 -13 pc
82 66 s
75 38 t
47 25 i


WORLD CITIES
Today
City Hi Lo W
Amsterdam 44 35 r
Baghdad 66 50 sh
Beijing 50 29 s
Berlin 38 31 sn
Buenos Aires 79 50 s
Cairo 68 53 s
Calgary -4 -18 pc
Cancun 84 76 s
Dublin 47 32 r
Edmonton -5 -23 c
Halifax 40 38 c
Kiev 34 28 c
London 48 34 r
Madrid 58 34 s


Fri.
Hi Lo W
36 22 s
36 30 c
74 51 t
56 37 r
-7-19 pc
71 39 t
27 13 sf
52 35 r
36 24 c
40 27 c
47 31 r
75 56 pc
23 12 c
34 18 i
33 22 sn
82 60 pc
32 21 sn
46 27 r
30 20 i
15 -9 pc
14 2 s
33 19 sf
6-13 c
31 17 sf
-1-19 pc
49 32 r
-4-18 c
83 68 s
43 35 r
29 14 sn


Fri.
Hi Lo W
37 34 pc
64 45 s
51 28 pc
34 26 sf
77 59 s
67 51 pc
-9-18 pc
85 75 s
43 37 pc
-12-28 pc
43 30 r
34 25 sf
39 32 pc
56 32 s


Low ....... -27 at WestYellowstone, MT
Today Fri.


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
77 45 pc
46 32 sh
48 31 sh
43 34 pc
-2 -15 sf
91 76 t
57 42 s
38 27 c
84 73 t
77 55 sh
57 46 s
54 28 sh
32 22 pc
7 -6 sn


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurdries, sn-snow, i-ice.


z*~

Lehigh Acres
84/63


K
Bonita Springs__.
84/65


SSE 714 1-3 Light AccuWeather.com


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


y Fri.
W Hi LoW
c 76 65 s
s 82 65 s
s 81 67 s
pc 82 69 pc
s 80 63 pc
pc 81 72 s
s 83 65 s
pc 81 63 pc
pc 82 61 s
pc 81 60 s
pc 80 73 s


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
81 73 pc
82 61 s
82 62 s
81 68 s
82 72 pc
84 66 pc
82 60 s
80 63 pc
83 64 s
77 65 c
76 67 c


Fri.
Lo W
73 s
61 s
3 60 s
63 pc
72 s
66 s
60 s
62 s
63 s
64 pc
56 c


Today
City Hi Lo W
Pompano Beach 81 71 pc
St. Augustine 78 63 s
St. Petersburg 82 66 s
Sanford 82 64 s
Sarasota 82 65 s
Tallahassee 80 62 c
Tampa 83 66 s
Titusville 80 64 s
Vero Beach 81 66 pc
West Palm Beach 82 71 pc
Winter Haven 82 64 s


Fri.
Hi Lo W
81 71 s
78 61 s
82 66 s
82 63 s
81 64 s
79 63 s
83 65 s
78 64 pc
81 64 pc
82 71 pc
83 63 s


He's back in the highly-anticipated comedy, Anchorman 2,
but much has changed for this actor since filming the first
Anchorman, 10 years ago.


Healthcare.gov sees



enrollment acceleration


WASHINGTON (MCT)
- In the clearest sign yet
that the federal health in-
surance website is vastly
improved, about 29,000
people enrolled in in-
surance plans in the first
two days of this week,
exceeding the number of
enrollments on the site in
all of October, according
to a source familiar with
the data.
The 29,000 figure tallies
the number of people
able to select health plans
Sunday and Monday, the
48-hour window after the
administration's deadline
for making major repairs
to the healthcare.gov
website.
That result is an
encouraging sign for
administration officials,
who claimed over the
weekend that they
successfully met their


goal of getting the
troubled shopping portal
running smoothly for the
vast majority of users by
the end of November.
Officials said the web-
site was loading faster,
handling more users
and experiencing fewer
errors. But until now,
enrollment data backing
up those claims had not
yet been made public.
The 29,000 estimate,
first reported by Politico,
does not include people
who enrolled through
state-run marketplaces,
the source said. In all
of October, just 26,000
people enrolled on the
federal exchange. The
administration hopes
to sign up 7 million
people by the end of the
enrollment period on
March 31.
The data represent the


number of people who
have selected a plan,
not necessarily those
who have completed
the process by paying
insurers. That last step
still remains a challenge
for the administration.
Although the con-
sumer-facing website is
functioning better, a tech
team continues to build
and repair the "back end"
of the system that han-
dles payments. Officials
have said they will have
that portion of the site
running in time to accept
payments in time for the
Jan. 1 deadline.
Despite the surge in
enrollment, insurance
industry officials also
remain deeply concerned
that the consumer
information the site is
sending insurers is still
not reliable.


Report: Student debt up in 2012


WASHINGTON
(Stateline.org) Seven in
10 students who graduat-
ed with bachelor's degrees
in 2012 had student loan
debt, with an average debt
of $29,400, according to a
report from The Institute
for College Access &
Success (TICAS).
Both figures increased
since 2008, the last year
comparable numbers
were available, when
68 percent of graduates
had an average debt of
$23,450.
Student debt varied
tremendously by state,
according to the report.
Students in South Dakota
were the most likely to
graduate with debt, with
78 percent of graduates
owing money, while
students in Nevada
were the least likely to
graduate with debt, with


41 percent of graduates
owing money.
Average debt per stu-
dent also differed across
state lines. Many high-
debt states were in the
Northeast and Midwest.
Delaware's students
had the highest average
debt in the country, at
$33,649, while students
in New Mexico had the
lowest average debt, at
$17,994.
"Despite discouraging
headlines, a college degree
remains the best route
to finding a job in this
tight market," said Lauren
Asher, president of TICAS,
a nonprofit organization
that aims to make college
more available and afford-
able. "But students and
families need to know that
debt levels can vary widely
from college to college."
The federal government


collects data to calculate
national student debt
figures every four years,
including 2012.
The TICAS report relies
on colleges voluntarily
sharing data. More than
half of all public and
private nonprofit four-
year colleges shared data
for the report. The state
figures exclude for-profit
colleges because almost
none volunteered their
figures.
The U.S. Department of
Education also launched
a financial aid website
Wednesday aimed at
helping guidance coun-
selors and others who
help students navigate
applying for colleges
and financial aid. The
Financial Aid Toolkit
includes a searchable
database with access to
financial aid resources.


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Temperature Placid;
82/65
680 Boca Grand
82/70
Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013

Publication date: 12/5/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
ESE 8-16 1-3 Light
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SPORTS


Thursday, December 5,2013


NFL fines Steelers
coach Mike Tomlin
$100,000, oPage 4


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


* GIRLS BASKETBALL:
Port Charlotte 45,
Island Coast 26

UP NEXT
Port Charlotte: vs. North Fort
Myers, Friday, 7 p.m.



Pirates


pick up


district


victory

By PETE SISK
SUN CORRESPONDENT
CAPE CORAL -
Approaching the halfway
point of their district
schedule, Port Charlotte
High School is in good
shape.
The Pirates (7-3) are 3-0
in District 6A-11 heading
into Friday's home game
against North Fort Myers
after a 45-26 win at Island
Coast on Wednesday.
"We were lethargic
tonight," Pirates coach
Kevin Purcell said. "That's
not us. We came out the
last two games very slow,
but we're 3-0 in district.
We're OK.
"I'm not happy with
our performance overall.
When you play any
team you've got to play,"
Purcell said. "Up, down,
sideways, you've got to
play.
"I don't like our lack
of intensity right now.
It'll come back to bite us
sometime soon."
Port Charlotte domi-
nated the first quarter
16-3 and were scarcely
challenged thereafter.
Island Coast briefly came
within 20-15 but that was
it.
The Pirates held Island
Coast to four points
PIRATES 13

* PREP WRESTLING:
Charlotte 54,
Fort Myers 22

UP NEXT
Charlotte: at Gary Freis Duals,
Fort Myers HS, Friday, 4 p.m.
(Includes Port Charlotte,
Lemon Bay)


Tarpons


trounce


Wave
By CHUCK BALLARO
SUN CORRESPONDENT
FORT MYERS -
Charlotte High School
opened its season with
seven pins in a 54-22
victory against Fory
Myers on Wednesday.
The Tarpons, who ran
off five straight victories
midway through the meet
to put things out of reach,
will return to Fort Myers
this weekend for the Gary
Freis Duals.
"We expected a tough
match and we got one.
We rattled off some wins
in the middle and the
pins came in handy and
that made the difference,"
Charlotte coach Evan
Robinson said. "It's a
great start for us. We're
TARPONSI3


* BOYS BASKETBALL: Port Charlotte 67, Lemon Bay 30


SUN PHOTO BY JENN
Lemon Bay High School's Jon Hill attempts to block the shot of Port Charlotte's Sean Price during Wednesday's game in E
The Pirates won 67-30.




Pirates domina!

Port Charlotte defense locks down Lemon Bay ii


By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
ENGLEWOOD Port Charlotte
High School standout Nicksen
Blanc spent most of the first
half in foul trouble, playing a bit
tentatively. The Pirates didn't have
center Sean Phillip at all, hobbled
by a knee injured Monday in
practice.
Port Charlotte opened the game
less than crisply, committing 14
turnovers before halftime.


UP NEXT
Port Charlotte: at North Fort Myers, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay: at Sebring, 7:30 p.m.

None of that seemed to matter
against Lemon Bay on Wednesday
night.
The Pirates turned in an oth-
erwise businesslike performance
in a 67-30 rout of the Mantas
to start the season with a third


consecutive victory. Gi
Collins led three played
digits for Port Charlott
points.
The Pirates held Len
2 for 20 shooting in the
and didn't allow a 2-pc
goal until after halftime
Charlotte led 33-13 at t
"I thought defensive
first half I thought we v
solid except for some s


I.



















a

















41FER BRUNO
Englewood.





te

n win|
guard Kyle
rs in double
with 16
non Bay to
e first half
lint field
e. Port
the break.
ly in the
were
3illy fouls,"
DEFENSE13


* BOYS SOCCER:
Riverview 2,
North Port 0

UP NEXT
North Port: vs. Braden River,
Friday, 6 p.m.


Bobcats


fall to


Rams
By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
NORTH PORT North
Port High School had a
chance to take a big step
forward Wednesday night
when it hosted perennial
power Riverview in a
nondistrict match.
The Rams took a
2-0 victory with two
first-half goals, but had
to withstand a strong
Bobcats offensive surge.
North Port (6-2) outshot
the Rams 14-6, and had
five shots in the last six
minutes which came
close to going into the
net.
"They're (Riverview)
a good team with a
good solid back four,"
North Port coach Gerard
Gregoire said." We had
some chances, but we
just couldn't do it. We
have about five or six
players out with injuries,
so we're hurting but that's
no excuse."
Riverview scored its
first goal when Carlos
Cabrera scored on an
assist from Ramon Elliott
after a free kick with 12
minutes, 32 seconds left
in the first half.
Near the end of the
half, Elliott slammed in a
goal on a penalty to cap
the scoring.
North Port picked up
its offense in the second
half, but couldn't find
the net. Juan Heeren
and Jacob Sumaljag had
some good shots on the
goal for the Bobcats.
Riverview keeper Mika
Kuschnitzky had seven
saves, including some
key stops late in the
match. Bobcats
sophomore goalie River
Silva made three saves.
"River played OK,"
Gregoire said. "On the
free kick, we just didn't
set up right and then
their other goal was on a
penalty kick."
The defeat was tough
for the Bobcats because
Riverview is a county rival
and one of the best teams
in the area. The Class
5A Rams are 10-1 on the
season. They've scored 37
goals to just 14 for their
opposition.
BOBCATS13


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Florida State


Investigation done, Winston learns fate today


AP FILE PHOTO
The prosecutor overseeing the investigation of sexual
assault allegations against Florida State quarterback
Jameis Winston said Wednesday it is completed.


By GARY FINEOOUT
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE -The
prosecutor overseeing the
investigation of sexual
assault allegations against
Florida State quarterback
Jameis Winston said it is
completed and will an-
nounce his findings today.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs scheduled a news
conference at 2 p.m., which
will be televised by ESPN.
Meggs said investigators
have learned as much
as they can about the


ACC CHAMPIONSHIP
WHO: No. 1 Florida State (12-0,
8-0) vs. No. 20 Duke (10-2, 6-2)
WHEN: Saturday, 8 p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte, N.C.
TV:ABC
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 820 AM, 1040 AM

December 2012 incident.
"We think we have
exhausted all investigative
tools," he said.
Winston, named the
ACC's player of the year
on Wednesday, has led the
12-0 Seminoles to the No.


1 ranking. They play Duke
in ACC championship
game Saturday at 8 p.m. in
Charlotte, N.C., with a shot
at the national title.
The quarterback also is
the leading candidate for
the Heisman Trophy, and
many of the 929 voters
are waiting to see whether
Winston will be charged
with a crime before casting
their ballots. Monday is
the deadline for Heisman
ballots to be submitted.
ESPN has previously
WINSTON 15


INDEX I Lottery 2 I Community calendar 2 I Golf 21 Baseball 21 Preps 31 NFL 41 College football 4 | Scoreboard 5 | Quick Hits 51 NHL 61 NBA 61 College basketball 6


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 5,2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Dec. 4N.................................. .. 3-1-2
Dec. 4D....................................... 6-3-4
Dec. 3N....................................... 5-5-7
Dec. 3D....................................... 7-3-9
Dec. 2N....................................... 7-6-6
Dec. 2D....................................... 3-6-4
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Dec. 4N....................................3-6-3-2
Dec. 4D....................................2-6-9-5
Dec. 3N....................................5-7-7-2
Dec. 3D....................................3-5-6-5
Dec. 2N....................................4-3-9-7
Dec. 2D....................................7-6-5-1
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Dec. 4............................3-8-10-27-30
Dec. 3............................ 2-8-17-24-29
Dec. 2..........................4-19-24-25-27
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 3
2 5-digit winners........... $108,544.33
373 4-digit winners............... $93.50
10,887 3-digit winners.................. $9
* MEGA MONEY
Dec. 3 ..................................3-8-36-39
M egaBall...........................................3

Nov. 29.........................12-18-43-44
M egaBall......................................... 14
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 3
0 4-of-4MB..........................$500,000
4 4-of-4..............................$1,497.50
35 3-of-4 MB ..............................$375
670 3-of-4..................................... $58
1,101 2-of-4MB......................$24.50
* LOTTO
Dec.4.......................2-6-10-32-41-46
Nov.30.................18-21-29-30-35-45
Nov. 27.....................2-8-20-33-35-49
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 30
0 6-digit winners ......................$37M
23 5-digit winners ..................$6,885
1,587 4-digit winners .................. $82
34,414 3-digit winners...................$5
* POWERBALL
Dec. 4............................6-9-11-31-44
Powerball........................................25

Nov. 30........................ 5-26-44-45-57
Powerball........................................29
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 30
0 5 of5 + PB.............................$70M
0 5 of5............................... $1,000,000
1 4of5 + PB..........................$10,000
46 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$81 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Dec. 3..........................7-12-41-44-59
MegaBall...........................................3

Nov. 29.....................9-41-43-47-57
M egaBall........................................... 5
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 3
0 5 of5 + MB...........................$205M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
2 4of5 + MB..........................$5,000
35 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


SunCoast Sports Now
Get the latest local sports news:
www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Like us on
Facebook:
facebook.com/
SunCoastSports
Follow us on
Twitter:
@SunCoastSports


Contact us

Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com

Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com

Rob Shore. Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* GOLFROUNDUP


AP FILE PHOTO
Tiger Woods waves his cap after winning the World Challenge in 2011 at Sherwood Country Club
in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Woods never won what he often referred to as his "hometown event" at
Riviera. He made up for it by winning five times at Sherwood Country Club.


Golf;


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
THOUSAND OAKS,
Calif. -Tiger Woods won
five times on the PGA
Tour this year.
And while it's not the
first time he has won that
often, Woods put it into
context Wednesday when
he called today's tour as
tough and deep as he can
remember.
Adam Scott and Phil
Mickelson won multiple
times, including majors.
Henrik Stenson became
the first player to win the
FedEx Cup and the Race
to Dubai. Missing from
the equation was Rory
Mcllroy, who started at
No. 1 and only last week
picked up his first win.
Woods said it's different
from a generation ago
when golf was loaded at
the top. Now there are
more players than ever
capable of winning big
events.
Most of them are at his
World Challenge, which
starts today.


new depth on




v at Sherwood


PGA TOUR WORLD
CHALLENGE
WHEN: Today-Sunday
WHERE: Sherwood Country Club
(7,052 yards, par 72),
Thousand Oaks, Calif.
TV: Golf Channel (Thurs-
day-Friday, 3-6 p.m., 8-11p.m.;
Saturday-Sunday, 1-3 p.m.,
6:30-9:30 p.m.) and NBC (Satur-
day-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.)
FIELD: Keegan Bradley, Jason
Day, Jason Dufner, Jim Furyk,
Bill Haas, Dustin Johnson, Zach
Johnson, Matt Kuchar, Graeme
McDowell, Rory Mcllroy, Hunter
Mahan, Ilan Poulter, Webb
Simpson, Jordan Spieth, Steve
Stricker, Bubba Watson, Lee West-
wood, Tiger Woods
ONLINE: pgatour.com

"It's more difficult to
win now," Woods said.
He pointed to advance-
ments in equipment,
particularly from wood
drivers and wound golf
balls. Woods said the
younger players who hit
the ball high "are shocked


to see the ball get moved
by the wind."
"For a lot of us who
grew up playing balata
balls, you wanted to
get that thing down.
You didn't want it up in
that wind because it got
pushed around like you
wouldn't believe," he said.
"It's a totally different
game. Guys have evolved,
and I think they've
become much more
aggressive now than they
ever used to be because
of equipment."
Separating the best
players is more difficult.
"It's fun to be part of it,"
Graeme McDowell said.

Boca Raton teen leads
LPGA Q-school: In Daytona
Beach, Jaye Marie Green shot a
10-under 62 to take the first-round
lead in the LPGA Tour's qualifying
tournament. The 19-year-old from
Boca Raton had 11 birdies and a
bogey on LPGA International's Jones
Course. The top 20 players after
Sunday's final round earn full-time
status on the LPGA Tour for 2014.


* MLB NOTEBOOK



Boston rebuild begins


Red Sox sign

Pierzynski,

bid Ellsbury

farewell
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON- Jacoby
Ellsbury went to the New
YorkYankees.
Jarrod Saltalamacchia is
gone, too.
The Boston Red Sox
began rebuilding for
their World Series title
defense Wednesday when
they signed free agent
catcher A.J. Pierzynski to a
one-year contract.
"It's not every day
you get a chance to
play for the defending
World Series champions.
Looking at what they
have coming back, there's
definitely a chance to do
it again," Pierzynski said
in a conference call with
reporters. "When they
called, it was hard to say
no.
A two-time All-Star,
Pierzynski will take over
for the switch-hitting
Saltalamacchia, who
agreed to a three-year,
$21 million deal with the
Miami Marlins on Tuesday
at about the same time
the Yankees pried Ellsbury
away from their rivals with
a seven-year, $153 million
contract.
"We wish Jacoby well,"
general manager Ben
Cherington said. "He was
obviously a real good


AJ. Pierzynski, above, batted .272 with 17 homers and 70 RBIs
last season with Texas and caught 110 games for the 13th
consecutive season. He'll be 37 next season.


player here. But we felt
that there was an area or
range that we were willing
to go to, and the market
just went past that."
The best candidate
to replace Ellsbury in
the Red Sox system is
Jackie Bradley Jr., who
batted .189 in 37 games
in the majors last year
and .275 with 10 homers
in 80 games at Triple-A
Pawtucket.

Konerko stays with
White Sox: Veteran slugger Paul
Konerko is returning to the Chicago
White Sox, agreeing to a one-year,
$2.5 million contract. The 37-year-old
ranks second to Frank Thomas in
franchise homers and RBIs. He dealt
with a back issue last season and
batted .244 with 12 homers and 54
RBIs.

Tigers finalize deal with
Nathan: The Detroit Tigers agreed
to terms with free-agent reliever Joe
Nathan on a two-year contract with a
club option for 2016, accomplishing


one of their main objectives this
offseason by adding one of baseball's
most accomplished closer to their
bullpen. Nathan, who turned 39 last
month, had 43 saves in 46 chances for
the Texas Rangers last season.

A's finalize deal with
Kazmir: Left-hander Scott Kazmir
has finalized his $22 million, two-year
contract with the Oakland Athletics
after he passed his physical. The
two-time All-Star was limited to
one start in 2011 before going on
the disabled list with a lower back
strain. The 29-year-old spent the
2012 season with independent Sugar
Land before bouncing back to go 10-9
with a 4.04 ERA in 29 starts and 158
innings for Cleveland this year.

Garagiola wins Buck
O'Neil Award: Joe Garagiola
is the winner of the Buck O'Neil
Lifetime Achievement Award, given
by the National Baseball Hall of
Fame. The 87-year-old former player
and broadcaster will receive the
award July 26 as part of Hall of Fame
weekend in Cooperstown, N.Y.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


TODAY
Port Charlotte Little
League: Signups today for
spring, 6-8 p.m. at Harold Avenue
Recreational Center, 23400 Harold
Ave., Port Charlotte. Other signup
dates and times: Saturday 10
a.m.-noon, Monday 6-8 p.m., Dec. 12
6-8 p.m. and Dec. 1410 a.m.-noon.
Bring birth certificate and three proofs
of residency. Cost: $75 forT-ball and
Grapefruit, $85 for Minors and Majors,
$95 for Juniors and Seniors. Visit
www.portcharlottelittleleague.com or
call Darcy, 941-763-2195.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club Holiday Regatta:
Skippers meeting today for event on
Saturday and Sunday. Divisions: PHRF
spinnaker, PHRF non-spinnaker, PHRF
cruising, PHRF multihull. Open to any
mono-hull or multi-hull sailboat that
conforms to class rules and holds a
valid WFPHRF certificate. Late entry
fee: $55. Entry form available at
pgscweb.com. Contact Butch Dorey,
dmdorey@comcast.net, or Roger
Strube, rogerstrube@embarqmail.
com.

BASEBALL
Charlotte County
over-53 team: Players needed
for all positions, college playing expe-
rience a plus. Tryouts in December.
Contact Dave Power, 941-456-5229 or
pgj2007@embarqmail.com.

PIGS travel tryouts:
TryoutsJan.11-12for9-under,1OU,
11U,12U,13Uand 14U teams at1185
O'Donnell Blvd., Port Charlotte. First
three age groups run from 10 a.m.-
noon. Remaining age groups 1-3 p.m.
Visit www.swflironpigs.com or contact
coach Wayne Harrell, 941-626-1274 or
waynelharrell@yahoo.com.

Game Day Heat:
12-and-under travel team is looking
for players. Practices Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 6 p.m. at North
Charlotte Regional Park. Call Scott,
941-421-8378.

Snowbird Classic: Seeking
volunteers to help with admissions,
scorekeeping, public address
announcing, concessions, program
selling and parking. Event held at
South County and North County
parks from Feb. 14 to March 22.
Call 941-876-3226 or email steve@
snowbirdbaseball.com or Shannon@
snowbirdbaseball.com.

BASKETBALL
Charlotte County
Bailers: Practice for girls in 3rd
through 8th grade, Dec. 11 and
Dec. 18,7 p.m. at Charlotte High
School. 8th-grade participants must
currently reside in Charlotte High
School's district. Contact coach Jack,
941-875-4183.

BOXING
Youth and adult classes:
Male and female. Mondays-Fridays,
6-8 p.m., at 24710 Sandhill Blvd.
in Deep Creek. Training and/
or competition. Member of USA
Boxing. Call 239-292-9230 or
visit CharlotteHarborBoxing.
com, www.facebook.com/
CharlotteHarborBoxingGymnasium.

CHEER
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
For ages 5-13. Register in person,
online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or
call 941-629-9622.

FOOTBALL
Peace River Athletic
Club flag football: Coed teams
for ages 5-17, games on Sundays.
Space limited to 300 participants.
Contact Elgin Hicks at 941-268-1891,
Carolyn Bagiardi 941-457-4291 or
register at www.pracflorida.com.
Skills evaluations are Saturday,
Sunday and Dec. 11. You must be
registered to participate.

Buffalo Bills Backers:
Meets for every Bills game at Buffalo
Wings and Rings, Price and Toledo
Blade, North Port. Everyone is asked
to bring a non-perishable food item
for the North Port Salvation Army food
bank. Call Betty, 941 429 6835.

KICKBALL


CC Adult Sports: Games
on Thursday at 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
at Englewood Sports Complex adult
softball fields. Call 941-209-5924.

OFFICIATING
Charlotte County
Officials Association:


Seeking those interested in being an
official with a focus on high school
and youth baseball and softball.
Call Bob, 941-380-2657, or AI,
941-815-7812.

PRESCHOOLERS
Franz Ross Park
YMCA: All Sport, Soccer and
T-ball. Register in person, online at
CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or call
941-629-9622.

PROSPORTS
ACADEMY
Youth sport specific
personal training and
group sessions: Football,
baseball, basketball, track & field,
volleyball and soccer. Strength
and conditioning, speed, agility,
stretching, mobility and weight
management. Call Elgin, 941-268-
1891 or email makeitcountsports@
gmail.com.

ROWING
CHYC Dragon Boat
Team: Seeks new members.
Team practices year-round at 8:30
a.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays
at Charlotte HarborYacht Club on
Lister Street in Port Charlotte. Yacht
club membership not required to
participate. Call or email Eric Dehmel,
941-807-0120, or EDehmel@aol.com.

RUNNING
Foot Landing Running
Academy: Go from walker to
runner in six-week training program.
$35 fee includes coaching, registration
for the Strides for Scholarships 5K
and T-shirt. Contact Scott and Krissy
Varner, 239-216-1355 or scottgo-
bucks@aol.com.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested
in them. No dues. Meets first Monday
of each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon
Harry's. Visit http://groups.yahoo.
com/group/CHMA/ or call Ron,
941-876-6667.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
for all ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217 or
visit pgscweb.com.


SOFTBALL
Miss North Port
Fastpitch camp: Dec. 14 at
7508 Glenallen Blvd., North Port.
Pitchers and catchers 9-11 a.m.,
position players and hitters 11 a.m.-3
p.m. Cost: $40. Register at www.
northportfastpitch.com. Email Jeff at
missnorthportfastpictch@gmail.com.

60-plus Evening Slow
Pitch league: Signups for the
winter/spring season Dec. 26, Dec.
31, Jan. 2, Jan. 7. and Jan. 9,5 p.m. at
the Carmalita Complex, Punta Gorda.
Anyone turning 60 by January 2015 is
eligible. Season starts in mid-January.
Contact Vince, 941-624-3630.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming: Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

SOCCER
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
For ages 3-13. Register in person,
online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com
or call 629-9622.

TENNIS
Instruction: Age 5 to adult,
at Franz Ross Park YMCA. Register
at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or call
941-629-9622.

Rotonda QuickStart:
Free lessons for parents and kids
(12-under), 10-11 a.m. Saturday,
Rotonda Park. Rackets and balls
provided. Call 941-698-9480.


The Community Calendar appears daily
as space permits. To have youractivity
published, fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one week in
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable forpublication will be
edited for length and clarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


pq






The Sun /Thursday, December 5,2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO


* GIRLS BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK



Injuries plague Bobcats


North Port High

sees five of its
players hobbled

By DAWN KLEMISH
SUN CORRESPONDENT
NORTH PORT -There
was a dark cloud around
North Port High School's
basketball team this
week, and the Bobcats
have had to enlist the
help of junior varsity
players because of it.
Le'Kyra Smith is the
lone healthy starter after
a rash of injuries that
started Friday, leaving the
Bobcats with just eight
players on their roster.
"It's unbelievable,
really," coach Tom Tintor
said. "We're hurting. I've


never five. Wow."
The trouble started
with forward Rohanda
Burke, who twisted her
left knee Friday in the
first quarter against
Palm Harbor University.
Saturday, Jelena Dosen
(broken hand) and
Shauna Naudascher (fore-
head gash) were sent to
the hospital with injuries
suffered one minute apart
in the first quarter.
Lorena Marra jammed
her thumb in the third
quarter of the same
game and went for
X-rays Tuesday. Finally,
Camille Frederick is still
hobbled with an ankle
injured last week.Tintor
said Naudascher would
probably return first, and
Dosen is out until at least


"At this point, I don't
want to rush anything,"
he said. "We're hoping
to just have everyone
healthy come January.
We've got two full weeks
off during Christmas
break, I hope that's
enough to get everyone
back."In the mean time,
our younger kids are go-
ing to see a lot of action."

Pirates come close:
Port Charlotte advanced to the
championship game of the Bokampers
Tournament this past weekend, falling
to Community School of Naples in
Sunday's final. The Pirates defeated
Lely on Friday and Barron Collier on
Saturday to earn rights to the trophy
game.
"We did not take care of the ball
down the stretch in the (last) game,"
Port Charlotte coach Kevin Purcell said


performances: seniors Taylor Lindsey,
Courtney Robertson and Katie Stewart.

Walking wounded: Charlotte
senior guard Autumn Scott is off
crutches, but still sidelined with a left
ankle injury. Coach Mike Robishaw said
her return will be a game-time decision
for Tuesday's matchup against Gulf Coast

Don't miss these games:
This week is rivalry week for high
school basketball, kicking off Friday
when DeSoto County travels to Hardee
at 7:30 p.m. for a meeting between
the long-time opponents. The Bulldogs
are led byTishonna Riley. ... Monday's
feature matchup is a cross-town
rivalry between Charlotte and Port
Charlotte. This game is hosted by Port
Charlotte at 7 p.m. Lemon Bay and
DeSoto County established a strong
rivalry during volleyball season, the
first season the schools'matchups had
playoff implications after this year's


North Port High School's Rohanda Burke shoots as Charlotte's never seen anything like Tuesday. The timeline of the loss to Community School. FHSAA redistricting. Whether the rivalry
Victoria Vartiainen defends this season. Burke, who twisted her this. Maybe two girls for Burke, Frederick and Three Pirates earned a spot continues into basketball season will be
knee against Palm Harbor, is one of several banged-up Bobcats. (injured) at a time, but Marra is unknown, on the all-tourney roster for their seen starting Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.


BOBCATS
FROM PAGE 1
"I don't think we've
ever beaten them (on the
varsity level)," Gregoire
said.
North Port will have
its next match at 6 p.m.
Friday against visiting
Braden River, which gave
the Bobcats their other
defeat of the season in
the first meeting between
the teams. It is a District
4A- 11 match. There is no
junior varsity match that
night so the varsity match
is starting earlier.



TARPONS
FROM PAGE 1
still rusty but we'll clean
it up."
Bucky Dennis rallied
in the third period to pin
Michael Delago in the
heavyweight class to get
things rolling.
"He's gotten a lot
stronger and I wasn't
wrestling the match like
I should have," Dennis
said. "I pulled it out with
a pin to give the team
what it needed."
Dylan Mooney (126),
Joey Kralik (132), Ethan
Tenney (145) and Brody
Mansfield (152) recorded
pins during the Tarpons'
run, with Mansfield's
coming in 17 seconds.
Trey Hoff won on a tech-
nical fall at 138 pounds.
"It was a good match.
We came out hard and
ready to go and we domi-
nated," Hoff said. "It was
my first tournament back
since football season and
as a captain we need to



PIRATES
FROM PAGE 1
combined in the first
and third periods. Of the
Gators' 27 points, 11 were
in the fourth quarter long
after the game had been
decided.
"We let that first
quarter get away from
us," Gators coach J. Ellis
said. "We didn't have that
discipline and focus that
we talk about every day.
For us, that's what works.
"I'm not disappointed.
I'm disappointed, but....
they win 20 games every
year. They haven't lost a
home game in three years
or something. They're a
good team. So I'm not
disappointed."
Courtney Robertson
scored 15 points to lead
the Pirates.
In a third period that


PREP SCHEDULE
TODAY
Girls basketball
Bishop Verot at Charlotte, 7 p.m. "
Sarasota Christian at North Port,
7p.m.
Girls soccer
Southwest Florida Christian at
Imagine, 5 p.m.
DeSoto County at Sarasota A
Military Academy, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Cape Coral, 7:30 p.m.
Port Charlotte at North Port, 7 p.m.
Boys soccer
Cape Coral at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County at Sarasota
Military Academy, 7 p.m.
Southwest Florida Christian at
Imagine, 7 p.m. ..:.


step out and take control r
of the team, so I had to
make a stand tonight."
Colton Thomas (120)
recorded the only pin for ) 4 a
Fort Myers, which was
missing Chris Whipple at Ofj
126, Juan Vila at 132, and "
others who didn't make
weight.
But Fort Myers coach 44
Chris Drake wasn't about
to use that as an excuse.
"Charlotte is a good .
team. Whenever we get
the opportunity to wrestle .
them, we welcome these
challenge," Drake said.
"I thought we did some
good things and there
were things we need to
work on."
CHARLOTTE 54, FORT MYERS 22
At Fort Myers
106: Matt Jgerdy (CH) d. Jayson Johnson
7-5; 113: Hadley Vadyak (FM) forfeit; 120:
Colton Thomas (FM) p. Wylie Wilkinson
1:20; 126: Dylan Mooney (CH) p. Gio Rich-
ard 1:44; 132: Joey Kralik (CH) p. George
Ortes 1:03; 138: Trey Hoff (CH) d. Carter
Evans 4:27; 145: Ethan Tenney (CH) p. Matt
McQuinn 3:33;,152: Brody Mansfield (CH)
p. Mike Ortes :17;,160: Chase Zahalka (FM)
d.Travis Locklear 14-2;,170: Demetrik Fuller
(FM) d. Omar Powell DQ; 182: Stone Den-
nis (CH) d. Najee Jacob 11-2;195: Jeramiah
Martinez (CH) p. Kevin Delago 3:36; 220:
Ryan Adams (CH) p. Jerry Gaiety 1:58; 285:
Bucky Dennis (CH) p. Michael Delago 5:38.

totaled five points (four
by Port Charlotte) the
main event was an injury
to guard Katie Marshall.
Marshall was hit in the
face and didn't return to
the game, but a bloody
nose appeared to be the
extent of her injuries.
"She's fine," Purcell
said. "She's got a pretty
good bloody nose. SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BR
"We've got to prepare Lemon Bay High School's Joe Garza leaps above the Port Charlotte defense for a shot during Wednesday's game in Englewood.
for Friday's home game Garza led the Manta Rays with 15 points.
against INotrth Fo jrt I vMlylrs


against NortiF rot Mvyers.
We're 3-0 in district and
after Friday we'll have D E F EI
seen everybody once. 7-3
looks pretty good, but FROM PAGE 1
we've got stuff to work
on." Pirates coaci
said. "That's
PORTCHARLOTTE45,1ISLANDCOAST27 hang our hal
PORTCHARLOTTE 1610 4 15 45 The Pirate
ISLANDCOAST 312 1 11 27
PORT CHARLOTTE (45): Stewart 8, Trea- contest on a
sure 2, Marshall 7, Dungan 6, Lindsey 7, forced Lemo
Courtney Robertson 15. Totals: 19 (5) 4-5 turnovers.
45.
ISLAND COAST (27): Jones 2, Leanne Ellis Blanc finis
13,JenniferFasano 11,A. Heavlin 1. Totals: points and 1
8(1)10-1527. andKeyshav
had 11 point
nine rebound
Charlotte (3-
Joe Garza
points to lea


MSE


h Bill Specht
where we
ts."
s ended the
31-4 run and
n Bay into 35

hed with 12
0 rebounds
wn McLeod
s and
ds for Port
0).
scored 15
d Lemon Bay


(3-2).
The only hiccup to the
Pirates' night was that
Lemon Bay opened the
second half on a 13-3
run, including 3-pointers
by Jon Hill and Garza.
The Mantas sliced Port
Charlotte's lead to 36-26
with 1:52 left in the third
quarter.
"(We were) solid, except
for about five minutes in
the third quarter," Specht
said. "I don't know if we
thought the game was
over."
Port Charlotte did its
part in the run, going


0 for 5 from the floor
and committing five
turnovers.
"I challenged them at
halftime to cut the lead
to 10," Lemon Bay coach
Sean Huber said. "Then
with a 1:20 to go, it was
10.
"And then we lost by 35."
Blanc had 10 of his 12
points in the fourth quar-
ter and had 9 of his 10
rebounds in the second
half. McLeod was almost
as good, dominating the
paint at times with his
physical play. With Phillip
out indefinitely (he will


UNO


have an MRI on his knee
today), that was a great
sign.
"He did that on JV last
year and he had a solid
summer with us," Specht
said of McLeod. "After
football, he's got a long
way to go still."
Contact Rob Shore at 941-206-1174 or
shore@sun-herald.com
PORT CHARLOTTE 67, LEMON BAY 30
PORTCHARLOTTE 17 16 9 25-67
LEMONBAY 6 713 4-30
Port Charlotte (67): Leggett 2, Specht 7,
Price 8, Caldwell 2, Smarjesse 2, DeLisca 2,
Kyle Collins 16, Rains 5, McLeod 11, Blanc
12. Totals: 22(4) 19-29 67.
Lemon Bay (30): Jackson 8, Joe Garza 15,
Hill 5, Cutting 2. Totals: 9 (4) 8-21 30.


The Sun/Thursday, December 5, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


SHER=







*NFL:




Tomlin fined six figures


Steelers could
also lose draft
pick for incident
last week
By WILL GRAVES
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH Here's
another adjective Pittsburgh
Steelers coach Mike Tomlin
can call his ill-timed two-step
onto the field last Thursday
night against Baltimore.
Expensive.
The NFL fined Tomlin
$100,000 onWednesday for
interfering with Baltimore's
Jacoby Jones on a kickoff


return in the third quarter of
a 22-20 loss to the Ravens on
Thanksgiving night.
The fine is the second-high-
est ever levied by the league on
a head coach, behind only the
$500,000 the NFL docked New
England's Bill Belichick in 2007
for spying on an opponent's
defensive signals.
There is also the chance the
Steelers have a draft pick taken
away "because the conduct
affected a play on the field."
Though he was not penalized,
the league said the Steelers
should have been flagged 15
yards for unsportsmanlike
conduct.
All that from what Tomlin
called an "embarrassing,


inexcusable" case of being
"mesmerized" while stand-
ing in a restricted area that
separates the sideline from
the playing field and staring at
the video board during Jones'
73-yard return.
Jones had to
swerve to avoid
running into the
coach and was
tackled during
a return that
might have gone
TOMLIN for a touchdown
if not for the
obstruction. Tomlin briefly
stepped onto the field before
he jumped back.
Tomlin insists the "blunder"
was not intentional but has no


plans to appeal the ruling.
"I apologize for causing
negative attention to the
Pittsburgh Steelers organiza-
tion," Tomlin said in a state-
ment Wednesday. "I accept the
penalty that I received. I will
no longer address this issue as
I am preparing for an import-
ant game this Sunday against
the Miami Dolphins."
Jones didn't blame Tomlin
for his own inability to score
on the return, but his team-
mates believe the move put
the coach and the league in a
difficult position.
"I'm not going to lie, it's
tough," Baltimore wide
receiver Torrey Smith said. "I
can't say he did it on purpose


because I don't know what
he was thinking. It definitely
sends a message across the
league. He stepped across the
line, which definitely threw it
off."
Tomlin said he was following
his normal routine on the
play and said standing on the
6-foot wide strip is common
practice.
The league will not deter-
mine whether to take a pick
away from Pittsburgh until
after the draft order has been
set. It would be an unprec-
edented move for a coach
getting involved during a live
play.


* NFL NOTEBOOK


Jaguars aim to


slow Johnson again


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSONVILLE -The
Jacksonville Jaguars
would love a repeat
performance against
Houston receiver Andre
Johnson.
The Jaguars held the
five-time Pro Bowler
to two receptions for
36 yards in their first
meeting 11 days ago,
Johnson's worst day in
more than a year.
But the Jaguars (3-9)
realize there's little
chance it happens again
when the Texans (2-10)
come to town for the
rematch tonight. After
all, this is the same
inexperienced second-
ary that got torched by
Arizona's Michael Floyd
for 193 yards last month,
and by Cleveland's Josh
Gordon for 261 yards last
week.
"You definitely don't
want to see those kind
of performances on
your secondary," Jaguars
cornerback Alan Ball
said. "We have to put it
behind us, learn from it
and go from there."
Sounds simple, but
Johnson has a history
of success against
Jacksonville. He has
106 receptions for
1,470 yards and seven
touchdowns in 18
career games against
the Jaguars. And the
best game of his 11-year
career was a 14-catch,
273-yard performance
against Jacksonville last
year.

London game will have
morning time slot next
year: London is getting its first NFL
day game, creating a new morning
time slot for viewers in the United
States. The NFL announced that the
game between the Atlanta Falcons
and Detroit Lions atWembley
Stadium on Oct. 26 will start at 1:30
p.m. local time, making it a 9:30
a.m. ET kickoff in the U.S. The league
said the switch will make it easier
for a large global audience to tune
in, and create an unprecedented
fourth game window for American
viewers that Sunday. The other two
London games scheduled for next
season Dolphins-Raiders on
Sept. 28 and Cowboys-Jaguars on


TEXANS AT
JAGUARS
WHO: Houston (2-10)
at Jacksonville (3-9)
WHEN: Today, 8:25 p.m.
WHERE: EverBank Field,
Jacksonville
TV: NFL Network
RADIO: No local affiliate
TICKETS: ticketmaster.com

Nov. 9 will both start at 6 p.m.
local time.

Packers quarterback
expects a decision on
his playing status soon:
Aaron Rodgers expects a decision
Friday Saturday tops whether
he'll be medically cleared to face
the Atlanta Falcons in a game
crucial to the team's dwindling
playoff prospects. The results of a
scan on his fractured left collarbone
earlier in the week showed that he's
healing, but the outlook wasn't as
promising as he hoped. If he can't
go, Matt Flynn is back in again.

Death outside
Arrowhead Stadium ruled
to be a homicide: The death
of a Missouri man in an Arrowhead
Stadium parking lot during Kansas
City's game this weekend was
ruled a homicide, but police said it
could still take a few weeks before
they know what killed him. Kyle
Van Winkle, 30, of Smithville, was
unconscious on the ground when
police responded to a disturbance
call around 5:20 p.m. in Lot A at
Truman Sports Complex, where
Arrowhead is located. In announcing
the Jackson County medical
examiner's ruling Wednesday, police
spokesman Darin Snapp said that
wouldn't change how the case is
being handled.

Bills president not
thrilled with games in
Toronto: Buffalo Bills president
Russ Brandon is expressing concern
over whether his team loses a
competitive edge by playing annual
home games in Toronto. During his
weekly show on Buffalo's WGR-AM
radio station, Brandon said "nothing
comes above winning," before
adding the benefits of the"Bills In
Toronto"series will be "reviewed in
a grand manner." He stopped short
of saying whether the Bills would
consider canceling the series or
can opt out of the four remaining
years of their deal with Rogers
Communications.


AP PHOTO
Jaguars teammates Sen'Derrick Marks (99) and cornerback Alan
Ball (23) celebrate last week in Cleveland. Ball has the task of
covering Andre Johnson against the Texans today.


* NFL:


Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon (8) congratulates wide receiver Tiquan Underwood during the second quarter of
this season's game at Ford Field in Detroit.




Carrying momentum


Without playoff hopes, Bucs build for next year


By GREG AUMAN & JOE SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA- Defensive
tackle Gerald McCoy said
while the Buccaneers
have been eliminated
from playoff contention,
they still have much to
play for in the final four
games this season.
"We're not going to the
playoffs. It's a fact. So
what?" McCoy said. "Are
we going to lay down,
or are we going to finish
off strong? We have four
more weeks to leave our
mark on 2013. What are
we going to do with it? It's
up to us."
McCoy said it's import-
ant to establish positive


momentum for the
offseason, remembering
last year's season-ending
win against Atlanta that
ended a five-game losing
streak.
"Same thing: Our last
four games, how we finish
this season, that's the
first thing you're going
to talk about next year,"
McCoy said. "We've got
four more guaranteed
opportunities to leave our
mark. We have to refocus
and prepare to be able to
do that."

INJURY UPDATE: WR Vincent
Jackson missed the early portion of
Wednesday's practice. Coach Greg
Schiano said Jackson has a hamstring


BILLS AT BUCS
WHO: Buffalo (4-8)
at Tampa Bay (3-9)
WHEN: Sunday, 1 p.m.
WHERE: Raymond James
Stadium, Tampa
TV: FOX
RADIO: 103.5 FM, 620 AM,
1580 AM

issue but believes it's nothing
serious. He pointed out Jackson, like
another veteran, RG Davin Joseph,
was supposed to get an extra day off
anyway.
"We're getting into the fourth
quarter of the season, and some of
the guys have played a lot of football,"
Schiano said. "We've got to give them
a third day or a Wednesday to get


some extra rehab."
Meanwhile, CB Darrelle Revis, who
left Sunday's game due to a chest/
shoulder injury, practiced and seems
likely to play Sunday against the Bills.
Schiano also said there should be
an update soon on LG Carl Nicks, who
has missed most of the season with a
foot injury and MRSA infection.
Though Nicks hasn't been seen
in the locker room during media
availability, Schiano said he is in
Tampa and the two are in touch often.

ROSTER UPDATE: The
Bucs put LB Jonathan Casillas on
season-ending injured reserve with
a knee injury and signed former
UConn LB Danny Lansanah off of the
Jets' practice squad. Lansanah hasn't
played an NFL game since he was a
rookie with the Packers in 2008.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK


Tonight'

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

An old keg is the
traveling trophy that
goes to the winner of a
long-standing Ohio River
football rivalry. And it's
most of what's at stake
when No. 19 Louisville
plays at Cincinnati
tonight.
The Keg of Nails won't
be changing hands
again anytime soon with
Louisville (10-1, 6-1)
leaving for the Atlantic
Coast Conference next
year. Cincinnati (9-2, 6-1)
will stay in the American
Athletic Conference.
The Cardinals can't
win the league title
because their one loss


game may impact UCF


CARDINALS AT
BEARCATS
WHO: Louisville (10-1, 6-1 AAC)
at Cincinnati (9-2, 6-1)
WHEN: Today, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Nippert Stadium,
Cincinnati
TV: ESPN

was to first-place Central
Florida, but the Bearcats
have a slim chance. They
could win the conference
title by beating Louisville,
if Central Florida also
loses to SMU on Saturday.
Cincinnati would get
the BCS bowl berth if
it finishes higher than
Central Florida in the
final BCS standings.


There is no head-to-head
tiebreaker because the
two teams did not play
each other during the
season.

Zach Mettenberger's
college career comes to an
end: The LSU quarterback injured his
left knee while unloading a 32-yard
completion in the fourth quarter
of No. 14 LSU's 31-27 victory over
Arkansas last Friday, and LSU coach
Les Miles confirmed that the injury
is a torn ACL. Mettenberger will miss
the Tigers' bowl game and undergo
surgery. His rehabilitation will take
place when he would have been
preparing for next spring's NFL draft.

Winston among 5
finalists for Walter Camp
award: Florida State's Jameis
Winston, Alabama's AJ McCarron


and Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel,
Northern Illinois'Jordan Lynch and
Boston College's Andre Williams are
the five finalists for the Walter Camp
player of the year award. Notre Dame
linebacker Manti Te'o won the Walter
Camp player of the year award last
year. Winston was also named ACC
Player of the Year.

Grambling State hires
new head coach: The
University has named current
McNeese State tight ends coach
Broderick Fobbs as the Tigers' next
head coach. Fobbs, whose hiring
was announced Wednesday, will
remain with McNeese through the
Cowboys'second-round FCS playoff
game Saturday. He'll then take over
for Dennis "Dirt"Winston, who was
Grambling's second interim coach
of 2013. Grambling went 1-11 this
season.


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013






The Sun/Thursday, December 5,2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Cincinnati
GOLF
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, World Challenge, first
round, atThousand Oaks, Calif.
12 Mid.
TGC European PGA Tour, Hong Kong
Open, second round
4a.m.
TGC -Nedbank Challenge, second round,
at Sun City, South Africa
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7p.m.
ESPN2 -West Virginia at Missouri
FS1 -LIU at Seton Hall
8p.m.
FSN -Texas A&M-CC at Oklahoma
9p.m.
ESPN2 Mississippi at Kansas St.
FS1 -High Point at Georgetown
NBA BASKETBALL
7p.m.
TNT- NewYork at Brooklyn
9:30 p.m.
TNT- Miami at Chicago
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
FSFL -Winnipeg at Florida
SUN -Ottowa atTampa Bay
NFL FOOTBALL
8p.m.
NFL Houston at Jacksonville

Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA FOOTBALL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
Louisville 7 31/2 (51) atCincinnati
Friday
Conference Championships
Mid-American
At Detroit
N. Illinois 3 31/2(581/2) Bowling
Green
Saturday
atUConn Pk
Pk (43) Memphis
at Rutgers 7 6 (461/2) South
Florida
atBaylor 14 15(711/2) Texas
at South Alabama Pk 3
(58) La.-Lafayette
at SMU OFF OFF UCF
at Oklahoma St.101/29/2 (57) Oklahoma
Off Key
SMU QB questionable
Conference Championships
Conference USA
Marshall 41/2 41/2(601/2) at Rice
Southeastern
At Atlanta
Auburn 3 2 (58) Missouri
Atlantic Coast
At Charlotte, N.C.
Florida St. 30 29 (62) Duke
Pacific-12
at Arizona St. 3 3 (56) Stanford
Big Ten
At Indianapolis
OhioSt. 61/2 51/2(511/2) Michigan St.
Mountain West
at Fresno St. 31/2 31/2 (60) Utah St.
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE 0 T O/U UNDERDOG
Houston 3 3 (43) atJacksonville
Sunday
KansasCity 3 3 (45) atWashington
at Baltimore 7 7 (43) Minnesota
at New EnglandOFFOFF(OFF) Cleveland
at N.Y. Jets 3 21/2(401/2) Oakland
at Cincinnati 51/2 51/2(431/2) Indianapolis
at NewOrleans 31/2 31/2(451/2) Carolina
at Philadelphia 21/2 21/2 (54) Detroit
at Pittsburgh 31/2 3 (401/2) Miami
atTampa Bay 21/2 21/2 (43) Buffalo
at Denver 121/2 12(491/2) Tennessee
at Arizona 7 61/2(411/2) St. Louis
at San Diego 3 3 (471/2) N.Y. Giants
at San Francisco 21/2 21/2 (41) Seattle
at Green Bay OFFOFF(OFF) Atlanta
Monday
at Chicago Pk 1 (491/2) Dallas
Off Key
Cleveland QB questionable
Green Bay QB questionable
NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
Valparaiso 31/2 at Ball St.
Richmond 31/2atWilliam
& Mary
atOhioSt. 10 Maryland
atVirginia 4 Wisconsin
at GeorgeWashington 91/2
Rutgers
at George Mason 31/2 South Florida
atWake Forest 171/2 Tulane
atToledo 9 Detroit
Harvard 3 at Northeastern
at Drexel 61/2 Cleveland St.
at NC State 9 Northwestern
at Louisiana Tech 111/2 La.-Lafayette
SMU 91/2 at Il.-Chicago
atVillanova 171/2 Penn
atTexasA&M 9 Houston
atTemple 21/2 Saint Joseph's
at Michigan St. 9 North Carolina
at Purdue 21/2 Boston College
at Nebraska 51/2 Miami
at Pepperdine 41/2 Cal St.-Fullerton
at Fordham 14 Furman
at lona 18 Marist
at Charlotte 81/2 Davidson
atW Illinois 3 E. Illinois
at Southern Miss. 10 Morehead St.
at Samford 61/2 UT-Martin
at Murray St. Pk Evansville
atBradley-x 111/2 IUPUI
x-at Renaissance Coliseum
NBA
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
Denver 412(20212) at Cleveland
LA. Clippers 31/2(2021/2) at Atlanta
at Houston 101/2(209) Phoenix
at New Orleans 11/2(2061/2) Dallas
Detroit 41/2 (193) at Milwaukee
Indiana 8 (187) at Utah
San Antonio 41/2 (205) at Minnesota
at Portland 212(2041 2)Oklahoma City
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atNewJersey -110 Montreal -110
atDetroit -125 Philadelphia +105
Phoenix -130 at Calgary +110

Pro football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
New England
DOLPHINS
N.Y Jets
Buffalo
South
Indianapolis
Tennessee
JAGUARS
Houston
North
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
West
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


Pet PF PA
.750 322 261
.500 252 248
.417 189 310
333 267 307
Pct PF PA
.667 285 274
.417 264 267
.250 174 352
.167 230 323
Pct PF PA
.667 292 216
.500 249 235
.417 263 278
.333 231 297
Pct PF PA
.833 464 317
.750 298 214
.417 279 277
333 237 300


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0 583 329 303
Philadelphia 7 5 0 .583 300 281
N.Y Giants 5 7 0 .417 237 297
Washington 3 9 0 .250 269 362
South W L T Pet PF PA
NewOrleans 9 3 0 .750 312 230


Carolina 9 3 0 .750
BUCS 3 9 0 .250;
Atlanta 3 9 0 .250
North W L T Pet
SDetroit 7 5 0 583 3
I Chicago 6 6 0 .500 3
Green Bay 5 6 1 .458
SMinnesota 3 8 1 .292
West W L T Pet
x-Seattle 11 1 0 917 3
San Francisco 8 4 0 .667
Arizona 7 5 0 583
St. Louis 5 7 0 .417
x-clinched playoffspot
S Today's game
Houston at JAGUARS, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday's games
Atlanta at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Kansas Cityat Washington, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at BUCS, 1 p.m.
DOLPHINS at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
SSeattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
SCarolina at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
S Monday's game
Dallas at Chicago, 8:40 p.m.

Pro hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts
Boston 27 18 7 2 38
I Montreal 29 17 9 3 37
Detroit 29 14 8 7 35
LIGHTNING 27 16 10 1 33
Toronto 28 14 11 3 31
Ottawa 28 11 13 4 26
PANTHERS 28 716 5 19
Buffalo 28 6 20 2 14
S Metropolitan Division


285 157
217 285
261 340
PF PA
326 287
323 332
294 305
289 366
PF PA
340 186
297 197
275 247
279 278


GF GA
75 55
80 62
81 79
76 67
77 77
82 92
61 95
48 85


GP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 29 19 9 1 39 89 66
Washington 28 14 12 2 30 83 82
N.Y. Rangers 28 14 14 0 28 62 71
Philadelphia 28 13 13 2 28 63 68
NewJersey 29 11 12 6 28 64 71
Carolina 28 11 12 5 27 61 79
Columbus 28 11 14 3 25 68 80
N.Y. Islanders 28 815 5 21 74 96
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division


GP W LOTPts GI
Chicago 29 20 5 4 44 105
St. Louis 26 18 5 3 39 9
Colorado 25 19 6 0 38 76
Minnesota 29 16 8 5 37 71
Dallas 26 13 9 4 30 74
Winnipeg 29 13 12 4 30 78
Nashville 28 13 12 3 29 63
Pacific Division
GP W LOTPts GI
San Jose 27 19 3 5 43 96
Anaheim 30 18 7 5 41 9.
LosAngeles 29 18 7 4 40 76
Phoenix 27 16 7 4 36 9
Vancouver 30 15 10 5 35 8i
Calgary 26 9 13 4 22 71
SEdmonton 29 9 18 2 20 75
NOTE: Two points for a win, one po
overtime loss.
Wednesday's results
Montreal 4, NewJersey 3, SO
Philadelphia 6, Detroit 3
Phoenix at Calgary, late
Today's games
N.Y Rangers at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Dallas atToronto, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at LIGHTNING, 7:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at PANTHERS, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.

ECHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OLSLPts G
SWheeling 1911 5 0 3 25 5
Reading 1610 6 0 0 20 4
Elmira 17 510 0 2 12 3
North Division
GPW L OLSLPts G
Cincinnati 1912 7 0 0 24 6
Evansville 1710 4 0 3 23 4
FortWayne 17 7 7 1 2 17 5
Kalamazoo 15 7 6 0 2 16 4
Toledo 16 5 9 2 0 12 4
South Division
GPW L OLSLPts G
SouthCarolina1914 2 1 2 31 6
Florida 2013 5 1 1 28 7
Orlando 2012 7 0 1 25 5
Greenville 19 710 1 1 16 3
Gwinnett 20 613 0 1 13 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division


F GA
5 80
1 60
6 52
0 67
4 76
3 82
3 78

F GA
6 62
3 80
6 62
1 86
0 78
0 93
5 101
int for


F GA
4 44
3 37
8 54

F GA
2 52
9 52
0 60
4 42
2 58

F GA
4 42
5 49
4 50
6 45
2 58


GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Colorado 1912 4 3 0 27 60 48
Alaska 1611 5 0 0 22 58 28
Idaho 18 9 5 2 2 22 56 54
Utah 16 6 8 1 1 14 35 40
Pacific Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Ontario 2014 2 1 3 32 62 45
Stockton 1911 6 0 2 24 60 51
SanFrancisco20 612 1 1 14 33 66
LasVegas 18 611 1 0 13 43 60
Bakersfield 18 512 0 1 11 37 62
Note: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Wednesday's results
Colorado 3, Orlando 1
Alaska at Utah, late
Stockton at Idaho, late
Today's games
I Kalamazoo at Greenville, 7 p.m.
Toledo at Evansville, 8:15 p.m.

AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Manchester 2315 4 1 3 34 72 56
Providence 2111 7 1 2 25 74 71
St.John's 2311 9 1 2 25 66 67
Worcester 17 8 8 1 0 17 38 49
Portland 18 7 8 1 2 17 46 53
East Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Binghamton 21 14 6 0 1 29 78 59
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton2113 5 1 2
29 7053
Syracuse 2011 7 1 1 24 56 53
Norfolk 2210 8 0 4 24 57 56
Hershey 19 7 7 2 3 19 57 59
Northeast Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Springfield 2014 4 1 1 30 62 47
Albany 2213 7 1 1 28 69 61
Adirondack 21 910 0 2 20 48 55
Hartford 21 910 0 2 20 55 69
Bridgeport 21 710 1 3 18 56 73
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Grand Rapids21 15 4 1 1 32 81 51
Milwaukee 2010 5 4 1 25 51 55
Rockford 241211 1 0 25 69 84
Chicago 2110 9 0 2 22 57 56
Iowa 19 811 0 0 16 45 53
North Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Toronto 2012 7 1 0 25 59 53
Rochester 2210 8 2 2 24 70 72
Hamilton 2210 9 0 3 23 59 63
LakeErie 2010 9 0 1 21 56 62
Utica 20 612 1 1 14 44 65
West Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Abbotsford 2517 6 1 1 36 83 70
Texas 2412 8 2 2 28 83 72


SanAntonio 221010 0 2 22 61 63
Oklahoma City23 9 11 0 3 21 60 69
Charlotte 21 713 0 1 15 54 67
Note: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Wednesday's results
Albany 6, Springfield 4
Bridgeport 1, Adirondack 0
Rochester 6, Utica 1
Iowa 5, San Antonio 4, SO
Today's games
Rockford at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Lake Erie, 7 p.m.

Pro basketball
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W L Pet GB
Boston 8 12 .400 -
Philadelphia 7 12 .368 1/2
Toronto 6 11 .353 1/2
Brooklyn 5 13 .278 2
NewYork 3 13 .188 3
Southeast W L Pet GB
Miami 14 4 .778 -
Washington 9 9 .500 5
Atlanta 10 10 .500 5
Charlotte 8 11 .421 61/2
Orlando 6 12 .333 8
Central W L Pet GB
Indiana 16 2 .889 -
Detroit 9 10 .474 71/2
Chicago 7 9 .438 8
Cleveland 6 12 .333 10
Milwaukee 3 15 .167 13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pet GB
San Antonio 15 3 .833 -
Houston 13 7 .650 3
Dallas 12 8 .600 4
Memphis 9 8 .529 51/2
NewOrleans 9 9 .500 6
Northwest W L Pet GB
Portland 15 3 .833 -
Oklahoma City 13 3 .813 1
Denver 11 7 .611 4
Minnesota 9 10 .474 61/2
Utah 4 15 .211 111/2
Pacific W L Pet GB
LA.Clippers 12 7 .632 -
Golden State 11 8 .579 1
Phoenix 10 9 .526 2
L.A. Lakers 9 9 .500 21/2
Sacramento 4 12 .250 61/2
Wednesday's results
Cleveland 98, Denver 88
Atlanta 107, LA. Clippers 97
Phoenix 97, Houston 88
Detroit 105, Milwaukee 98
Dallas 100, NewOrleans 97
San Antonio at Minnesota, ppd.
Indiana at Utah, late
Oklahoma Cityat Portland, late
Today's games
New York at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 9:30 p.m.

College basketball
MEN
Wednesday's results
SOUTH
Alabama 76, North Florida 48
Appalachian St. 78, North Greenville 70
Barton 101, Belmont Abbey 97
Coastal Carolina 76,W. Carolina 68
Davidson 87, Charlotte 78, OT
ETSU 80, Austin Peay 74
Georgia Southern 75, Brewton-Parker 66
Georgia St. 71,Young Harris54
Lenoir-Rhyne 78, Brevard 65
Longwood 95,WVUTech 80
Louisiana-Lafayette 89, Louisiana Tech 80
Louisville 90, UMKC 62
Mount Olive 94, Pfeiffer 82
Mount St.Joseph 87,Transylvania 70
MurraySt.65, Evansville63
NC State 69, Northwestern 48
Radford 111, Cent. Pennsylvania 72
Richmond 71,William& Mary 60
Sewanee 54, Maryville (Tenn.) 52
South Florida 68, George Mason 66
Southern Miss. 74, Morehead St. 60
St. Augustine's 72, Chowan 67
UT-Martin 89, Samford 73
Union (Ky.) 78,Tenn.Wesleyan 70
Wake Forest 72,Tulane 57
Wisconsin 48,Virginia 38
Wofford 65, Gardner-Webb 62
EAST
Adelphi61,Pace51
American U. 76, Howard 53
Binghamton 74, Mount St. Mary's 70
Bryant 72,Yale 64
CCSU 65, New Hampshire 56
Columbia 81, Army 64
Curry 68,W. New England 61
Dowling 78, Felician 74, OT
Drexel 85, Cleveland St. 82,30T
Duquesne 94, UMBC 88
Fordham 79, Furman 48
Franklin Pierce 77, S. New Hampshire 63
Gannon 68, Slippery Rock 61
George Washington 93, Rutgers 87
Green Mountain 102, Johnson St. 99,OT
Harvard 72, Northeastern 64
Holy Cross 62, Albany (NY) 57
lona 83, Marist 74
La Salle 75, Hartford 62
LeMoyne 66, American International 59, OT
Lehigh 57, St. Francis (Pa.) 50
Loyola (Md.) 87, Catholic 75
Merrimack 82, Bentley 71
NJIT 81, Maine 72
NYU 77, Merchant Marine 67
Navy 79,The Citadel 74
Old Westbury86, St.Joseph's (LI) 58
Philadelphia 76, Chestnut Hill 68
Purchase 69, Mount St.Vincent 53
Randolph-Macon 66,Washington & Lee 56
Rochester 85, Hobart 75
S. Connecticut 76, St. Rose 55
Sacred Heart 73, Hofstra 59
St. Anselm 99, St. Michael's 90
StevensTech 90, Baruch 78
Stonehill 61, Assumption 56
Stony Brook 77, Fairleigh Dickinson 62
Temple 77, Saint Joseph's 69
Utica 103, SUNY-Canton 86
Vaughn 97, Brooklyn 93, OT
Villanova 77, Penn 54
William Paterson 74, Richard Stockton 72
MIDWEST
Bethel (Minn.) 69, St. Mary's (Minn.) 58
Bucknell66, Kent St. 59
Dayton 56, Delaware St. 46
IUPUI72, Bradley66
Illinois St. 75, Chicago St. 56
Indiana Tech 54, Concordia (Mich.) 52
Madonna 89, Northwestern Ohio 81
Michigan-Dearborn 82, Marygrove 58
Missouri St. 81,Cameron 57
Ohio St. 76, Maryland 60
Purdue 88, Boston College 67
S. Dakota St. 88, Dakota St. 62
SMU 73,11I.-Chicago 65
St. Norbert 71, Lake Forest 56
St.Thomas (Minn.) 71, Augsburg 53
Toledo 91, Detroit 75
Valparaiso 69, Ball St. 50
W. lllinois60, E. lllinois32
Wis.-La Crosse 0,Wis.-River Falls 52
Wis.-PlattevilleB0,Wis.-Oshkosh66
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 74,Wis.-Eau Claire 55
Youngstown St. 84, Robert Morris 76
SOUTHWEST
Houston Baptist 73, Rice 71
IncarnateWord 77, St. Edward's 67


Texas A&M 74, Houston 57
Texas St. 79, Cedarville 58
Tulsa 98,Texas Southern 71
WEST
New Mexico 79, New Mexico St. 70
WOMEN
Wednesday's results
SOUTH
Alabama St. 44, Samford 40, OT
American U. 58, Hampton 46
Barton 76, Belmont Abbey 67
Delaware St. 90, George Mason 83, OT
Florida 104,Troy 74


Florida Gulf Coast 60, South Florida 55
Florida St. 60, Michigan St. 58
Georgia Southern 61, Mercer 54
Georgia Tech 93, Illinois 69
Jacksonville 87,Tennessee St. 66
Lenoir-Rhyne67, Brevard 48
Maryland 67, Ohio St. 55
MiddleTennessee 69, Austin Peay43
Milligan 80, Columbia (SC) 54
Mississippi 79, Louisiana Tech 68
Mississippi St. 78, Louisiana-Lafayette 51
Mount Olive 59, Pfeiffer 36
NC A&T 62, Appalachian St. 43
North Carolina 75, Nebraska 62
Rutgers 66, Davidson 35
Tenn.Wesleyan 58, Union (Ky.) 48
UT-Martin 75, Alabama 57
W. Carolina 42, Presbyterian 38
Wofford 63, Bluefield 44
EAST
Albany (NY) 81, Dartmouth 59
Boston U. 66, UMass 63
Brown 66, Rhode Island 56
Bucknell 78,Towson 62
Buffalo 87, St. Francis (Pa.) 77
CCNY 71, Merchant Marine 69
Colgate 65, Drexel 60
Cornell 63, Binghamton 55
Drew 83, Albertus Magnus 68
Holy Cross 70, Northeastern 62
Howard 45, New Hampshire 40
James Madison 71, Pittsburgh 61
Notre Dame 77, Penn St. 67
Philadelphia 65, Chestnut Hill 53
Quinnipiac 62, Hartford 49
SaintJoseph's 73,Temple 53
St. Bonaventure61,Canisius47
St. Francis (NY) 73, Columbia 47
Stony Brook 77, St. Peter's 47
Union (NY) 54, Hamilton 51
Vassar 88, St.Joseph's (LI) 41
W. New England 72, Curry 55
William Paterson 81, Richard Stockton 71
Yale 72, Bryant 61
Yeshiva 68,York (NY) 67
MIDWEST
Adrian 80, St. Mary's (Ind.) 70
Aquinas 60, Lourdes 43
Arkansas 64, Kansas 53
Bethel (Minn.) 78, St. Mary's (Minn.) 69
Calvin 77, Albion 69
Carthage 78, Clarke 36
Cincinnati 75, Morehead St. 44
Concordia (Wis.) 72, Edgewood 41
Davenport 55, Siena Heights 51
E. Illinois 71,Bradley67
E. Michigan 82, Loyola of Chicago 64
Evansville 80, IPFW 67
Finlandia 53, Northland 47
Gustavus 75, Hamline 66
IUPUI 79,W. Michigan 64
Indiana 71,Virginia Tech 65
Indiana Tech 85, Concordia (Mich.) 79
Iowa St. 83, N. Iowa 55
Kalamazoo 79, Alma 57
Kent St. 69, Niagara 46
Macalester at Concordia (Moor.), ppd.
Madonna 62, Northwestern Ohio 58
Miami (Ohio) 70,Youngstown St. 67
Michigan-Dearborn 71,Marygrove37
Milwaukee Engineering 65, Marian (Wis.)
59
Missouri 86, Oral Roberts 64
North Dakota 78, Milwaukee 66
SE Missouri 72, S. Illinois 50
St. Catherine 70, St. Benedict 69
St. Norbert 73, Lake Forest 50
St.Thomas (Minn.) 56, Augsburg 40
UMKC 83, Maryville (Mo.) 79
Wis. Lutheran 70, Lakeland 56
Wis.-Oshkosh 76,Wis.-Platteville 49
Wis.-River Falls 59,Wis.-LaCrosse 56
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 85,Wis.-Eau Claire 45
Wis.-Whitewater 85, Elmhurst 71
Xavier 70, Murray St. 66
SOUTHWEST
North Texas 70,Texas-Arlington 55
Oklahoma 97,W. Illinois 80
SMU 82, SE Louisiana 39
TCU 60, Stephen F. Austin 52
Texas 60, UALR 26
TexasTech 58, Ark.-Pine Bluff50
W. New Mexico 59, Angelo St. 52
Washington 66, Houston 55
WEST
Colorado 63, WyVoming 59
N. Colorado 74, Denver 71
Oregon 105, Seattle 100

Pro soccer
MLS Playoffs
MLSCUP
Saturday, Dec. 7: Real Salt Lake at
Sporting KC, 4 p.m.

Transactions
BASEBALL
MLB Suspended New York Yankees
catcher Ryan Baker 50 games for refusing
to take an offseason drug test in violation
of baseball's minor league drug program.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Signed C AJ. Pier-
zynski to a one-year contract.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Agreed to
terms with 1 B Paul Konerko on a one-year
contract.
DETROIT TIGERS Agreed to terms
with RHP Joe Nathan on a two-year con-
tract.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Signed LHP
Scott Kazmir to a two-year contract.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS Named Jay Bell
bench coach and Don Long hitting coach.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Signed
RHP Ryan Vogelsong to a one-year con-
tract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS-Assigned G Dennis
Schroderto Bakersfield (NBADL).
CHICAGO BULLS Recalled G Marquis
Teaguefrom Iowa (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL Fined Pittsburgh coach Mike
Tomlin $100,000 for interfering with play
against Baltimore during a Nov. 28 game.
BUFFALO BILLS Released RBTashard
Choice. Signed TETony Moeaki.
CLEVELAND BROWNS Signed
WR Brian Tyms from the practice squad.
Placed DL Desmond Bryant on the reserve/
non-football illness list. Released LB Justin
Staples from the practice squad. Signed
DB TJ. Heath, DL Cam Henderson and LB
Johnathan Stewart to the practice squad.
DETROIT LIONS Signed LB Julian
Stanford.
GREEN BAY PACKERS Announced
the resignation of vice president of sales
and marketing Tim Connolly, effective Feb.
1,2014.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Released
TE DJ.Williams.
NEW YORK JETS Signed LB Tim Fug-
ger to the practice squad.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Placed
LB Jonathan Casillas on injured reserve.
Signed LB Danny Lansanah from the New
YorkJets'practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Recalled Fs
Jeremy Morin and Joakim Nordstrom from
Rockford (AHL). Reassigned F Brandon Pirri
to Rockford. Assigned D Michael Kostka to
Rockford on a conditioning assignment.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Recalled


G Mike McKenna from Springfield (AHL).
Assigned F Michael Chaputto Springfield.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled LW
Reid Boucher from Albany (AHL). Placed F
Ryan Carter on injured reserve, retroactive
to Nov. 30.
NEW YORK RANGERS Agreed to
terms with G Henrik Lundqvist on a con-
tract extension.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Recalled D
MattTaormina from Syracuse (AHL).


QUICK HITS


MIAMI ONE OF CITIES they actually plan to deliver all six
remaining venues after the Dec. 31
TARGETED FOR MLS deadline, but claim only three are

EXPANSION delayed, with the other three being
handed nvpr aftpr thp pvnprtpd datp


NEWYORK (AP) -
Major League Soccer
hopes to place its next
two expansion teams in
Miami and Atlanta.
"We're making progress
in both of those markets. I
wouldn't say we're close,"
MLS Commissioner Don
Garber said Tuesday
ahead of this weekend's
championship game
between Real Salt Lake
and Sporting Kansas City.
Former Manchester
United, Real Madrid and
Los Angeles Galaxy star
David Beckham is leading
the Miami effort and has
the right to an expansion
team at a discount fee of
$25 million.
"We are very excited
about the opportunity of
David putting together
an ownership group and
finalizing a stadium site
in downtown Miami,"
Garber said. "We can't
go to Miami without the
right stadium solution.
David understands that.
The city understands
that. That is an indisput-
able fact."
New teams have been
announced for 2015
in New York City and
Orlando, increasing the
league's total to 21. MLS
began with 10 teams in
1996, expanded to 12
and then contracted to
10 in 2002 when Miami
and Tampa Bay were
eliminated.
"The Miami today
demographically, socially,
politically is very different
from the Miami of 2002
where we folded the
Miami Fusion," Garber
said. "So we believe
Miami could work if we
get the right stadium
situation. We don't have
that yet."
Falcons owner Arthur
Blank heads the Atlanta
venture, which would
play at his NFL team's
new stadium ,scheduled
to open in 2017.
The two new teams
would give the league
23 teams, one short
of the league's goal
for 2020. Garber said
that Minneapolis, San
Antonio, St. Louis and
Austin, Texas, are among
the possibilities for a 24th
team....
The Brazilian government has
brushed aside the importance of more
delays in completing 2014 World Cup
stadiums, saying that missing FIFA's
deadline will not affect the country's
ability to successfully host next year's
tournament. Brazilian officials said




WINSTON

FROM PAGE 1

reported that DNA
belonging to Winston was
found in the underwear
of the accuser. A lawyer
for Winston has suggested
that the star quarterback
and the accuser had
consensual sex. But the
family of the victim has
accused the 19-year-old
of rape.
Meggs has said he
wanted to make sure
prosecutors completed
a thorough investigation
before making a final
decision. He has also
said several times that
it's up to prosecutors to
determine whether there
is a "reasonable" chance
of conviction.
Timothy Jansen, the
attorney representing
Winston, said he does not
know what Meggs will
announce.
"We're hoping and
waiting like everyone
else, and we believe the
evidence will exonerate
Mr. Winston," Jansen said.
Despite the ongoing
sexual assault investiga-
tion, on the field Winston


and the Seminoles have
remained focused. The
preparation phase has
been a significant part of


only because of problems accom-
modating the schedule of Brazilian
President Dilma Rousseff, who wants
to be present for the ceremonies.


OLYMPICS

IOC president headed
to check on Brazil: Warning
that Brazil has"no time to lose/new
International Olympic Committee
President Thomas Bach will travel
"in the next couple of months"to Rio
de Janeiro to check on the troubled
preparations for the 2016 Games.
With less than three years to go,
preparations for the Rio Games remain
dogged by construction delays,
financial uncertainties, environmental
worries and possible public protests.
The Olympics face many of the same
concerns afflicting next year's World
Cup in Brazil, where three stadiums
will not be finished by the requested
deadline. ...
With Los Angeles hoping to mount
a bid for the 2024 Summer Games,
U.S. Olympic officials said they are
in the process of visiting potential
sites around the country. They have
already visited Los Angeles during the
fall. The number of American cities
that have expressed serious interest
is fewer than 10, and the visits are
expected to conclude in January.
Dallas, Washington, Boston and San
Diego are among the potential suitors.
Bach has said he would like to see an
American bid.


SKIING

Vonn says knee feels
stable, might compete: After
a day of World Cup downhill training,
Lindsey Vonn smiled as she chatted
with U.S. teammates Julia Mancuso,
Stacey Cook and Leanne Smith.
Closing in on competing for the first
time in 10 months, Vonn was pleased
to be back on the elite ski racing scene
completing a safe training run and
declaring her surgically repaired right
knee "stable." She said she will wait
until after the training run scheduled
for today to decide whether to race
this week.


BOXING

De La Hoya leads Hall
of Fame class: Oscar De La
Hoya, who won Olympic gold and
became a champion in six weight
divisions in winning 10 world titles,
has been selected for induction into
the International Boxing Hall of Fame.
He headlines the class of 2014, which
also includes Felix "Tito"Trinidad, Joe
Calzaghe, George Chaney, Charles
Ledoux and Mike O'Dowd in the
old-timer category, while Tom Allen
is the lone honoree in the pioneer
category. The Hall of Fame's 25th class
also includes promoter Barry Hearn,
referees Richard Steele and Eugene
Corri, journalist Graham Houston and
veteran Sports Illustrated photogra-
pher Neil Leifer in the non-participant
and observer categories.


Winston's decision-mak-
ing ability. Coach Jimbo
Fisher runs intense offen-
sive meetings so Winston
is able to recognize a
defense and know the
weakness of the call.
"I literally had to start
taking my ADD medicine
so I can pay attention
and get every single
thing," Winston said with
a laugh. "You've got to
take notes in there all the
time. You've got to be up
to date, every single time
or you're going to miss
something."
Duke (10-2) hasn't over-
whelmed its opponents
defensively.
The Blue Devils are the
No. 5 scoring defense (23
points per game) in the
ACC and No. 9 in yards
allowed per game (395.2).
Winston has been adept
at going through his
progressions and taking
the easy, short comple-
tion when the deep ball is
taken away.
Duke coach David
Cutcliffe is still worried
about the big plays from
an offense that had nine
players voted All-ACC.
"You have to defend


and compete to where
they have to work to earn
yards, which is difficult to
do," Cutcliffe said.






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 5,2013


0 NBA ROUNDUP


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
LaQuinton Ross scored 17
of his 20 points in the first
half, hitting his first four
3-pointers, to lead No. 5
Ohio State to an early lead
and a 76-60 victory over
Maryland on Wednesday
night in the ACC/Big Ten
Challenge.
Sam Thompson added
14 points, including four
rim-rattling dunks, and
Lenzelle Smith Jr. had 12.
Aaron Craft created havoc
on defense and chipped
in with 10 points as the
Buckeyes (7-0) controlled
the game at both ends.
Ex-Xavier guard Dez
Wells had 19 points, for-
mer Michigan swingman
Evan Smotrycz scored
15 and Charles Mitchell
added 12 points and 11
rebounds for Maryland
(5-3), which had won four
in a row after losing two of
its first three.
This is Maryland's last
ACC/Big Ten Challenge
- well, at least as an
ACC team. Next year,
the Terrapins join the
Buckeyes in the new 14-
team Big Ten.

No. 8 Wisconsin 48,
Virginia 38: Charlottesville, Va.,
Josh Gasser scored 11 points and


Minnesota Timberwolves players leave as smoke engulfs the basketball court before Wednesday
night's game in Mexico City. The game will be replayed in Minnesota at a date to be determined.



Smoke postpones




Mexcio City game


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEXICO CITY-The
NBA postponed the game
between the San Antonio
Spurs and Minnesota
Timberwolves because of
smoky conditions inside
the Mexico City arena.
The game scheduled for
Wednesday night will be
made up in Minnesota at
a later date.
The arena was evacu-
ated about 45 minutes
before the scheduled
9:30 p.m. tipoffwhen a


HEAT AT BULLS
WHO: Miami (14-4)
at Chicago (7-9)
WHEN: Today, 9:30 p.m.
WHERE: United Center, Chicago
TV:TNT
RADIO: 99.3 FM

generator malfunction
outside the arena sent
smoke pouring into
the building, according
to NBA spokeswoman
Sharon Lima.


While the teams were
warming up, lights went
out in parts of the arena
and smoke poured out of
vents in the upper deck.

Cavaliers 98, Nuggets
88: In Cleveland, Kyrie Irving scored
23 points and the Cavaliers snapped
Denver's seven-game winning streak.

Hawks 107, Clippers 97:
In Atlanta, Kyle Korver tied the NBA
record with a 3-pointer in his 89th
consecutive games as the Hawks beat
Los Angeles.


* COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP



Ross, No. 5 Ohio St.



smother Maryland


Wisconsin (9-0) won a defensive
struggle against Virginia (7-2), limiting
the Cavaliers to 23 percent shooting
(11 for 47).

No. 7 Louisville 90,
Missouri-Kansas City 62:
Louisville, Ky., Montrezl Harrell scored
14 points to lead five Louisville players
in double figures as the Cardinals (7-1)
routed Missouri-Kansas City (1-6).

No. 25 Dayton 56,
Delaware State 46: In Dayton,
Ohio, Matt Kavanaugh scored 11 points
and Dayton (7-1) overcame a sluggish
first half, poor free throw shooting and
a late slump to defeat Delaware State
(2-6).

STATE
South Florida 68, George
Mason 66: In Fairfax, Va.,Corey
Allen, Jr. hit a floater with two seconds
remaining as South Florida (5-2) came
back from a 17-point second-half
deficit to beat George Mason (5-3).
S. FLORIDA 68, GEORGE MASON 66
SOUTH FLORIDA (5-2)
Rudd 5-134-4 15, Perry 5-7 4-614, Egbunu
1-1 1-23,AllenJr.5-8 9-1019,CollinsO -77-8
7, Brock 1-3 1-3 3, Abdul-Aleem 0-1 0-0 0,
LeDay 0-3 0-0 0, Hawkins 3-5 1-4 7. Totals
20-4827-3768.
GEORGE MASON (5-3)
Williams 0-3 1-2 1,Gujanicic 5-101-2 11,Al-
len 5-90-2 14,Wright6-13 8-1022,Edwards
3-4 0-0 7,Gray 1-31-2 3, Holloway3-8 0-0 6,
Copes 0-1 0-1 0, Okoloji 0-1 0-0 0, Jenkins
1-20-0 2.Totals24-5411-1966.
Halftime-George Mason 34-29. 3-Point
Goals-South Florida 1-9 (Rudd 1-3, Brock
0-1, Allen Jr. 0-1, Abdul-Aleem 0-1, Le-
Day 0-1, Collins 0-2), George Mason 7-17
(Allen 4-6, Wright 2-3, Edwards 1-1, Gray
0-1, Gujanicic 0-2, Holloway 0-4). Fouled


Out-None. Rebounds-South Florida
36 (Perry 11), George Mason 33 (Copes, Wil-
liams 6). Assists-South Florida 9 (Collins
5), George Mason 7 (Allen, Wright 2). Total
Fouls-South Florida 18, George Mason
24. Technical-Okoloji. A-4,587.

WOMEN
No. 4 Notre Dame 77,
No. 10 Penn State 67: In State
College, Pa., Natalie Achonwa had 21
points and 10 rebounds to lead Notre
Dame (7-0) in a victory over Penn State
(5-2).

No. 8 Maryland 67, Ohio
State 55: In College Park, Md.,
Alyssa Thomas had 25 points and
12 rebounds, and Maryland (8-1)
overcame a shaky first half to beat
Ohio State (6-4) in the ACC/Big Ten
Challenge.

No. 18 North Carolina
75, No. 15 Nebraska 62: In
Chapel Hill, N.C., Xylina McDaniel hit 11
of 15 shots and scored a game-high 25
points to lead North Carolina (7-2) in a
victory over Nebraska (6-2).

No. 17 Oklahoma 97, W
Illinois 80: In Norman, Okla., Aaryn
Ellenberg scored 25 points and four
teammates scored in double figures as
Oklahoma (6-2) beatWestern Illinois
(4-5).

Around the nation:
Louisville announced guard Antonita
Slaughter will undergo tests today to
determine what caused her to collapse
during Tuesday night's victory over
Missouri State.


0 NHL ROUNDUP


Time) !1 (Zu(c'1


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AP PHOTO
Montreal's P.K. Subban, far right. Brian Gionta, Tomas Plekanec
and Andrei Markov, left, celebrate David Desharnais'goal.


Habs bump off


N.J. in shootout


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWARK, N.J. David
Desharnais scored
the tying goal with 37
seconds left in the third
period and added a goal
in the shootout and the
Montreal Canadiens
rallied for a 4-3 victory
over the New Jersey Devils
on Wednesday.
Ears Eller also scored
in third period and
shootout for Montreal,
which also beat the Devils
in Montreal on Monday
night.
Rookie Reid Boucher,
making his NHL debut,
scored for the Devils in
the shootout, breaking
a string of 20 straight
missed chances by the
Devils, who are 0-5 in
shootouts this season.
Patrik Elias' unassisted
goal at 18:54 had given
the Devils a 3-2 edge, but
Desharnais redirected
a slap shot by Brian
Gionta to score at 19:23
for Montreal and force
overtime.

Flyers 6, Red Wings 3:
In Detroit, Sean Couturier had two
goal and two assists and Philadelphia
scored four goals in third period to
rally for a win over the Red Wings.


SENATORS AT
LIGHTNING
WHO: Ottawa (11-13-4)
atTampa Bay (16-10-1)
WHEN: Today, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Tampa Bay Times
Forum, Tampa
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 106.9 FM,
107.5 FM, 620 AM, 1220 AM,
1530 AM
TICKETS: ticketmaster.com

JETS AT PANTHERS
WHO: Winnipeg (13-12-4)
at Florida (7-16-5)
WHEN: Today, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: BB&T Center, Sunrise
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: No local affiliate


Around the league: Just
two days after watching from the
bench for a second straight game, No.
1 goalie Henrik Lundqvist agreed to
a long-term extension with the New
York Ranger. Lundqvist agreed to a
seven-year contract reportedly worth
$59.5 million, making make him the
NHL's highest-paid goalie. ...
The Columbus Blue Jackets placed
goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky on
injured reserve (groin strain) that will
sideline him for 4-5 weeks.


(Limited


-Page 6 SP


The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


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FREE
Hot Dogs
11 am-2pm


M. 8 AM 6 PM
nday 10AM 4 PM
3415 Tamiami Trail, Punta


Gorda, FL 33950


A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. i^&__ Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


n





,'/ ,r /

9y ^y\\ 11 /IC\ WI//I

Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation



Rommiynim
..........



23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Dr. Mark Asperilla
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Dawn Klemish
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Capt. Dan Sansiveri
Betty Staugler
Bryan Stockbridge
Tony Towns
Capt. Cayle Wills
Walter Wilt

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
941-205-6400
LPeth@sun-herald.com
Advertising Manager
Mike Ruiz
941-205-6402
MRuiz@sun-herald.com
Display Advertising
Chris Beckett
941-205-6405
CBeckett@sun-herald.com
Boaters' Bargains
941-429-3110
Printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
It take a bit of luck to catch a
king mackerel on 40-pound
fluorocarbon leader. Smarter
anglers use a short piece of wire.


Than


Although WaterLine comes out each and every
Thursday, our deadline is late Tuesday night. Once
those pages hit the press, it is what it is. I'd like
to say that 99.9 percent of the time our product
is perfect, even flawless. If you've ever dabbled in
the paper business, you should've gotten a good
chuckle out of that.
It takes a lot to pump out an edition each
week, and many people are relied upon to do
so both at the paper and various people in the
community. Of course, what would the paper be
without Sun Publisher David Dunn-Rankin. He lets
us do what we do. Then there's our advertising
crew. Leslee, Mike and Chris do their thing, and
they do it well.
But in terms of the actual content in WaterLine,


you have to look no further than our columnists.
Some write every week. Some write every month.
And for each article they submit, they have taken
time away from their schedules to sit down and
focus on a topic of their choice and do what they
like to do. They are writers, and WaterLine is
dependent on them. Sure, we may change some
words here and there, and we will certainly add
photos when needed, but our columnists speak
their own mind. They have their own voice.
Of course, WaterLine Publisher Josh Olive and
I are thrilled to get out on the water whenever
possible and write about our experiences, but
that just doesn't happen as often as you might
think. There's a whole lot to keep up with in the
world of fishing, hunting, boating, science and


everything outdoors. We depend a lot on wire
services and emails and notifications from various
agencies and organizations. But we also depend a
lot on groups and individuals in the community to
keep us in the loop of topics and issues relevant to
what we do.
People will contact us about something of
interest, or an upcoming event. Sometimes it
leads to a story, or at least a home in our Bulletin
Board.
Our fishing reports also keep us informed of
what's going on. From what's biting to red tide,
those bait shop guys are invaluable.
When press time comes on Tuesday, there are a
lot of thanks that need to go out especially to
our proofreader. Thanks, Pease!


I I I I;


I


If you have a comment or question for
WaterLine editor Lee Anderson, email
him at Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com.
LEE:
Lee, I drive over the U.S. 41 bridges every
workday and often see people fishing from
spots over 40 feet off the water. What
happens when they catch a fish they need
to release? I can't imagine the 40-foot fall
helps the fish's survival chances very much.
Duane Ising, Punta Gorda

MR. RISING:
1i li. I I Elir t'i'' ,.',ti,.E OC f i.'/ ll l: I I ,.'I" C' lE C'l I I llll I',.',
htl '.i tish t'),0 i T tih I li1 h ThaT sii CiOO I hai E lhj
hti',M h klAhc' 'E 1" / A0iiA' i IMi0liii f/01 h, Oi,
^l iKtuii/l ThE hititih p T hE ill)E/ci thE hiThEi
ThE, cha EiE isA Ti)' ThE tish 1kl71iE 5 :Oii? tiE Il,,i?
hi ]i li'dd n i Ti) linaAE' ThEli Tiansip'i T l ThElii tish' satfc'
It 1 i, h))A, a I'.')lih h itii'.l i Oin1i t',li T A lii if,
ai di7,iifh t"ihil 1ti hIllk] lT tp li'u} FEET TchE li i
Eic'i c'i I ,.ui Ti). iEIEa' Ei T if n li Tlic'h Ii lI,., i,.iiti T hE
i? i Sl E S .,ii ,.,i IT ft.i Ti T ,t.i a E h'O FEET t ip


9rrr


At the Range BILLY CARL
Load en'i up ladi,
Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS. DVM
inai,,d, i riutl, aridl latter


Angling 201 CAPT. MIKE MYERS
Fear fialr


Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Nee you rie I year hoig.
Birding ABBIE BANKS
.nmall parL. ib birNi.
Man on the Pier -MATT STEVENS
0, yVoiju I'vanrl 1i: a ;l, i eep h rierd'er
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
Maybe iti;twe ,to ,a
Florida Fauna JOSH OLIVE
Fl:oat liL.e a b tijlttrflv .IiriQ li,. e burrini.q firte
WlalerLmeb Iri, u S(ranmble fihhir, ,ournanenwrit in,:,rniatn
Havirnq firiun arind ,,iriQa li tt le ,I d
Best of The Fumbling Fisherman TOM JOHNSON
lhat tine i; il
Ask Your Sea Grant Agent BETTY STAUGLER
Helpiriq :,ujr Harbor
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
olI, i relative
OMail. ide.
Tournament Bassin'* GREG BARTZ


* ** v~ayi,,ii lri-' ,,rni


:.EI [,1iilli 1 i. 1i 0 ti i"Tf ). ,.' i ThE hlinE 1i '1 u a h if hi[
ThE, i6i,.liET'Ef p llti'.1 ,,i ThE I a l l i t l iT it 'i ,
l'/ii,.cE if s.iElf mT, a h.i hlli c'1E nET i ti[ )i I,,11 El iT ,./,'ll ll


T'h I llt hti c i-.I 11 'al? i)tt'ci', ? a" JIJ ii iit i )', i E.T)
i.'il? ahl ai S h)',l Eil ThE sih d.ii',i onld ii a1 A iT Ti)' ShiE
tind1 h,;,'Efu11/ t hil fThE sh S. Ii l l .'i

LEE:
Lee, your planned tournament is a great
idea and I wish you success. It is sure to
raise awareness of WaterLine, and keeping
it family oriented with the later start is sure
to draw more of us "amateur" fisherman
and reduces the intimidation of fishing
against the "pros" It sounds like it will be
a fun day at a convenient location for us
ICW and Gasperilla Sound fishermen, and
my guess is that you are going to get more
sponsors as the pace of anticipation picks
up.


- Capt. Ray Allain, Port Charlotte


MR. ALLAIN:
lie ,.cr Arr pEili, (hi Ila.1h lifc rl ,iit., i 'n. hlE ,.,1i
Jon I I as sqilr;I sl ii cE 1 s.siI a.0n fiEi11 0a E1
hElp/nt. ,.iul II Ii.:Th lhi; .I p ,.,i 1is a ln r' li .Itisi:.

liE tilE J,,"'f;1 ) ,,i," ,,i I 'S hr T ,i"t',iT tM h. .11 ,h1r h ,sill 0 I
4h I 14.11 f.1,1ias)T i]1t c ha lhE i i f)E .1.ii P 1.Ihl'.1i
Thr' sti/llil a(,),? 4 inThr Fihri h'rstiih'lia,'l'T Plaikl1a'
Fish AulaiAE andj Fihin' hulanA s airc ai/s) hr~lpint? )tifl
hEE tiflE i 'a14 i f 1 Ec'14E h1 [ h1. il( ,.1iA 1"'I E iE ,"ii
(2,' l,.aA r; si rc ThEl Ali)',II h,',il in i,.'h II E E..1 'ic'ia ,.,..1
(hri hel ThE pla i ,fi hai.l; a in V ,.Ih..11 a ,il h
f,.il'li ,1iI fii i i,.t ,l i It'.l (" hrEIp ,tuiT ,ih'hcEi .: 1 [1h
iici.E .'ss IT St.idSi, siinpl; (iT lii(hi,, Jhil rl iS' Ip / .di"
h.;7'E AI)(hc'i Nau/iir;i :))pit7ci(Efc i SEEc ad;\)i'c' i;,
I _,- l i- ri it -i i ii i in- il, n iy I, i ,i ,r r I- i i- iili i I I l
iii- I,, ti I- i- ni 1 l,- It 1- 1i l,-ii-, lii [,- I l- lhi _",iii
,,iiri -l l -r. 111 i v ii n i ,-i iv '1 II 'r i-n i i iii-h 1 ii t il .,i% im mii r
,I l ,,-lIh ,l n All 1,-,[[-r. % 1 I I 11- '1lnl -,I w 10 1 i l 1 11 -
11 11 li l 111h l .1 lltiI- -r,,l rlilw l,,u ii [ I- ri 11 w il .II 1,,I ,
1i i pi ii, ii ri il ii h*r I in a i nir l i, ili- H l ilo i- |
il l [ i[I-l ii- i' lii in l [I-r'I t i I i ri- l I,, -lv [li,,- I Ii i -
i ,li l in I il trWiiirti[r' I l rt i li- iin '.m.i i rIi [ MN il i .,iimp
[ il I- i1, r,- p in% lbl alltv hi r Ili [- i i [ ,I I I- i I- I-r.


7 Iffl ..


We'll Have the Fish:
a,. :LARRY. DARRYL & DARRYL

SGood and cheap
We decided to stop in at Shark's
F'ae 10 Fish House in Port Charlotte.
This is a small restaurant, and it
Fal I looks out over U.S. 41.
'a,.:le l l


P'ae 12



f'a,.e l,
Faqtt1

Faqle 14

Faqet1
F'a,.I 7.



Faqtt1
f'aj,.: e l
lfa,.ile l:!
Faiie 13

F'aie ]':

F'ae 2''
P'ale l

Paqe '2


Dive Local CAPT. DAN SANSIVERI
laLe a divirq: vacali on
Kayak Away BRYAN STOCKBRIDGE
leed[l tI o be where e are
De(enlber filled ,vith holilay hunting : tradition
,alirn. ;afetly ,iur're;
Letu(e Lale raimp l fed ior faelin
Ladies First* DAWN KLEMISH
Don I lauhi
From the Publisher's Desk JOSH OLIVE


DI 'S V IEINI


ing the crew


I


faqe :'4

faie 2:
Fage 2'"
Fage 2'
F'aQe 30

Faqte 31


Gellr iriq nv'lvd i a r,, val par aq. 2.'


BULLETIN BOARD i r. e MAP OF LOCAL WATERS i rae7

TIDE CHARTS I rae 4 SEAFOOD RECIPES I rae 11

READER PHOTOS I FaIe HSH PROFILES I raqe 2

FISH FINDER I a SOLUNAR TABLES I a, 1


., e7, 0 F 7-, A






tfwuswu Page 3 December 5,2013


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


I y have a meeitii tournament o her t yo t ildd in the OutToo-r Bullei Boa it WateLinagne@gmil.
if yo have a meeting; tournaments, fesfival or other event you want inicludedidiin h Otor Hews Bulletin Board, email 1110 oWatierLin-eMa-gazinFe@ gmaiI.com


Im, .,Y H K I N I I h o dpppkr iko ipvtm n diint ii lw i fPm iGri il9 17044


V after me's outdoor seminar series kicksoffat
6:30 p.m. Dec. 12th with a talk by Capt. Mike
Myers of Reelshark Charters. Capt. Mike will
discuss effective techniques for winter fishing,
including where to find fish on those tough
days after a front blows through and how
to get them to bite. The public is invited to
attend this free seminar at Gasparilla Marina
(15001 Gasparilla Road, Placida). There will be
free refreshments and door prizes, plus you'll
have a chance to win a fishing trip with Capt.
Mike. For more information, email Josh Olive
at Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com or call
941-276-9657.


HELP PLAN THE BABCOCK-WEBB WILDLIFE
MANAGEMENT AREA
A 10-year plan for the Fred C. Babcock-Cecil M. Webb Wildlife
Management Area will be presented on Dec. 5 during a public
hearing in Charlotte County. People are invited to attend the 7
p.m. public hearing in the Myakka River Room at the Charlotte
Harbor Event and Conference Center (75 Taylor St., Punta
Gorda). Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
staff will present the draft land-management plan for FWC-
managed portions of the Babcock-Webb WMA, and people will
be encouraged to comment and ask questions. For more info
on the local public hearing call Gary Morse at 863-648-3852
or go to MyFWC.com/Conservation and select "Terrestrial
Programs" then "Management Plans:'

DISCOVERING INSECTS AND THEIR WAYS AT
CURRY CREEK PRESERVE
Sarasota County is offering a guided insect identification nature
walk at Curry Creek Preserve (1500 Pinebrook Rd.
off Edmondson Rd., Venice) in Venice on Dec. 5th from 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. Sarasota County Volunteer and retired entomologist,
Dr. Fred Santana, will lead you through pine flatwoods and oak
hammocks describing the little known insect denizens of the
preserve and introducing them to the insect diversity of nature
and the role insects play in our environment. Register on-line at
Scgov.net and click"Calendar"on the left, or call 941-861-5000.

VIEWING AT MOORE OBSERVATORY
Observation session on Dec. 6th at the James and Barbara
Moore Observatory (26300 Airport Rd., Punta Gorda) begin

BULLETIN BOARD 126


i n.r. 3ni r.i i Ttm .R3i i vtin a; ni Lo 1 .UdS
Guard Auxiliary conducts free vessel safety checks
every Saturday morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
at the Venice boat ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave.,
Venice). They'll make sure the safety equipment
mandated by federal and state regulations is on
board. If an inspected vessel is found to be safe, a
"Seal of Safety" is affixed to it. For more info or to
schedule an appointment, call Patrick Wheeler at
941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek
are offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at
8:30 a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe
or kayak rental fee. Bird walks are also offered every
Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and guided scrub jay walks
every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more info on any of
these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH:
Listed as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail.
Meet your volunteer guides (weather permitting)
at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at
Tigertail Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail)
to 951 South to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall
Court, the fifth light after crossing the bridge to
Marco Island. Turn left at four-way stop sign at
Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach. Water shoes and
binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue
Dr., Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or visit
Conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A boat-
ers'get-together is held from 1 to 2 p.m. the second
Sunday of each month at the waterfront chickee
hut at Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina (9700 S.W.
Riverview Circle, Lake Suzy). This informal gathering
is open to the public to discuss boats, fishing, the
Peace River and other topics. For more information,
call the Nav-A-Gator at 941-627-3474.
GULF COVE FISHING CLUB MEETINGS: The Gulf
Cove Fishing Club meets on the second Monday
of the month October through May. The meetings
are held at the Hope Lutheran Church in Gulf Cove
(14200 Hopewell Ave, Port Charlotte) at 7 p.m.


Vneie spedaes u Ld, Ol l,, iiieil~y OPIS. aIndii UU lUliLOt
the meetings the Club holds a monthly fishing
tournament and a monthly picnic. For more
information call 941-698-8607.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the morning
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
every Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience
includes a nature walk to see the park's diverse
ecosystems, native flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956
for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort
Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more
about the plants and animals that live in the Slough
or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The center is open
Tuesday through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Parking is $1 per hour per vehicle. Reservations not
required. No groups of eight or more. For more info
call 239-533-7550 or visit LeeParks.org/SixMile.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock
Park Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice)
holds its monthly volunteer work mornings from
8 to 10 a.m. on the third Friday of each month. As
abilities and interests allow, volunteer tasks may
include trash collection along trails and within
vegetated areas of the park, light trimming along
paved multi-use trail, organization of storage areas,
exotic plant removal and other maintenance tasks.
Long pants, closed-toe shoes, sun protection, and
plenty of drinking water are recommended. Park
staff will provide trash collection buckets/bags,
pickers, gloves, and other tools as necessary. Meet at
the Shamrock Park Environmental Center. For more
information, call Jennifer Rogers at 941-861-5000 or
email her atjrogers@scgov.net.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters
share their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors,
shorebirds, waterfowl and other avian visitors at
Myakka River State Park (13208 State Road 72,
Sarasota). Volunteers set up scopes and help people
identify birds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every day of the
week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive
club that meets on the third Tuesday of each month.


L ,I UU INadsea ou u iu a L d iU t JU[Ud. UL d I I I I -/ "'+ '+Z '+
or contact BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a
free saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami
Trail, Port Charlotte). The public is invited to attend.
Call 941-875-9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide
will lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes
Regional Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers)
at 8:30 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month.
This free walk offers an opportunity to see birds
in natural vegetation as your guide points out the
many species in what is a birding hot spot and
crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive at 8 a.m.
at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and sign-in. Wear
comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors. Bring
water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera. Call
239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N:
Members of this club for multihull owners, sailors or
those who are interested in it exchange ideas about
equipping and sailing boats, share information
about anchorages and cruising destinations, hold
informal races that help to improve their sailing
ability, and have local raft-ups. No dues. The club
meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first Monday of
each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit Yhoo.it/
XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL: Walk
or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew Road,
Estero). Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4 for sin-
gle-occupant vehicle; $5 for two to eight occupants
vehicle and $2 each additional person over eight per
vehicle. Call 239-992-0311 for more information.
SARASOTA FITNESS WALKS: Join Sarasota County
Parks staff each Friday for a fitness walk through
Rothenbach Park (8650 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota)
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. The pace will be geared
toward fitness, aiming for a 20-minute-mile pace.
The walk will cover approximately three miles in one
hour of brisk walking. Enjoy the beautiful scenery
and wildlife, but keep up the pace. Wear appropriate
workout clothing, including good walking shoes, and
bring your water bottle. Meet in the pavilion near
the playground. Call 941-861-5000.





/'iPage 4 *December 5,2013
j t. ./f,,. Page 4 December 5, 2013


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THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUN
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N, 82A633 W
:0055 0157 ___
I ') 2.250--0 2.03 164 1 7
i r _A n i I.0 1 -,,


MONDAY


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


. -- 1. nn 1841 19


, ,1_,. ,/ ,..,-0:--,,1,,-7 ",,44 -1223--..02 09, -.7
18 27 0916 1004 1.051 0.29 .57 0.52 0.32
0.54 -0.39 -0.19
MHHW 2201, MHW 1932, MSL 1172, MTL 1152, MLW 0371, MLLW 0000 All measurements in feet, for more info seeTidesAndCurrents noaa gov
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PUNTA GORDA 26.9283 N, 82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES)
0318 0413 0513 .... 0620 2031 0735 2109 2149 223C
2:20-18 39 2:07-19 18-1-87--1-62146-09 06--57- 1118-167
1.16 1.19 1.25 62 1.35 1.35 1: 9 12 0,- .10991/1
fE Ifft.'-,/N /1, \ r\ \ 1%/\ A s
22 15 2328 0051 0218 V11
S1 \.00 0.94 V 0.85 0.71- 1441--0346-1^5-05 06-0-66-
1128 1217 1305 1353 0.27 0.51 0.48 0.28
-0.49 -0.35 -0.17 0.04
MHHW 1 962, MHW 1 703, MTL1 076, MSL 1070, MLW 04.149, MLLW 0 000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26.8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)
S0033 0125- 0224-- 0334 .-1924 2003.
1.85 15 52 1.74 1638 1.56 11 1.34 13 -18 4 1 o 4
/'' 1.00 A 1.08 1.11 1.19 066 13 084 .0
r 0.93 0.95/ \ ,/, 0.95 0.l88
1930 2041 22 11 23 54 2313......130.....0 57 .5
0.--1o.81 0.79 0 o.74 0.63- 12 21 3534711o5o5'0.51
)905 V0954 1044 1134 0.19 0.45 0.36 0.22
-0.43 -0.32 -0.17 0.01 9 022
MHHW 1407, MHW 1.175, MSL 0.784, MTL 0 768, MLW 0 358, MLLW 0.000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N, 82.0667 W
0243 0335 0434 0544 13 0 74 2054 2134 2213
F2.19-1802- 2:.06-1848-- 185-19 31-159- 2013 0714 1-09 06- 1.54-1 54-166
11.12 1.18 1.28 1.32 141 .1 1.66
1.111 12 1.18 1.12 1.04
i r \ y /^_/ \ r / /%4 /^ /1\ 10 /\ -
\ /2157 \ /2308 \ / 0038 \ / 0221 / /
fi 096 0-94 %../ v 401 164-
1132 0.9 0.94 0.88 0.75-1450-0401 -15 37-105 22 4
, 1221 13 11 10 n0.23 0.43 0.26
-0.51 -0.38 -0.20 0.01
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0000


VENICE INLET
Thursday 08:27 -0.54 feet
15:23 1.29feet
19:16 1.06feet


I Friday 00:55
09:16
16:03
20:26
Saturday 0157
10:04
16:42
21:45
Sunday 03:07
10:51
17:20
23:13
Monday 04:26
11:37
18:00

Tuesday 00:44
06:03
12:23
18:41
Wednesday 02:09
08:02
13:09
19:23


2.25 feet
-0.39 feet
1.32 feet
1.00 feet
2.03 feet
-0.19 feet
1.39feet
0.91 feet
1.76feet
0.04feet
1.49feet
0.77feet
1.47feet
0.29feet
1.61 feet

0.57feet
1.23 feet
0.52 feet
1.73 feet
0.32 feet
1.10feet
0.72 feet
1.84feet


PUNTAGORDA


Thursday 03:18
11:28
18:39
22:15
Friday 04:13
12:17
19:18
23:28
Saturday 05:13
13:05
19:54

Sunday 00:51
06:20
13:53
20:31
Monday 02:18
07:35
14:41
21:09
Tuesday 03:46
09:06
15:28
21:49
Wednesday 05:06
11:18
16:16
22:30


2.20 feet
-0.49feet
1.16 feet
1.00 feet
2.07 feet
-0.35 feet
1.19 feet
0.94 feet
1.87 feet
-0.17feet
1.25 feet

0.85 feet
1.62 feet
0.04 feet
1.35 feet
0.71 feet
1.35 feet
0.27 feet
1.46 feet
0.51 feet
1.12 feet
0.48 feet
1.57 feet
0.28 feet
0.99 feet
0.66 feet
1.67 feet


PLACIDA
Thursday 00:33
09:05
15:52
19:30
Friday 01:25
09:54
16:38
20:41
Saturday 02:24
10:44
17:21
22:11
Sunday 03:34
11:34
18:03
23:54
Monday 05:04
12:23
18:44

Tuesday 01:34
06:56
13:10
19:24
Wednesday 02:55
08:44
13:57
20:03


1.85 feet
-0.43 feet
0.93 feet
0.81 feet
1.74 feet
-0.32 feet
0.95 feet
0.79 feet
1.56 feet
-0.17feet
1.00 feet
0.74 feet
1.34 feet
0.01 feet
1.08 feet
0.63 feet
1.11 feet
0.19 feet
1.19 feet

0.45 feet
0.95 feet
0.36 feet
1.30 feet
0.22 feet
0.88 feet
0.51 feet
1.40 feet


MATLACHA PASS
Thursday 2:43 2.19feet
11:32 -0.51 feet
18:02 1.11 feet
21:57 0.96 feet
Friday 03:35 2.06 feet
12:21 -0.38feet
18:48 1.12 feet
23:08 0.94 feet
Saturday 04:34 1.85 feet
13:11 -0.20feet
19:31 1.18feet


Sunday 00:38
05:44
14:01
20:13
Monday 02:21
07:14
14:50
20:54
Tuesday 04:01
09:06
15:37
21:34
Wednesday 05:22
10:54
16:24
22:13


0.88 feet
1.59 feet
0.01 feet
1.28 feet
0.75 feet
1.32 feet
0.23 feet
1.41 feet
0.53 feet
1.12 feet
0.43 feet
1.54 feet
0.26 feet
1.04 feet
0.60 feet
1.66 feet


BOAT STORAGE


DRY STORAGE

WET SLIPS

BOAT LIFTS



WATERSIDE GRILL


OPEN EVERY DAY

FOR BREAKFAST,

LUNCH & DINNER


AMENITIES


BOAT RENTALS

FUEL DOCK

BAIT & TACKLE

SHIPS STORE

24/7 SECURITY

ON-SITE SERVICE


GASPARILLA
[~-M ARINA-)i ]K

15001 GASPARILLA RD
PLACIDA, FL 941-697-2280
GASPARILLAMARINA.COM

MARKER 20 |

ON THE ICW W


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A6 cited 11-year-old ,
AN agenson with
al lI~ch she~pshead
caught in a PGI canal
fat the home of her
grandparents, Mary
and JoanellDyrstad.
Go Edina Hornets! (It's
a Minnesota thing)
^*^igH


V


U=

TM

Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your
high-quality digital photos to
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.
corn, or send prints by snail
mail to The Charlotte Sun,
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980,
ATTN: Lee Anderson. Include
a self-addressed stamped
envelope if you want your
prints returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us
photos of oversized or
other release-only fish
being poorly handled.
Photos of such fish being
gaffed, held bythe lowerjaw
only or obviously damaged
or dead WILL NOT be
published, no matter how
big the fish is or how proud
the angler may be.


th,





j#Eual.,,.et ,U Page 6* December 5,2013


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WITErW~ThrJPIT~~i


H20NLY
Nokomis
941-488-8229


FISHERMAN'S EDGE
Grove City
941-697-7595


Sheepshead around the jetties will eat small live shrimp or live fiddlers. Flounder
at Caspersen Beach have been pretty good on live shrimp tail-hooked on jigheads.
In the backcountry, redfish are feeding well in the afternoon once they warm up.
Snook are active in Venice Inlet and the bays, but the season is closed.


Guys (and gals) are catching a bunch of snook in the backcountry, along with trout.
But remember, snook season is closed. It is illegal to harvest them. A lot of sharks
are swimming in Lemon Bay. Scattered pompano reports have been coming in;
mainly around the passes. Flounder and whiting are still hanging around the
beaches.


UllJIXUtjidLLI
The reefs have been producing good porgies with Spanish mack-
erel and a few king mackerel hanging around near the surface.
Red grouper are being reported in 100 feet of water.


Offshore in 90 feet of water, there are lot of red and gag grouper,
but you can't keep the gags -season closed Dec. 3. Use cutbait or
frozen squid.The water is looking a lot cleaner offshore. No red tide
reports.


U, AIVARM
Seatrout have been in good numbers over
the grass adjacent to deep channels and
cuts. Search the edges ofsandholes, prop
scars and dropoffs with a MirrOdine or live
shrimp.


Sheepshead are bigger around the
inshore reefs than around the docks and
piers, but that will change. Just feel the
bite, they are tricky biters. Try using bar-
nacles, oysters or fiddler crabs. They have
been working.


Venice Beach has been a good place to find flounder. Use live shrimp on ajighead, A few red grouper reports 30 miles offshore using frozen squid over El Jobean has been giving up good num-
or try bouncing a spoon off the bottom. Big black drum have been eating blue structure, bers ofsheepshead on fiddler crabs or cut
crabs or shrimp fished under the U.S. 41 bridges and the Venice jetties. The North Port shrimp, and there are lots of them around
FINE BAIT & TACKLE canals that connect directly to the Myakka have been holding good numbers of baby theTom Adams Bridge also.
North Port tarpon- trysmall live pinfish or whitebait. The Venice pierand jetties have been
94120 -598Q1 producing decentSpanish mackerel and lots ofladyfish. Lemon Bay is holding
941-24 -5981 snook thatare chasing whitebait around. Canals have blue gills and crappies.

ISnook are scattered around and are hunkering down in their winter spots. Reds Red grouper and larger mangrove snapper are biting in at least There is a lot of baitout in Placida, and
Share schooling around and are chewing on cutbait, or topwater during the morning 100 feet ofwater. Smaller blacktip sharks are swimming along the trout are liking it. Look for deeper holes,
hours. Look for them in deeper holes and the edges of bars during low tides. Jacks beaches, and you can usejust about anything. Cape
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE and ladyfish are feeding near the passes. Mangrove snapper are near the passes, Haze Bar is holding some big ones.The low
Port Charlotte especially around structure. Bass are active in the freshwater canals and lakes.The tide puts them in the deeper holes.The
941-527-6800 crappie bite is aboutto pick up this month, high tide scatters them around the flats.

Y 1 J iFish are still moving around. Itwill be about a week or so until the fish start sticking Red grouper are being caught20 miles offshore and some lane Trout.They ain't big, butthey are out
I ; I I d around their usual winter hangouts. Reds and snook are scattered. Look for deep snapper 15 to 20 miles out. Scattered king mackerel reports have there. Fish the mouths of creeks and
holes next to shallow bars.There will usually be fish there. Mangrove snapper been coming in. Be ready for some unusual action out there.There channels in 4to 6 feet of water. Live bait
FISHIN' FRANK'S are having a good year. Look for them around the passes near structure and bars. have been scattered reports of sailfish, blackfin tuna and dolphin under a popping cork or artificial lures will
Charlotte Harbor Sheepshead are in the Harbor, but the bite is only going to improve during the next also known as mahi. catch them. Avoid treble hooks they
941-525-3888 few weeks. Flounder and pompano are still hanging around the beaches, have delicate mouths.
941-625-3888

Reds are scattered. Snook are hanging in winter haunts in deeper channels and cuts. Barracuda reports are coming in consistently. There have also been Trout are everywhere. Fish outside of
Pompano and flounder are still on outside of bars and beaches. Try using pink jigs a number of blackfin tuna reports as shallow as 50 feet ofwater. bars and channels. Pirate Harbor has been
for the pompano. Bonnethead sharks are everywhere with bulls and blacktips Tripletail are hanging around off the traps. Use a freelined shrimp, producing some beauties. Soft plastics and
LAISHLEY MARINE scattered. Spanish mackerel are biting well from Alligator Creek to the Pass.The Tripletail have to be at least 15 inches to harvest.You can keep two jerk baits of lighter colors are doing the
Punta Gorda sheepshead bite is on. Use oysters, small crabs or barnacles around structure, per day. trick right now.
941-639-3949

The trout bite has been hotjust off Bokeelia, with the best fish being caught on King mackerel up to 30 pounds are being reported offshore, and Two Pines and Buzzard Bay have
white artificials.The Pine Island canals are holding the usual mangrove snapper, the red grouper bite has been good in at least 100 feet ofwater. been holding smaller redish.Try a medi-
along with some decent-size jacks. Blackdrum have started moving into the urn or large freelined shrimp.They may not
D&D BAIT AND TACKLE inilc A fiw flounder hvh nrhtn riqh ir th Sinihil (uiwv Thi Pine h mnntfpr rdc hut thivir fun tnrntrh
iii M a t la ch a I, r, I ,iiriii r i i' '- -,,-i ,ri, l r,, l l, ,r,,lii ,, i ,,.,-il ,iii ,ii pom pano i, i r,
239-282-9122 rt

Snook iri- illi-lri rl r,,inlr ln u-lii nI Mi, llt. 1i ,,rln ii ii -rnun ii 1 11- l-, r rli N 1-, i ir Imr lri I ,iInirini, redgrouper Gag grouper t-i ,in lit- ,l r ir n lit- -1 iwll irI. I,1ilt-il .l iin
li,- il,--l,,-r irl- i ,I Pull inil r l/ rol- li i1v irl- l ri njii i, i i i -i. ri ,l- 1 i -1 i 1 l inI .... Il,-, .: ilrnl..n i ll l, ,-rn i1l ii in lrir l Ij l ir- li n,-r il ,- 1 I-,-n ,11111- 1[ tredfi sh A [li, [- lI- ilri, [lil- ri li wi. ll
I' li,-r,- i [ill i- ii,-uiii-i ii l u rni-, li u i lr liii l i I, -I,,-i,-r i.iirl' I i ii ll i i' l, lhli sharks iu lih-r,-r, 1 ii, i i .vr,- ltl-t l lj sacks I,,it-rl'i- ju i re-ish l- A I ht -lilti-l rl r ii] ,iii- r
OLD PINE ISLAND M ARINA l iii, ,, I,-' il lit- trout rli iri IVti i t-,-r iiii--l ii il h ,iiN, rli- ili-ti- i -l -r illJ- A li- cobia iiiiiJi hiv wi. ,iiiiirl, ,Ij ,,11 l [i, vi iril- [i,
St. Ja nim es C ity ii ivlt- it-t-r, riiiriini hu- iii iiJ ,ii .-ii -ti, -r Mangrove snapper lit- iilri, ini ,jirl l ;1 : ;1 t- i,,''r triii l[iIuiJ [t-r hlur- Iiv,-
2 3 9 -2 8 3 -2 5 4 8 ., h t [ ii hit[- i> i [l ir- 11 i [ | ..il .,r.- I 11["i ][. ir l [il iin ] i i li i][[r v [ri-i

j I ll 4 'I ,

Sizes are imeasulred total length (Io'in for war- Cobia: MinIIiiu ii 3 forl, linit Imi u fish Redfish: Slot h :; -2I ,7, limn .3. :; h.l- per vessel) NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Zero hbag limit kior B:ne-
most part of head to tip of pinched tail) unless per vessel) Shark: Mn. 54" except Atlantic sharpnose fish, Goliath Grouper (Jewfish), Sawfish, Spotted
otherwisernotednAll bag limitslareiperhharveste
otherwise noted. All bag limits are per harvester Dolphin: Limit 10 blacknose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead Sharks
per day. Other limits may apply; for most current smooth dogfish, limit 1 (max 2 fish per vessel) (go to the website listed below for a full list of
rules visit www.MyFWC.com/fishing. Federal Flounder: Min. 12", limit 10 Sheepshead: Mn. 12" limit 15 no-harvest species)
regulations may differ from state regulations. Grouper, Black: Min. 22", limit 4, season closed Visit http://bit.ly/l OnYDlz for full rules.
LICENSES Feb. 1-March31 Snapper, Lane: Min. 8, limit 100 pounds
ide s o An 7, Grouper, Gag: Min. 22'" limit 2, season July Snapper, Mangrove: Min. 10", limit 5 FRESHW ATER FISH
Residentsaltwaterorfreshwater:Annual $l I Dec. 3 in state waters; July I until quota met Snapper, Mutton: Min. 16", bag limit 10 Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
5-year $79. Ifyou fish from shore only, a license is in federal waters 0Max. size 14", bag limit (may possess one over
requiredbutisfree.Residentlicenseforbothfresh- n federal waters Snapper, Red: Min. 16", limit 2,2013 season Max.size 4 bag imit (m
water and saltwaterfishing: $32.50 annually. Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed June I July 14 in state waters and June I June 14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22",
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days Feb. 1 March 31 28 in federal waters bag limit 5 (may possess one over 22")
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing Grouper, Scamp: Mn 16" limit 4, season Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12", limit 10 Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
license not available for nonresidents. closed Feb. March 31 Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster $5/ closed Feb. March 31 Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish Black, Gag, Red and Scamp Grouper per included in aggregate bag limit of 10 Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17", limit 2 (may
included in aggregate bag limit of 4 Snook: Slot 28"-33" (west coast), limit 1, season possess one over 17")
SALTW ATER FISH Hogfish: Min. 12"fork, limit closed Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31. Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1, Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2 Spotted Seatrout: Slot 15"-20' limit 4 (may Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
season closed June I July 31 possess one over 20") otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish: Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15 Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
Slot limit 14"-22", aggregate limit 5 Mullet: No size limit, limit 50 Triggerfish, Gray: Min. 14", limit 2, season gar (except alligator gar; possession ofthis spe-
Black drum: Slot 14"-24", limit 5 (may Permit: Slot]11"-22"fork, limit 2 (may possess closed June-July cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
possess one over 24") one over 22") Tripletail: Min. 15", limit 2 Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYJQr for full rules,
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10 Pompano: Min. 11 "fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2 including special management areas.




.' // nAiti, ,.a.,ir=, kS-n ,AA,,,,
ju/p ,cers.qvu Page 7 December 5,2013 mommunum ma..umm.uus.m




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,t ,i ~* Page 8 December 5, 2013


S.UMSUE*..IfUUME E--.IIhUEU..MOEE,


Ask any trainer, gun store owner or
member of the National Rifle Association and
the statistics might shock you shooting
sports have attracted more women than ever
before.
In the classes I teach, more than half
are ladies. When you go to the range, you
definitely see plenty women of all ages at the
firing line. What's caused this interest from
the ladies in what has traditionally been a
male dominated area? First, we have to give
some credit to what we all see on the TV and
in the movies. An excellent example is the TV
show NCIS. What red-blooded, all-American
lady wouldn't like to be the show's character
Ziva a highly-trained Israeli Mossad
ex-operative. Or Kensi the tall brunette
girl on NCIS Los Angeles (I can hear you
laughing at me, but it's a good show!). As
is evidenced by the way they safely handle
their handguns on the set, these girls are
highly trained, and soft on the eyes.
Their techniques are far different from the
gun molls (the female companions of male
professional criminals of times past), whose
guns were recklessly pointed anywhere and
everywhere. The show's directors are really
paying attention to real-world training issues
like muzzle discipline, trigger finger on the
frame where it should be and more. I like
it, and so do the ladies. It's now in style for
women to be highly skilled with weapons.
Many women are tired of sitting on the bench
while their boyfriends or husbands have
fun. They don't want to shoot"Bubba's" .44
Magnum, but they really love to send some
rounds down range with their own Lady-
smith, Sig, Kimber, Glock, Springfield or other
popular guns among the sewing circles.
The cat's out of the bag Women know it's
great fun, and they can shoot as well, or
maybe even better, than their men. That fact
probably won't make me too popular with
you guys, but you all know it's the truth.
Proper shooting is not relative to strength -
it requires acquired skills and practice.
Another factor is that the gun industry
has seen the marketing opportunities, and
now they're making all kinds of guns, apparel
and accessories just for women. Factory pink
guns, grips that are designed to fit a woman's
hands, purses correctly designed to safely
carry a handgun and provide quick access for
self-defense situations are all on the market
now. The concept of women and guns is now
looked at in a highly different light than
before, and it definitely shows.
T-shirts with slogans like"this is MY Glock,
there are many more like it, but this one is
MINE;"are commonly seen at the range and
elsewhere. Almost all the teams involved
in competition shooting have highly skilled
women on them. Even female NASCAR drivers
carry gun manufacturer logos on their race


cars as sponsors. The bottom line is there are
more women with guns these days, and as a
man, I have to say I love it.
Another thing I see as an instructor is
that ladies have realized that in the area of
self-defense, their man, or any other man for
that matter, will not necessarily be around
to protect them if they were to be attacked.
They also understand that the police force is
geared primarily as a response to a criminal
act, therefore it will require time before law
enforcement is able to actually help them.
They simply realize they need to protect
themselves in an increasingly dangerous and
violent world, and they should learn from
a competent instructor who knows how to
develop their skills and confidence so they
are ready to proficiently protect themselves.
One of my female students recently told
me when her neighbor asked her why she
wanted to carry a gun she replied "a cop is
far too heavy'." All joking aside, the police
can't be everywhere all the time. In most
attacks or home invasions, they get the call
and arrive as fast as humanly possible, but
usually after the event is over. Most women
realize that this type of training can't be
done in one session, and it takes time and
patience to reach the level of competence
that will protect them in a self-defense
situation. To a large degree, the women that
I see are ready and able to put in this time
and gain the confidence that is critical in
defending their lives. Recently, I saw a former
female student at the range who had heeded
my words about continued practice. She and
a couple of her friends had gone in together
and bought a .22 target pistol. They come to
the range and compete to see who will buy
lunch loser taking the bullet, so to speak.
That beats the heck out of a knitting circle or
playing cribbage at least in my humble
opinion. You go girls! I guess what I'm saying
is this: I really like the ladies enjoying the
shooting sports and being able to protect
themselves. I don't belive it's a bad thing.
As a final note to my female readers, I'll
teach a repeat of the beginners women's class
that I did last year for basic pistol instruction.
I'll do a free class for the first five ladies
that contact me. This is not for experienced
shooters, but for beginners, or someone who
is curious and wants to see what it's like. If
you don't already have a firearm, I'll supply
guns and ammo. Just call or email me and
we'll get together on scheduling. Ladies, I'll
see you all at the range.
Safe shooting.
Billy Carl is an NRA-certified firearms
instructor and is available for individual
instruction in firearms safety and concealed
carry classes. Contact him at 941-769-0767,
jcarl l @embarqmail.com or through Sportrap
Gun Shop at 941-629-7775.


f-^,





5I4&m*~&VI. Page 9 December 5,2013


I recently had a tense moment at Dunkinm'
Donuts. I know this because the clerks behind
the counter were practically in tears after
a peaceful resolution was reached. Let me
explain. I stopped in for a pumpkin decaf
latte, which is, as far as I am concerned, the
single best reason to celebrate this time
of year. Sure, there's the fun of Halloween
costumes and week-long sugar rushes. There's
the reminder to be thankful for family and
fortune over buffets and banquets. The air is
cool, long-absent friends have returned and
businesses are booming. But nothing says
autumn like a hot decaf pumpkin latte.
On my third trip to Dunkin' Donuts in a
week, I decided to order a dozen donuts to
take to work to assuage my conscience over
my guilty little pleasure. I asked for 12 mixed
donuts one of those, a couple of these,
a sprinkled one, an iced one, a star, etc.
Obviously, my raison d'etre was the latte. Just
as my server went to pick up the star-shaped
donut to place in my box, the drive-thru clerk
swooped in and grabbed it for her customer.
"Oh, just make it a cruller instead;' I said,
apparently unheard. "Maybe there are more
in the back;" a clerk said. "No, that was the
last one.""Are they baking more?" After
countless frenzied trips to the rear of the
building and back, my server finally tossed
a cruller in the box and let me go about my
day. With furtive glances over their shoulders,
the two clerks heaved huge sighs of relief and
whispered to each other, "That was tense!"
Now, I'll admit that I don't spend a great
deal of time at Dunkin' Donuts. I rarely go
there when it's not pumpkin latte season. But
do they often have brawls break out over who
has dibs on the last donut of one particular
type or another? Maybe I'm just not enough
of a connoisseur, but they all taste pretty
much the same to me. Sweet. Covered in
sweet. Sprinkled with sweet.
Later that day at Peace River Wildlife
Center, an animal control officer brought us
a young adult raccoon that had scratched
someone. We took him to our surgery suite to
knock out this young, healthy, strong raccoon
to examine him, and in order to do so, we
had to transfer him from the trap in which
he came in, to a chamber we could flood
with anesthetic gas. We get a lot of raccoons
that come in after having been hit by cars or
infected with various diseases that tend to
make the animals sluggish and weak. Did I
mention that this young adult male raccoon
was neither sluggish nor weak?
Luckily, we were fortified by all the
sugar coursing through our veins from the
donuts. We injected him with medications
to knock him out briefly. And repeated it
when he had trouble falling asleep. Twice.
(How many donuts did this little dude have
for breakfast?) Just when he seemed to be
getting a little groggy and we thought we
could transfer him to the chamber, he sprung
awake at the slightest jarring, and bolted out
of the trap.
Our"surgery suite" is basically a small
shed, the walls of which are lined with cages,


shelves and an x-ray machine and processor.
A large exam table and sink sits in the middle
of the room, leaving about a foot of walkway
in a loop around the room. The last thing we
wanted at this point was for someone to open
the door where we were trying (and failing
miserably) to deal with the raccoon and have
him escape, so we locked the door. The poor
raccoon was so frightened by this point that
he was frantic. We tried to use our catch pole
to snare him around the neck, but it was too
long to use effectively in the cramped quar-
ters. We tried to corral him into a kennel, but
the door fell off. There were three of us -
two rehabbers and a veterinarian. We were
professionals who work with wildlife every
day of our lives, yet we must have looked like
the three stooges. And Albert Einstein of the
raccoon world was kicking our butts.
The raccoon ran up a bank of cages, dove
under the x-ray machine and knocked all
the supplies off the shelves as we grappled
and tripped over each other trying to get a
hold of him. At one point, he jumped up at
the wall beside the door and hit the light
switch, effectively plunging us into total
darkness. After a collective gasp, we all stood
perfectly still for a moment, afraid to step on
the raccoon or run into each other. Then, of
course, we all dove for the light switch at the
same time. It was dark, so I can't be sure, but
I think the raccoon was actually snickering
at us by that time. He certainly had enough
drugs on board to have been enjoying the
show.
We finally contained the raccoon and
determined he was healthy unlike
the three of us, who were all bruised and
battered by then. The whole incident started
because someone thought it was cute to feed
wildlife. I've seen people hand-feeding nuts
to squirrels. I think the person involved in
this episode had been feeding cats (and, of
course, raccoons) on her back porch. For some
reason on this particular day, the raccoon
decided not to wait for the kibble to hit the
bowl, and climbed up the lady's legs to get
to it as she was trying to fill the bowls. She
suffered only minor scratches, but alerted
animal control of the incident.
Lessons learned: Do not feed wildlife it
disrupts their natural distrust of humans, and
they don't get the well-balanced diet they
would when foraging naturally. And if you
ever go to Dunkin' Donuts, do not order the
last donut on the shelf. Apparently, some of
the people who frequent that place have the
manners of a raccoon. It can get pretty tense.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preser-
vation and protection of Charlotte County's
native wildlife since 1978. They are open 7
days a week year-round, including holidays.
Tours are offered from 11 a.m. to 4p.m. PRWC
receives no government funding and relies
entirely on private donations. For more info,
or ifyou would like to volunteer or make a
donation (including aluminum cans), visit
PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.com, email PeaceRiv-
erWildlife@yahoo.com or call 941-637-3830.


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n *Page I0 December 52013
j^M~riv- *Page 10 9 December 5, 2013


SUMUEIBUUmEimi mm EtDIIUUEU.IIEEI


When you spend as much time on the
water as I do, and with such an array of
different personalities, you learn a lot
about the human race. I have been blessed
over the years with an extremely diverse
clientele. I have had people of just about
every race, creed and color this world
has to offer onboard my vessel and their
income levels are just about as diverse as
the folks themselves.
One of the things I've noticed over the
years (at least when they're on my boat)
is that no matter how dissimilar people
may be they all have at least two things
in common with each other. First and
foremost, they all have a passion for fishing
and the great outdoors. The second thing
they all have in common is a "fear" of
something.
Talking with so many people all the time
has really opened my eyes to what drives
people nuts.
It's amazing how many different phobias
are out there. I'm pretty sure there is a
phobia for anything and everything one's
mind could imagine, like being afraid of
gravity (barophobia) or being scared of
peanut butter sticking to the roof of the
mouth (arachibutyrophobia). Unfortunately
I myself understand the anxieties people
suffer through, no matter how superfluous
it seems, when they have a true phobia.
I suffer from a type of (Entomophobia)
which is a fear of insects. I have a horrible,
stupid fear of just one certain type of
harmless, ugly, creepy, nasty, worthless,
good-for-nothing bug. Sorry about that,
I get freaked out just thinking about that
little bugger. Anyway, here are a few of the
more common phobias I have found people
have when they're out fishing me.
I have noticed that a lot of folks have
a fear of sharp objects (Aichmophobia). I
have quite a few clients and friends alike
who I feel suffer from this psychological
condition. The people I'm referring to tell
me about the hooks they use when they
go fishing on their own. They also tell me
about how many fish they lose because
their fish come unhooked halfway through
the battle. I show them the hooks they
should be using but the response is almost
always the same "Those hooks aren't worth
the extra money they cost." The truth here
is that they're buying the cut-rate dull


hooks because they're scared the sharp
ones will get stuck in their skin too easily.
It sure can't be because they're too cheap
to spend an extra buck on a pack of hooks
that really work, can it?
A fear of trees (Dendrophobia) is another
phobia I see a lot on my boat, more so from
my friends, I think, than my clients. I spend
hours on the trolling motor some days just
meandering down mangrove shorelines
looking for fish. I can't tell you how many
times I've spotted big redfish or snook just
hanging out under an overhanging branch.
Most of my clients are pretty good at
landing the lure I gave them right in front
of the fish but my friends seem to miss the
mark with their lures quite a bit. I really
think that some of my friends are actually
scared of the mangrove trees, though I
have noticed that when they"borrow" my
lures they get a lot braver around those
overhangs, hmmmmm...
Ichthyophobia (fear of fish) is one fear I
have yet to see out on the water. I do have
quite a few people who refuse to touch a
fish on my boat but I think that's due to
other phobias like aichmophobia, because
some fish have sharp spines and gill plates,
or blennophobia, because fish can be
somewhat slimy. I have only seen a few
cases of selachophobia (fear of sharks) over
the years but that is understandable as
handling sharks the wrong way can get you
hurt. I am proud to say though that I have
helped a few people overcome this fear and
they are now regular clients of mine.
I'd like to recommend that you go out
and buy a decent pack of hooks, pet a fish,
hug a tree or take a shark trip to help you
get over your fears. And please help me get
over mine by stomping on and grinding,
with all of your might, into the ground,
every last stinking praying mantis you ever
encounter.
Sorry, I really don't like them.
Tight lines.
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte
Harbor guide. Having fished the waters all
along the Southwest Florida coast for more
than 35 years, he has the experience to put
anglers on the fish they want. His special-
ties are sharks, tarpon and Goliath grouper.
For more info, visit ReelShark.com or call
Capt. Mike at 941-416-8047.


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Mint etIIunhl ItI aEB shI ilMIllI Im uM s InEEU


Hogfish are beautifully colored fish that,
in my opinion, might be the firmest, whitest
and mildest meat of any fish that can be
caught in Southwest Florida. Their primary
prey is reported to be marine snails, but
they do eat some crustaceans and anglers
sometimes accidentally catch a few hogfish
while fishing offshore in the Gulf for snapper.
You probably won't see a hogfish in Char-
lotte Harbor, but if you fish with shrimp on
offshore ledges from about 30 to 60 feet of
water during the winter months, you'll likely
catch a few. (I think that the most hogfish I've
ever seen taken on rod and reel on a single
offshore trip in our area was five). Divers are
somewhat more successful taking hogfish
with spears than are hook-and-line anglers,
and spearfishermen can almost always pop
a few hogfish on an offshore dive. Well, not
any more this year in federal waters. In a rela-
tively surprising move, the National Marine
Fisheries Service announced over the Thanks-
giving weekend that hogfish harvest was
being closed from Dec. 2 to Dec. 31 in federal
waters of the Gulf. The NMFS has estimated
that the allowable catch for hogfish in 2013
has been reached, and as a result, the fishery
is closed until the beginning of the new year
when a new allocation kicks in. It's not known
whether the FWC will also close hogfish in
state waters to mirror the federal closure, so
stay tuned.
REDTIDE
It's unusual but not impossible: Appar-
ently, there was a bit of a red tide fish kill
well up in Charlotte Harbor in recent weeks.
I have not seen any official confirmation of
potentially lethal levels of red tide organisms
in the Harbor, but that might be because
those waters are not normally sampled for
red tide because outbreaks here are so rare.
There were reports of dead fish and worse,
of dying fish spinning at the surface, on


4 sheepshead fillets
1 can (12 ounces) flat beer
2 bay leaves
1 red onion, chopped
Old Bay Seasoning to taste
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste


the east side of the Harbor outside the bar
between Pirate Harbor and Alligator Creek.
Also, some boaters in that area reported the
watery eyes, scratchy throats and coughing
that often characterize an outbreak of red
tide. Thankfully, the event seems to have
been spotty in coverage and short-lived and,
for now at least, seems to have dissipated.
As a note: It's possible that something other
than red tide was responsible for the fish kill,
so in the absence of confirmation from FWC,
it's only a guess that red tide was actually the
culprit.
CHRISTMAS BOAT PARADE
Make your plans now to check out the 24th
Annual Charlotte Harbor Lighted Boat Parade
on Dec. 15. Thousands of spectators gather
each year to watch as the lighted boats prom-
enade across the upper Harbor, with drive-by
passes in Punta Gorda Isles, at Fishermen's
Village, and at Laishley Park. The two most
popular evenings of the year for small boaters
to be out after dark in the Punta Gorda area
are July 4th to watch the fireworks, and on
the night of the boat parade. Hundreds of
anchored boats usually line the parade route
to watch and cheer as the parade partici-
pants pass by. If you're not a boater, there
are also several good choices for land-side
viewing of the parade. Go to bit.ly/lcaja9c
for information on the parade route, best
viewing locations and for information about
registering to participate in the parade with
your own boat.
Let's go fishing!
Capt. Ralph Allen runs the King Fisher
Fleet of sightseeing and fishing charter
boats located at Fishermen's Village Marina
in Punta Gorda. He is an award-winning
outdoor writer and photographer and is a
past president of the Florida Outdoor Writers
Association. Call him at 941-639-2628 or
email Captain@KingFisherFleet.com.


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by


Preheat oven to 3500F. Season fillets to taste, place in broiler pan with onion. Add bay leaves to
the side of fillets. Pour beer around the outer edge offish fillets and steam until tender, about 10
minutes. Serves 4.
Recipe adapted from www.all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


Saismney

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/ Page 12 December 5,2013
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Ollie's Pond Park is a wonderful
little area tucked away in the corner of
Northwestern Port Charlotte in Charlotte
County. Venice Area Birding Association
has this little gem on their itinerary at
least several times each birding year. Our
group met at Ollie's in the parking lot, and
there was plenty to see as soon as we got
out of our vehicles.
We set up our birding scopes at the
edge of the pond to see what was visiting
the area, and we weren't disappointed.
Many of us enjoy watching the ducks as
they come in from the north. Today, we
spotted hooded mergansers, blue-winged
teal, common gallinule and the American
coot which is the mascot of the Toledo
Mud Hens Minor League Baseball team.
A red-bellied woodpecker scolded us for
being near his tree. A red-shouldered hawk
flew overhead and black vultures were
riding the currents and gliding back and
forth across the pond. Several northern
mocking birds were singing, and we also
heard the territorial call of the cardinals.
That parking lot sure did offer plenty of
birding action.
After everyone arrived, we began our


hike around the pond. The walk is only
about a mile, however, we always stop to
check out every movement in the bramble
and trees. For this reason, it takes us over
two hours to walk the mile. We stopped to
see what kind of small birds were flitting
in the trees. There were blue-gray gnat-
catchers and palm and yellow-rumped
warblers or butter butts, as we call
them were abundant. Celia spotted a
black-and-white warbler kind of rare -
so everyone moved quickly to get in a good
gander. A black racer caught the attention
of several of the group as it slithered into
the bushes. A short distance down the
trail we spotted another black racer. After
that, we all kept an eye out for snakes. We
also stopped for beautiful butterflies and
zipping dragonflies. This trip we spotted
many dragonflies, however they were all
the same. I believe they were scarlet skim-
mers, which were accidentally introduced
to Florida.
As we slowly walked the path, joggers
were running past us. Maybe I'll get back
into that some day. We had our birding
scopes set up and spotted little and great
blue heron and great egrets, all feeding


along the banks. There was quite a bit of
chattering among us some of our snow
birds returned and this was their first trip
of this season. As we slowly walked the
trail, a photographer who had passed us
returned to tell us he spotted two great
horned owls sitting on a branch high up in
a pine tree. We hurried to the area and we
were all thrilled, of course, to see these two
beautiful birds just sitting and noncha-
lantly watching us. The folks with cameras,
of course, were snapping away, and we
were all were craning our necks to get the
best view through the branches. It was a
perfect day for birding.
It wasn't too hot and a nice breeze was
rustling through the leaves. We didn't mind
walking and just enjoyed the pleasant
and peaceful scenery and camaraderie.
We spotted a northern shoveler mixed in
with a group of hooded mergansers and
blue-winged teal. A tri-color heron flew
overhead and landed on a sandbar across
the pond. As we scanned the pond with
our birding scopes, Sue Love, who has the
keenest eyes of the group, pointed out a
belted kingfisher headed our way. I heard
the kingfisher calling before I actually saw


it. Everyone likes spotting kingfishers.
The kingfisher's top crest reminds us of a
Mohawk hairdo. A half-dozen white ibis
flew onto the bank near us and began their
erratic pecking in the muck for tasty tidbits.
As we approached, they spread their wings
and took off. Ibis are beautiful in flight, as
they are all white with black wing tips.
Celia spotted a green heron, well-cam-
ouflaged against the green and brown
branches. It was perched on a branch,
poised for a strike at a small fish or frog.
We soon approached the site where
we began our hike a mere mile away
that took two hours to walk. Since birding
and eating go hand-in-hand, at least for
us, we gathered the group together and
headed for Spinnaker Cafe in Englewood
for brunch. It was just another great day of
birding in beautiful Southwest Florida.
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There are flocks of sheepshead that need
tending around area piers, but you've got to
have what it takes to shepherd them in.
The return of the prison-striped fish from the
porgy family with the funky teeth and tendency
to thieve bait has hit its stride: Sheepshead
season is now in full swing. To fill your cooler and
taste the sweet meat that sheepies have to offer
you'll need know-how, patience and a little bit
of lady luck.
Sheepshead are in the midst of their annual
migration to nearshore waters to spawn, and
their favorite haunts hold unbelievable numbers
offish. And they're hungry.
But what do you feed a ravenous sheepshead?
The possibilities are almost endless: Crabs, sand
fleas, shrimp, barnacles, tube worms, oysters.
The list goes on. Find the bait that best suits you,
or better yet, best suits the fish. But you'll most
likely have to harvest it yourself.
There are quite a few spots to try, but start
with one of these famous sheepshead haunts:
The Boca Grande, Placida, El Jobean or L.A.
Ainger piers, the Venice jetties or the beach. If I
were you, I'd hit Boca or Placida right now.
Gearing up for sheepshead is simple. Chances
are the spinning rod and reel you've already
got will work just fine. One thing to consider
though is a stout rod, which will help you pull up
sheepshead out from under the pier. A 7-foot,
medium-heavy rod rated for 12- to 20-pound
line is a solid choice.
For your leader, use 1 12-feet of 20- to
30-pound monofilament attached to your main
line with a swivel. Before you tie on the swivel to
your main line slide an egg sinker on, 1 ounce or
less depending on the current. To anchor the bait
in the water attach a small splitshot sinker about
six inches above your hook. Finish by attaching a
No. 2 live bait hook.
Hanging around the pilings is where you'll
find sheepshead, and the reason for that is a big
part of their diet: barnacles. When the water is
clear enough you can watch these fish float up
and down around the pilings nipping barnacles
off and eating them. If you open a sheepshead
up, barnacle bits are one of the things you'll
almost always find in its stomach. Hint, hint.
So drop your bait down in front of a piling
and try to keep it as close to the pier as possible.
Fish so the tide is carrying your bait away from
the pier, but use the ebb and flow from the
pilings to keep it in close. You'll have to get used
to leaning over the pier for extended periods of


time with your arm outstretched, also know as
the"sheepshead stance'."
You've probably heard other anglers cursing
sheepshead. I think everyone whose ever fished
for them has. I, ahem, accidentally let loose
a tirade aimed at a sheepie the other day at
Placida. Very embarrassing. But the reason these
fish get cursed at is because they're not easy to
hook. Especially not at first.
Sheepshead have small mouths and big
teeth. The teeth are strangely human-esque,
and apparently also like those of a sheep, hence
the name. The design fits the fish perfectly
considering it needs to crunch the outer shell
or covering of most of its prey. To make matters
worse for the angler hoping to catch them,
sheepshead don't bite quite like any other fish.
There is really no strike at all.
When a sheepshead spots a tasty morsel
dangling near a piling it cautiously approaches,
gently takes the bait in its mouth and casually
swims away. The bite is so subtle that sheeps-
head cause more anglers to swing and miss than
any other fish. The trick is to learn how to feel
out the bite so you don't end up with your hook
and line flying straight back toward your face.
Not that I would know anything about that.
The initial stage of the bite feels like a small
bump. This is the sheepie grabbing the bait. You
may feel another small bump as the fish begins
to crunch the bait. The next part is the important
one. When the fish starts moving off with the
bait you've got to keep a close eye on your line
to track the movement, and try to feel for the
pressure of the fish. When you can feel the fish
or see the line moving it's time to set the hook.
Good luck. You'll probably need it the first
several times as you come up with nothing but
an empty hook. But stick with it and use your
sixth sense your sheepshead sense and
you'll get the hang of it before too long.
Sheepshead are a diurnal species, meaning
they feed mainly during the day. While they will
bite on both tides, I've had much more success
targeting sheepies on an incoming tide.
Sheepshead must be 12 inches long to keep,
and the daily bag limit is 15 per angler.
Until next time, hook'em up and fight'em
hard. Fish on, fellow anglers.
MattStevens is an avid saltwater angler and
an award-winning outdoor writer. His writing
is dedicated to all types of shore-bound angling
in Charlotte Harbor and the surrounding waters.
Email him at mstevens@sun-herald.com.


Serving Charlotte Harbor and the Peace & Myakka Rivers
Trust the local experts.
Sea Tow Charlotte Harbor \ 941-625-5454\ 800-4-SEATOW
seatow.com/charlotteharbor
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I'm actually excited about a fishing tour-
nament for the first time in decades? I see
WaterLine is putting together a family-ori-
ented trout event right here in my backyard
- at the Fishery Restaurant in Placida.
This is something we all can look forward
to get more families involved in fishing.
The Fishery is going to prepare some roast
pig for us. The fish is going to feed people
who need it. I know editor Lee Anderson has
worked with The Salvation Army to make
that happen, but maybe people could even
bring in some canned goods to go along with
the trout.
In related news, I saw one of the new
WaterLine hats, and it seems like a great way
to help others get exposed to our educational
and growing publication. I want to add that
I'm noticing more objectivity, and we are
all learning and growing. I'll even add that
publisher Josh Olive has carried WaterLine
forward, and Lee's addition is a big contribu-
tion we are creating a great publication. I
can't remember exactly how long ago Water-
line was conceived, but I'm glad to have
been there from the start, and am especially
excited to be back onboard today.
Josh's troll-and-pole idea has great
merit. Captains Robert Hill, Ralph Allen,
Ron Blago, myself and others put this all
together a couple of decades ago for our
county commissioners. Unfortunately, it was
and election year, and we wasted our time
because they where afraid to rock anyone's
vote I mean boat. What's funny is that
they may still have the information. It was
well thought out, and vetted through all


area interests. We did it for manatees, but
since the County Commissioners chickened
out back then, we got slammed with blanket
closures by the feds later.
Anyway, some areas would benefit from
pole-and-troll. No internal combustion
engines would be allowed in these zones.
Birds, fish, animals, and fisher folk would
all benefit. The zones need to be carefully
selected, because we do need running lanes
through the back country for safety in windy
weather. You would be amazed at how these
simple quiet zones can enhance our fishing
experience and catching. They must be
through by all parties involved before a deci-
sion is reached. It took us almost two years to
put that last one together. Why not dig it up
and grab some ideas from it?
With that said, let's talk nets. I'm not going
to bore you by repeating netting issues, but
it's obvious by what I'm reading everywhere
that we need a better understanding of gill
nets. First, remember that a gill net is only
one specific mesh size. They can be any size
or strength. One size of mesh can only gill
a certain, specific-sized fish. Larger fish can
frequently get tangled, but may not get
caught. Trout and snook, for example, can
usually cut the mesh with their teeth or gills.
Of course, if the mesh is exactly the matching
size, it can suffocate them. But if the mesh is
light enough, stronger fish can bust through
it! We could have controlled mesh sizes and
twine strength to actually manage the net
fishery. Instead, some powerful groups
decided to push net restrictions that were, in
fact, net bans.


If soAM j'doS&Akn$WWTi^ a -
certain tool, I don't believe they should decide
how it should be regulated, or eliminated. We
have had, and still have, certain fishermen who
abuse our fishery. Challenges certainly remain,
but the latest gill net dilemma did not solve our
problems. It simply created others and hurt our
legitimate commercial fishermen, fish houses
and their families.
It may seem to some people with little
knowledge of nets that if you put a gill net
in the water, fish they just swim right into
it. Not so. Fish, like most animals, aren't
stupid. They're much smarter than you may
think. Some do panic and hit the net, but
most simply swim around until you pick it
up, then swim off to safety. To believe that
fish can't see monofilament nets in the water
is simply naive why do we spend lots
of money on fluorocarbon leader material?
Because fish see monofilament! Consider
the fact that we had to guess the exact size
of our target fish to match fish and mesh
size to be effective catching fish with mono.
If your mesh strength was too big, fish saw
it easier. Too light, and they broke it. Fish
tore up mono, and netters were constantly
patching their nets. You had to avoid catfish,
rays, sharks and crabs whenever possible
because they tore up gear and wasted time
and effort. No, netting was no easy task.
Tides had to be considered because current
flow knocked your net wall down or carried
your gear away. You couldn't always see what
is in the deeper waters and snags caused big
problems. Even locating fish was a challenge.
It wasn't easy! I want folks to gain a better


"bad"- it's only a tool. Today, it can work
great in properly skilled hands, or it can be
bad if used by poachers or the ignorant.
Something our regulators might consider
is this: If you want to be respected, earn it
and show respect. Because our law enforce-
ment lacks funding, it needs respect and help
from the knowledgeable public. We are glad
to help those that help us and reluctant to
get involved if we don't feel respected. When
rules seem to be interpreted to discriminate
against certain groups, and certain groups
receive extra attention, it doesn't earn trust
or respect. This applies to fishermen, too.
We all need to look closer, listen longer and
make better decisions. We all have to get
involved. Otherwise, you're just sitting back
waiting for things to happen good or bad.
Maybe we can get some stakeholder discus-
sions together? I don't want arguments. We
need open dialogue where all parties can speak
their views. We need to share ideas and find
solutions that allow all of us the most freedoms,
yet manage our natural resources. Yes, I'm
swinging for the fence here, but even a base hit
would be better than nothing.
Thank you to all involved with WaterLine
for your hard work. Great job folks. It's time
to take some action!
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rll l/Mt o'm'."-- ""'*Nember 5,201 1 .. ,.
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Since I was young, I've spent a lot of time
outdoors in Southwest Florida. In that time,
I've had painfully close encounters with all
sorts of bugs: Scorpions, spiders, wasps, giant
water bugs, even biting katydids. But the one
that got me the worst was a caterpillar.
Adult io moths (say"eye-oh") are beautiful,
ethereal creatures. Their delicate wings and
feathery antennae look very fragile, and they
are. After they leave their cocoons, the moths
live only a few weeks at best.
Their offspring, on the other hand, are
demons straight from hell. They're heavily
built green caterpillars that can reach nearly
3 inches long and are covered with clusters of
sharp spines. The spines are venomous, and
even brushing against a spine's tip can be quite
memorably painful. Some people are affected
more than others, and I'm apparently on that
list. I was once stung by a dozen paper wasps at
once when I bumped into a nest I didn't realize
was there. I'd rather repeat that experience
than get zapped by an io caterpillar again.
Despite that, I'm always happy to spot one
of these green monsters crawling around. The
moths have always been one of my favorites,
going back to long before I was able to recog-
nize their Satan-spawn caterpillars. Io moths
are part of the saturniid (sa-TURN-ee-id) family,
which includes the polyphemus, luna and
cecropia moths. All of them have distinctive
brown fuzzy cocoons that look a bit like a kiwi
fruit, only smaller. The cocoon is made of silk,
like all other moth cocoons, but it's of a finer
quality than most. The silkworm moth, the only


source of genuine silk, is also a saturniid.
Io moths are sexually dimorphic, which
means the male and female are easy to tell
apart at a glance. The moth pictured above is a
male, which you can tell because of his bright
yelow coloration. Females are more of a rusty
orange or reddish color.
Both males and females have prominent
eyespots on their hindwings, which are usually
covered by the forewings when the moth is
resting. If it senses danger, the moth can raise
its forewings and flash the eyespots, which is
thought to scare away at least some predators.
It doesn't work on people, though. In fact, the
interesting wing patterns have made this moth
a favorite of insect collectors.
Males also have more plumose antennae,
which they use to detect the pheromones of a
female moth. Once they leave their cocoons,
the window to procreate is short. Saturniid
moths are incapable of eating as adults all
they do is mate, lay eggs and die. Females
emerge ripe with eggs and ready to mate
almost immediately, which they advertise by
sitting in one spot and producing a chemical
that you and I can't smell but to a male io must
smell like the smoke from Whiskey Creek. He's
powerless to resist it.
Once she's been fertilized, the female seeks
out a suitable plant to lay her eggs. Io caterpil-
lars aren't as picky as some other species, but
they definitely favor certain types of foliage. In
yards, they are fond of ixora and roses. In the
woods, sweetgum, red maple, buttonbush and
wild indigo are often selected.


Although an encounter with one of the
caterpillars can be nasty, it's important to
remember their venom is strictly for defensive
purposes. They will not seek you out to sting
you; you have to actively grab one to get stung.
For some people, the experience is just a minor
irritation. For me, it was like a lit match against
my skin. If you get stung and there are spine


tips broken of in your skin, put scotch tape on
the affected area and peel it off carefully. That
should take care of the stinging hairs. There's
no lasting damage it's just very painful.
It was actually a good lesson: Always keep
your eyes peeled when you're out in the woods.
There are lots of ways to get hurt. Being aware
of what's around you will help you stay safe.


LLaishley

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^tfwMur, u Page 16 0 December 5,2013


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,|A /^v o Page 17 December 5,2013


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aamusasama~wmumuu m~uauumu.s.mhmEa


Having fun and doing a little good


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
Fishing should be fun, even in a fishing
tournament. No matter what other reasons we
may have for participating in a tournament -
bragging rights, cool prizes, getting your picture
in the paper fun should always be at the
heart of it.
And if you're going to have fun, why not do a
little good at the same time?
So that was the kernel of an idea. Maybe we
could have a fishing tournament that would
make fun the focus, and maybe we could find a
way to help people while we're doing it.
We planed the kernel and it grew into what
you see here the first WaterLine tournament.
It's also the only trout tournament that I know
of in this area.
It's also a kill tournament. Some of the
people I ran this idea past said it was risky to
plan a kill tournament in today's catch-and-
release atmosphere, but I figured that with
the way our local trout population has been
booming, harvesting a few to feed the needy
would probably not be a huge problem. If we
had tried to do a kill snook tournament, that
would have been different.
What we've got planned for January 11
at the Fishery in Placida is a family-friendly
fishing tournament, a pig roast and rock-n-
roll party, and there's no need to get up early
- the fishing won't get going until 11 a.m.
The pig roast will be provided by the Fishery
(their manager, Candace, is sort of a pig roast
goddess), and the rock-n-roll will be courtesy of
Alternate Route.
It's also an opportunity for all of us to give a
hand to those in need. The Placida Fish Market
is going to help us out with processing the fish,
and The Salvation Army will handle distribution
to the less fortunate. The Toledo Blade Publix


in North Port will also be making a donation
of other food goods, thanks to manager David
Waring. We'll also have a 50/50 raffle, with the
proceeds going to benefit The Salvation Army.
Adding to the fun factor: Trout are one of the
easiest fish to catch, especially in winter. They'll
readily take shrimp or soft plastic lures, and
even kids can catch them. And although first and
second place winners will be the guys who can


catch a bunch quickly (which takes skill or great
luck), third and fourth places are up for grabs
to anyone who comes back with even a single
keeper trout. And these are good prizes, each
worth at least $400. For the full prize rundown,
see the rules below.
We're not really looking for the biggest trout.
That's intentional, because trout are a little
fragile and not a great catch-and-release fish.


We don't want our anglers throwing a bunch
of fish back to keep only the big ones that
would not be in the best interest of the fish.
So we're going to have some fun, and we're
going to do some good. If it works out, maybe
we'll do more of this kind of thing. We'd love to
have you join us, if that sounds like your kind of
thing. Just fill out the slip on the opposite page
and send it or drop it off. We'll see you there.


Think you're a great trout fisherman?


[ffM 0m ZsM MODBL~t

More than $3,500 in prizes will be up for grabs at the
first annual WaterLine Feed the Hungry Trout Scramble!

The WaterLine Trout Scramble fishing tournament entry fee is $125 plus sales tax ($133.75) for
a team of two to four anglers. All participating anglers must be at least 6 years of age on Jan.
10, 2014. All team captains must be at least 18 years of age on Jan. 10, 2014. To participate,
minors must provide tournament organizers with an affidavit signed by their legal guardian.


Team name

Captain __

Angler #1


T-SHIRT SIZE


S M L XL XXL

S M L XL XXL


Angler #2 (optional)

Angler #3 (optional)


S M L XL XXL

S M L XL XXL


Mail this slip along with your check or money order for $133.75 to WaterLine Trout Scramble,
23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte FL, 33980. Or leave it at any Sun office or Fishin' Frank's.


PURE I Publx


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1. The tournament is planned for Jan. 11,2014, but
may be rescheduled in the case of extreme weather.
Entryfees will not be refunded due to rescheduling.

2. The entry fee for the tournament is $125 plus
sales tax ($133.75 total) per team. Payment may be
made by mail or in person at any Sun Newspapers
office or Fishin'Frank's in Charlotte Harbor. Entry
forms and payment are due no later than Jan. 6,
2014. Late entries will be accepted up to the captains
meeting; however, team shirts may not be available
for late entries.

3. Teams may consist of two, three or four anglers.
A mandatory captains meeting will be held at 6:30
p.m. Jan. 10 atthe Fishery Restaurant (13000 Fishery
Road, Placida). At least one member of each team
must attend. Any team that is not represented at the
captains meeting will not be permitted to participate
in the tournament, and will not be eligible for a
refund of the entry fee.

4. All team members must be at least 6 years old
on Jan, 10, 2014. All team captains must be at
least 18 years old on Jan. 10, 2014. To participate,
minors must provide tournament organizers with an
affidavit signed bytheir legal guardian.

5. Except with prior approval from tournament
organizers, no person who is not a member of that
boat's team may be aboard a competing boat.

6. All tournament boats will be subject to inspec-
tion at the Fishery dock prior to the start of the
tournament. Once each boat has been inspected,
that team will be released to fish and the time
recorded. Upon returning, each team must check in
at the Fishery dock. The time elapsed between the
recorded departure and check-in atthe dock shall be
a team's official time.

7. The tournament will begin at 11 a.m., and the
first boat will be released at that time. Late arrival is


permitted, but no boats will be released after 1 p.m.
All teams must check in at the Fishery dock by 4 p.m.
to be eligible for prizes.

8. The first-place team shall be the team to return to
the Fishery dock in the shortest time with no fewer
than eight legal-size spotted seatrout (Cynoscion
nebulosus) on ice. The second-place team shall be
the second team to do the same. Third and fourth
places will be selected randomly from all other
teams to return in the allotted time with at least
one legal-size spotted seatrout on ice. In the event
of a tie for first or second place, the winner shall be
the team with the heavier total weight of spotted
seatrout. A separate prize will be awarded for the
heaviest single spotted seatrout.

9. In the event no team is able to return with eight
seatrout, first- and second-place prizes shall be
awarded based on the number of spotted seatrout
entered. If more than one team enter the same
number of spotted seatrout, the winner shall be
the team with the heavier total weight of spotted
seatrout.

10. In the event no spotted seatrout are entered,
prizes shall be awarded by random drawing of all
teams that fish the tournament.

11. Prizes shall be as follows:
First place: Four Fenwick Aetos rods with Pflueger
Patriarch reels and Invisi-Braid line. Retail value,
approximately $1,600.
Second place: Four Abu Garcia Volatile rods with
Penn Conflict reels and Invisi-Braid line. Retail value,
approximately $1,000.
Third place: Four Penn Squadron rods with Penn
Fierce reels and Invisi-Braid line. Retail value,
approximately $480.
Fourth place: A four-hour fishing trip with Capt.
Mike Myers. Retail value, approximately $400.
In the event a prize is not available, a similar
substitute of equal or greater value will be supplied.


12. Anglers may fish anywhere on tournament
waters accessible by boat, except areas designated as
off-limits by local, state or federal officials. Anglers
must keep a minimum distance of 50 yards from any
other competitor or competitor's boat unless invited
closer. Wading is permitted; the boat's combustion
engine must remain off while anyteam member is
wading or out of the boat.

13. Tournament fish must be caught during the
tournament. Teams may enter only fish they have
caught themselves from the wild. Fishing assistance
from any outside entity is not permitted.

14. Tournament fish must be caught using a rod and
reel and in a sporting manner (no foul hooking).
Anglers may use only one rod at a time. The number
of lines a team has in the water must not at any time
exceed the number of team members.

15. All legal baits and artificial lures are allowed.

16. No angler may alter or attempt to alter the
length or weight of any tournament fish. Any
team which enters altered fish will be immediately
disqualified.

17. All tournament fish will be filleted and
the meat donated to The Salvation Army or a
similar charitable organization for the purpose of
distribution to the needy. By entering fish in the
tournament, participants agree donate them for
this purpose.

18. Each team is required to have a cooler or other
suitable insulated container with at least 10 pounds
of ice. All tournament fish must be properly iced to
prevent spoilage. Other edible fish may be brought in
and donated, so long as they are legal to keep. There
is no competitive advantage in doing so.

19. No tournament boats may come together for any
reason or pass anything between boats during the


tournament, except for emergency purposes.

20. During tournament hours, fuel, bait and other
supplies may be purchased from retail facilities only.

21. All participants are required to follow all
applicable federal, state and local statutes, rules
and regulations. This includes slow or idle zones and
manatee areas. Any violations of such statutes, rules
and regulations may result in disqualification from
this tournament and future WaterLine tournaments.
Additionally, all competing boats must have all
required U.S. Coast Guard safety equipment.

22. All tournament participants are required to
conduct themselves in a sportsmanlike manner
during all tournament activities. Unacceptable be-
havior may result in expulsion from future WaterLine
events. Disqualification or misconduct in any other
fishing tournament within 36 months prior to the
tournament date is grounds for an application not
being accepted or returned. WaterLine may refuse
any tournament application by returning the entry
fee to the team captain.

23. Winning teams are subject to polygraph tests.
Each captain agrees to submit, by their signature
on the official entry form, to a polygraph test to
determine the results of the tournament and shall
not contest the results. Failure to be available for the
test is grounds for disqualification. Polygraph tests
may be required up to one week after the event.

24. Protests are allowed up to one hour after the end
of the tournament. All protests must be in writing
and accompanied by a $200 fee. If the protest is up-
held, the fee will be returned. If the protest is denied,
the tournament will retain the protest fee. Protests
will be determined by tournament organizers and/or
polygraph test.

25. WaterLine reserves the right to amend these
rules at any time except during tournament hours.





* Page 18 December 5,2013


Pnnaina5numm ihiwe o
liUiiaiifi-lhtEi i ii*inii uiioim


Editor's note:Although Tom
has passed away, his writing is still
in demand. Therefore, we will re-run
one of his columns each month.


Photo provided
Does anybody
have the time?


I always wear a watch. It's a habit
that comes from years working in retail
hellholes (had to make sure I used every
second of my break time). As a recreational
fisherman, I definitely spend less time
checking the clock. That's the way it should
be angling is the epitome of escapist
behavior. But I still can't entirely dodge
the wheels of time.
Out on the water, I ponder inscrutable
questions that have no business popping
into my head. How long have I spent in
this one spot? Should I try to get back for
lunch? Will the fiber I had for breakfast
kick in before I get there? If I head to the
boat launch right now, will I get home in
time for an afternoon nap? Shut up, brain;
I'm trying to fish!
Seriously, I am about the last person
on the planet who needs to worry about
constraints of the clock. Unlike you other
poor suckers who have to work for a living
(and only get a few precious hours with a
rod in your hand), I can always defer my
fishing till tomorrow. Ah, don't get jealous.
Remember, I'm living on bread and water
while you strike it rich in the real estate
market.


Anyway, I float around in a boat with a
chintzy $9 digital watch from Walmart. I
have considered buying one of those fancy
super chronograph watches. I always push
my nose up against the glass counters
when I spot one in a store. But, honestly, I
don't need an extra pound to carry on my
wrist. Besides, I don't do much diving with
pressurized-air devices. Though I do swim
with my wife after eating at the Bean
Depot.
My watch is the standard "four button"
type that we all hate. It has a jazzy
Velcro band that unlocks at inopportune
moments. It's nearly impossible to re-set
Daylight Saving Time without a manual.
You can't read it without extinguishing all
light sources. And it has a recurring alarm
that only other people can hear.
But give this cheap ticker some credit
for survival. Remember who's wearing it.
I once cut my finger making a bed. I know
it's shock-resistant, because I have done
some shocking things while wearing it. I
have tangled braided fishing line around
all the buttons. I left it in a half-full shrimp
bucket overnight!
You youngsters probably don't


remember, but the invention of the digital
watch was supposed to wipe analog
watches and their mechanical moving
hands from the face of the earth. Like
most expert predictions (including hurri-
cane pathways and football scores), this
prophecy was way off the mark. Instead of
fading away, analog watches have become
trendy. If old and outmoded is considered
trendy, I have some very trendy things in
the trunk of my car.
I remember when the watch-making
industry stopped advertising watches as
"waterproof.":' Watches suddenly became
"water-resistant" to such and such a
depth. No big deal? Imagine if SWAT team
vests suddenly became "bullet-resistant"
instead of"bulletproof." See, it does make
a difference. Time-keeping took a nose
dive when they watered down the guar-
antee. It's like when the weatherman says
40 percent chance of rain. Come on, make
a commitment: Will it or won't it?
They say that time is relative. So spend
it with your relatives and give thanks that
your kids have the fewest number of body
piercings and tattoos in the family. (There
is always something to be grateful for.)


Say, I wonder if fish have any concept
of time. Do they wait an hour to swim
after eating? Do they remember their
relatives' birthdays without their wives
reminding them? Of course not; those are
silly questions. Nature has no need for our
artificial schedules because her creatures
are guided by basic instincts. But that
could change.
Whenever I see good-hearted scien-
tists attaching tracking tags and collars
to nautical animals, I start to worry
that fish will become more like us. That
someday, on the fast track of evolution,
fish will have occupations and wear
finny watches. I guarantee the first fish
on the bandwagon will be the marine
lawyers. Hourly fees from a redfish with
a Rolex.
Maybe someday I will feel comfortable
fishing without a watch. It will be a chance
to tan that semi-permanent pale stripe
around my left wrist. Until then, I will give
you the up-to-the-minute news about my
fishing trips. That's a threat, not a promise.
Tom Johnson, the Fumbling Fisherman,
was an award-winning outdoor humor
writer. He passed away in 2009.


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Betty Staugler is the Charlotte County
extension agent for the Florida Sea Grant
Program. In this column, she answers ques-
tions about the Charlotte County Regional
Waterway Management System and why it
should interest you.

Q: WHAT IS IT?
A: The Regional Waterway Management
System (RWMS) is a data-driven approach
to promoting safe access and navigation,
protecting aquatic resources, and stream-
lining channel maintenance permitting.
Originally piloted in Sarasota Bay, the
RWMS was later expanded to include Lee,
Manatee, and Sarasota counties. The RWMS
is currently in the works in Charlotte County.

Q: HOW DOES IT WORK?
A: The RWMS includes a census of boats
and a bathymetry survey of all canals and
waterways. The resulting GIS database
stores locations and characteristics for boats,
moorings, and miles of navigable water-
ways. An analysis of boat drafts and channel
depths determines the number and severity
of boats restricted by water depth at Mean
Lower Low Water.
Once the analysis is complete the County,
the West Coast Inland Navigation District
(WCIND), and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (FDEP) develop a
multiyear general permit for maintenance of
the County's public waterways.
The first step is to determine which canal/
waterway segments within trafficsheds
(boat source areas) and secondary channels
(serve multiple trafficsheds) to include in
the permit. In situations where dredging
is selected as an appropriate management
option, the prescribed dredge depth will
depend on a number of factors, including
regulatory and historical precedents, poten-
tial environmental impacts, draft character-
istics of the present boat population, and
cost.

Q: WHAT ARE THE PROS OF THE RWMS?
A: A central tenet of the RWMS approach
is that maintained, signed channels (1)
discourage resource depletion by encour-
aging boaters to stay within the channels


and away from environmentally sensitive
shoal areas and (2) promote safe navigation.
The RWMS also saves money because the
permit is good for multiple years.

Q: WHAT ARE THE CONS OF THE RWMS?
A: Any time dredging occurs there will be
environmental impacts. The RWMS approach
strives to minimize those impacts but the
reality is they do occur. Where environ-
mental impacts are anticipated to occur, the
FDEP will require mitigation.

Q: WHAT KIND OF MITIGATION
MAY BE REQUIRED?
A: This will depend on the resources
impacted. In Lee County, where new
dredging in the aquatic preserves were
likely to impact seagrasses, the WCIND and
the County agreed to establish "No Internal
Combustion Motors Zones" (Poll and Trolls
or NICMZ). Before any dredging under their
permit can occur the NICMZ for the aquatic
preserve must be established, marked, and
enforced. Many boaters and environmen-
talist were unhappy about the process to
establish NICMZ in Lee County. However, not
because they weren't in favor of NICMZ but
rather because they weren't included in the
process of identifying where they would be
placed until it was too late.

Q: HOW CAN YOU GET INVOLVED
A: It is still very early in the process of
developing the Charlotte County multi-
year permit for maintenance dredging, so
mitigation requirements haven't yet been
identified. Charlotte County, the WCIND and
the FDEP want to ensure that all those inter-
ested have a chance to be heard, hence the
reason for this article. Currently, the parties
above along with Florida Sea Grant (which
developed the RWMS methodology) are
identifying which canals/water segments
to include in the permit. Following that,
public meetings to gather input will be held
starting in early 2014.
If you would like more information
about the R WMS you can contact Betty at
staugler@ufl.edu or 941-764-4346. To access
the RWMS technical document for Charlotte
County visit: Bit.ly/l1 lQcSqn.






















































Many of you are originally from areas of
the country where it gets cold. Really cold -
snow and ice cold. If you're in that club, you
may regard Florida's winter weather as very
mild. In fact, you may think we don't have a
winter at all. Well, you can think that if you
want, but it's not exactly right. Cold is relative
to where you are, not where you're from.
OK, 40 degrees might not be very cold to
you if you're used to it. But this is subtropical
Southwest Florida. Our fish are adapted to
warm water. You don't catch rainbow trout,
walleye and smallmouth bass here they
need cool water. Some of our fish really prefer
water even warmer than what we have. Snook
are basically at the northern edge of their
range. Tarpon are tropical by nature, although
Charlotte Harbor is an important nursery
ground for them.
Tropical fish don't do well when water
temperatures get chilly. When it drops into the
mid-60s, those species start to suffer. Water
in the mid-50s can be fatal, especially if the
temperature drops rapidly. Some fish will
migrate in search of warmer water. Most of our
larger tarpon have already left us for points
south. Snook don't leave the area, but they do
move from the beaches to the river mouths


and other areas with relatively deep water
and darker bottom sediments. Those areas are
thermal havens, where the water will warm up
faster and hold that heat longer.
Right now, we're still in the middle of
our transition to winter fishing. Every cold
front that blows through will drop the water
temperature another degree or two, some-
times more. The sun's weaker winter rays
can't warm the water fast enough to make up
for the temperature loss, so it gets steadily
chillier. Part of that transition is the migration
offish moving south along our coast. The
tarpon have left us already, but the fish that
spent the summer in the northern parts of the
Gulf- cobia, pompano, sharks, kingfish and
Spanish mackerel are all out in the Gulf
right now.
Dropping water temperatures have driven
them out of their summer homes, and each
front drives them a little further south. How
far they go depends on how chilly it gets. If
the forecasts that have called for an extra-cold
winter prove accurate, the migration might
go all the way to Cuba. In milder winters, they
sometimes stay off our beaches until it's time
to go north in the spring.
Then there are the fish that aren't bothered


by cold. Sheepshead, seatrout and flounder
seem to actually prefer cooler water. Redfish
are also cold-tolerant, but most of our decent-
size redfish are out in the Gulf right now,
hanging out with their bigger brothers. When
the flats are abandoned by reds and snook,
there's a void of predators. It gets filled by the
trout, which enjoy not only reduced competi-
tion but also far fewer sharks, tarpon and cobia
that would happily eat any trout that showed
up in warmer months.
On the flats, water both warms and cools
quickly. When the humidity is low, our night-
time temperatures can be 30 or 40 degrees
cooler than the daytime temps. Although the
water won't vary by that much, it can easily
fluctuate by 15 or more degrees. Wind also has
a major impact on flats water temperatures.
A northeast wind, like we often have after
a front, blows water out and exposes sand.
Without a blanket of insulating water, that
sand rapidly cools. When the water rises back
over it, that chilled sand will suck the warmth
right out.
Fish are cold-blooded. When its surround-
ings cool, a fish's metabolism drops and it has
no choice but to slow down and become less
active. They need heat to get going, so they'll


move into shallow water to soak up a bit of
sun. Once they're up to temperature, they'll be
hungry but that takes time. This is why you
don't need to get out on the water at 6 a.m.
in winter. Stop for breakfast, and maybe even
lunch. On a cold day, the afternoon can be the
most productive fishing time. Often, south-
facing shore lines, which get a little more sun
exposure, will be a degree or two warmer.
Slow fish aren't likely to chase down a fast-
moving bait. Instead, a slow presentation is
called for. And smaller baits are often better -
a slow metabolism means small meals are more
appealing. The water is getting clear, so you
need to be stealthy. It's great for sight fishing,
but just remember they can see you, too.
If you go into the tackle shop and the
staffers are all dressed like Eskimos, it's cold. If
it's not cold to you, that's fine. Just remember,
no matter where you grew up, all our fish are
from right here. Keep that in mind it's not
a bad thing.
RobEli ti L.ltIItZ is M the niltiIe.lt of FishtUi
fito iiA s Bot ToCAmE lo(otead ot- 4425-D
TolihIl T-i,/ ilnl ('h'iltonE Ht'obOi CGiI
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SSIZE LIMIT: n a Floridiansolte
DAILY BAG LIMIT: 100 Ib per harvester sipper is talb
AVERAGE SIZE: AbouLIt a pounlid FISHING MET


STATE RECORD: 15 Ib 8 oz
HABITAT: Ar:lound reefs, r:kods aind pilings
A few flsh are caught inshore, bult most are
taken ill water 20 t,:o 50 feet deep
LEGAL GEAR: Hook aind line. spears.
I)I)S. seilne 1o astnet
FOOD VALUE: Eh(ellent aind
highly underrated by
lmalily anglers liative


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best baits SquL
dtlrability. bult
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fish Fish a fool


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THODS: Grtnts feed miiinly oni
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epedt t: (t(h simaller ijrints
y will j rtInt talke a piece :f cuti
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NOTES: (Comm'only called Key West guillnt
S Often feed imore aggressively than
siiapper alnd will beat them to a:
_-..,. bailted hook


Hi I m Captain John Howe
,'t Ktn l, i I, i ',.. h i f, ,- ,~ ,i t ,i, hl, I.. _'? I., buy orsell
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J. /Prs.,au Page 21 0 December 5,2013


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Commission fisheries biologist Tom Matthews said.
"The crab claw size is down, which is telling us
that we are catching them faster than we used to
Matthews said. There are roughly 1 million stone
crab traps off Florida and the annual harvest has
been roughly between 2 and 3 million pounds a year,
Matthews said.


MAKE YOUR OWN RLUIEFIN TUNA


CLERMONT, Fla. A black bear crashed a birthday
party for a 12-year-old boy Nov. 30 in Central Florida,
causing quite a stir. "(The children) were excited
seeing a bear but at the same time you don't want
them try to scare the bear or make the bear come
towards us'"said mother Yvette Picasso."With all the
barbecue smoke, I said,'Maybe he's hungry."' Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers
tracked the bear all afternoon and decided to capture
him when he came too close to the party. Officers
used a tranquilizer dart to knock the 200-pound bear
out before transporting it safely out of the area.
HIGH STONE CRAB DEMAND; LITTLE SUPPLY
Commercial stone crab fishing is off to a horrendous
start this year. "It has been a disastrous start" Key
Fisheries owner Gary Graves said. "It is the highest
prices on record. But the catch has been horrible. I
am not very confident that this going to be a good
year." Last season was one of the worst on record.
Middle Keys commercial trap fishermen Gary Nichols
has tried to stay optimistic. "If it weren't for the
price, the season would be horrible," Nichols said.
"The price is just good enough to keep us going
out after them. But if the catch drops anymore, we
won't be going out." Nichols is averaging about 300
pounds of crab claws per trip, pulling between 800
to 1,000 traps a day, he said. Fish houses are paying
$21 to $23 a pound for jumbo-size claws, $18 to $19
a pound for large claws, and about $12 a pound for
medium claws, he said. The stone crab fishery is "fully
exploited," Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation


It's been widely reported that Japan's taste for bluefin
tuna or kuro-maguro is putting the species
in danger of extinction. The Pacific bluefin stock is
estimated to be about 3.5 percent of the size it should
be. That's not good news, but at least now someone's
trying to do something about it. The Japanese
Fisheries Agency has invested more than $20 million
in a facility at the Seikai National Fisheries Research
Institute near Nagasaki. This is not the first effort
to raise the fish in captivity; that's already being
done at 140 farms around Japan. But this is the
first time there's been a serious attempt to get the
fish to spawn in artificial conditions. The Institute's
new massive pools are the first in the world built on
land for the specific purpose of harvesting fertilized
bluefin tuna eggs. Currently, all farm-raised bluefin


are wild-caught as juveniles an arrangement
which sometimes falls flat, as young bluefin are
sometimes very hard to find. With demand always
exceeding supply and the price of bluefin averaging
$25 a pound, there's plenty of incentive to figure out
a way to ensure a steady supply.
'GLADES WIND FARM GOES BUST
A proposed 200-megawatt wind energy project
in Everglades sugar country has been round-filed.
According to Wind Capital Group, the plan is not
feasible due to a lack of economic incentives for
renewable energy in Florida. The wind farm would
have consisted of 124 turbines each about 475 feet
tall, spread out over 10,000 acres. A number of
wildlife and waterfowl proponents are applauding
the project's demise, saying that its location -
between Lake Okeechobee and the Arthur R. Marshall
Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is an
important and much-used part of the Southern
Atlantic Flyway, and the number of birds killed by the
turbines would have been unacceptably high.
TIME FOR A SHARK FREAKOUT
In an annual event guaranteed to needlessly panic
hundreds of thousands of coastal residents, huge
schools of blacktip and spinner sharks will appear
along South Florida's Atlantic shore in the next
few weeks. The migration yields spectacular aerial
videos and occasional beach closures. Scientists
from Florida Atlantic University have counted up to
15,000 on a single day off Palm Beach County, and
these just represent the ones visible from one flight
along the coast. Like birds and manatees, the sharks
come south for the winter, arriving in December
and January, with numbers peaking in late January
and early February. The sharks swim as far south as
southern Broward or northern Miami-Dade County,
said Stephen Kajiura, associate professor of biology
at FAU, who has studied the migration. They head
north in March, reaching as far as North Carolina.
Scientists say the danger to people is low, despite
scary aerial videos that show vast swarms of sharks
within yards of clueless swimmers. Blacktips and
spinners, which typically reach lengths of 5 or 6


feet, eat mullet and other fish nothing as large
as a human being.
CORAL IN YOUR BONES
A study by Swansea University in Wales showed that
grafts in 16 patients were considerably improved by
partially converting properties found in coral. Doctors
can treat fractures using grafts of sea coral implanted
with bone cells. Sea coral naturally contains calcium
carbonate and possesses a porous structure, not unlike
natural bone. Coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) from cor-
al has been used for many years as a successful bone
graft material, but it has been limited to specific bones
because it does not fully biodegrade. Researchers have
now discovered that CHA can be further refined into
coralline hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate (CHACC),
which was shown to improve bone grafts in the 16
patients after four months and fully biodegraded after
two years. Dr. Zhidao Xia, one of the researchers, said
the better biodegrading properties of CHACC made it
more compatible with natural bone.


LESSON LEARNED
An inexperienced boater ran aground on a sandbar.
A passing fisherman offered to pull him off with his
boat for $100. Knowing a commercial tow would cost
much more, he agreed. After his boat was off the
sandbar, he said to the fisherman,"At those prices,
I would think you could make a pretty good living
pulling people off night and day.""Can't," replied the
fisherman. "At night I dredge and haul sand back
onto the bar."


WEEKLY MAGAZINE


PRESENTS

WINTER FISHING SECRETS
WITH CAPT. MIKE MYERS


6:30 PM DEC. 12
WaterLine's outdoor seminar series kicks off with a talk
by Capt. Mike Myers of Reelshark Charters. Capt. Mike
will discuss effective techniques for winter fishing,
including where to find fish on those tough days after
a front blows through and how to get them to bite.
The public is invited to attend this free seminar at
Gasparilla Marina. There will be free refreshments and
door prizes, plus you'll have a chance to win a fishing
trip with Capt. Mike. For more info, email Josh Olive at
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com or call 941-276-9657.


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You should stop to consider just how that
plastic worm may look as you work that bait
along the bottom. Are you making it look real-
istic? Do you know what a worm looks like in the
water? You might think this is crazy, but believe
it or not, I actually think about things like this.
Crank baits, spinner baits, or any moving bait
for that matter, all have some action built into
it. At times, you can get away with chucking it
out there and reeling it back in and catching
some fine bass. But a plastic worm isn't simply
a cast and reel type of bait. It takes some inge-
nuity on the angler's part to give that bait some
sort of realistic action. There are a few things
that I've done to refine what I think works best
for me in enticing bass to bite that plastic worm
as I retrieve it back to the boat.
Now, depending on the length of the worm,
I do different things to the bait in order to give
it certain action that I think makes it more
appealing to a bass. Some veteran anglers may
read this and think that I've slipped a gear or
two, but I can honestly say that I've tweaked
this enough to think that it does work. I'm
talking about the weight of the worm.
When it comes to weight size, the wind and
cover will more often dictate what size weight
you use. If you absolutely are looking to get that
bait on the bottom and stay in touch with the
bottom of the lake, you'll have to step the size


of the weight up. If you want to swim the worm
across the tops of vegetation, or you're fishing
structure and want that bait to look as lively as
possible, a lighter weight is what you need. But
the trick comes from the retrieve itself if you
want to get fish to strike that bait.
No matter what, when I cast that plastic
worm out there, I want it to fall on slack line. As
soon as that bait hits the water, I start stripping
off line. I want as much of an absolute straight
fall as I can possibly get. It looks much more real
in its descent than arcing back towards the boat.
If I'm working that worm across the bottom,
I wait until the line goes slack, then I know it
has hit the bottom. Next, I engage the reel and
"hop"the bait back to the boat. By hoping the
bait, I mean small movements with the rod tip
that makes it feel like it's hopping up and down.
But what I'm really doing is trying to keep the
weight touching the bottom, hopping it just
enough to keep the tail swirling around.
For me, the more movement you can give
the bait without changing its location, is a
key part of getting bass to bite. If its location
changes, you can end up pulling the bait out
the strike zone. However, if you leave the
bait in place and show as much movement
as possible, I believe it will entice more bites.
Another great way to show movement is to
"drum"the line. While keeping tension on


your line from rod tip down to the bait, hold
the line just above the reel and drum the line
with your fingers. With smaller plastic baits,
you can literally make the bait shake down on
the bottom without moving it. Both of these
techniques are awesome when fishing smaller
plastic worms, because you can create move-
ment on those baits without actually pulling it
along the bottom.
When it comes to bigger worms, I like to work
them when I'm trying to get attention to a bait
over the top of vegetation. I generally like using
smaller weights for this because the worm itself
has weight to it, and I want to keep that longer
body moving more naturally in the water. As
the bait hangs up on the vegetation, I pop the
line straight up off the vegetation to give the
head of the bait some clearance in hopes that
the longer body falls free of whatever it's hung
up on. This allows the bait to fall in and out of
holes in the vegetation, and as it moves, lets the
tail of the longer worm curl up and fall down
near the head.
With this type of retrieve, you want to make
sure that the worm falls on slack line so nothing
impedes the way it drops. That longer body will
stay in the strike zone much longer and often
lead to a strike from large bass working around
the vegetation. It's hard to be patient with
this style of fishing, but I can tell you that you


._ --- `- __r
can catch some big bass from the vegetation if
you're patient enough to perfect this retrieve.
More often than not, I've gotten my strikes as
the bait is being jumped out of the cover. Bass
will surge on it thinking that it's getting away
from them and simply race after it.
You can also swim this longer plastic worm
as a retrieve as well. Hold your rod tip high
and keep your reel moving. As the bait starts
to come back to the boat, pop the rod tip with
a quick flick of the wrist and stop the retrieve.
Give that worm a chance to coil up before you
start retrieving it again. Do this every two or
three feet and vary the cadence up just
enough to make the worm look like it's acting
erratic. Once a bass strikes the bait, drop the rod
tip and slam the hook home. Big bass will come
out and chase that big worm. For them, it can
look like an easy meal.
Hopefully, these little tricks can change
up the simple drag and crank method of soft
plastic worm fishing. As you perfect this, I'd be
willing to bet you'll see more strikes with these
retrieves than you will with the old standard
drag retrieve.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fish-
erman based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes
throughout Florida's Heartland with his wife
and tournament partner, Missy Snapp. Contact
him at Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.


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Sometimes a meal out is a full-on
experience, especially when you're
dining on the water. A warm and salty
sea breeze, a sweet view of our lovely
waterscape, a secure place to tie up your
boat. When you buy an experience, you
usually pay a premium price. And that's
OK, when that's what you're looking for.
But sometimes, you just want dinner.
Which is why we decided to stop in
at Shark's Fish House in Port Charlotte.
This is a small restaurant, and it looks
out over U.S. 41 definitely not a
high-dollar view. As you might expect,
the atmosphere is casual and low-key,
very family-friendly just like the little
ma-and-pa restaurants you find in small
towns everywhere, right down to the
paper towel rolls on every table.
Usually we dine as a twosome, but this
time we brought a third to discuss some
other business. That gave us the opportu-
nity to sample a wider range of the menu
than we are able most of the time. That
turned out to be a good plan, because for
a small place the menu was fairly long.
Be forewarned that your cardiologist
probably would not be happy to see you
walking into Shark's. The menu is heavily
weighted toward fried food, although
you can order your fish blackened or
sauteed (however, we didn't see anybody
eating anything that wasn't fried).
There are a few items for landlubbers
- burgers, chicken wings and tenders
- but seafood dominates the offerings
here. The other thing we noticed right
away was the prices, which are a good bit
lower than what we've come to expect
in other restaurants. The most expensive
item on the menu is $18, and you can
walk away full for less than $10.
Since we wanted to taste a variety, we
opted to start with both clam chowder
and lobster bisque. Both were claimed
to be homemade, and they were. We
could taste the sherry in the lobster
bisque, and to our surprise we
could actually see and taste the lobster.
The clam chowder was full of chopped
potatoes, and chock full of fresh-chopped
clams. It wasn't too thick, or too thin. We
also tried the crab cakes, which were not
heavy on spices but had a higher propor-
tion of meat to breading than many
other versions we've seen elsewhere.
All the entries are served with cole slaw
and your choice of seasoned fries, hush
puppies, yellow rice or mixed veggies.
The slaw is coarsely chopped instead of
shredded and is sweet and non-acidic
- a good counterpoint to the salty fried
seafood. The vegetables were definitely
not picked fresh from the garden, but we


. t ..


FRAuW4, 1W


had already heard that Shark's traditionally
uses the canned variety of vegetables, and
that was just fine. We weren't there for the
veggies.
We were pleased to see that Shark's
has joined the trend of properly labeling
swai on their menu. Swai is a type of
catfish farmed mostly in Thailand.
The flavor is milder and blander than
American catfish. For years, swai has
been misrepresented as other fish, often
grouper, at many restaurants. That's an
unfair trick to pull on diners, but there
weren't many complaints about the fish
itself. No matter what you call it, it's
pretty good eating. And Thai aquacul-
ture regulations are much stricter than
China's, where most tilapia is raised.
Anyway, the swai was delicious. We also
had an assortment of other seafood -
clam strips, sea scallops, shrimp, oysters
- and found them all to be very good. Too
many restaurants fry food and put it under


heat lamps. This practice will dry out even
fried chicken, so something as delicate as
a scallop or shrimp can be rendered into
rubber very quickly. At Shark's, your food is
made when you order it. The upside is that
everything was done to perfection no
leathery fish or vulcanized shrimp. The
downside is that when your server puts the
plate in front of you, you have to be patient
or you'll toast your fingers.
There are other places in the area where
you can have a very similar meal and pay
50 percent more for it. That's because
you're buying an experience. At Shark's
Fish House, you're buying lunch or dinner,
and that's all. Simple down-home seafood
at simple down-home prices. Nice.
Shark's Fish House is located at 3821
Tamiami Trail in Port Charlotte (941-
627-1006). They have another location
at 14595 Tamiami Trail in North Port
(941-429-2150) where the menu is
slightly different. To see a full menu, go


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Diving vacations
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14 1997 Natico Cat Hull, 4o0hp Johnson with trailer. $5990.
Very Dry and stable ride for it's size. New Floor and transom.
BiminiTop, Brand NewTrolling Motor, and CMC Jack Plate
Draft's 8 Inches.
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-- 941-639-6603
- WWWACRYSTALCAV.COMW
4225 Taylor Road, PG





16 MITCHELL, Cenler Console 1984,
Mooring Cover-75HP Evinrude. $4000 $1350.


With the holiday and winter
travel season about to start,
many local divers are begin-
ning to think about exotic dive
locations and warm water.
While any vacation takes a
good deal of planning, a dive
vacation adds a bit more to the
game. No matter if you choose
a weekend trip, a live aboard,
a cruise or a dive resort, I think th
will be helpful.
RESERVATIONS
The days of showing up at dive
without a reservation and getting
are long gone. If you want to be s
to dive, you'll need to book your t
advance. In their high seasons, di
fill their space quickly and often t
many divers without reservations
The same goes for dive excursic
cruise lines. As soon as you book
you need to get on the line's webs
your dive trip. Cruise line dive exc
are quite limited and fill quickly.I
makes it easy to identify dive ope
of the major dive locations, but se
operator can be difficult.
A great website does not neces
the operation is one you want to(
Recommendations from divers yo
trust are usually a good source of
but remember things change ove
confirm any information you get.
best bet is to call the dive operati
phone, you can often gauge the c
by how they handle your call and
I have done this many times prior
a trip, and have never been disap
the selection I made. You should E
for your trip when you book, so yo
be aware of the cancellation police
operator.
You also need to understand w


di


ving


C,'rstal Cay Center
"41-631-6603
-~ WWW.C RYSTALCAY. COMVI___
425r Taylor Road, PG





Got a boatto sell

Call 941-429-311


vacation

ie following getting for your charter fee. Other than on
cruse line excursions, dive equipment is usually
not included in the price of the charter. You
need to know this in advance, rather than be
operation surprised by a significant additional charge. If
g on a dive you are traveling by air, you should be aware
ure you'll get of additional baggage charges so you can
trip well in decide whether to bring your own gear or rent.
ve operators Personally, if I plan on diving I always bring my
turn away own gear. Paying the airline for an extra bag,
s. is well worth the peace of mind of diving with
ons run bythe gear I know and trust.
your cruise
site and book PACKING
ursion spaces To me packing is the worst part of any trip,
The Internet whether I'm diving or not. But packing your dive
rators at any gear requires some special care. My first bit of
electing an advice is do not pack your dive gear in one of
those bags that has the name of equipment
sarily mean manufacture stenciled all over it. This tells a
dive with. crook that this bag is filled with dive gear, high
u know and dollar and easily sold items. In addition, that big
information, roller gear bag is a cumbersome and unwelcome
r time so item aboard a dive boat. Instead pack your gear
I think the in a regular piece of luggage and include a mesh
on on the duffel bag to transport your gear once you are at
operation your dive location.
questions. Prior to packing your dive equipment, lay it
r to booking all out so you can be sure you have everything
pointed in you need. This is also the time to check if
expect to pay everything is in working order, or to get items
ou should serviced or replaced if necessary. Pack all items
:ies of the carefully, and once you have everything in the
bag do not take anything out.
hat you are Only open the bag to put another


'I


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Located at BEAUTIFUL '[ RIN NA.J%





17 Angler Cenler Console 1982, 115 Merc-1982, Irailer
Just Serviced Ready to go! $3,950
C,vtntal Cay Cente,.
941-639-6603
S2WW5W.CRVSTAILCAY.COIrRM,
S4225 Taylor Road. PG


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Please call for pricing!
Punta Gorda's Com-Pac Dealer
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item in if necessary, otherwise you may get to
your destination to find the items you took out
didn't all make it back into the bag. Weigh your
bag once it is packed, and remember airline
rules limit bags to 50 pounds. Airlines may
have you remove items to get an overweight
bag down to 50 pounds, or charge a surcharge
of $100 for bags 51-75 pounds.
Once you are at your destination, repack
your gear into the mesh duffel. Pack this bag
putting the items you will need first on top.
For example, put your fins, boots, wetsuit,
gloves, mask/snorkel in the bag first, with your
regulator and BC on top as you will need them
first when you set up your gear to dive. Doing
this will prevent you from looking like a disor-
ganized mess to the dive boat crew and your
fellow divers, which is never a good thing.

DIVE BOAT ETIQUETTE
Having run a charter dive boat for awhile, I
have seen divers behave in some strange ways.
Some of these behaviors could be attributed to
having never been aboard a dive boat before or
anxiety, but many are purely the result of lack
of thought and courtesy. It is very important
that divers arrive on time for check-in, a few
minutes early is always a good thing. Be sure
you and all in your party have their C cards
with them. The days of taking your word that
you are certified are gone due to liability
issues. While most operators will try to verify
certification of a diver through agency web
sites if necessary, this is not always possible
and it is not the dive operator's responsibility.
Have your C card with you and there will be
no problems. Once you board the boat the crew
will either assign you a spot on the boat, or ask
you to pick one. For the duration of the trip this
will be your assigned location, set up your gear
and stow your bag and extra items in your area
only. Do not change your spot once assigned
without permission of the crew.
Accounting for divers can be a challenge at
times, and is often accomplished by knowing
who is in what spot on the boat. Space on
many dive boats is tight, so try to be a good
neighbor. Once you have your gear set up and
stowed, step away and give divers on either
side room to work on theirs. Good conversation
and an atmosphere of comradeship make a
dive trip more pleasant. It is always a good
idea to introduce yourself to other divers and
to engage in small talk, but stay away from
topics that could lead to disagreements of
any kind. It is also wise not to be too helpful


to other divers or the crew. Most divers would
rather solve their problems themselves, and
the crew has established procedures and tech-
niques they use to keep everyone organized
and safe.
If someone asks for your help do what
you can, and if you see a dangerous situa-
tion always let a member of the crew know.
Briefings presented by the boat captain and/or
other members of the crew are important for
safety, and the information provided will be
helpful to you as a diver. As a matter of cour-
tesy stop what you are doing, put your conver-
sations on hold, and pay close attention to the
information being provided. You are bound
to learn something new, and the information
likely will contribute much to your dive.
Don't be reluctant to ask questions or
request help from the crew, the captain and
crew would rather answer questions and help
you, than have to deal with an incident during
the dives. Always follow directions given by
the crew throughout the trip, they are likely
for your safety which is the crew's primary
responsibility.
A subject that always comes up and raises
some controversy is tipping. It is customary to
tip the crew or the divemaster on a dive boat.
The amount of the tip depends on the type
of trip and any individual services that were
provided. In general $5 per tank on a two- or
three-tank dive is usual. Tipping on live-
aboards or at dive resorts is a different matter
as crew/staff duties are different. Divemasters/
boat crews are service workers, much like
waiters and waitresses, and tips often make
up a good portion of their income. If you feel
the crew's service to you did not warrant a tip,
speak to the captain or operation manager and
let them know why so the problems can be
corrected.
Diving in a new or different place serves
to expand a diver's base of knowledge, and
may even provide exposure to an entirely new
aspect of diving. Go ahead and start planning
that trip you have been thinking of now, and
have a great dive.
Capt. Dan Sansiveri is a retired Army Special
Forces Officer. He is a USCG licensed 100-ton
Master, and an active NA Ul Scuba Diving
Instructor. Dan works with Florida West Scuba
and Charters in Venice. He has been diving the
local waters since 1999, and had the opportunity
to dive all over the world while in the Army.
Contact him at dansansiveri@comcast.net or
through Florida West Scuba, 941-486-1400.


This is an awesome hat.


Call 941-429!3iO- -
to list your boattdavY! __


'her
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dib 'A


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18' 200 C HawK Bay Boat w/ 90hp i-our StroKe Merc.
Asking $13,990. Very Low hrs almost like a new boat!
SS Propeller, Garmin Color Chart Plotter GPS. Comes with
trailer. Bimni top, Live Well, Coast Guard Equipment.
Ready For the Water!
RAYSHORF MARINF 941-697-5777 havshnremarinefl .nm


Sale price @ $11,990. Very Low Hrs Since New. Lower Unit
just completely redone. Full cover. Engine is spotless. Runs
Exc.needs nothing!. Very solid boat with a great ride and fast.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


21 1998 WelilcraTt Dual console with a 150p Mercury. very
Clean! $11,990. Garmin GPS Color Chart Plotter.'08 Alum.
Trailer. Full Windshield. Lots of seating. Much easy to main-
tain then a deck boat ( Removable Cushions) with a much
better ride. Turn Key! Ready for the water today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com







21' 2003 SEASWIRL $17,500
Please contactTod Sullivan at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers and
Redfish Yacht Brokers


19' 1996 Wellcrall Cenler Console. Johnson 112HP 21' 2013 HURRICANE SUNDECK Fun in Ihe Sun!
$7,990. Fish Finder, CD Player, Fishing Chair, Full Warranty $28,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
Life Jackets, Bimini Top & Swim Ladder. Fresh Water McCallMarineSales.com
Boat Very Good Condition! Has Trailer. This boat By appointment only Ai
Needs nothing ready for fun in the sun today! Licensed Yacht Broker
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com Located at BEAUTIFUL [ IMA RIt N..]


19 2000 Seaswirl Center Console: Good shape,
115HP Johnson. NewVHF, Garmin fishfinder/chartplot-
ter combo, battery and bilge pump. Bimini and console
cover included. Asking $11,500. ( .
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 Ti r' T SL








19' SEAPRO 115 Merc with trailer $16,000
Call Tod at 941-457-0131
or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


20' 1997 Aquasport 200 Center Console $14,999
Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only i D
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL (MI A R I NA]


Call For Details 941-662-0015
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY F i
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL 'NI A I NA.j







21' RO BALO i-?',' :,.:,4 ,: l1 a..:.,4 ,.3 r:.:,4 r l ,-i- I:.j
Mercury 225 hp. Low Hours' excellent compression, tan-
dem trailer with brakes, new tire's, spare, hard top, rocket
launcher, electrons box, GPS, potty 4 sided enclosure,
spreader light's. Been sitting need's TLC!!
$8750..0B0..941-875-8000 239-652-0000
SALE PENDING!





21' CELEBRITY FISH HAWK WAC 1991, trailer. $4,69.
Now $3,000. Motor available $2,800 installed.
c_,vstal Cay Ceonte.
9041-639-6603
Swww.CRYSTALCAY.c CM
4225 Taylor Road, PG43


*r------------------------------------------------------------

VYES, I HAVE TO HAVE A WATERLINE HAT!

I Hats are priced at $14.02 each plus tax, which conveniently comes to $15
(we planned it that way). Shipping is $7 anywhere in the U.S., whether
you buy one or 100. Clip this and send it along with your check or money
order to WaterLine Hat, 23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte FL, 33980.

Name

Address

City State ___ ZIP _____
If you live in Southwest Florida and don't want to pay shipping, call 941-276-9657.
h-----------------------------------


20U learn Sailftisn, 1996b, with trailer. center console, live
well, motor Yamaha 130,2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777
fi r-i i l


20' THOMPSON 1988,V-6 Mercruiser I/O
Boat & Trailer. Ready to ride! $4,805. $3,995.
sTjtasl Cay Cene,,
041-630-6603
WW.CRVST ALCAYCO.CQ"
422S Taylor Road, PGa


fishing! $23,990 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only l ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL Ii.R ,- ig ,Rt.)


22' SEA HUNT Escape220 LE $34,000
Escapes have everything you need! Call 941-662-0015
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I H
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL -M A :I NAR *


j#.tfletVU Page 25 0 December 5,2013





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BULLETIN BOARD
FROM PAGE 3

about 30-45 minutes after it is dark enough to see the stars
and continues as long as stargazers linger. Prior to complete
darkness, visitors cannot be admitted into the observatory as
the equipment needs to be setup and aligned with the stars,
but early arrivers are welcome to enjoy views of the lake and
the scenery of the campus from the lakeside picnic tables. The
public sessions are free, weather permitting. Call 941-637-
3518 or 941-637-5669.

MARCO ISLAND CHRISTMAS
ISLAND STYLE BOAT PARADE
Enjoy a wonderful festive family evening on Dec. 7th on Marco
Island from 6 to 8 p.m. Watch the boats sail by, decked out
for Christmas, to get you in the holiday spirit. Recommended
viewing spots include The Esplanade and Snook Inn (1215
Bald Eagle Dr., Marco Island). Call 239-250-8348 for more
information.

ADVANCED SALTWATER FISHING CLASS
AT CAPE CORAL YACHT CLUB
This class held on Dec. 7th from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Yacht
Club Community Park (5810 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral) is
designed for the experienced angler with topics including:
Graphite rods versus fiberglass rods, catching live bait, fishing
structures, chumming and fighting techniques. Cost is $45 fir
Cape Coral residents and $55 for non-residents. Call 239-574-
0806 for more information or visit CapeParks.com.

BIRDING DIVERSITY IN VENICE
Calling all birding enthusiasts! Be tantalized and wowed on
Dec. 8th from 7:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. by the vast array of bird
species and nature found at the beautiful T. Mabry Carlton, Jr.
Memorial Reserve (1800 Mabry Carlton Pkwy., Venice). Join
Sarasota County Volunteer Charlie Sample as he leads you on
a birding nature journey. Don't miss this opportunity to help
document the many species of birds of the Carlton. Please
contact Charlie Sample at csample41@verizon.net or call
941-266-9318 for your reservation.

GUIDED WALKS AT ANN DEVER/
OYSTER CREEK REGIONAL PARK
Join Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center on a guided walk
on Dec. 8th from 9 to 11 a.m. through this 263-acre Charlotte
County park. Bobcat, pileated woodpecker, gopher tortoise
and various wildflowers may be seen in the pine flatwoods
and salt marshes along the trail. Wear sturdy shoes and bring
drinking water. Enter via the San Casa entrance. Call 941-475-
0769 for information.

ENGLEWOOD FISHING CLUB MEETING
The Englewood Fishing Club will hold its monthly meeting
Dec. 11th at 6:30 at the Lemon Bay Park Environmental
Center (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). Featured will be a
presentation by Capt. Jay Withers of Silver Lining Charters
speaking on "Near Shore Wintertime Fishing".' Admission is
free and open to the public. Visit EnglewoodFishingClub.net or
contact Tom Amatucci at twafish1@comcast.net.

SEAGRASS ADVENTURE WADING TRIP
Explore the creatures within the sea grass beds of Lemon
Bay using nets and buckets while wading out into knee to
hip deep water. The trip is held on Dec. 11th from 9 to 11
a.m. at the Cedar Point Environmental Park (2300 Placida
Rd., Englewood). Hold sea horse, crabs, fish and others while
watching dolphin jump in the bay. Family educational fun.
Free but reservations are required. Call 941-475-0769 to
register for for information.

NIGHT FISHING CLASS IN CAPE CORAL
Find out why fishing at night can be the best time to fish on
Dec. 12th from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Yacht Club Community Park
(5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral). Information will be given
about fishing snook lights, bridges and deep and shallow wa-
ter. The use of artificial lures, live and cut bait will be covered
as wellas safety tips and gear for night. Coast is $20 for Cape
Coral residents and $30 for non-residents. Call 239-574-0806
or visit CapeParks.com for more information.

GUIDED WALK AT TIPPECANOE II
MITIGATION PARK
Join Charlotte Harbor Environmental Park (Joppa Ave., Port


* Page 26 0 December 5,2013


Charlott) on a guided walk through this 380-acre Charlotte
County park on Dec. 12th from 9 to 11 a.m. in search of some
of the many bird species found within. The scrub habitat is
home to the threatened Florida scrub jay as well as many local
and migratory species. Wear sturdy shoes and bring drinking
water. Call 941-475-0769 for information.

PEACE RIVER AUDUBON BIRD COUNT
Peace River Audubon's 2013 Christmas Bird Count will be on
Dec. 14th and encompasses a fifteen mile diameter circle, the
center point being approximately downtown Punta Gorda.
The circle is divided into about 12 areas, the furthest south
areas being Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center and Cecil
B Webb pre-serve. There are three water areas: the southern
part of Charlotte Harbor including the area around Alligator
Creek; the northern part of the Harbor; and the Peace River
from the U.S. 41 bridge. Each area is headed up by an individ-
ual who determines where their group goes in their particular
area, where and when they meet. In some cases they break
up into smaller groups covering particular areas, such as a
golf course. Most groups start about 7 a.m. and go until about
noon. Some go out again later in the afternoon to count birds
coming in for the evening. Call Tony Licata at 941-505-9775 or
contact him at Alicata@Dcwis.com.

TARPON SAMPLING IN LEMON CREEK
Hike with a guide on Dec. 14th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. at the
Wildflower Preserve (3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd., Englewood)
to observe seining for juvenile tarpon, measurement and
marking of fish. Call 276-233-6364 or 941-830-8922 for more
information.

BIKE THE WILD T. MABRY CARLTON, JR.
MEMORIAL RESERVE
Join Sarasota County volunteer guides on Dec. 14th from 9 to
11 a.m. for a challenging bike excursion while enjoying the
wild wilderness of a true Sarasota County gem, the beautiful
T. Mabry Carlton, Jr. Memorial Reserve (1800 Mabry Carlton
Pkwy., Venice). Pre-registration required. On-line registration
available at Scgov.net. Click"Calendar on the left, or call
941-861-5000.

BAY LIFE SAFARI AT LEMON BAY PARK
Explore the sea life near our beaches with American Littoral
Society biologists on Dec. 14th at 9:30 a.m. at the Lemon
Bay Park and Environmental Center (570 Bay Park Blvd.,
Englewood). We'll be searching shallow shorelines and sea
grass beds; observing, collecting, and learning about some
of the many interesting fish and other animals that inhabit
Sarasota Bay. Wading shoes, sunscreen, and drinking water
are suggested. Call Chuck at 941-488-8998 for info.

SURVIVAL CLASS
This class is held on Dec. 14th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Cape Coral Yacht Club Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy,
Cape Coral). Everyone should know survival skills because
disasters, whether man made or nature made, can occur
at any time. Learn about fire-starting techniques, proper
water collection, emergency shelter coverage and needed
survival gear. Learn how to make and assemble your very own
survival kit and go-bag. Discover the many uses and how to
make a para-cord lanyard that you will get to keep as a class
souvenir. The cost is $35 for Caep Coral residents and $45 for
non-residents. Call 239-574--0806 or visit CapeParks.com for
more information.

LIGHTED BOAT PARADE
AT FISHERMAN'S VILLAGE
The boat parade presented by Fishermen's Village/Punta
Gorda Chamber starts at 6 p.m. on Dec. 15th. Viewing begins
at dusk. Decorated vessels of all sizes parading on Charlotte
Harbor. Enjoy live music by the Port Charlotte High School
Wind Orchestra beginning at 5:30 p.m. Call 941-639-3720 or
visit Fishville.com for more information.

GUIDED WALKS AT TIPPECANOE
ENVIRONMENTAL PARK
Join Charlotte Harbor Emnvironmental Center on Dec. 15th
from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Tippecanoe Environmental Park (2400
EIJobean Rd., Port Charlotte) for a guided walk through this
380-acre Charlotte County park. Habitats such as scrub, pine
flatwoods, marsh and wetlands occur in this diverse property.
Wear sturdy shoes and bring drinking water. Meet behind
the Charlotte County Sports Park. Call 941-475-0769 for
information. -= .


2.4 225 TRITON SEA HUNT CC $35,900 FullWarranty 24 2008 Bay Scoul 240 4i ... ,,.a =riaia., .'a,
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198 boat!! Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I By appointment only I
Licensed Yacht Broker l llL Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [MARI A = ,4 Located at BEAUTIFUL *[.MARI NA]


Iii w,,



23' 1993 SEA RAY SUNDANCER Lu'n-i- 1-,n :ri,:,l:
$12,900 Call Meagan McCall for Details! 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located in BEAUTIFUL f A R IN )

M A Ri N %"-






t i P l yl m- ,:k B ,:'Il .Z OO.' E ,:-ll n l| .:.:.n d
Bimini, 150 Merc gas engine. No trailer. $9,200
C..stal Cay Cernt,
941-639-6603
W W CRYSTACCAV.COMI_41
WS-raylr Road, PG C


... ~.


EFI Only $16,990. Garmin GPS Sounder, Sleeps 4
Comfortably. Was Dry rack Stored and she shows!
Very Low Hrs Always maintained. Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


24t Uu2 0ea nay OUiNUhL..l wilil .l. DIOdVU 3 UUdi Irup.
Only $15990. Plenty of seating. Porta Potty Room. Garmin
GPS, Stainless BiminiTop. New oil pan, oil exchanger &
shift cable just replaced.Turn key!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


I'U


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RIE DU CE D!
24 Ptivaleel Renegade 1987, wilh Ilailel, 260hp molol,
Stereo, Furuno Radar, GPS, plotter, much more! $14,000.
Crystal Cay Centee,
S 941-639-6603
SWWW.CRYSTALCAY.COMV_
4225 Taylor Road, PG


Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only nIRn
Licensed Yacht Broker *w f
Located at BEAUTIFUL I*MA R I N.


251" 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


ZU ZUUI fnlhlUlIU &U IalUII pUU,kJUU
Call Richard Rosano at 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only ll l B I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [MARINA.J%


A i A iI


iilese OULIIII dle upenllLU Ln uII neeUui I 1 1diyel.ll
Paddle participants must provide own PFD, water-
craft and be able to swim. Voluntary donations to
the Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted.
Reservations are required for all outings. For more
information visit bit.ly/16iFOnM
PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: Dec. 5th
from 8:30 to 11 a.m. with John Phillips and Jamie
Reynolds through pine flatwoods, scrub and freshwater
pond habitats, Voluntary donations to Charlotte Sierra
Club are gratefully accepted. Reservations are required.
To reserve call 941-639-7468.
RELAXING LETTUCE LAKE PADDLE: Dec. 10th from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried
through a maze of channels into the Peace River,
exploring side lagoons to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch
and back a different route. Voluntary donations to
Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve call
941-637-8805.
SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: Dec. 12th from 8:30
to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips
and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, scrub and
hardwood hammock. Voluntary donations to Charlotte
Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve call
941-639-7468.


IVITm ILLM m CCm.,, R m rRmtm L Cammuomec. 15IJ]l110111l d.111.LUZL
p.m. with Florida Master Naturalists Jim Story and Rick
Fried through freshwater jungle and brackish channels
to lower Shell Creek and waterfall over dam containing
Punta Gorda's water supply. Voluntary donations to
Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To reserve
call 941-505-8904.
PRAIRIE CREEK PADDLE: Dec. 16th from 8:30 a.m. to
12 p.m. with Florida Master NaturalistJamie Reynolds
though cypress wetlands. Participants must provide
pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Voluntary dona-
tions to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. To
reserve call 941-637-8284.
CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS PRESERVE HIKE: Dec.
20th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and freshwater habitats. Voluntary
donations to Charlotte Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-639-7468.
LETTUCE LAKE PADDLE: Dec. 27th from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through a maze
of channels into the Peace River, exploring side lagoons
to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch and back a different
route. Voluntary donations to Sierra Club are gratefully
accepted. To reserve call 941-637-8805.


Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


24'2004 TRITON
Superbly well kept loaded with extras. Also comes
with a complete full mooring and storage cover.
Also includes trailer. $40,000 Call John
@ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


26' 1996 CHRISCRAFT CROWN
With new engine and trailer $15,000
Call Mike at 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


N.


24 2005 SHAMROCK V4. 111 4n',in,,.0-, i:,,, 26' 2001 Sea Ray 260 Sundancer in-i,,n,.:u.1 .- ::,,,:,,
hours. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-9511 $29,900 Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only N By appointment only i
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [ MA R N A] Located at BEAUTIFUL .,A* R 1 I A ]


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t,/^,* Page 27 0 December 5,2013


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FAMILY BIKE ADVENTURES AT THE
BEAUTIFUL CARLTON RESERVE
Got bikes? It's perfect weather to grab the whole family to
join Sarasota County and Carlton Reserve volunteer guide
David Reynolds and family for an off road wilderness bicycle
ride through the beautiful T. Mabry Carlton, Jr. Memorial
Reserve (1800 Mabry Carlton Pkwy., Venice) on Dec.
15th from 10a.m. to noon. Expect to see lots of wildlife!
Pre-registration is required and should be secured by calling
David Reynolds at 941-412-5575.

WOODLAND STROLL AT POCONO TRAIL
PRESERVE IN NOKOMIS
Join Sarasota County Environmental Specialist Jeff Weber on
Dec. 17th from 9 to 11 a.m. as he leads you on a woodland
stroll from upland habitats to the shores of Shakett Creek
at Pocono Trail Preserve in Nokomis (189 Pocono Trail East,
Nokomis). Participants will see a variety of plant and animal
species including live oaks, eastern red cedars, cabbage
palms, bracken ferns, osprey, wading birds and other wildlife
common to the area. Register on-line at Scgov.net. Click
Calendar of Events on the left, or call 941-861-5000.

FAKAHATCHEE ISLAND CRUISE
The Friends of Fakahatchee are offering a guided holiday
cruise to historic Fakahatchee Island Thursday on Dec. 19th.
The island off the coast of Everglades City was once home to
a thriving community of farming and fishing families. It even
had a school. In earlier days, Calusa Indians made the island
their home. Everglades National Boat Tours will head for the
island through the mangroves of the Ten Thousand Islands.
Once on the island, a naturalist will point out unusual
plants on the path to the historic cemetery. Cold drinks and
snacks will be served on the boat. The cruise begins at the
Everglades National Park shelter near the docks at 2:30 p.m.
and returns at 5:30 p.m. Advance reservations at $75 per
person are required. For details visit OrchidSwamp.org or call
Bruce Bunch at 239-567-7919 contact him at brucebunch@
yahoo.com.

HIKE THE WILDFLOWER PRESERVE
A guided ecology walk of about two miles from Wildflower
Preserve (3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd., Englewood) to adja-
cent Amberjack Preserve on Dec. 28th from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Differences in habitat types, management and animals and
plants will be discussed. Call 941-830-8922 for more info.

COMMISSION SEEKS VOLUNTEERS
The Charlotte County Commission is seeking volunteers
for the Marine Advisory Committee: An organization or


association to volunteer to serve as a permanent member of
the Marine Advisory Committee. Each organization shall be
marine-oriented and hold regularly scheduled meetings, and
have a membership of at least 25 people. Representatives
from this organization/association will serve three-year
terms. The term of the first representative will be effective
once the organization/association is approved, or as soon
thereafter as a selection is made, and shall expire Dec.
31st. For an application form to turn in with your resume,
contact Pam Alexander at 941-764-4909 or Pam.Alexander@
CharlotteFL.com, or fax your request for a form to her at
941-764-4108.

SOUTH FLORIDA MUD RUN 5K
The South Florida Mud Run is the only 100% charity Mud
Run of it's kind! Grab your friends, create a team and come
get dirty for a good casue while we work together to build
America's newest Children's Hospital in American! The 3.1-
mile race is on Jan. 11th and starts at 9 a.m. at the Redneck
Yacht Club Punta Gorda (44570 Bermont Rd., CR 74, located
3 miles east of CR 31, Punta Gorda). Call 941-505-8465 for
more information.

VENICE SAILING SQUADRON
MEMBERSHIP MEETING
Venice Sailing Squadron's membership meeting is on Jan.
15th at 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Venice Community Center
(326 Nokomis Ave. South, Venice). There will be a pot luck
dinner with guest speaker. Monthly races and cruises will
be discussed. Racing crews needed. You don't need a boat to
Join. Interested parties are always welcome to attend. Call
941 445-5069 or 941-861-1380 for more information.

MIAMI BOAT SHOW TRIP FROM CAPE CORAL
Sit back, relax and enjoy a trip to the Miami Boat Show that
departs on Feb. 15th at 7 a.m. from the Cape Coral Yacht Club
Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral) and
returns at 9 p.m. The trip includes transportation, entry fee,
parking, tolls, snacks and soft drinks. Call 239-574-0806 or
visit CapeParks.com for more information.

ANNUAL HARBOUR HEIGHTS RUN/WALK
The eight annual Harbour Heights 5K run/walk is a
community event on Feb. 22nd that benefits Autism Speaks
and exceptional students at four Charlotte County elementary
schools. Through this race we hope to raise awareness about
autism and help the classrooms for developmentally disabled
children. We appreciate your support! The race starts at 8
a.m. at Harbour Heights Park (27420 Voyageur Drive, Punta
Gorda). Call 941-58-2891 for more information.


Call 941-4293iG-
to list your boattoday! __


26' 2002 FourWinns 268 Vista: Super clean inside
and out, just waxed, 5.7 Volvo w/289 hrs,
generator w/86 hrs, full camper enclosure.
Recent survey rated above average. Asking $34,000.
Call Ray Mason D fv
941-505-7269.


28' CruiserYacht 1998,5.7 Twin Merc engines,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $25,000.
Cf.-stal Cay Centse
04'41-639-6603
4225 Taylnr Rmad, PG "f


26' Pursuit Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200Yamaha 28' Luhrs Open, twin-Yanmar Diesel, 2006,
four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass, $119K Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500. or the office at 941-833-0099
Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, "TierOn f e Offered by
941-626-1329 \ fSt Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [-MNAI HIN.


(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,00 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


Th P. I b -~,-f -tt.Ol() AIP)f


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following field trips and walkabouts. These trips are
free and open to the public.
OLLIE'S WALKABOUT: At Ollie's Pond Park (18235
Avon Ave., Port Charlotte) on Jan. Istat8 a.m. Contact
Stu and Louise Lewis at 603-742-2874.
WILD TURKEY STRAND FIELD TRIP: At Wild Turkey
Strand Preserve (11901 Rod & Gun Club Road, Fort
Myers) on Jan. 25th. Meet at 7 a.m. at south car pool
location. Call Jim Knoy at 303-868-8337 for more
information.
PUNTA GORDA HISTORY PARK WALKABOUT: At
Punta Gorda History Park (501 Shreve St., Punta Gorda)
on Feb. 4th at 8 a.m. Call Starr Zachritz at 941-391 -
4446 for more information.
CELERY FIELDS FIELD TRIP: At Celery Fields (100
Coburn Rd., Sarasota) on Feb. 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m.
at the north car pool location. Call Eleanor Marr at


Charlotte County Natural Resource Department
will be conducting the following free guided
walks and programs in December. Unless noted,
all walks begin at 9 a.m. For directions or further
information, call Cedar Point Environmental Park at
941-475-0769.
DEC. 8TH: Join Greg Brazicki on a guided walk
through the old growth pine flatwoods and mangrove
fringe of 125-acre Oyster Creek/Ann Dever Regional
Park in Englewood. Meet at the San Casa entrance.
DEC: 10TH: Join Margaret Dunson and Nancy
Clayton on a guided birding walk through the
scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre Amberjack
Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet at the end
of Gasparilla Pines Blvd. Walk begins at 8 am.
DEC. 11TH: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers
at Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure
Wading Trip into Lemon Bay in search of marine
organisms such as sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish.
Registration required
DEC. 12TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through Tippecanoe II Mitigation Preserve in Port
Charlotte. This 150 acre preserve is home to several
families of the threatened Florida scrub jay. Meet in
the parking lot
DEC. 15TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through 308-acre Tippecanoe Environmental Park.
This Charlotte County park includes habitats such as
scrub, pine flatwoods, marsh and wetlands. Meet
behind the Charlotte County Sports Park.
DEC. 16TH: Join Bruce Dayton on a guided
walk through Cedar Point Environmental Park in


y4-O6L- l48o t iUi iuie iiiiUiiiidtIUin.
DEEP CREEK PRESERVE WALKABOUT: At Deep
Creek Preserve (10797 SW Peace River Street, Arcadia)
on March 4th. Call Shannon McGinnis at 941-268-0429
for more information.
BABCOCK FIELD TRIP: At Babcock-Webb Wildlife
Management Area on March 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m. at
the Babcock-Webb entrance. Call Dave Lancaster at
586-214-0203 for more information.
SHELL CREEK WALKABOUT: At Shell Creek Preserve
(3081 Duncan Road., Punta Gorda) on April 1st at 8
a.m. Call Dave Lancaster at 586-214-0203 for more
information.
FORT DESOTO FIELD TRIP: At Fort DeSoto Park
(3500 Pinellas Bayway S., Tierra Verde) on April
19th. Call Eleanor Marr at 941-624-4182 and
Stu and Louise Lewis at 603-742-2874 for more
information.


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tLgIIeI oVUU, I L. 11I 1 J-dLcr I IUdri w LVUnlly OPdr
has nesting bald eagles along with various wading
and migratory bird soecies. Meet at the Visitor
Center.
DEC. 19TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided
walk through the old growth pine flatwoods and
mangrove fringe of 125-acre Oyster Creek/Ann
Dever Regional Park in Englewood. Meet at the San
Casa entrance.
DEC. 20TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through the scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre
Amberjack Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet
in the parking lot at the end of Gasparilla Pines Blvd
DEC. 22ND: Join Stu Lewis on a guided walk
through Tippecanoe II Mitigation Preserve in Port
Charlotte. This 150 acre preserve is home to several
families of the threatened Florida scrub jay. Meet in
the parking lot
DEC. 23RD: Bring the Pre-school Wee Ones to Cedar
Point Environmental Park for a one-hour Moms &
Tots Nature Adventure. The theme will be "New
Year's Beauty". All children must be accompanied by
an adult. Program begins at 10:00 am.
DEC. 27TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided
walk through the old growth pine flatwoods and
mangrove fringe of 125-acre Oyster Creek/Ann
Dever Regional Park in Englewood. Meet at the San
Casa entrance
DEC. 31ST: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers
at Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure
Wading Trip into Lemon Bay in search of marine
organisms such as sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish.
Registration required


27' 2006 GLASTRON
With its beautiful condition and many fine
amenities, this boat is a must-have
for any boating enthusiast.$34,000 Call John @
Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


M hft





27' 2006 SEA RAY AJ
This 27 Amberjack is the perfect all around
package. Engine has been updated
and shows 30 hrs.$40,000 CALL JOHN
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575

i^






28 1991 Sea Ray Weekender: Two rebuilt
Mercs with low hours, large cockpit for
fishing, new interior
upholstery. Ask $23,900. Tie oxt
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269. -" fl"ff-L1


29 1989 uCruisers
SVery clean with owner having kept her in great condition,
new bottom service, batteries and cockpit carpet are just
a few of the upgrades. $19,000 Call John
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin, 29" Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only $29,900.00
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure, New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 90 hrs. Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
lift kept. Excellent condition, head w/shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
$28,500. 941-639-7890. BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only f A f I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL FM ..\ 1I N .-|


el
















REDI
I1 I


-rT1


30'1999 PURSUIT 3000 OFFSHORE $55,000 32' 2006 Century for $109,999
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 Call Orion for details at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I AC I By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .m A R I -1 Located at BEAUTIFUL Nj-.1 RIR J


30'2006 GRADY WHITE MARLIN 300 Fully loaded & 32 2008 Cenlury Offshore I1 111 -.. ..nil...,i,.
beautiful! $109,900 Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198 $129,900 Call Orion Wholean 941-249-0177
McCallMarinesales.com McCallMarineSales. corn
By appointment only lMll ,1 By appointment only ^
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [ & a ,INAj I Located at BEAUTIFUL _[.1.A RI-N. .I

B "k M IHIIIII --**


30' Checkmale 300SX, 1986, wiIh ri-axle trailer
2 MerCruiser 600HP motors, bimini, & more. $34,500 32' CATALINA 2003, 30 hpYammar,
0vtaI cay cenreC AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
w% t, o% 4B o3 ,,,, $77,000. 941-347-4670
S4225 raylor Ro~ad, g email irvina32@centurylink.net


Blessed to


My name is Bryan Stock-
bridge. My wife Diana and I are
outdoor enthusiasts, stewards
and adventurers who love being
out on the water. We became
Coastal Systems Naturalists
through the Florida Master
Naturalist Program and we own
and operate Gulf Coast Kayak in I
We purchased the business a lit
year ago and we feel very lucky to
a beautiful view of the north side
Pass right from our location. MatI
Aquatic Preserve, which is part of
Sound that borders Charlotte Har
a unique and productive ecosyste
many flora and fauna. Each day w
work is a new experience. It truly
when we don't see manatee in th
feeding on sea grass, dolphin toss
the air and snook flushing out pre
mangroves.
Along with our seasonal custom
many migratory visitors of the fea
Many an afternoon you can catch
egret stalking our shoreline in sea
crabs and other crustaceans. It's ii
watch from a kayak a red-shoulde
making its way through the pass,
to rest on a palm tree leaf. You ge
view of pileated woodpeckers dril
into nearby buttonwood trees. If'
enthusiast, kayaking in and arour
Pass is the best way to see some b
coastal and wetland birds up close
personal.
You may mistake an anhinga fo
ture Loch Ness monster as it snak
out of the water, swimming along
You can also glimpse an osprey di
lightning speeds, ready to sink its
an unsuspecting mullet.


ne


Swnere


we are

latlacha. During the early hours of the day, if you're
title over a a "quiet" paddler with a keen eye, you may
o have such encounter the reclusive great blue heron
Sof Matlacha camouflaged in a mangrove nook, or a flock of
acha Pass white ibis perched on mangrove roots feeding
f Pine Island on mangrove crabs.
bor, is such At dusk, if you're fortunate, you may
m with so stumble upon the nocturnal yellow-crowned
re come to night heron hiding in the shadows and
is a rare day gazing at the beautiful Matlacha sunset or
e channel the elusive roseatte spoonbill flying across
sing fish in the horizon as it makes its way to nest in the
ey from the mangroves. All of these birds living in the
estuary depend on their habitat for survival,
ners, we have and the more I learn about the complexities
father kind. of this unique ecosystem, the more it makes
a great white me understand we're mere visitors seeking
arch of ghost a little piece of paradise. We're blessed to be
incredible to where we are.
ered hawk My wife and I have some interesting stories
stopping to tell, and we're excited for the opportu-
?t a unique nity to write for WaterLine. You can expect
Iling holes future articles to inform you on kayaking,
you're a bird kayak fishing, and the history and ecology of
id Matlacha Southwest Florida as it relates to Pine Island
beautifull Sound, Matlacha and other places scattered
e and throughout the Harbor. We know that starting
a business isn't easy, but it sure has been fun.
or the minia- There's always an adventure out there.
es its head For more information on guided kayak
g the estuary, eco tours, lessons, or kayak and stand-up
ving down at paddleboard rentals, contact Gulf Coast
s talons into Kayak at 239-283-1125 or visit us at
GulfCoastKayak.com


30 CRUISER IND 1988, Twin 350s, 10 beam.
Full cabin, bimini top & more. $49,00. $16,900.


c.Vaetal Cay Cenwer
041*-39-6603
- WWAL.CRYST/LCAY.COIVM
4225 Taylor Road, PG Aft-


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only l
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL N.R .-J






31' 2005 Chaparral 310 Signature: Loaded w/options,
T-Mercs w/300 hrs, Bravo III outdrives, well main-
tained, lift kept. Owner open to a trade for 24'-26'
walkaround. Asking $98,000.
Ray Mason,941-505-7269 cZ %c n^er
Pier One Yacht Sales S' it


5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$69,000. T'ieir O e-
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 JP4(t S1nilf


'A- Im U riu Lin.111 J I --A IJI I-V I -V VV I. bII 1.
clean inside & out, 5212 Garmin chartplotter, lift
kept & serviced on a regular basis. Trade an
option. Ask $75,000.
Ray Mason, 5iD One
941-505-7269 YjnCT)rnr


33'2004 GRADY WHITE
Meticulously maintained and upgraded, this owner
knows how to keep his boat right! $129,900
Call John @ Knot lOYacht Sales 941-915-3575


............

34' 2000 LEGACY 34 EXPRESS 1":':'
Call Richard Horst 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! a .
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL [M A RIN .&
SREDCED! "'


uali uicK Horst For uetaiis 941-b48-bU/U
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A M 1
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL *.,1AII.NA


34' 2006 FOUR WINNS
This is one of the most beautiful boats in its class.
She is in superb condition showing
its high pride of ownership. $2,000. $87,000
Call John@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


F -_
34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER $139,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only W
Licensed Yacht Broker GM
Located at BEAUTIFUL [._'.,RI A__ .*_


I* aln n*n .IfnUlm*nn eAwr
WMIIOt1IIh3II tfll UMUUSUEUEE5. iiM i t9iWmUEUq BI





* ~i*uK.,.UFieUi.e.u
~SaSEhE~EuUU5aEE~DIEUEI~.SuSuEEI


5I.4&K/ Page 29 December 5,2013


December filled



with holiday



hunting tradition


Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission

There's finally a chill and certain festiveness
in the air as most of us try to take time off from
work to enjoy spending quality time with family
and friends and reflect on the passing year. Chil-
dren will be out of school on winter break soon,
and while the holiday season is upon us, so are
several traditional hunting opportunities.
The second phase of waterfowl and coot
season comes in statewide Dec. 7 and runs
through Jan. 26. In addition to the usual hunting
license and permit requirements, duck hunters
also must have a Florida waterfowl permit ($5)
and a federal duck stamp ($15).
The daily bag limit on ducks is six, but you
need to know your ducks before you pull the
trigger, because there are different daily limits
for each species. For instance, within the six-bird
limit there may be only one black duck, one
mottled duck and one fulvous whistling-duck.
Only two of your six-bird limit may be canvas-
backs, pintails, redheads or scaup, and three
may be wood ducks. And you may have no more
than four scoters or four mallards (of which
only two may be female) in your bag. All other
species of ducks can be taken up to the six-bird
limit, except harlequin ducks.
The daily limit on coots is 15, and there's a
five-bird limit on mergansers, only two of which
may be hooded.
When hunting waterfowl, hunters may use
only nontoxic shotgun shells. Only iron (steel),
bismuth-tin and various tungsten-alloys are
permissible.
For something different, try woodcock
hunting. Woodcock season again runs Dec. 18
- Jan. 31. Woodcocks are excellent game birds
because they hold well for pointing bird dogs
and provide a challenging shot when flushed.
The daily bag limit is three.
The third phase of mourning and white-
winged dove season opens Dec. 14 and runs
through Jan. 12. The daily bag limit is 15 birds.
From November on, the shooting hours for all
migratory birds are one-half hour before sunrise
to sunset. However, you must get a no-cost
migratory bird permit where you purchase your


hunting license before you hunt any of these
birds.
The only firearm you can use to hunt
migratory game birds is a shotgun, no larger
than 10-gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to
a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber
combined). Bows also are legal.
Retrievers and bird dogs can be useful in
hunting migratory game birds. Artificial decoys
and manual or mouth-operated bird calls also
are legal and essential gear for duck hunters.
You may hunt migratory game birds over
an agricultural field if the crop was planted by
regular agricultural methods. However, don't
even think about "sweetening" the field by
scattering agricultural products over it or
anywhere near it or you could wind up in
serious trouble. It doesn't matter if you aren't
the one who scattered the bait. If you knew or
should have known that such bait was present,
you're accountable under federal law.
Some other things you can't do while hunting
migratory game birds include using rifles,
pistols, crossbows, traps, snares, nets, sinkboxes,
swivel guns, punt guns, battery guns, machine
guns, fish hooks, poisons, drugs, explosive
substances, live decoys and recorded bird calls,
sounds or electrically amplified bird-call imita-
tions. It is also against the law to shoot from a
moving automobile or boat and herd or drive
birds with vehicles or vessels.
Bobcat and otter hunting season always runs
Dec. 1 March 1, and there's no daily bag or
season limit on either species.
Like foxes, bobcats may be chased year-round
with dogs, but possessing firearms during the
closed season, between March 2 and Nov. 30,
is prohibited. On a few wildlife management
areas, bobcats and otters may not be taken, so
please consult the specific area brochure before
you hunt.
December has the hunting opportunities
you're looking for, whether you are upland-bird
hunting with friends and family, shooting ducks
on the pond with your favorite lab or taking that
big cat as he slips up behind an unsuspecting
fawn.
Here's wishing you happy holidays and a
successful hunting season.


SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Sail Trim Sem inar (Advanced) .....................................................................................................i7 to 9 p.m Dec. 5
VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-493-2837
Call for information
PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
Charting Local W aters Sem inar ............................................................................................ 9 a.m to Noon Dec. 7
G PS Sem inar .......................................................................................................................... 1 to 3:30 p.m Dec. 7
ABC Boating Course (7 W eds)............................................................................................ 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 8
Marine Electrical Systems Course (9 W eds) .......................................................................... 9 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 8
Sail Course (8 W eds).......................................................................................................... 6:30 to 8:30 p.m Jan. 8
Cruise Planning Course (4 Mons and Thurs) .................................................................... 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 13
Marine Engine Maintenance Course (11 Tues)......................................................................... 9 to 11 a.m. Jan. 14
Partner in Com mand Seminar................................................................................. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 25
Charting Local W aters Sem inar ........................................................................................... 9 a.m to noon Feb. 22
G PS Sem inar ....................................................................................................................... 1 to 3:30 p.m Feb. 22

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
Cal or i llor

Provided by Greg Scotten



PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safety.................................... Dec. 21 .................Dec.21 ................ Sarasota ...................... 941-758-5954
About Boating Safety.................................... Dec. 21 ................................. Fort Myers...................239-322-7089
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 6....................Jan.6 ................Venice ......................... 941-492-5904
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 13..................Jan.13 ................ Englewood..................941-697-9435
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 18..................Jan.18 ................ Fort Myers...................239-322-7089
Provided by Dave Nielsen


Call 941-429 iG-
to list your boattoday! __


34' Catalina mkl, 1989, diesel, new canvas,
$39.9K Call Jim at 941-740-0389 or the
office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts


34' CruiserYacht Express, $99,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G [. A RI NA :







34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
This is the upscale package with lots of
standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
ContactTommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400
m"i .....


35 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
Listed for $63,500. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only liif _
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [.f1M AR I N-1%






35 2014 Regal Sport Coupe "-', ,: ,
Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A im i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL 'M .3. I N;A.},


36'2008 TWIN VEE
With a tower, cutty cabin and twin 300 HP Suzuki
engines makes this boat a great find.
$129,000 Call John @
Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575

JUST REDUCED!


Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only II
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I:'M A RI NA.






37' SeaRay 370 aft cabin,Twin diesel,
Genset and much more!
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


39' Mainship Trawler 1999 with single
diesel, AC and currently on the hard for
your inspection! $99,000 Contact Jim at
941-740-0389 Punta GordaYacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts 941-833-0099


40' DEFEVER DOWNEASTTRAWLER 1980,
twin diesel, new fiberglass decks,
fuel tanks, water tanks,
$35,900- NOW $29,900.
941-505-1770


reailui ii iUIl Uldii aIUUp, ani IrUUIIne, '4U 'JhUL" I nHVVLfn 191 -
diesel, wheel. $24,995 Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Call Mike 941-412-6430 or Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
the office at 941-833-0099 Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers Call 941-408-9572


REDUCED


36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311
ZdAVWA




36' 2000 Carver Mariner Diesels: (PRICED BELOW GAS
ENGINE MODELS) Twin Cummins diesels, Westerbeke
diesel gen set, radar, autopilot, much more. Just detailed
and serviced. Asking $79,900. Call Tier O "
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 YA(w-l$


a.-m, --gr

41'1989 Egg Harbor
Beautiful condition shows a meticulous owner
that has loved his boat and has it professionally
maintained. $89,000
Call John @ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


Chris-Craft Convertible, Diesel, $11
Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
or the office at 941-833-0099
Offered by
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers





* ~g~ueefIFieUei.eeu
uu~a~mhm~w.umMmmumEumm~.mauumEm


M ,p, ~* Page 30 December 5,2013


~rj ~


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only fi BI
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL L.% _ARI NA-I


Lettuce Lake ramp




closed for facelift


chartering (Bahamas here you come). Two staterooms (cen-
terline queen in aft), two heads, large living area refrigera-
tion, AC and spare sails. Asking 0i "
$75,000. Call Ray Mason, 941-505-7269!i er O'x


EDDYLINE SANDPIPER
Only 381bs and 12' long with 3501b capacity.
Anyone can paddle this boat and
take the dog along! $1,299.
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter







Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

If you do a lot of boating in DeSoto County,
and you regularly use boat ramps, you more
than likely have noticed the ramp at Lettuce
Lake Park is out of service. And it's going to be
for a while.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission awarded DeSoto County
a $351,000 grant under its Florida Boating
Improvement Program. The grant will be used
to give the Lettuce Lake facility a much-needed
face lift. It may have taken a little while to get
the ball rolling, but it is rolling. The project is
estimated to be complete by May or June.
According to the DeSoto County Parks and
Recreation director Tara Anderson, a new
double ramp is scheduled to be constructed.
Also included in the project plan are floating
docks and a paved parking lot.
"The contractors are clearing land to make
room for 30 parking spaces;' Anderson says.
"There will be picnic tables available, but the
main attraction will be the double ramp and
the two floating docks. This ramp has needed
this change for a long time. It's nice to see the
project progressing.":'


One concern boaters and ramp patrons share
is the possibility of paying for parking or other
ramp fees. According to Anderson, there will be
no parking or ramp fees.
The project is overseen by Punta Gorda-
based Marine Construction Group, Inc.
For those boaters, canoers and kayakers who
regularly use the Lettuce Lake ramp, there are
alternatives close by. The Liverpool Boat Ramp
(9211 Liverpool Road, Arcadia) is a concrete
boat ramp at the cul-de-sac at the end of
Liverpool Road providing access to the Peace
River and several of its backwaters and islands.
There is also the Nocatee Boat Ramp (3701 SW
CR 760, Arcadia).
Master Naturalist Rick Fried used to lead
paddling trips out of Lettuce Lake for the Char-
lotte Sierra Club, but had to change his plans
for the season.
"Right now, I'm thinking of launching at the
Liverpool ramp, crossing the river, and going
up to the Nav-A-Gator in Deep Creek;' Rick says.
"That way we will still do a paddle and lunch
venue. We'd return out on the river with a few
side-channel shortcuts when the tide isn't too
low."
For more information, contact the parks and
recreation department at 863-491-7507.


What is a solunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table? The sun Sunrise: 7:05 a.m. Sunrise: 7:05 a
and moon, even Sunset: 5:36 p.m. Sunset: 5:36 p
when they are out Moonrise: 9:31 a.m. Moonrise: 10:22
of sight, exert forces Moonset: 8:46 p.m. Moonset: 9:521
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel.cThese forces 10% Waxing crescent 19% Waxing ere.
and otheranimals Major Times Major Time
feed.Weather and 2:38 a.m.- 4:38 a.m. 3:37 a.m.- 5:37
tidealso playa role, 3:08 p.m.-5:08 p.m. 4:06 p.m.-6:06
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 9:31 a.m.- 10:31 a.m. 10:22 a.m.-11:22
the majorand minor 8:46 p.m. Q-46p m 9:52 pm -10'52


':l.lll IJ ll 1 II I '

SUNDAY
,uinri;,e 7 1 7 a n i
,urin et ?.:' p ni
M,:iri:,n e 11 5 1a ni
Moonset: 11:56 p.m.
Moon Phase
40% Waxing crescent
Major Times
5:27 a.m. 7:27 a.m.
5:52 p.m. -7:52 p.m.
Minor Times
11:51 a.m.- 12:51 p.m.
11:56 p.m.- 12:56 a.m.
Prediction: Average


freaicton: Average

MONDAY
,unn Ie 7 17 a ni
..urin et ?.:' p ni
Mi:,,nn:,r e 1 12, ?.0 ni
Moonset: -:-
Moon Phase
50% First quarter
Major Times
6:17 a.m.- 8:17 a.m.
6:42 p.m.- 8:42 p.m.
Minor Times

12:30 p.m.- 1:30 p.m.
Prediction: Average


im.
im.
a.m.
p.m.
e
scent
es
a.m.
p.m.
es
2a.m.
pm


freaicton: Average

TUESDAY
<,urirIe 7 ; '7 a ni
,,urij e 5 ; .7 p ni
MN:I ri:,r ie 1 p ni
Moonset: 12:55 a.m.
Moon Phase
62% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
7:06 a.m.- 9:06 a.m.
7:30 p.m. -9:30 p.m.
Minor Times
12:55 a.m.- 1:55 a.m.
1:09 p.m.-2:09 p.m.
Prediction: Average


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 7:06 a.m.
Sunset: 5:36 p.m.
Moonrise: 11:08 a.m.
Moonset: 10:55 p.m.
Moon Phase
29% Waxing crescent
Major Times
4:34 a.m. 6:34 a.m.
5:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.
Minor Times
11:08 a.m.- 12:08 p.m.
10:55pm -11-55pm
Prediction: Average

WEDNESDAY
,unn ,Ie 7 O.' a n i
,uri;e 3 .7 p ni
M,,ri:, e ": p ni
Moonset: 2:49 a.m.
Moon Phase
71% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
7:53 a.m. 9:53 a.m.
8:17 p.m.- 10:17 p.m.
Minor Times
1:53 a.m.-2:53 a.m.
1:48 p.m.-2:48 p.m.
Prediction: Average+


48'1999 SUNSEEKER
Very well taken care of and lift kept since 2002, this boat
is loaded with options. Low hours and superb Yanmar
engines. This boat is must-have! $279,000
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


49'2007 HUNTER
This is a one owner boat and never been chartered. In
superior condition and well-maintained for the next owner,
with many options and amenities.$295,000.
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


52'2007 BLUEWATER YACHT S297,000 H I--'.'--i--..
THING you need to cruise!! Dick Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only AC B
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL *M ,-A RI NA-.]
REDUCED!! _'_


EVER DREAM OF LIVING ON A BOAT?
THIS IS FOR YOU!! 15.5'BEAM, DIESEL
EXCELLENT CONDITION. $1, NOW $92,500
ENGLEWOOD 941-266-6321







Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
127" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


JACKSON ORION KAYAK
Great little kayak for fishing, birding,
photography. 10' long, only 521bs 3001b capacity
Save $100 on year end sale! $799.
Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


KC Fishing Kayak Thermoformed ABS for
light weight only 631bs. 12 foot long
With mount can add a motor. $1,399.
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter



-

..' -. .. -, Mai .

OCEAN KAYAKTRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Old Town Predator 13
Award winning new fishing kayak.
13'2" long, 15" adjustable seat,
425# capacity. $1,299
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n .-- y ,, rurt a ,n a -
M~u~i u. m~iu om .sm,


j#tfleS.V, Page 31 0 December 5,2013


This column is an apology to my poor
boyfriend. Thanks to his tutelage, his boat
and his unending patience for my thousands
of questions, I have been fishing steadily and
increasingly more competently over the past
seven months.
Somewhere along the line, I got a little
cocky. I laughed at him when he ran out of gas.
I scoffed at his catfish catches as I brought in
tiny trout after tiny trout. At least my spoils
were edible!
And then, I crossed a line. I caught two
redfish one day, around 24 inches, documented
by photos. When he pulled a tiny red from the
water he played good sport and let me take
a picture of him grinning proudly with his
10-inch trophy, all in harmless fun.
But I sent those pictures to WaterLine and
they ran, one atop the other, with a "Better
luck next time, buddy" caption beneath.
(Sometimes, it pays to know the editor).
Clippings appeared on hospital ER bulletin
boards and fire stations around greater Char-
lotte County (he is a firefighter), and he was
razzed to no end. Through it all he never got
angry or refused to continue to teach me how
to be a better fisher(wo)man, just took it all in
stride. He even laughed about it. Once.


* Because of all that, I owe it to him to come
clean with my snook story...
From the moment I hit the Florida waters, I
wanted this elusive snook creature. Season was
closed for three years and I heard they were
quite good eating, so as soon as a snook permit
was available, I made sure we were both
stamped and ready to haul in a load of these
suckers to feed on for the summer and fall.
Except, it didn't happen.
He went out of his way to take me to the
usual snook haunts murky edges of the
mangroves, dock and bridge pilings, etc. -
but each trip was fruitless. I don't get frus-
trated very easily but it happened fairly quickly.
Snook spook so easily it's ridiculous. Something
as small as waves lapping against the boat hull
will make them scatter and since they only
school when they're breeding, losing sight of
one may ruin a whole day.
I didn't care. I was bound and determined
to land, fillet and fry up one of these suckers,
and I put it into overdrive. Every pop I heard
on the water, I demanded the boat head that
way. I was a single-minded beast, and the
snook was my Bigfoot. If want and willpower
had anything to do with it, my boat would have
runneth over.


Except it wasn't willpower but skill I needed,
and the fryer lay empty and wanting.
My boyfriend had it made: He caught a
snook on the first day of the season, and it
was a monster. There was no pressure on him.
Suddenly, it was mid-November and I was
still empty-handed and disheartened. Snook
season closed at the end of the month, and
I had caught seemingly everything in the
ocean except a snook: Catfish, sheepshead,
flounder, trout, grouper, redfish, snapper,
a pesky crab and even once, when the tide
was just right, a giant rock with seashells
stuck to it.
It was pretty, but it wasn't a snook.
The snook taunted me. Every time my
boyfriend spotted one, it would vanish just
before I could cast. As soon as my hook was
bare, the damnable fish would return. I had
nightmares of me finally cornering "the big
one"only to have it grow legs and sprint up a
dock into safety.
Then one day, it happened. November 19
dawned sunny and cool, we had the boat in by
8 a.m. and I had a great feeling.
Six hours later, my intuitions had proved
wrong. We explored our way up an inlet and
posted up under a small bridge that was


yielding nothing but pinfish. We had just pulled
anchor to relocate and began to motor out
when I heard it.
Pop.
"That's a snook,"' I said, more sure than I had
ever been about anything in my life.
I baited up, offering up a silent prayer to the
fishing gods as I reared back to cast. "I don't care
if it's 7 inches long. PLEASE. Just one snook.":'
I got hit right away. I yelled. Finally! The big
one!
Approximately 45 seconds later, all of the
talent and love and effort I had put into snook
season came to fruition.
And it was every bit of 7 inches long.
My boyfriend was laughing so hard it took
three tries to get a picture that wasn't blurry.
But you know what?
I. Caught. A. Snook.
In all fairness, his monster catch put my
snook to shame.
We're even now, honey.
...Until next season.
Dawn Klemish is an award-winning sports
writer and avid fisher(wo)man. She is the
author of an online blog, SnarklnfestedWaters.
wordpress.com. Reach her at: Sun25rise@aol.
corn.





_________P ,V Page 32 December 5,2013







. .


ma~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


Sure, you want to change things for the
better everyone does. But who has the
time? It takes a lot of energy to put yourself
out there, even in a small way. And getting
involved is a pain in the backside. There's
always somebody mad at you for something.
It's a bunch of work for little reward. No
matter how much you put into it, the end
result will never be what you had envisioned
in the first place.
These things are all true, but they're also
just a pile of excuses. We're really good at
coming up with excuses for why we can't do
things, and then convincing ourselves that
they're reasons, not excuses. Meh.
It's human nature to be selfish and to view
situations with a short-term perspective. We
don't want to change our own behavior unless


it has immediate benefit to us personally. I just
spent an hour talking to Capt. Josh Greer about
this subject. He's a pretty sharp guy (though
you'd never know it to look at him). I know
people are this way when it comes to other
people, but his perspective helped me realize
that we're also this way about our future
selves. Yes, I could peel myself off the sofa and
get in some exercise, which might lead to a
healthier overall lifestyle, which might result
in a longer and happier life. But it sounds like
work, and I want to watch another episode of
Family Guy. Do I get up and get physical? Nope.
Screw you, future me. What did you ever do for
me anyway?
This kind of thinking leads us to make all
sorts of bad decisions. Here's what's really
funny about it: When we see other people do


ro


Ni Pain


the same thing, we often realize how stupid it
is. Hey, fatty, lay off the cheeseburgers. That
cough sounds terrible maybe you oughta
quit smoking. You know exactly what they're
heading for, and when it happens, you mutter
under your breath,"Well, what did he think
was gonna happen?"
The hard part is to look at ourselves with
the same lens. Self-examination is always
uncomfortable, because deep down, we know
what we're truly like. It's not pleasant to see it,
and it's even worse to admit it and try to fix it.
So instead, we gloss over it and buy our own
excuses. So, so much simpler that way.
Except that in the end, we're hurting
ourselves. And that's kinda dumb.
How does this apply to the outdoors? In lots
of ways. Capt. Greer and I were talking about
no-motor zones and hunting from swamp
buggies, but there are a great many situa-
tions where this same "logic" buggers us. For
example, have you ever been tempted to take
a fish that's out of season, oversize or over the
bag limit? Maybe you said to yourself, "Well, it's
a daily bag limit, and I didn't fish yesterday, so
I'll just take one for then.":' Or, "The season just
ended last week; it won't hurt anything if I put
this one in the cooler.":' It's easy to rationalize,
but the cold fact is that it's theft from both your
fellow anglers and from your future self. Who
are you going to blame when your favorite spot


A 10-year plan for the Fred C. Babcock-Cecil M. Webb
Wildlife Management Area (Babcock-Webb WMA) will
be presented at a Thursday, Dec. 5, public hearing in
Charlotte County. The public is invited to attend the
7 p.m. public hearing in the Myakka River Room at
the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center,
75 Taylor St, in Punta Gorda. Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission staff will present the draft
land-management plan for FWC-managed portions
of the Babcock-Webb WMA, and people will be
encouraged to comment and ask questions. For more
information on the upcoming local public hearing, go
to MyFWC.com/Conservation and select "Terrestrial
Programs"then "Management Plans'."
stops producing? It's probably your buddy who
you told about the fishing here, or the guides
you see nearby. It can't possibly be your fault.
But it is your fault. And it's my fault. The
blame falls on every one of us when we know
what we ought to do but give ourselves a pass
instead.
So instead of doing nothing, I'm going to get
involved. I'm going to try to change things for
the better. I'd suggest you do the same, but it's
not really fair to ask that of someone else. It's
something you have to decide for yourself. It'll
be a pain, and some people will be mad at me,
and I'll never get out of it what I put into it.
That's OK. At least I won't have to look back
and regret never even trying.


Boat!




Boats Wanted;
Late model Pontoon and Deck =,,,
boats 17-26 ft
Late model Center Console Fishing
Boats, 16-28 ft 5 Jlr n, C1 900
A. Dv a.:rGmieFs 1 PV~~4ioeBmiiC lyrTve r~ o o trg hre
Sl
Boats, 16-28 ft lI~Shinq nO Sk,,nq $16.900 *N ogTr




200 HP Yamaha w/onl20000 hrs, Cuddy, Trailer 150 HPYa08aha 4sloke,T-Top, Elecrionics,
$17,600 $29,900
Re o- $19900uminum




Repoered in 20()6 withTwin 225 HP Evinrude E-Tech's with oniy200J hrs 190 HP VolvoVery Economical, Shows Piide of Ownership
$29 900 -,- -


r 4628 Tamiami Trail (Corner of US 41 & Kings Highway )

Powru M Port Charlotte, FL 33980
$1,6,00 $162900


LlF*J~ IYOU^^l





Thursday, December 5, 2013


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IUKiIH n rUn Ibun. 1-t4
3493 Lakewood Blvd
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5940 Garlin Ln. (P.G.)
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17400 White Water Ct
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PORT CHARLOTTE
3578 Harbor Blvd. Updated
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Marge Trayner
Bud Trayner Realty, PA
941-380-2823






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Suncoast Isles Realty
Pat Rice SOLD!
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Thursday, December 5, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
941488-2418 or 496-9252
5923 SW HWY 17
ARCADIA Short Sale






Small 1993 built block
and stucco 2 bedroom
home sitting on 1.4
acres of land adjacent
to state roadside park.
Great starter home or
snowbird retreat
$54,900. Make Offer
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


OL[it L. ,U LUIII IIUIIn e, /21b
sq ft with pool, built in
2002, spectacular large
park-like yard with lake view,
cul de sac. FABULOUS!
Don't Miss this ONE!!!
$299,900
Pat Walker RE/MAX Anchor
Realty 941-276-4674
I IV__


3/i .~JJ!*


~ _


Ter. 4/3/3 pool home 2344
sf. SS appliances, priv. cul-de-
sac w/1200 sf. detached
Garage. 12' overhead door,
000 lb. car lift. $339,000
By Owner 419-341-4498


ENTLEOWUUU, :. -. pI
home on corner lot. 6127
Bennington St. 1746 SF,
J&J built home in 2004.
Immaculate, many upgrades,
hurricane shutters, propane
back-up generator. For Sale
By Owner. Appointment Only
941-475-9510


I -



I I I I I~'

I g'I l l IllIl
BERK I ,RE ,4ATH ,.AY


GULF FRONT MANASOTA KEY
2/2 Top Floor with partial Gulf
view. Updated with private
beach on the Gulf of Mexico!
Turnkey furnished.
$299,900
RE/Max Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 J


MHAKBUUK H-II-IIS
Harbour Oaks Gated Com-
munity. 3 Bedrm/2.5 Bath
POOL Home. 2,401 SF on
Oversized Lot. $279,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

Just Reduced!



DEEP CREEK
425 Bahia Grande Ave.
1990 Pool home 3/2/2,
2121 sq.ft. cul-de-sac lot,
mature trees, etc.
Too much to list! MUST SEE!
Asking $184,000 By owner
Call 941-815-6927 for
appointment


V^dL


broke, Circle. 3/2/2, 1964sf.
Beautiful Split Plan w/ Sepa-
rate Living & Family Rooms!
$249,900. MLS# C7048798
Linda 941-457-7245 or Jill
Brouwer 941-276-4459 Jill
Brouwer Realty





3045 N. BEACH ROAD
MANASOTA KEY 2/2/2
Great Room, Beach & Bay
Easements, Oak Trees &
View of Lemon Bay $379,900
Immediate occupancy.
RE/MAX Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com



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2300 Jasmine Way
Beautifully Remodeled 2005
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1946 SF Under Air, New SS
Appliances, tropically Land-
scaped in gated Community
of Charleston Park. Asking
$259,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


..-,;---__14
NOKOMIS I,,ion:r Valley
750 Shetland Cir, 3/3/3
Pristine Pool Home, Park
Rv/Boat, veg garden. Owner
$369,000 941-488-4499
NORTH PORT HOLIDAY
SPECIAL 3/2/2 WITH GREAT
LANAI AND LARGE PAVER
PATIO. Home is completely
FURNISHED ready to MOVE
IN. Located at 1327 RICE
TERRACE. 5 mins to 1-75 or
41. ILLNESS has caused this
BEAUTIFUL home to be
someones CHRISTMAS PRE-
SENT. Offered Turnkey at
$119,900. Call for private
showing. Donna Lee Realty
941-426-5197
"If you want it I can find it?"


Creek West, Lovely 3/2/2
Pool home, built in 1981.
Detached stables, tack room,
storage & efficiency apt.,
Beautiful 5.6 acre fenced
property w/pond for horses.
Home Warranty. $299,900.
Marge Trayner
Bud Trayner Realty
PA 941-380-2823


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 in Gated Community
of Pepper Tree Estates!
Open Concept! 2,218 SF.
New Energy Efficient AC Unit
& Newer Water Heater!
$199,500
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max
Palm. 941-979-2843



LISTING

PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2/2 House with heated
pool. Built in 2006.
(Near Murdock Middle School)
Only $139,900!
Call Gloria 239-250-9440
Coldwell Banker





PORT CHARLOTTE S:. 2 2
on freshwater canal with
dock and a waterfall to sooth
you! Inground swim spa &
fenced yard. Updated AC,
water heater & fresh paint!
149,900 Jodi Kozenieski
A Clear Choice Realty, LLC
941-979-9396
I~nm i .I


PORT CHARLOTTE
MOVE IN ready -Clean and
partially updated 2/2 home,
great location, lovely lot.
1452 Pulaski St. $72,500.00
Peggy Mardis, Broker
REMAX EXCEL 863-990-1877

f17NAW -1


PORT CHARLOTTE
RIVERWOOD IBIS MODEL
2 Bedroom + Den/2Ba/2CG.
Gorgeous. Pool w/ Waterfall.
$239,900. Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586


HOMES FOR SALE

:Z^ 020 ^






PORT CHARLOTTE, *p:i
cious Custom 3/2/2, Htd.
Pool & Spa! Beautiful Kitchen,
Fop of the Line Appliances
Corner Lot! $205,000. Dori
Walters, Bud Trayner Real
ty. 941-661-4019


Vailzrg
PT CHARLOTTE
2/2/1.5 OVER 1500SQFT.
(BLOCK HOUSE) W/
BONUS RM & POOL
JUST RESURFACED, NEW
TILE, GRANITE & POOL
EQUIP. NEW ELECTRIC
PANEL $95K BY OWNER
941.268.8794


Lakes gated golfing communi-
ty. 2 bdrm + den, 2 car gar
almost 1700 sq ft. Lovely
large lanai, great golf course
and lake views.
10296 Shadow Run Ct
$230,000
Pat Walker 941-276-4674
RE/MAX Anchor Realty





ROTONDA WEST
157 COUGAR WAY
Beautifully Remodeled 2001
Pool Home, 3 bd/2ba/2car,
Granite & New SS Appls.,
Park Like Setting, On DIb
Lot, Asking $219,900
BAY BRIDGE HOMES
941-626-8200

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HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^



PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2
SELLER FINANCING 30yr
Quiet remodeled House
Bad Credit OK -1750 Sq Ft
$1K/Month Need Good Down
Payment 941-483-0085
S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


VWteri trUIit U UU[IIL
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! $499 K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


VILLA, MODEL WATERFRONT
1718' 2BR/2BA/2CG + DEN,
LOTS OF EXTRAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
$242,900. FURNITURE
NEGOTIABLE 941-681-2424


PORT CHARLOTTE 1428
Hayworth Rd. 2/2/1 pos 3rd
br. Pool, workshop, on Canal.
Rose Padua 941-624-3800
Century 21 Sunbelt Realty


B SUY A L1JI11A
BUY A CAR! PORT CHARLOTTE- I-.';
Lake Worth Blvd. Luxurious
3/2/2 HEATED POOL Home
on Canal! $429,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
gj| iI V941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc
ROTONDA WEST, FSBO
253 Mariner Ln, 3/2/2 Solar
heated Pool, Built 2005,
Low Insurance, 7K in
hurricane shutters. Can obtain
seasonal renters. Furnished.
$184,000 941-698-4776 PUNTA GORDA 3/2/2 with
1707 sq ft on Macedonia
P iCST IDr, in Burnt Store Isles
rd C ONTRACT I ,,;ith lar ,nnni,1 an e a


Incredible Park like setting!
Beautiful Custom 3/2.5/2+CG
Estate Home. Amenities:
Granite, Custom Cabinets,
Fireplace, 18" tile throughout,
Electronic Gated entrance,
Board Fencing, Barn, RV pad,
+++. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-585-9599
www.Carol.Wade.com


Val..ltl'r., a./zK/z'-, ll[. lntlu
Beach. S. Venice Ferry.
updated w/granite tops,
large fenced yard & new
appliances. Mother in law
suite-new A/C & roof.
$168,500 Jerri King
941-374-2562


: WATERFRONT
L^HOMES 1030

PORT CHARLOTTE, 18313
Wolbrette Cir. 3/2/2 1670 SF
Pool, Salt water canal. By Appt.
$185,000 406-240-3239

-.Er -....,


2 Triplexes (6apts). Dock on
basin. Min. to harbor, Furn,
rented. Must see. Immaculate.
$3600/mo income.
$299,000 FSBO, No Realtors.
941-626-9652

COMMUNITY
^^ 1035 ^


55+ Active Community
Affordable Manufactured
Homes!" 1 Year FREE
Golf Membership With
New Home Purchase!
Call Ted @
800-538-2590
for details or please
visit our website
www.arcadiavillage.com


12981 Kingsway Circle
4/2/2 POOLw/ Hot Tub!
Outside Kitchen Located on
the 15th Hole! MUST SEE!
MLS#C7048624 $295,500.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty





O LAKE SUZY 3,,'2,,'3
12539 SW KINGSWAY CIR.
Newer S/S Appliances,
Granite Countertops, All Tile
except one guest bdrm, walk
in closets in master bdrm,
beautiful view of Kingsway
Country Club on 17th
Fairway, oversize garage,
New pool screen.
Jill Brouwer Realty,
Jill Brouwer 941-766-1606
or 941-2764459 or
Call Linda 941-457-7245





LAKE SUZY
Exec. Home. Golf Course &
Lake View. 3/2.5/2, Updated
Kitchen. Metal Roof,
Shutters, Workshop. 4237
sf. w/Addl' Buildable Lot!
Must See! $399,000.
Lolly Lopinski, South East
Realty (941)-628-0941
JADVERTS!
|CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1^ 040 i


$400,000
June Poliachik
Sun Realty 941-916-0100


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Spectacular Water View!
3/2/2 w/ POOL!
Well maintained on Oversized
Sailboat Lot! $374,900.
Deb Sestilio,
(941) 391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
1i J I- I


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit! Meticulas!
MLS#C7047973 $209,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2, Updated Kitchen -
Granite Countertops. Heated
Pool, Large Lanai, 30' Dock,
Boatlift & HurricaneShutters!
Priced to Sell at $429,000.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty





Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


ICONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
^^ 1040^


Beautiful 2/2 Fully Renovat-
ed, New Kitchen AppI & Cabi-
nets, Tile and Paint. Fully Fur-
nished, Great Location. Close
to Everything! $65,900 OBO
Owner 423-343-6349


ruT i I HRLU I I .
RIVERWOOD VILLA.
Gorgeous Jacaranda Model
with Pool. 3 Bedroom + Den
2 Car Garage.
Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586





PT CHARLOTTE CONDO
PROMENADES EAST 2/2
ALL UPDATED APPLIANCES, AC,
& FURNITURE. COMM POOL,
ELEVATOR & INSIDE PARKING
$69,900 941-255-5252

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!





PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 w/ Deeded Dock! Par-
tial Harbor View. 2nd Building
From Harbor! Walk to Fisher-
man's Village $419,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800
Ir F -


Muil 1A UJKUAflbl-t
FURNISHED TURNKEY
Waterfront Condo
2 Bed/2 Bath Updated
Kitchen. Low Condo Fees -
$120,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net
.... .


2/2 with 2 Carport.
Single floor villa, tile &
laminated floor throughout,
10 x 30 Four Seasons lanai,
community pool & dock.
Surrounded by Curry Creek
Preserve near Legacy Trail.
1953 Sattlement Rd.
FSBO $59,500
941-488-7614
MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
^ 1090 ^

PALM HARBOR HOMES
4/2 Stock Sequoia 2,200
sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at $499!
Call John Lyons for details
1-800-622-2832 ext 210


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090


$25,900! Priced Below Mkt
For Immediate Sale! No pets,
Adult Community. Fishing
Pier On Charlotte Harbor.
Immaculate & updated 2/2
double. Better hurry & call
Mike @ 941-356-5308

,&~REDUJCDI



PORT CHARLOTTE- '.,.+
Maple Leaf! Estates! 2/2/CP
in Gated Golf Course
Community! Open Floor Plan.
Amenities Galore!! $69,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc


vC1mmVI.C ULM) DIUl~.,
Venice Ranch. 24'X48' 2/2
Furnished, across from
Clubhouse & Pool. Lake view.
$9,800 484-336-5602
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
10955


PUN IA UGORDA
RIVERSIDE!
$39,995
2/2, FURNISHED.
UPDATED & VERY CLEAN!
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






Punta Gorda. 3 Bedroom.
Immaculate. Pergo. 1500
sqft. Private Lanai with
Serene View!
$59,900
Riverside Oaks
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


IMMACULATE
ADULT COMMUNITY.
Immediate possession.
Conveniently located near
town. Immaculate all drywall
2/2 sectional. All new &
updated.
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
^1095 5

ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Financing Available!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122

PUNTA GORDA- I
Completely Remodeled
2BD/2BA/CP. Large Raised
Florida Room, Utility Room &
Lake View! $29,900.
Call Greg 941-626-7829

HOMES FOR RENT
S 1210





PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2 2ND FL 55+ CONDO $625
2/2/1 LARGE FENCEDYARD $800
PUNTA GORDA
3/2/2 w/DEN IN DEEP CREEK $1075
NORTH PORT
2/2/2 LARGE 55+ GATED $1250
3/2/2 LAKESIDE PLANTATION $1300
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY




3/2/2 Pool NP $995
3/2/2 lanai E. Eng $965
2/2/1 FL rm N Eng $895
2/2/lanai 55+Mobile $575
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-07 18
www.rentalsflorida.net

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BAI2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-A-ABring your pets!A-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME


For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1600...3/2/2 Pool & lawn incl..PC
$1000.. .3/2/2 1340 SqFt..... NP
$800....2/2/2 1182 SqFt..... NP
$750....2/2 1185 SqFt.........PC
$700....2/2/CP Gated Corn Condo.PG
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A Faeb-Based Business


3/2 BOSWELL ST.


$900


ROTONDA WEST
2/2 ANNOPOLIS, POOL $1050
OFF SEASON/SHORT TERM
2/2 ENGL. HOME FENCED $1300
3/2 NORTH PORT $1600
LAST MINUTE
2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice


2/2 S. Venice ..


$1600


Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 ^






IAWk
ENGLEWOOD 3/2/Lge
Workshop, Tile, N/S, Available
Jan 1st, Small Pets Only,
$950/mo 941-662-0926
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-033
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com
0 NEED RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
NORTH PORT, 6395 Jordan
St. 2 or 3/1.5, All tile,
$750/mo. 941-628-9810
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/1,
1200 SF, fenced, eat-in kit., all
tile, split plan. $750/mo,
lst/last/sec (941)661-5388
PORT CHARLOTTE, 3/2, Tile,
CHA. $675. Mo. + 1st, Last &
Security. Deposit. Immediate
Occp. Call Jim 941-924-2764
PT. CHARLOTTE EL JOBEAN
2br/lba on culdesac/canal
Scr. lanai Pool & laundry facili-
ty. $700/mo 941-258-7468
PT. CHARLOTTE Lg 4/2/2
2596sf, Nice neighborhood,.
22440 Lewiston Ave
$1200/mo Drive by then
call For apt. 941-628-4494






|CONDOS/VILLAS
~Reduced Mgmt Fees~
www~lfloridaealty.comJ


FOR RENT
L 1240

DEEP CREEK, Heritage Lake
Park, Lrg 2/2 Condo, over
looks lake & clubhouse, Gated,
N/S, N/P, $750 941-257-8725
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2 1st
floor, newly renovated, central-
ly located, water incl. $750 1st,
Last, & Sec. 941-286-6252
PORT CHARLOTTE, Central
Prom/Parkside Area; Deluxe
refurbished, 1/2 UNF. Condos.
Avail immed. Walk to Hospi-
tals, Promenades, Shopping.,
NO PETS, F/L/SD. $650-
$750, 865-809-7710
PT CHARLOTTE LOVELAND
COURTYARDS, 3BR/2BA, VERY
PRIVATE, 1 STORY, VAULTED
CEILINGS, GOURMET KIT., ALL
SS APPL. + W & D, TILE,
POOL, 1 PET OK, SCRND.
COURTYARD. $900/MO WTR
& SWR INCL. 941-627-4177
VENICE ISLAND
Downtown Venice 1st Floor
Condo, 55+ 2/2 Lanai,
Covered Parking & Just
Upgraded! Includes Electric,
Cable & Water. $1000/mo.
No Pets 941-493-2746

DUPLEXES
FOR RENT


PUNTA GORDA Large, clean
2/1 w/carport, No Dogs $700
mo includes water. $1400 to
move in 941-740-0491

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
L^ 1320^^

STUDIO APT5S -
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY:1-800-955-8771


FOR RENT










PORT CHARLOTTE
^ 1320 ^










VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
NOW ACCEPTING



WAIncomeTING Lmts Apply
APPLICATIONSll 941-624-440450




TTY-1-800-955-877 1
PORT CHARLOKT





VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
VILLA SAN CARLOS 11
AFFORDABLE



Inc1 Bedrooms Available.nts



$375 Move-in Fee.


Bedroom Accepting 41El
for 62 or lucher

Easy Street Income Limits Ased






62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-22664
TTY-1-800-955-8771
LOOK







VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.EK
Aff1 Bedroomrdable 55+ community
$375tucked away Move-in North Port.
Call 941-488-7766.
Venice Studio & 1 ~






Bedrool, Acceptivity Room, Fitnessing






Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Special8 Vouchers on 1BR
941-488-7.766 s






VILLA& 2BR Apartments. Small PetL 2550
Friendly. Call us Today for ased
62+ or needing features





of accessible o unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1L800-955-8771












EFI CIENI
^^ f EQ UA L HOus'ING






WILLOW CR RECENT

HARBOUR HEIGHTS + close to
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness





Cerivnter, newly renovastricted efficien-ss
Entries w cable & internet, Sunny- 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!




brookMotel 941-625-6402 0
FOR RENT


HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to



rivDeep Creek, private efficient. and
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
|ROOMS FOR RENT
L 1360 ^


Deep Creek, private ent. and
bath, furnished, wifi, utilities,
pool, $125/wk 941-875-1757
SEmploy Classified!
ENGLEWOOD/ SO. VENICE
$495/mo, quiet area, utilities
included.305-747-8701 7-1 lam
PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean &
Quiet Furn. Room Single Working
Man $140wk+Dep 941-626-2832
SOUTH VENICE on Bus line,
clean, quiet, w/d, $480 with
ult. 941-496-8655
|RENTALS TO SHARE

::^ 1370 ^

ENGLEWOOD/PC Large
room, all util. paid, plus extras.
$85/week. 941-467-0156
S VACATION/
SSEASONAL RENTALS
<^^1390^


AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *
1/1 Condo
Forrest Nelson Blvd., P.C.
$1350/mo
3/2 Waterfront,
Barre Dr., P.C.
$1500/mo
*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com


I VACATION/
SSEASONAL RENTALS
^^ ^1390 j

Englewood/Rotonda
Great Selection Available
West Coast Property Mgt.
941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net
P.C, Iurn. 2/1.b/1 w/ Lanai.
Avail. Jan. 1st.
941-628-9016

SLOTS & ACREAGE

Z 500 ^


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!





ARCADIA: Private Country
Living: 2.5 Acres, Includes
3/2 MH & Carport Near 1-75,
Walmart & Peace River Boat
Ramp. $145k Cash.
941-743-6601
WATERFRONT
Z^1515 ^


Leland St SE. Prime Sailboat
Water cul-de-sac Lot w/dock &
lift on 130' seawall. 5 min to
Charlotte Harbor & Gulf access.
$229,000 941-625-7088

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

| BUSINESS RENTALS

Z 610 ^

PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200

LGQK
PORT CHARLOTTE
3315 Harbor Blvd, off US41
Retail or Office Space.
Approx. 425 sqft. All
Tile Floor, Great Location.
Call for More Details:
941-206-0250






The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 5, 2013


I BUSINESS RENTALS
L 1610 ^


US 41 Office Space
941-815-2199
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

COMMERCIAL/
USTRIAL PROP
1620


ARCADIA 4.4 ac By Owner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992

L WAREHOUSE
I & STORAGE
^^,, 1640 ^

NORTH PORT 800SF WH
$450/mo. 400 SF, $220/mo
400SF Office, $295/mo, All +
Tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL

Z^ 2010 ^

STYLIST, Exp. Needed FT in
Punta Gorda. All Repies Con-
fidential. Charles 941-276-3330

SCLERICAL/OFFICE

Z 2020 ^

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
FINANCE & SALES SUP-
PORT. F.T., weekends
required. Job includes cus-
tomer interaction, data entry,
preparing paperwork, cus-
tomer closings, warranty
sales, scheduling and general
support for our Sales and
Finance Departments Must
be honest and a self starter.
Non-Smoker, DFWP, Call Ed
Davidson (941) 966-2182 or
fax resume to (941) 966-
7421.


CLERICAL/OFFICE
L 2020 J


OFFICE ASSISTANT
Fast Paced Community Associ-
ation Environment. Must Be
Multi-tasker, Attention To
Detail, Computer Proficient In
MS Word & Excel. Have Work-
ing Knowledge Of Powerpoint
& Quickbooks. EOE/ DFW.
Background & Reference
Checks. Apply In Person At:
5401 Holiday Park Blvd, North
Port, M-F 9am-3pm or Fax
Resume To: 941-423-1084
PRIVATE CLUB IS SEEK-
ING A FULL-TIME RENTAL
AGENT. STRONG CUSTOMER
SERVICE, ORGANIZATION-
AL, COMPUTER SKILLS AND
ABLE TO MULTI-TASK.
SOME PHYSICAL LABOR
REQUIRED; MUST BE ABLE
TO CLIMB STAIRS. EMAIL
RENTALI@BOCAGRANDECLUB.COM
OR FAX RESUME TO
941-964-0193.
PAID BRIDGE TOLL AND
GREAT BENEFIT PACKAGE.
EOE/DFWP
PRIVATE CLUB SEEKS
FULL-TIME SEASONAL
EMPLOYEE FOR BUSY
FRONT DESK. MUST BE
COMPUTER LITERATE,
INCLUDING EXCEL AND
WORD. MUST HAVE AN
OUTGOING PERSONALITY
AND BE ABLE TO MULTI-
TASK. ABILITY TO WORK
WEEKENDS A REQUIRE-
MENT. HOTEL OR CLUB
EXPERIENCES A PLUS. BELL-
STAND ALSO NEEDED,
RESPONSIBLE FOR GENERAL
DUTIES. DFWP EMAIL
RENTALI@BOCAGRANDECLUB.COM
RECEPTIONIST Weekend-
Part Time / Nokomis. Job
includes greeting customers,
multi-line phone system, data
entry, misc duties. DFWP, Non-
Smoker, Call Ed Davidson
(941) 966-2182.

L MEDICAL
mw 4:2030 J


11
HARBORCHASE
m senjor i

CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS

CARE MANAGERS
FT/ PT/ PRN

TIRED OF BEING JUST A
NUMBER ... AT
HARBORCHASE WE CARE
ABOUT OUR EMPLOYEES AS
MUCH AS OUR RESIDENTS.


HARBORCHASE COM-
PETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V


I MEDICAL
L 2~030 ^


CAREGIVER Small ALF,
VENICE, Sat & Sun *Days
& Mon-Fri 4:30pm-6:30pm
941-468-4678 or 488-6565

CNA NEEDED
For Assisted Living to
Work with Elderly. ALL
SHIFTS NEEDED. Only
licensed CNA's need
apply. Apply in person:
2295 Shreve St, P.G.


PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

CNA's/HHA's
4-' WORK
1 r NOW!
Busy Home
Care Agency
has F/T and P/T Openings.
EXP REQUIRED CALL
NOW! 941-2574452
CNA/HHA'S
SARASOTA & SURROUNDING
AREAS. CALL 941-343-4416.
DENTAL HYGIENIST, PT,
Punta Gorda to start on Jan
6th call -(941)-637-0101

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
eCOTA, OT, PT & ST
for PT/FT/PRN
*RN PRN/FT/PT
available for all shifts
Dietary Manager F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

JOYCE VEIN & AESTHETIC
INSTITUTE IS SEEKING
to Employ a
Venous Ultrasound
Technician 2 Days Per
Week During the Winter and
Spring Season. Fax CV to
941-575-4191 or E-mail it to:
Michelle@jvai.com

a
HARBORCHASE
ng^g
( Te~atinL r

PREP COOK,
DIETARY AIDE,
SERVERS
FT / PT

HARBORCHASE OFFERS
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!


I MEDICAL
L ^ 2030 ^

Med Asst/CNA FT/PT, for
peds off. Multitask, Ped VS,
EMR & Exp nec. 625-4919
MILLENNIUM PHYSICIAN
GROUP IS GROWING
AGAIN!!!!

CMA'S
CMA's for Englewood,
Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda
locations. Visit us at
www.millenniumphysician.com
click on "employment" and
"open jobs" to apply for
open positions. Come work
for the best! DFWF/EOE

RN UNIT MANAGER

PORT CHARLOTTE REHAB
is seeking an RN Unit
Manager with experience
managing a busy Rehab unit.
Apply in Person to:
25352 Rampart Blvd
Port Charlotte Fl 33983


RN/LPN
Full Time, nights &
days, minimum of
1 year experience as
floor nurse

RN Weekend
Supervisor
12 hour shift
minimum of 1 year
experience as shift
supervisor or Unit
Manager

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP

HORIZON
4.HEALTHCARE
INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Dec 30 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
* Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
* Home Health Aide (75hrs)
* Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
* EKG Tech (165hrs)
* Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
* Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

RESTAURANT
HOTEL


NEED CASH?
ALL POSITIONS, Clock
Rest.,Venice Isl. Stop by and
Apply: 301 Tamiami TrI S.


RESTAURANT/
I HOTEL
va: 2040 ^


ASSISTED LIVING
FACILITY IN NEED OF A
COOK, FT/PT, WEEKENDS,
that can cook from scratch,
recipes. Apply at
2295 Shreve st, Punta Gorda.
NO CALLS PLEASE.

HAMPTON INN
PT CHARLOTTE IS
LOOKING FOR
MANAGERS.
IF YOU HAVE A POSITIVE
ATTITUDE, ARE MATURE,
ENTHUSIASTIC WITH GREAT
GUEST SERVICE SKILLS, AND
WANT TO BE CONSIDERED FOR
AN INTERVIEW PLEASE APPLY.





OUR COMPANY OFFERS:
COMPETITIVE WAGES
401 K
PAID VACATION AFTER ONE
YEAR OF SERVICE
EMPLOYEE TRAVEL DISCOUNTS
UNIFORMS PROVIDED
MIN 2 YEARS MANAGEMENT
EXPERIENCE IN HOSPITALITY
OR CUSTOMER SERVICE.
AVAILABILITY TO WORK ALL
SHIFTS INCLUDING WEEKENDS
AND HOLIDAYS A MUST. j
LINE COOK NEEDED for
Local Golf Club. FT/PT. Experi-
ence a Plus But Willing Train.
Call 941-697-4190 ext 204

| SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 ^

r ------------------

IA well established local
Construction company is
now seeking experienced
personnel for employment:
I* BACKHOE OPERATOR
I I
for lake excavation & slope
work with the dirt crew.
IBenefits,apply in person to:
13801 North Orange Avenue I
iSarasota, FL. 342341
IDFWPEOE I
LI ------------- J
A/C INSTALLER
Exp. Preferred, Great Pay w/
Benefits, 941-637-9800
AUTO TECHNICIAN,
ASE Certified w/ Service
Manager Capabiites. Able to
Perform in all Areas of
Automotive Repair and
Servicing including
Alignments. Prior Work
History with Referances
a MUST. Competitive pay.
Monday Friday, 8am-5pm
pply at: Watkins Tire & Auto.
87 Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte 941-255-9299
DRIVER, Must be
Experienced For Seafood
Company. Local Delivery
941-380-9212
DRIVER, Part or Full time with
class A or B w/Tanker
Endorsement to drive VAC
truck. Must be non smoker
in good physical condition
with 2 yrs of exp. Must be
available for emergency calls,
nights & weekends.
Qualified applicants only.
SOS Septic Inc.
941-662-0095
80 Harvard St. Englewood










STUCCO PLASTERER, 3-5
yrs. Exp a must. Good Pay! Pt.
Charlotte Call (941)-769-2407
| Advertise Today! ]


SKILLED TRADES
L 2050 ^


TIRE & LUBE TECH
Exp. Only, Other Skills A Plus.
Clean Driving Record, Paid
Vacation & Holiday. Uniform
Provided. 941-484-9542
TRUCK DRIVER,
EXPERIENCED WITH CLASS A
LIC. OR CLASS B CHAUF-
FEUR. WILL HAUL ASPHALT,
FILL DIRT AND SHELL BASE.
SOME LABOR REQUIRED.
941-625-5888

MANAGEMENT
i 2060


BUSINESS MANAGER
Suncoast Humane Society,
a non-profit organization, is
looking for a highly motivat-
ed individual to manage the
financial, business, and cer-
tain administrative opera-
tions. Responsibilities
include budget develop-
ment, accounts payable and
receivable, reconciliation,
posting of daily receipts and
payroll. Administrative skills
required Must be knowl-
edgeable with Quickbooks,
Excel, and Microsoft Word.
Compassion for people and
animals a must. Send
resume & cover letter to
Phil Snyder,
Executive Director at
philsnyder@humane.org.
Please no phone calls.

SALES
^^ 2070 ^


ADVERTISIr>G
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM
Seize the sales
with Classified!





Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


SALES
Lwow 2070 ^


Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
SVacation
*Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
*Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.
.. ... ... .. .............. .
READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
S DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
North Port Florida.
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
SWe offer:
j Training
:0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
i Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
: Employer/Drug & Nicotine:
SFree Diversified Workplace.-
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.


Have A Garage
Sale!


SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
* Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.



SALES

The North Port Sun, an
edition of America's Best
Community Daily
newspaper, is looking for
a Part Time SALES
EXECUTIVE to work
with local customers
creating advertising
solutions to help them
build their businesses.
You will work within a
company where you can
make a difference. Must
have the desire to win, be
self-motivated, and
believe that the customer
is all important.
We offer a competitive
salary plus commission
and one-on-one training.
We are a stable company
that is very community
minded and involved.
If you are looking for an
opportunity that will allow
you to learn and grow,
this is the job for you.
Please Send Resume to:
northportjobs@gmail.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drug & Nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


BOCA GRANDE GOURMET &
GIFT STORE Seasonal mid-Oct
mid-July. Varied hours, 5-days
per week Gourmet food knowl.
req'd+retail exp pref. Bridge
paid. Call 1-5pm 941-964-0614

LOGK
SALES
PROFESSIONALS
Needed For High Volume
Car Dealership.
Must be Self Motivated.
Full Training Available
GUARANTEED SALARY!
4 Locations!
GENE GORMAN
PFEBllIEB
1305 S. Tamiami Trail
Punta Gorda, FL

SENIOR ADVERTISING
EXECUTIVE
UP TO $50,000 per year.
If you have over 5 years
of proven print
advertising experience
you may qualify as a
Senior Advertising
Executive for The Smart
Shopper Group.
We have been publishing
for over 20 years and
have positions open in
Charlotte and Sarasota
Counties.
Send Resume to:
rknight@smartshoDpg.com



for Manufactured Homes,
Experience preferred.
Email to:
phcenter@embarqmail.com


ffid yoer B
Friend in the
Classifils!

GENERAL
aw 2100


DELIVERY CONTRACTOR
wanted once a month to
deliver coupon booklets to
Englewood businesses.
Route is approximately 3
hours and the delivery profit
is between $30-$36. No
collecting. Please email:
Cmerritt@sun-herald.com
to set up a meeting to
discuss delivery option.

DEVELOPMENT
ASSISTANT
Part time 20 hrs p/w Data
Entry, correspondence &
scheduling. Must be detail
oriented and dependable.
Strong writing and commu-
nication skills required.
Email resume to
tina.figliuolo@
cchomelesscoalition.org
No Phone Calls Please

EARN EXTRA
$$ MONEY $$
Deliver Phone Books
Punta Gorda
Port Charlotte
* Work Your Own Hours
* Have Insured Vehicle
And Valid Drivers License
* Must Be At Least 18
Yrs. Old
* No Experience Necessary
1-855-955-7337
www.sddsdelivery.com
Job #FL14


SSALES SALES
L 2070 JL2070 ^


GENERAL
L ^ 2100 ^


HOMELESS RE-HOUSING
CASE WORKER
Part time position 20 hrs
p/w working with families
who are homeless to gain
stable housing and econom-
ic self-sufficiency. Must be
able to work independently.
SEND RESUME TO
john.fanning@
cchomelesscoalition.org
No Phone Calls Please

LOCAL YACHT
BROKERAGE &
NEW BOAT DEALERSHIP
seeks hourly shop employ-
ee to do "get ready" boat
detailing, light mechanical
and building maintenance.
Must have good driving
record & reliable transporta-
tion. Call Ed or Jim:
941-833-0099

MAINTENANCE PERSON:
FT For Lg. Manufactured
Home Community.
General Knowledge of
Building Maintenance
Required. Carpentry,
Plumbing, Swimming Pool &
Electrical Experience a Plus.
Benefits. D.F.W.P.
Call 941-625-3130
or Fax Resume: 941-625-5750
SHIFT SUPERVISOR
Part time Sat 8pm-8am &
Sun 8pm-8am. Must have
strong decision making
skills and ability to fairly
impose house rules with all
residents. Must have clean
drug & criminal background
and a valid driver's license.
Experience in a residential
setting preferred.
Please bring resume and
apply in person M-F/9-5
at 1476 Kenesaw St.
Port Charlotte
E.O.E.


Fmd'itinthe




Sun Newspapers
Assistant District Managers:
The Sun is currently seeking
part-time Assistant District
Managers in our Circulation
Department. Our Assistant
District Managers work
directly with an independent
contractor network to
manage home delivery
and customer relations in
Charlotte/Sarasota County.
Responsibilities include
contractor recruitment and
orienting, meeting
established service goals,
resolving service errors,
managing contractor draw,
and insuring customer
satisfaction.
Must be able to work early
morning hours, weekends
and holidays in an
office/warehouse
environment and outdoors in
various temperatures and
weather conditions. Requires
valid Florida driver's license
and insurance. Must have
reliable transportation to
perform daily job
responsibilities.
Opportunities available in
Charlotte/Punta Gorda and
North Port/Englewood.
Up to 29 hours per week.
Starting pay $11/hour,
phone allowance, mileage
reimbursement.
Drug/Nicotine Free
Company, Pre-Employment
Screening Required.
Apply at
23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
or email
cmerritt@sun-herald.com


I GENERAL
L 2100 ^


HEDGER/TOPPER Operator
for grove service. F/T, Exp.
req. Must have clean license.
Call Wes at 863-990-2550.
SUBSTITUTE BUS
DRIVERS/ATTENDANTS
Training provided.
Starting pay $12.18/$8.88
per hour with potential for
advancement to regular dri-
ver or attendant.
Call 941-575-5432 for
more information


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!

TURNER REALTY
COMPANY, INC.
looking for good, aggressive
Sales Associates.
Please call 863-494-4777
or 863-990-1557
WAREHOUSE,PERSON
needed, Venice Area.
941-485-1478

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY


SEWING EXPERT NEEDED,
PT w/sewing machine exp.,
flexible hours, $8-10Ohr based
on exp. N. Port 941-429-8030

L SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT


HARD WORKING 18YR OLD
MALE IN VENICE SEEKS
EMPLOYMENT WITH A COMPANY
DOING LAWN WORK OR ANY TYPE
OF WORK OUTSIDE. POSITIVE ATTI-
TUDE, GOOD WORK ETHICS,
DEPENDABLE, VERY VERY HARD
WORKING. SORRY NO DRIVER LIC.
PLEASE CALL 941-237-6375

3000







NOTICES

|ANNOUNCEMENTS

L ^ 3 0 10 ^




FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUNIN4
(hrJt ]V% } MnslL *knh pus el


Add a
only


photo for
$10.00!


Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
:^3020 ^



45 YEAR Old Male Looking
for Female Companionship.
David 941-258-4350
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
BODY RUBS BY
BRAND
SNOWBIRD SPECIALS
941-600-4317
WINTER SPECIALS*
MASSAGE AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041
PEGGY- I forgot the directions
that you had given me Tuesday
night prior to Thanksgiving-
when we were chatting in the
grocery isle. Paul @ (941)
244-2898.
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
941-483-0701 North Port

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
4 3060~


CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
IS SOMETHING CALLING
TO YOU? ARE YOU SHAOLIN?
Try Something New. All FREE
Classes Available in Traditional
Shaolin Kung Fu for adults &
children! For More Info
Call 941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010


***ADOPTION:***
A Creative, Financially
Secure Couple, LOVE,
Laughter, Travel,
Sports awaits baby.
Expenses Paid.
1-800-552-0045
FLBar42311
*** Lisa & Kenny ***

HAPPY ADS
3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 5, 2013


& INSTRUCTION
3^^060 ^

ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570


& CHURCHES
W4! 3065 ^
CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
SClassified = Sales
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte

BURIAL LOTS/
CRYPTS


RESTLAWN, Forrest Nelson,
2 burial plots, $995 each. Pt
Charlotte (941)-743-4028
LOST & FOUND/
L:^ 3090 ^


FOUND: DOG, Small Brown
Female in the Vicinity of
Washington Loop Rd.
(Near Airport) in Punta
Gorda. 941-639-2474
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face, ear & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
L ^ 3091 ^


BEACH GLASS & Shell
Jewelry @ Creative Classes.
New Designs!
Home Classes Available
Call Susan for info, Venice:
941-492-2150.
|COMPUTER CLASSES
L 3092 ^



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org


EDUCATION 5000
L...3094 J


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
| EXERCISE CLASSES I

z 3095 J

GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
JUDO 941-232-5444
AIKIDO 239-225-8247
AGES 7- ADULT, no exp nec.,
USJA sanctioned,
6660 Taylor Rd, Punta Gorda
941-232-5444





| RELIGION CLASSES

Z :^3096 J

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES

LZ: 097 J

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

4000


FINANCIAL

L BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
^ 4010^ ^

RIDING ACADEMY "PG City
Limits" Regulation jump
arena, Standards, Poles,
brush box, coop, Horses
avail. 10 mins to County
Show Ring. Dianna
941-457-5551

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.


BUSINESS SERVICES

ALUMINUM
M 006 UM


THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
SLanais Pool Cages *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia .
Pavers Concrete
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33
APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
Z 5020

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
ADULT CARE
L 5 50 50C


SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
ADVERTISED!

CHILD CARE
LW :5051 ^

ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICEI




EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.
We Come To YOU! *
November Special
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
ALL PC & LAPTOPS *
FREE over the
phone diagnostics!
Wireless Router Set-Up
Windows Upgrade
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
Microsoft Certified
941-404-5373
941-276-6623
Visa MC Discover AMEX
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011
CONTRACTORS
L Z 505C4


TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ilns.
CRC 1327653


L COURIER/TAXI
Z:^5055 ^


AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$50 SRQ-$55
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM

CONCRETE



A-1 ROOF CLEANING
& COATINGS
Decorative Curbing,
Pool Deck, Lanai & Driveway
Coating, Epoxy Flake Garage
Floors, Poly Pebble Removal.
(941)-485-0037
Custom Design Driveways
Pool Decks Patios.
Decorative Concrete/Natural
Stone. A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
BERNICE'S CLEANING
HOMES, 20 YRS EXP.
CALL 941-743-3803
ROSEMARY SUNSHINE
CLEANING SERVICES
Homes Offices Move In/Out
Plus much more!
Bonded...Free Estimates
Good References Available
941-423-5906
862-219-9748
ELECTRICAL



DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
'Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
50S80 ^


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
*Selective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
DUMP TRUCK SERVICES
A DIVISION OF
TREMENDOUS TREE
Bobcat Services, Fill Dirt,
Grading, Driveways Installed
(Shell/Rock), Private Roads,
Tri Axle Dump Truck
Free Estimates
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


I HANDYMAN/
I GENERAL REPAIR I
^^ 5089^^


"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
..related electrical &
plumbing work.
Experienced &
References Available
941-275-0712
AIR
HEATING & AIR
Z^5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738


A/C & Heat |j
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2695 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
FEDERAL TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE
ST. LIC #CAC1816023


IMPROVEMENT


5100 Basic Gutter
Cleaning & Handyman
Services Call: Mike
240-925-6806
TOPP'S FENCE INC.
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"

LICENSE #AAA0010261
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DAVID BECK
The Handyman, LLC.
Kitchen Bath Remodels .
Ceramic Tile *
941-766-1767 Lic# 1327942
Ins. Member BBB
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#O60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227


I HOME / COMM.
IIMPROVEMENT I



HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
*PRESSURE CLEANING*
Homes, Roofs, Etc.,
Auto Detailing, Window
Cleaning & More. Lic & Ins
Call 941-276-0628

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED

J. BONANNO
HANDYMAN SERVICES,
Complete Home Repair &
Maintenance. Pressure
Washing, Mowing, & Yard
Work. 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
Ray Tippins
Seawall Erosion
Repair: Repair Sink-
holes & Sodding, Tree
Service, Shrub & Weed-
ing. Owner Operated,
Lic./Ins. 941-625-2124
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens* Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County
SIDING, Soffit, Facia, Seamless
Gutters & Pressure Washing
Jenkins Home Improvement
941497-2728


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445


P75LfDER
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
& Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
"The Stucco Guy"
Drywall, Window Sill & Wire
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands,
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/lns.
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY
WITH CLEAN WATER!
OXIDIZES HOME
INLINE WATER 30-DAY
BACTERIA & MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"

WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11:00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351






Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^ 5110 ^^

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages. Scr. lanais. etc...
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding .
*Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
Employ Classified!
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins


Acquaticto
/"oplarw(
_~ OF FLORIDA INC. 0 *
LAKE & POND SERVICES
INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES TO FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
ROMAN'S LAWN PRO
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/lnsured941-484-6042
TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.


& TREE
50 LAWN/GARDEN

Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035

| LEGAL SERVICES /
L 5115 J


Florida Paralegal Services
"Legal Help @ an Affordable
Fee" 941-623-9773
FloridaParalegalServices
@yahoo.corn
Advertise Today!

MARINE REPAIR
Z 5121




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231

Delivery & Transport
No Item Too Small
|MoveltSuncoastgmail.com


MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing- Loading- Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

S PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10%/o Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
S AAA00101254

STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834
A-1 ROOF CLEANING &
COATINGS-
Ext. & Int., Comm., & Res.,
Warranties! Free Estimates!
(941)-485-0037


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER

SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
IZ 5140^

LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do lt!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MARK HUNTER PAINTING
34 YRS IN BUSINESS
PREFECT WORK PROMPT SER-
VICE. PAY NOTHING UNTIL
WORK IS COMPLETE. FREE EST.
BONDED INS. Lic 90000092534
SERVING SARASOTA Co.
941-475-2695

MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service
941-484-4576
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AAA009837
SWEENEY'S PAINTING
Pressure Cleaning *
MildewTreatment Painting I
Interior & Exterior *
SFree Est. Sr. Discounts *
941-916-1024
Lc# AAA0010702 I
r------------------

WAYNE PATTON PAINTING,
LLC CUSTOM REPAINTS,
PRESSURE WASHING POOL
CAGE CLEANING, INSULATIVE
ROOF COATINGS, CONCRETE
ROOF CLEANING & SEALING.
WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS EXP.
LIC/INS. 941-276-5245
S OR 941-258-5089
L_-------------Jl
L PET CARE
WOOOZ5155 ^


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

7 PLUMBING
L 5160 ^


DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
L ^ 5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps .
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/lns.
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268


PRESSURE
CLEANING


A-ZRESPRESSR
OW445180 ^

ACKERS A-Z PRESSURE
CLEANING & MORE
Roofs, Homes, Docks,
pool decks & cages,
Mobile detailing etc... No
job too small. Free Est.
Sr. Disc. 941-929-6775
BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais,
Driveways, ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www.BensonsQualityCleaning.com

S SCREENING
L III0 5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com-
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/lns.
ROOFING

Lwmwa 518'5




Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors &Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
UC#1325995

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins
Reroofing Solutions-Products
for all roof types.
"Why replace when you
can Save it"
A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693


WATEr1Uco
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LiC #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED
13\Authlariwdl


L ROOFING
44,4:518'5


STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WINDOW CLEANING

z 5225 ^

CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting
Also available Wallpaper
Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845

TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals *
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic./Ins.
(941)-661-5281

6000
q v D<


MERCHANDISE

GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


6013
6025
6027
6030
6035
6038
6040
6060
6065

6070

6075
6090
6095
6100
6110
6120
6125
6128
6130
6131
6132
6135
6138
6140
6145
6160
6165

6170
6180

6190
6220

6225
6250
6260
6270


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions

MERCHANDISE

Moving Sales
Arts & Crafts
Dolls
Household Goods
Furniture
Electronics
TV/Stereo/Radio
Computer Equip
Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
Antiques &
Collectibles
Fruits/Veges
Musical
Medical
Health/Beauty
Trees & Plants
Baby Items
Golf Accessories
Exercise/Fitness
Sporting Goods
Firearms
Firearm Access.
Bikes/Trikes
Toys
Photography/Video
Pool/ Spa & Supplies
Lawn & Garden
Storage Sheds/
Buildings
Building Supplies
Heavy Constr.
Equipment
Tools/Machinery
Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
Restaurant Supplies
Appliances
Misc. Merchandise
Wanted to Buy/T rade


GARAGE SALES
6* (002^ i

--] FRI.-SAT. 10-3 9216
D Hillburn St. Corner Bowie
& Hillburn, w/d furniture, jew-
elry, collectibles & household


FRI.-SAT. 8-1 A'-, i, nr,-
Circle. EVERYTHING
PRICED TO GO!! Riding
Mower, Desk, Sofas, Tables,
Lamps, Household Items
Clothes & MUCH MORE!!
[-IFRI.-SAT. 8-2 1449 King-
ifisher Dr. Indoor Sale!
Couch, Harley, fishing equip,
generator & misc. household.
m-FRI.-SAT. 8-2 8515 Gull
IDr. Lemon Bay Isles. Misc.
household, TVs, xmas decor,
clean bedding & much more!
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-? 1220 S.
IIOxford. Huge Sale, Books,
DVD's, games, linens, house-
wares, cookware & lots more.
[-FRI.-SAT. 9-2 7016
Inland Street. Tools, Fish-
ing, Golf, Boating, & MUCH..
MUCH ..MORE!!
[-FRI.-SAT. 9AM-? 2643
LLear Rd. Designer Yard
Sale, white rattan dining table
& chairs, couch, bed, end
tables, coffee table, linens &
European recliners!
[ FRI.-SUN. 8-4
D 11354 Willmington Blvd.
Micellaneous Items
Priced To Go!
I-]SAT. 8-1
1122 W. LANGSNER ST.
LOTS OF NICE BABY FURNITURE,
HOUSEHOLD, BEDRM FURN & MORE
[-] SAT. 8-2 1900 Tangelo
iiCir. (off Overbrook) Furn.,
Pottery, Curtains, Bedspreads,
Bedding, Tools & MUCH MORE!
-]SAT. ONLY 8-3
I6312 Falcon Dr.
Yard sale Furniture, clothes,
nick nacks. Much more.
[-SAT. ONLY 9-?
I7332 Spinnaker Blvd.
MULTI-FAMILY SALE Unique
coffee table. Lg. framed mir-
ror, men & women clothing
Much more.
[-I THU. FRI. & SAT.
S 12/5, 12/6 & 12/7,
7:OOAM-4:OOPM
HUGE 5 FAMILY GARAGE
SALE! 5357 Ulysses St
Gulf Cove Participating fami-
lies from Oyster Creek,
Gulf Cove & S. Gulf Cove.
Rain or Shine Christmas
decor, household, garden
items, clothes Much more
NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES





FRI.-SAT. 8-2 6103 May-
berry Ave. Furniture, Signed
Art Paintings, Household
Goods & MUCH MORE!!


I The Classifieds!
[ FRI.-SAT. 8-3
E 4264 Persian Lane.
Dulcimer, jewelry, books,
tools, clothes & household.
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 3643
Atwater Drive. Various
items, furniture, New leather,
oversized chair & more!
[m-FRI.-SAT. 9-4
l2980Alwood St.
MOVING Downsizing! Must
sell all! Riding mower,
power/hand tools, glassware,
christmas decor, Too much!
[-FRI.-SAT. 9AM-2PM
18745 San Pablo Ave.
Household, Toys and Misc.,
items.


FRI.-SAT. 9AM-3PM
Villas of North Port.
5200 S. Biscayne Dr.
In case of Rain will on
Dec 13th & 14th.





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 5, 2013


SAT. 8-2 COMMUNITY
SALE! (Behind the yellow
walls on Sumpter Blvd,
between Appomattox &
Greenwood.) Antiques, col-
lectibles, xmas decor, tools,
sporting equip, Etc! SOME-
THING FOR EVERYONE!
m-SAT. 9AM-3PM 5554
ISylvania Ave. Furniture,
Household goods, Clothes,
Xmas, a Large Variety.
-GET RESULTS-

Q USE CLASSIFIED! )
-] SAT. ONLY 8-3 5050
IIGreenway Dr. Fishing,
Camping, Hunting Gear, Com-
pound Bow, XL camo clothes,
household collectibles.
m-THU. 9-5 4324 Kenoska
IStreet. Tools, Assortment
of items, You Won't Want to
Miss This ONE! 941-661-7317
SPT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
L, 6006 ^ ^

FIFRI & SAT 8-2 1181
DEWHURST ST. Tools
Xmas Decor Houshold Sm
Appliances
IFRI-SAT 8-? 3138 New-
1bury St., off clean or Bea-
con. MOVING SALE. Antique
radios, Corningware, hshld.
[FRI-SAT 8-2 22111
LBreezeswept Ave. Moving
Sale household, tools, Christ-
mas, furn, clothing & more
r-FRI-SAT 8-4 21153
lEdgewater Dr. Alfred Dun-
ner ladies clothes, Christmas
decorations, 17.5 kw Genera-
tor, 1993 Astro work van, leaf
blower, power washer, home
dehumidifier, 8" drill press,
1981 Honda CM200T Motor-
cycle only 524 miles.
m FRI-SAT 8:30-2:30 2335
JMalaya Ct. Collect., tools,
home goods, art prints, auto-
motive,camping, elect, garden
F-FRI-SAT. 9-2 313 Hinton
USt. Art, fishing tackle,
boating,golf, furn., misc.
r-FRI-SUN 8-3 23260
IPainter Ave. 3 family sale
X-mas items, household,
clothing
[FRI. SAT SUN. 8-5
-47 Sherbourne St.
33954 MOVING SALE:
ETHAN ALLEN DINING RM &
HUTCH, CUSTOM ENT. CENTER
(VERY TALL), 5 WOOD BAR
STOOLS, COUCH, CURIO CABI-
NET, WINNERS DESK WITH
HUTCH TOP & FILE CABINET,
PATIO FURN, LOTS OF HOUSE-
HOLD, COMMERCIAL WALKER
MOWER 42" MULCHING DECK
ZERO TURN EX COND., MUCH
MORE. DON'T MISS!
[ FRI. SAT SUN. 9-3
L131 Adams ct. 33952
MOVING SALE Too much
to list. Inside & outside.
Something for men &
women. No early birds
please. Call Bob for more
information 941-662-0049
S FRI.-SAT. 8-1 13374
SBallon Ave. Port Charlotte
Tools, fishing, boating &
household items.
mIFRI.-SAT. 8-3 103
''Tocopilla St. -Deep
Creek. HUGE!! Hardware,
collectibles & misc. (Take
Sandhill, L-Deep Creek,
L-Aysen, R-Tocopilla)
D FRI.-SAT. 8:30-4 1201
Roswell Dr. NW. Harley
parts & acc. Household, xmas
& RV items. No Early Birds!
[-FRI.-SAT. 8AM-4PM
I17249 Edgewater Dr. Fur-
niture, Ladies Boutique items,
quality jewelry, antiques, 19"
monitor, safe box, crocheted
baby blankets, housewares,
tools, clothes and much more.


I PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
^in^ 6006 ^ ^

[-iFRI.-SAT. 9-3 1248
Joplin Ave. HUGE SALE!
Variety of household items, 2
like new burgundy wing chairs,
white room divider, armoire,
antique table chairs and more!
[-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 21266
Stillwater Ave. (Behind Cul-
trual Center) MULTI FAMILY
SALE!! Everything MUST Go!
r-FRI.-SAT. 9-4 2440 Sisti-
Ina St. Furniture, kids'
clothes, shoes, toys, cook-
ware, books and much more!
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-5 209 Gar-
den Ave. Hess trucks,
antiques, Barbie dolls & parts,
and lots of misc!
[] FRI/8-1 SAT/8-12
127348 & 27437 San
Marino Dr. Harbour Heights.
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
I-] SAT DEC 7. 9-2
S CRAFT SALE
Port Charlotte Village
1000 Kings Hwy
In Tanner Hall
m-SAT. 8-? 943 Columbia
I-Terrace. Cleaning out the
house, something for every-
one! Babies through adults!
m-SAT. 8-1 345 Belaire Ct.
IIPGI. Cape Cod Style bdrm
set, asian area rug, lamps,
teak room divider, queen &
twin bedding sets, household,
kitchen items, indoor portable
air conditioner, lots of other
stuff. No Junk! Perfect for a
second home in Paradise.
m-SAT. 8-2 21561 Quasada
IlAve. Household items,
electronics, luggage, xmas
decor, sporting equip & more!
[m-SAT. 8:30-2PM
I23071 Worth Ave.
MULTI FAMILY.
Something for everyone furni-
ture, tools, books, dishes, etc.


SAT.-SUN. 8-2 -':-':. t'. A n
Dr.. Deep Creek. NEW CC rid-
ing mower with bagger, furn.,
yard items, & Household misc.
m-ITHU-SAT 8-3 Dec 5th -
L-Dec 7th. 4280 Flamingo
Blvd.
-]THU-SAT 9-4. 21012 Baf-
Ilfin Ave.(Off Peachland &
Dorchester) 2 Family A little
bit of everything.
[-THU.-FRI. 8-3 12048
Florence Ave. HUGE! New
& like new items, furniture,
appliances, collectibles, tools.
F-] THU.-SAT. 8AM-?
S 2146 Como St.,
Air Compressor, Bikes 2 & 3
wheel, Fishing, Tools, Pocket
Knives, Household, Lawn
Mowers, Antiques, & More.
| PUNTA GORDA |
GARAGE SALES




ANTIQUE DEALERS' ESTATE
770 ELDORADO DRIVE
PUNTA GORDA
THUR-SAT 8-3
ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES,
FURNITURE, LINENS, GLASS,
ALBUMS, TOOLS PLUS
TOO MUCH TO LIST!
FAMILY WOULD APPRECIATE
NO EARLY BIRDS!


FRI & SAT. 9-1 16170 Trad-
ing Post Rd. in Burnt Store
Lakes. No early birds please.
Furniture, household goods,
Some Antiques, collectibles, &
other misc items.
[-FRI-9-3 SAT 8-12 16450
Prairie Creek Blvd. (Off
Washington Loop) Moving Sale
Furn, dining table, kitchen
table, tools, kitchenware, dou-
ble matt. washer, dryer, book-
shelves. Everything Must Go
| Classified = Sales |
m FRI-SAT 7-2 27005 Clear
I-Creek Way, (Creekside) off
Taylor Rd. MOVING SALE Furni-
ture, kids toys, clothing.


PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
Z^ 6007^^

DIFRI-SAT 9-2 17065
Torreon Ln.(BS Lakes)
Estate Sale. Living room furn,
dining table 6 chairs, side
table, book shelf, everything in
pristine shape & much more.
Buyers are responsible for
removal of purchased items.
m-iFRI.-SAT. 7AM-3PM
1851 Via Esplanade.
West Marion L on Tropicana R
on Via Esplanade. HUGE SALE
furniture, household items,
clothes, shoes and more.





FRI.-SAT. 8-1 626 Eleuthera
Dr. (By Doggy Park)Furniture,
linens, glassware, antiques &
household items.
S FRI.-SAT. 8-12
E 25555 E. Marion Ave.
SOLONA STORAGE
Coke a Cola & Marilyn
Monroe Collect, Xmas,
sm. refrig, Futon, jewelry,
records, building mat,
lOpt. deer head, more.
[ --FRI.-SAT. 8-3
E 2475 Dorsey Dr.
Multi-Family, Hardware,
tools, clothes, household,
scooter, motor-cycle
camping trailer, Vera
Bradley, Steiff Bears,
Fountain & much more!!
F-1 FRI.-SAT. 8-4 36250
II Washington Loop Rd.
MULTI FAMILY GARAGE
/BARN SALE Sm/Lg Appli-
ances, Baby, furniture, home
decor, Scuba /sports, tools &
misc.Lots of Christmas!!
F-1 FRI.-SAT. 8AM-5PM
S 825 Via Formia.
ESTATE SALE, Many items,
furniture, household & more.
[-SAT. 10-3 3670 Aruba
LCt. Off Ryan. TREASURE,
Everyone's junk is someone's
Treasure.
F- SAT. 12/7 8AM-11AM
26300 Airport Rd.
EDISON STATE COLLEGE
Vendors invited, $10/space.
Call 239-284-5284.
SAT. 8-12
E1 14270 Burnt Store Rd..
Lots of Furniture, Household
Items & MUCH MORE!!
m-ISAT. ONLY 12/7 9AM-?
I1340 Segovia Dr. (No Early
Birds Please) X-mas decor,
household, marine. No Junk.
SATURDAY 10-2
27000 SUNNYBROOK RD
Harbor Heights (next to
Deep Creek Elementary)
Christ Community UMC is
sponsoring our 2nd Alter-
native Christmas Market
Many non-profit agencies
are participating. Give gifts
of love- a donation in a
friend or loved one's name
to their favorite charity!
Our Kozy Kitchen will be
open for lunch while you
shop!
F-1 ST. VINCENT
RUMMAGE SALE
25200 Airport Rd. and Taylor
Rd. Sat. Dec. 7th 9-12 noon.
Rain Date Sat. Dec. 14th 9-12
noon. Household items, furni-
ture, clothing, jewelry, shoes,
purses, books and linens.
I ADVERT1 SE.!|I
r- THU. ONLY 9-1
D 721 El Dorado. (Rio Villa
to Deltona to El Dorado.)
Lots of misc. items
|ROTONDAAREA
GARAGE SALES
^ ^ 6008 ^

iFRI.-SAT. 8AM-2PM
182 Mark Twain Ln.
3 family sale furniture, gift
items, misc. household, more
[mSAT. 9-2 54 Medalist PI.
L-Equip, HP Printer, Pwr
Tools, Jewelry, Holiday Deco,
hsehold, 2X Clothes, kids items.


[ FRI. SAT SUN. 8AM-?
614 Lakescene Dr.
MOVING/ESTATE
SALE Fully furnished
home including dishes,
household, everything
except the appliances
Mon Fri call for apt.
(513)-404-8007
or (513)-886-2855

VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
Z 011~

SAT. 8AM-??
-1 1545 Saturn Rd..
Household, Christmas Decora-
tions, etc. GREAT Prices!
AUCTIONS
Lw wa 6020 ^


JACK ROBILLARD,
CAI, AARE
Auctioneers & Appraisers
(941)-575-9758


PUBLIC AUCTION Sat.
Dec 7 @ 10 am. Insp @ 9am
719 Springlake Blvd PC 33948
General Household items.
Auctionzip.com #25770 for
pics. 10% BP. Jack Robillard
941-575-9758 AU3437 AB2632

ARTS AND CRAFTS

LZ 6025 ^

ABSTRACT ART 42" round,
peach/aqua floral $150 941-
639-0838
EASEL ARTISTS gold
anodized aluminum 6 ft $50
941-575-5107

Fid your Best
Sfmend in the
Clss ed !

ERASING MAC. Electric,
Staedler/Mars #52700, $30
941-505-6290
OIL PAINT one bag of oil
paint's $15 941-575-5107
OIL PAINTING 55"x43" moun-
tain & waterfall; $150 941-
639-0838
SCREEN PRINT t-shirt maker
never used $150 941-626-
5736
SIZZIX DIE cuts and 4 towers
$150 941-473-9269
| DOLLS
7L]
Low 602L7S ^


ELVIS TEDDY BEARS HAVE 4
$90 941-627-6780
JUDY GARLAND Doll Mint
cond in orig box $25
941-451-0964
LIBERACE DOLL Mint cond
clothed orig box $25
941-451-0964
LOUIS ARMSTRONG Mint
cond clothed orig box $25
941-451-0964
MAE WEST Doll mint cond.
clothed orig box $25
941-451-0964
PRINCE WILLIAM Baptism
porcelain Doll Baptis $125
941-426-6748
/MOVING SALES
LZ^6029 ^


CONDO MOVING SALE
Upscale Furniture, exc. cond.,
Call for Appointment
440-724-6354 Punta Gorda
MOVING MUST SELL! Tools,
Household, Furn., & more.
Give Away Prices! Call for
appointment. 941-627-9542


MOVING SALES
Z ^6029 ^


STAINLESS GRILL Small grill
extra tank, like new $39
941-380-3392
HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z 6030 ^

2 IN. FAUX WOOD BLINDS 6
sets var. sizes, whit $100
941-468-2752
2 WOOD NIGHTSTANDS Solid;
17" X 26"; 2 drws $40 941-
276-2411
5-PIECE DINETTE Wood
table, 4 caster chairs $150
317-443-3125
AIR FILTRATION Unit Equinox
- V.G. $45 727-906-1754
AIR PURIFIER HUNTER
Exc.cond. $45 941-257-8489
ALUM. LADDER 4 FT LIKE
NEW $25 941-380-3000
AREA CARPET Plush, nice for
wood floors. $85 (941)580-
4460
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BEDFRAME -NEW Mantua
#4XLW; can fit oversize $40
941-276-2411
BEDSPRED HAND crochet
white kq $200 941-227-0676
BETTER HOMES GARDEN-
STEALIGHT SCONCE Scrolled
NEW $15 941-493-1391
BLINDS, Vertical 6'
For Sliders, Fabric. $25
941-423-7611
BOHEMIAN CHINA Dinner-
ware service for 12 & $175
941-429-9305
BREAD & BAGUETTE maker T-
fal For Homemade $20 941-
235-1910
BREWERY & NASCAR
GLASSES: 16 oz., 8 for $10
941-639-0838
CALPHALON/UTENSILS 6
pieces like new $70
941-575-4364
CAR CANOPY 10' x 20' new
$175 941-423-3693
CEILING FAN Small white-with
light-new in box $40 317-443-
3125
CEILING FAN/LIGHT HAMP-
TON BAY, BEAUTIFUL,6 $75
941-460-8189
CHAIR COVERS Set of 6 for
chairs up to 42" tall. $85 941-
544-5755
CHERRY WOOD jewelry box
table top new $40 941-227-
0676
CHIPPENDALE MIRROR
VERY OLD, wood fram $85
941-999-4176
CHRISTMAS TREE Pre-lit,
7.5ft. Sears, never used. Pd
275 $125 828-777-5610 Cell
COFFEE MAKER Lavender
color, ex.cond, never $15
941-979-6362
COFFEE URN 42cup Hamil-
tonBch new in bx $10 941-
830-0524
/-NEED A JOB?--)
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
COMFORTER SET FULL
JACQUARD, LIKE NEW- $25
941-237-8336
COMFORTER, King, Shams,
Pillows $75 941-255-5598
DESK L-SHAPED
Desk, light grey $75
941-473-9269
DINNERWARE SET DOUBLE
PLATINUM BANDED. service
$50 941-467-1700
DIRT DEVIL vac excellent con-
dition stand up $50 941-426-
1686
DISHES 40-PIECE Light-
house, Warren Kimble, Coastal
Breeze. $200 941-473-0146
DOLPHIN LAMPS, large
table lamps (2) like new $59
941-380-3392


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

DEHUMIDIFIER FRIGIDAIRE
70 Pints $125 941-257-8489
DRESSER W/MIRROR
56"wide X 19"deep X 34"high
$60 941-276-2411
DRESSER; WOOD 20" deep X
72" long; 9 drawers $70 941-
276-2411
DRESSERS (2)OAK set w
storage $400 941-473-9269
ELECTROLUX VACUUM
cleaner with attachment $50
941-743-0582
FARBERWARE COFFEE Urn
12-55 cup, s/s, new/box $65
941-240-5540
FOOT SPA hydrotherapy jet
Conair model FB8S $20 941-
830-0524
FRAMED PRINTS FIVE
METAL. Signed 18"X26". each
$8 941-889-7592
GARAGE DOOR OPENER
Craftsman 1/2 hp $100
941-423-7611
GEVALIA COFFEE Maker cof-
fee for two/stainless stee $25
941-240-5540
HAND CROCHET bed spread
white king or que $200 941-
227-0676
HEADBOARD FITS K-Q bed
storage $400 941-473-9269
ICECREAM TABLE with 4
chairs Icecream table $250
941-426-6748
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS PAD, New king
elec Elec matt pad $35
941-488-5595
MICROWAVE MAYTAG over
the range bisque like new $50
941-429-1284
MINIATURE GRANDFATHER
CLOCK elec, 20" tall $35 941-
639-0838
MIRROR, Decorative golf
w/rought iron spikes sur $30
941-629-4950



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OAK MIRROR VERY NICE $30
941-460-8189
PALM RUG, 6 x 9 palm
rug shades of muted gr $35
941-380-3392
PATIO SET wht fiberglass
48"round table/4cushione
$100 830-8307
RANGE HOOD GE never used
light almond $50 941-629-
9939
REFRIGERATOR 27" HAEIR
WORKS GREAT $32 941-626-
1226
REFRIGERATOR, S/S very
clean, very nice, white $100
941-875-1519







Thursday, December 5, 2013 ads you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger


DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION. 2
Today's Challenge
Time 6 Minutes
17 Seconds 3
Your Working 1
Time Minutes
Seconds 17 6 l10 9


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2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
solution Z-*/ 3S
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Yesterday's j27 6 Y 1 31
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Answers 2 27 34 30

CryptoquiP U2011 by King Features Syndicate


MARMADUKE By Brad Anderson




















"No, the sign didn't work."

"No, the sign didn't work."


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
CONSIDERING THAT WE ...A'
LOST THE WAR GAMES, THE f
GOTSKUNKED AT 1 INNS
FOOTBALL...


T HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne
w .-momm


Brant Parker and Johnny Hart
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MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters
FAND IF 90U ORDER TODA4t,
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MLB MANAGERS
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Wednesday's unlisted clue: SEVILLE
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: CONNIE
Alston Durocher La Russa McGraw
Anderson Harris Leyland Stengel
Baker Herzog Mauch Torre
Cox Houk McCarthy
2013 King Features, Inc. 12/5


PICKLES By Brian Crane
WAY ARE YOU 3"LST 6RAM A -OIEP
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Yesterday's Cryptoquip: AFTER THE ANGLEIR
PUT GOBS OF FISH EGGS ON THE SHIP, THE
ALL SANG "ROE, ROE, ROE YOUR BOAT."
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: Q equals T


Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9







The Sun Classified Page 10 EINIC I hi ~ L'..' I


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii
-v -r U q V1L,


!reat deals in the Business & Service


blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and A


i the Classified Section of the Sun! /


a -1N-N1M MMtkAlia 63 1 *3


DEAR DR. ROACH:
Why do people snicker
when I tell them I have
RLS? They wouldn't laugh
if they knew the amount
of sleep deprivation I
have endured during the
20 years it took to correct-
ly diagnose it. I think if it
hadn't been for Sinemet
levodopaa and carbido-
pa), a Parkinson's drug,
I would have gone mad
long ago. Has anyone
discovered what causes
it? G.S.G.
ANSWER: Restless leg
syndrome causes an urge
to move the legs (and
sometimes arms), which
is worse at nighttime and
is relieved by movement.
It is usually accompanied
by unpleasant sensations
in the legs. When accom-
panied by sleep depriva-
tion, as yours has been,
it is also called periodic
limb movement disorder.
The cause is known
only in a minority of
cases. About 40 percent
of cases seem to run
in families, and several
genetic factors have
been identified. Iron
deficiency sometimes is
associated with RLS, and
replacement of the iron
can improve symptoms.
Moderate exercise, leg
massage and heat (say, a
warm bath before bed)
are some nondrug ways
of improving symptoms.
Levodopa/carbidopa is
an effective treatment;
pramipexole (Mirapex)
and ropinirole (Requip)
also are effective for
many people. There are
other alternatives as well.
An expert in the condi-
tion, usually a neurolo-
gist, is essential for severe
cases.
I think the name "rest-
less leg syndrome" may
be part of why people
don't take this condition
as seriously as it deserves.
After all, legs are sup-
posed to move, and being
"restless" doesn't sound
so bad but as you
know, it's a lot more than
that. For this reason, the
new name, Willis-Ekbom
disease, is preferred by
some.
Great information
about this condition is
available at RLS.org.
The booklet on rest-
less leg syndrome and
nighttime cramps offers
more tips. Readers can
obtain a copy by writing:
Dr. Roach No. 306,
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Can. with the recipient's
printed name and
address. Please allow four
weeks for delivery.


Dr. Roach

DEAR DR. ROACH: I
have a case of Charcot
foot stemming from
neuropathy caused
by exposure to Agent
Orange. I am not diabetic
and am on Veteran's
Administration disability.
I am treated by a po-
diatrist and have been
fitted for a CROW boot.
I find that information
on Charcot is not easy
to find, particularly
about what the future
may hold. This makes it
difficult to plan my life.
An Internet search turns
up a few papers, so there
is some limited clinical
information available. I
have two questions: Do
other specialists work
on Charcot foot, specif-
ically neurologists and/
or orthopedists? Do you
know of any educational
organizations providing
information and/or
support?
ANSWER: A Charcot
joint, also called neuro-
pathic arthropathy, is a
complication of any type
of peripheral neuropathy,
although diabetes is by
far the most common
cause in North America.
It is thought to be caused
by injury to the joint,
unrecognized at the time
due to the nerve damage,
leading to progressive
destruction of the joint.
Diabetes also tends to af-
fect blood vessels, which
also can have a role in the
development of a Charcot
joint.
Acute treatment is
aimed at stopping pro-
gressive damage, which
means taking the weight
off the foot for four to
six months. The CROW
("Charcot Restraint
Orthotic Walker") device
is one way of doing this.
Some authorities recom-
mend Fosamax or similar
medication as an adjunct
treatment.
Neurologists and
orthopedic surgeons may
treat this condition, along
with podiatrists. Surgery
is best avoided, but is
necessary in some cases.
I did find some websites
with good information at
www.charcotawareness.
org and on Facebook
at www.facebook.com/
CharcotFootAwareness.


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan














ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
WIOUJPY CAUS NIT IS AuAN
EXCEPTIONAL YOUN
PERSON WITH TALENT
^ BEYONDP HER


THINK I'M ONE .







ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


FRESHLY SQUEEZED I
I OH, PON'T WOIIY
ABOUT AIG. TH--E'S
NOTHING& I NE-P.


By Ed Stein
G- 6V/.N IF SOMNGONG
WAN6P TO BUY IT
FOg Me,


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
| HAPPENED iI LUCKY FO ME YOUi
FTHE PARK ;AS A WERE AROUND 0O YOU
CLOSE CALL. I'M GLAP MAKE A HABiT OF RES-,
I WAS THERE. CUING PAMSELS IN9


DILBERT By Scott Adams


Restless leg syndrome

not a laughing matter


THAT Sr.AF I SAW
AT NORPSTROM
Is MUMH TOO
eXTIAVA&ANT.
MOM... /
i-~z I


The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


T h ur s.j r '. ,- J I- r l -, r 2 1 1 3,


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Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463 .1638


ISU N NEWSPAPER
-~NEWSPAPER


BUSINESSS &~ i~~A1[ SR I]E DIRECTORS] I


JUMBLE
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek A


-Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon. 1 I
Print your "9 L7 J MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
answer here: LAIA I TTL rL7E 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GRIME BLURB ADJOIN INVENT P{NK SOck/.
Answer: Boo-Boo liked being Yogi's sidekick, except
when Yogi was being OVERBEARING LIT T L E /Nk

When the letters are scrambled -


Chip Sansom
I A'R t> WVOUL' (OU 5 t Ft'S S Y IT WOULt> ZMSE T4EI
S| N60OUT TRAT 7 t LENE.L OF PKOW)CTNITr

,i--y-A COcNPAtAI


Dear Heloise: I love to
solve the scrambled-word
puzzles in the paper. The
Sunday solution usually
is very long, and writing
the letters out in a row
still is hard to figure out.
I use my word-game tiles
and select the letters from
the puzzle words. It's easy
to move them around
and come up with the
right answer. -Judy R.,
Mandeville, La.

Heloise's corn
bread dressing
Dear Heloise: Could
you please reprint your
recipe for your corn bread
dressing? I want to make
it for the holidays. A
Reader, via email
Happy to reprint it! This
is Heloise's Corn Bread
Dressing, and it's great
for the holidays. It's an
old family recipe that my
grandmother and mother,
the original Heloise, made.
Yes, it's Southern-style,
and I love it! Here is what
you need:
6-8 slices of stale bread
(torn into pieces)
11/2 packed cups of
crumbled corn bread
1 cup turkey broth from
cooking giblets and neck,
or turkey/chicken bouillon
1/2 to 1 cup chopped
celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 stick butter or
margarine
2 eggs, beaten
teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon poultry
seasoning


Hints from Heloise

1 tablespoon sage
Place bread pieces
and corn bread in a large
bowl and pour broth or
bouillon over it until the
bread is moist. In a large
skillet, saute the celery
and onions in the butter.
Combine onions, celery,
bread mixture, beaten eggs
and seasonings. Mix well.
Place mixture in an oiled
casserole dish, cover and
bake for 35 to 45 minutes
at 325 E Heloise

Dandruff away
Dear Readers: Here
is a natural and safe
home remedy to try as a
dandruff "rinse" that also
is cheap. Use a cup of
water and 1 tablespoon
of chives to make a "tea."
The water just needs to
be hot (not boiling) when
adding the chives. Let
it steep a bit, strain and
cool before rinsing your
head and hair. Heloise

Spare pair
Dear Heloise: I keep a
spare pair of eyeglasses in
my laundry room so I can
always read the washing
instructions on clothes.
- J.R., via email


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
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The Sun Classified Page 12 EINIC I hi [:'e:~'-i-iI:'~'r ~ L'..' I


Twins share a birthday, but

shouldn't have to share gifts


DEAR ABBY: I'm the
proud mother of four
beautiful children a
daughter, a son and
8-year-old twin boys. I am
having a hard time getting
people to understand that
my boys, whom I rarely
refer to as "twins," are two
SEPARATE people! Every
year at Christmas some
family members buy gifts
for our daughter and our
eldest son, and then ONE
gift our younger boys are
expected to share. Abby,
they once received one
T-shirt, which was meant
for both of them. This also
happens on their birthday.
Yes, they share a room
and they are twins, but
they deserve the same
respect as their siblings. We
have never dressed them
alike. They are individuals
who should be treated as
such like their sister and
brother.
Christmas is around the
corner, and I don't know
how to tell my family
members to please buy
gifts for both the boys. I
realize we have a large
family. I don't expect any-
one to go broke. The gift
can be a small one. Can
you please help me find
the right words without
sounding greedy? MOM
OF FOUR IN OTTAWA
DEAR MOM: Your
relatives don't appear to
be particularly sensitive,
or they would already
realize that children are
individuals whether they
happen to be wombmates
or not. Their "frugality"
puts a damper on what
are supposed to be happy
occasions. It would not be
"greedy" to tell them that
if they can't afford a gift for
each child regardless of
how small it might be it
would cause fewer hurt
feelings if they sent none at
all for any of your children.
DEAR ABBY: My
boyfriend's daughter,
"Heather," came to me the
other day and told me a
girl at school is having sex
with a 36-year-old. Abby,
the girl is only 13. When
I told Heather I wanted
to tell a counselor, she
begged me not to because
she's new in the school and
doesn't want to be labeled
a snitch.


DearAbby

I am torn about what to
do. I don't want her mad at
me, but I can't just stand
back and let this continue
to happen. Heather and
I are nine years apart, so
I don't really come across
as a parental figure. I don't
know if I should tell her
dad or not. Please help. -
DON'T KNOWWHAT TO
DO
DEAR DON'T KNOW:
The girl in question is
being raped. The 36-year-
old is a predator. What
you should do is find out
the girl's name and then
let her parents know what
is going on so they can
possibly inform the police.
If you can't locate the
parents, talk to a counselor
at the school, because a
counselor is ethically and
legally required to report a
crime like this.
DEAR ABBY: I recently
realized that my parents
lied about their wedding
date. Because of my
mother's age and health,
I haven't told her I know
the truth. My father passed
away several years ago, so
his obituary states the date
they always used. When
my mother passes, do I
state the true date in her
obituary or perpetuate the
lie? DAUGHTER WITH
A SECRET
DEAR DAUGHTER:
I think you should do
whatever you think your
mother would want when
the time comes. The ages
of the offspring are not
usually mentioned in a
person's obituary, and
unless your friends read
the wedding date with
calculators in hand, I
doubt they will notice the
relationship between your
age and the nuptials. But if
anyone should be so taste-
less as to say anything, just
smile and say, "Yes, I was a
love child."


"Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and
forever,"- Hebrews 13:8
Nothing has changed! Put this great truth up against
the greatest trial you are facing and let Him solve it.
0 God, in the name of Jesus and by the power of your
Spirit, send many miracles in the lives of each of us
today. Amen.


B


ThANK'Y2U
SO mIC.H FOR.
\ ?OM&T141S. /


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our T( I\ 1 ,i ',. II ii


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You may be unaware of


beautiful people as a threat. You can counteract
their fears with friendliness and humor.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Ifyou have too much


the deep impactyou have on another person's life, to do, this puts you in an overwhelmed state, and
butyou can be sure that someone thrills toyour call, you'll accomplish very little. It is once again time to
your attention and even just seeing you around.
TAURUS (April20May 20). When problems pare down your responsibilities.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). When problems .... .. ..... .. .


talk about the opinions you share, but today your will not be enough to get you there. It will take a


differences must be addressed.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Avoid the situations that


continuous effort over the long term.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).You can't expect


come with giving others too much power over you. people to know what you know. Even the basics,


and sejr hiri, l .r .,ii r ri hI II ri j r| ririi .r,:v v,,r,:
easy, ev:rv. r, : ,.,.lil I, I. .,lhriq III d I .,u II -1] .,, ,,l
ifyoulTT[' i II
TODAY S BIRTHDAY 1i',, ,", ,,'.,',nk


Everyone is learning. Don't assume that someone such as how to be civil, have to be taught.You'll save and carjiiv' iir.,ijih pi[.i iii. Ir-iin,, i 1i1,1ii :4


who has more experience is going to know more.


time byworking with thosewho are uptospeed, good f l. i.,.,..i I. i.. r.ijijh[..j.h ,.. i.--rIjr c -j


percolate, sometimes the most intelligent thing to LuO (July 23-Aug. 22). You'll appreciate te beauti- S.OKPIO (uct.24-Nov. 2i). As you act in creative AQUUAKIU (Jan. 2U-eb. 18). YOU buried a problem tion. Ai,-i ii i 'iii l 'iii rll
percolate, sometimes the most intelligent thing to >; a rr >

do is to stay out ofit But then you have to abide by ful complexity of a natural phenomenon. Consider-
the solutions of the less intelligent. ing how hard it is to keep a simple houseplant alive,
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You work hard to make you have great admiration for nature.
yourself attractive according to your high standards, VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22).Your loved ones have


ways, you build the muscle ofimagination. Itwill
increase your ability to attract the person you're


last week, and now it resurfaces. It's as though the chargE- ,I ir,,rl ,,,-i jril I r,,ii,..,ri r I. r ,i i jriii, I r. ii,
problem senses that you're stronger and have more will for'" l jr r.--i r ilr i : l r,-i ,i,,jr


interested in. resources. You're ready, profes' i.ri Ijia,,r,- ii -i. t ,j i.l ii ijr, hil Ij,
SAGITTARIUS(Nov.22-Dec.21).Whatyouwantis PISCES(Feb.19-March20).You'llfocusonimprov- Aquariu l'jilir.iin irii. vj, ,i, lr.-.,,] iir


opinions very different from your own. You'd rather possible to obtain, but one or two good decisions


MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley





foxp- CUT V^m )w S I"




V'F4 AT TOA R 57A.^

PEANUTS By Charles Schulz


)CRANKSHAFT By Tom


CRANKSHAFT By Tom


latiuk & Chuck Ayers

I JjE-.lom ..


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear ori, I, -,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the pF z.-- i
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).


Rating: BRONZE


Solution I .

453261978
819347256
762859143
5 9 714 3 6 8 1I 1)2
3 2 6 7 1 8 -5 9 4
TT14819 2 -5 6 7

93 4 1 8 2 7 6 53

6 8 1 5 7 4 29


12/5/13


2 7

7 943 8

9 3 6 1 41E

714 9
2 8 3

4 91 1 18


59 _1 2 7

1 236 868

3 5
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The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


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and sometimes this backfires. Some people view


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Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


DEC.5 f'fk E PRIME TIME
ABC7QNews World News To Be a To Be a Once Upon aTime in Grey's Anatomy: Man on Scandal: YOLO The truth of ABC7News (:35) Jimmy
ABC M 7 7 7 10 7 7 @6pm(N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? Wonderland: Bad Blood Alice'sthe Moon A familiar face. (N) Operation Remington. (N) (HD)) @11pm (N) KimmelLive
_____ __(N) (N) (R) father. (N)(H)) (HD)) (N)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Enteitainment Once Upon a Time in Grey's Anatomy: Man on Scandal: YOLO The truth of ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC 7 11 7 @6:00pm(N) DianeSawyer News(N)(HD) Tonight(N)(HD) Wonderland: Bad Blood Alice's the Moon Afamiliar face. (N) Operation Remington. (N)(HD)@11:00pm KimmelLive
(N) father. (N) (HD) (HD) )(N) (N)
WINKNews CBS Evening WINKNews Inside Big Bang The Millers ( 1) Crazy Two& Half (:01) Elementary: Tremors WINK News Late Show
CBS M1)13213 5 5 5 at6pm(N) (HD) News(N) (HD) at7pm(N)(HD) Edition (N)(HD Disproved Favorite child. Ones(N)(HD) MenClumsy Sherlock forcedtotestify.(N) atllpm(N) Jennifer
SIdiscovery. (N) Imodel. (HD)( 1(HD) Lawrence.
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Big Bang The Millers ( 11) Crazy Two & Half (:01) Elementary: Tremors 10 News, Late Show
CBS Mi) 10110 10 o6pm(N) News(N)(HD) Fortune(N) (HD) Disproved Favorite child. Ones(N)(HD) MenClumsy Sherlock forcedtotestify.(N) 11pm(N) Jennifer
______(HD) discovery. (N) model. (HD)) Lawrence.
NBC2News NBC Nightly Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) The Sound of Music Live! A postulant nun is tasked to serve as the governess to the NBC2 News (35) The
NBC 2 2 2 2 6pm (N)(HD) News (N)(HD) Fortune (N) (HD) children of a widowed Austrian naval officer, andwinsthem over by teaching the joys of @11pm(N) TonightShow
(HD) music. (HD) (HD) (R) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Sound of Music Live! A postulant nun is tasked to serve as the governess to the NewsChannel (35) The
NBC E D 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:OO(N) News (N) (HD) 8 at7:OO(N) Tonight(N)(HD) children of a widowedAustrian naval officer, andwinsthem overbyteachingthejoys of 8at11:00(N) TonightShow
_______music. (HD1) (R) (HD)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The Simpsons The X Factor Results Show Glee: Previously Unaired FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News The Arsenio
FOX (I) 4 4 4 Community news; weather; (R) (HD) Guardians. (R) Elimination; musical guests. (N) Christmas Nativity Scene. (N) news report and weather at Eleven (N) Hall Show (N)
_____ traffic; more. (N) ___________ (HD) (HD) update. (N) (HD))
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) omg! Insider The X Factor Results Show Glee: Previously Unaired FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX IN 131313 13 13 events of the day are reported. Mark Elimination; musical guests. (N) Christmas Nativity Scene. (N) top news stories are Edge(N)(HD) Hollywood(N)
_____ (N) (HD) Wahlberg. (HDP) (HD)) updated. (N) (HDP) (HD))
BBCWoild Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) My Music: Classical Rewind Classical Inside Foyle's War A behind-the-scenes My Music Folk's best
SPBS 30 3 3 3 News Business music set against scenic images of the look is taken at the articulate sleuth and his moments. (R) (HD)
America Report (N) beauty found in nature. (R) work. (R) (HD)
BBCWoidd Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) My Music: Classical Rewind Classical Return to Downton Abbey Look at show's My Music: The Best of the
WEDJU3 3 3 3 3 News Business music set against scenic images of the first three seasons. (R) (HI)) 60's Music performances from
America Report (N) beauty found in nature. (R) the 1960s.
Modem Modem The Big Bang The Big Bang The Vampire Diaries: The Reign: Left Behind Diane's plan WINK News @lOpm (N) (HD) 21/2 Men 21/2 Men
CW IMl 6 21 6 Family: Family School One night Pennyworried. Cell Damon's dark past. (N) to have Bash legitimized. (N) Alan moves Alan'sheart
_____ Treehouse projects, stand. (H1)) (H11)) out. (H)) attack.
King of King of 21/2 Men 21/2 Men The Vampire Diaries: The Reign: Left Behind Diane's plan Rules Engagement The Arsenio Hall Show
CW N) 9 9 9 4 Queens Depo Queens Fight Alan moves Alan's heart Cell Damon's dark past. (N) to have Bash legitimized. (N) Engagement Jeff's curiosity. Scheduled: comic Mike E.
Man Schlub out. (HD) attack. (HD) (HD) The Score Winfield. (N) (HD)
Loves Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud House: Unfaithful Priest finds House: The Softer Side Male Cops Cops Seinfeld An Community
MYN 13111 11 11 14 Raymond: Kramer's soul (1VPG) (R) (1VPG) (R) a bleeding Jesus. (H)) and female genes; House is Reloaded (HD) Reloaded (HD) ex's baby School dance.
_____ Who Am I? mate. nice. (HD) )shower. (HD)
Access The Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy House: Unfaithful Priest finds House: The Softer Side Male Law& Order. Special Victims Seinfeld Seinfeld An
MYN a) 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Show: Brian in jail. Brian's son. a bleeding Jesus. (HD) and female genes; House is Unit: Protection Woman on the Kramer's soul ex's baby
_____ (HD) B.M.O.C nice. (HDP) run. (HDP) mate. shower.
Modem Modem The Big Bang The Big Bang Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order Special The Office The The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND 32 12 1212 38 12 Family: Family School One night Pennyworried. Unit Protection Woman on the Victims Unit: Class temp is pretty. Promise Brian in jail. Brian'sson.
Treehouse projects, stand, run. (H)) Murdered co-ed. (HD) breaker.
Without a Trace: Between the Without a Trace: Suspect Criminal Minds Mosley Lane Criminal Minds Solitary Man Criminal Minds: The Fight Law& Order Criminal Intent:
ION 110 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Cracks Missing young model. Teen vanishes from private The BAU profiles a child A truck driver is kdnapping Teamn investigates homeless The Consoler Church banker
(HD))( school. (HDP) abductor. (HDP) women. (HDP) men murders. dies. (HD()
A&E 26262 6263950 181 48 Night club shooting. Duck (R) IDuck (1 Duck (R) IDuck (R) Duck (R) Duckck ( RDuck (R) Duck (R) Duck (1 Duck(R)
AM 56 56 5 30 53 231 (5:00) Shooter ('07) *** A former Marine is framed for the National Lampoon's Animal House (78, Comedy) College misfits Pulp Fiction ('94, Crime) **** A day
AMC 56 assassination of an Ethiopian dignitary, attempt to undermine the dean and his favored fraternity, in the crimes of Los Angeles. (R)
APL 44 4444443668130 Finding: Big Rhodey North Wood (R) (HD)) Woods Law (N) (HD) |North Wood (R) (HD) North Wood (N) (HD) North Wood (R) (HD)
BET 3535353 5 4022 270106 & Park Top music videos. (N) IThe Wash (01, Comedy) Car wash kidnapping. (:35) All Things Fall Apart ('12) ** 50 Cent. Football star. (R)
BRAVO 68 686868 254 51 185 Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker Getaway. (.10) Matchmaker (N) Courtney 100 Days Watch What Matchmaker
COM 6 6666 661527190 South Prk Tosh.O (R) Colbert IDaily (R) Chapplle IKey;Peele Sunny Sunny Tosh.O (R Tosh.O (R) Daily (N) Colbert
DISC 40 4040402543120 Fast Loud (R) (HD)) Fast Loud (R) (H1) ) Alaska Udder issue. (R Alaska (R) (HD)) Alaska (R) (H1) )Alaska (R) (HP)
E! 46 4646462726196 (5:30) Kardashian (R) E! News (N) (HD) Kardashian (R) (HD) Kardashian (R) (HD) Party On IParty On C. Lately INews (R)
FAM 55 5555551046199 Rudolph Missing baby. The Polar Express ('04) *** Train to North Pole. The Muppet Christmas Carol ('92) Ghosts teach tyrant valuable lesson.
FOOD 37373737 76 164 Food Court (R) (HD) Chopped (R) (HP) Chopped (R) (HP) Chopped (R) (HD) Restaurant (N) Restaurant (R)
21/2 Men Anger (R) (H) (:01) Hall Pass (11, Comedy) Owen Wilson. Husband allowed affair tries Anger (N) (HP) (.0) Hall Pass (11) Husband allowed affair fries luring women
FX 51 51 51 51 584953 (H) luring women at bars with pals, causing trouble. at bars with pals, causing trouble.
GSN 179179179179 34179184 Fam. Feud Fam Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Newlywed INewlywed INewlywed Newlywed Fam. Feud Fam.Feud IFam. Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Moonlight & Mistletoe ('08) Christmas crisis. (NR) Let It Snow ('13, Holiday) Businesswoman. (NR) Window Wonderland ('13) Store competition.
HGTV 41414141 5342165 1st Place 1st Place Flop (R) Flop (R) Flop () Flop (R) Rent Buy Rent Buy Hunters Hunters Rent Buy IRent Buy
HIST 81 81 81 81 3365128 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Bible: The Real Jesus
LIFE 3636 36 365241140 Swap Lobsterwoman. Wife Swap Cowgirl. Project () (H) )Project (N) (HP) )(.1) Come Dine (N) Come Dine With Fire.
NICK 2 5 2525 2444 252 Sponge ISponge Guppies Stolen ring. (N) Sponge ISponge Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Friends Friends
OWN 58 58585847 10316120/20 Clara Harris. (R) 20/20 Couple stranded. 20/20: What Remains 20/20 Child abduction. 20/20 Disappearance. 20/20: What Remains
QVC 1414 14 9 1413 150 (5:00) Gourmet Holiday Orthaheel Footwear QVC Customer Choice Gift List: Finale A variety of gifts for the holidays. Judith Ripka Sterling
SPIKE 5757 57 572963 54 Cops (R) |Jail (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Impact Wrestling (N) (HD) Cops (R) Cops (R)
SYFY 67 67676725364180 (5:00) Infestation ('09) Piranhaconda ('12) Hybrid monster. (NR) (HD)( Beast of the Bering Sea ('13) Seavampires. (NR) Arachnoquake (12) *
TBS 5959 59 593262 52 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Family IFamily Big Bang Big Bang Ground Big Bang Conan Jim Parsons. (N)
TM 65 65 6 65 1 Bunny Lake Is Missing ('65, Mystery) Sir Laurence The Defiant Ones ('58, Drama) ***1/2 (:45) A Raisin in the Sun ('61, Drama) Famiy struggling to make ends meet
TCM 65 65 65 6 Olivier.A woman seeks her missing daughter. Escapees put aside their distrust, unexpectedly receives a large sum of money.
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72139 Sisters Pregnancy. (R) Sisters (R) (H) Sisters Baby shower. IGypsy Sisters: Web of Lies Fight; jail. (N) (HD) Sisters Fight; jail. (R)
S Castle Lucrative deal. (H14) ) (> NBA Basketball: New York Knicks at Brooklyn Nets from NBA Basketball: Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls from United
TNT 61 616161285551 Ct La da () Barclays Center (Live) (HI)) Center (ive) (HP)MiaieaCcl))l
TOON 8080124124 4620 257(5:00) Surfs Up ('07) Chima (N) Berk (N) Berk (N) ITitans Go! Regular Adventure Cleveland IDad (HD) Family IFamily
TRAV 69 69696926066170 Bizarre Foods: Mexico v Food (R) v Food (R) Bizarre Foods: Venice Mysteries (N) John Wayne () Mysteries (R)
TRUTV 633 63 635030183 Dumbest (R) Dumbest (R) Guinness (N) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (N) Panic (N) (:01) Guinness (R)
TVL 626262 623154 244 Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith IRaymond: The Model Raymond Raymond Raymond Queens IQueens
USA 34343434225250 SVU: Svengali (V14) SVU Serial rapist. (HD) SVU College party. White Espionage case. SVU Brother returns. SVU: Streetwise (1V14)
WE 117117117117 17149 Will Grace Will Grace Will Grace Will Grace Braxton (1V14) (R) (HI)) Braxton Family (1V14) Braxton Family (1V14) Braxton Family (1V14)
WGN 16916161941 11 9 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (1VPG) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) How I Met Rules
CNBC 33939 37 102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Fugitives (R) Fugitives (R) IFugitives (R) Mad Money (R)
CNN 32 232 321838 100 Situation ICrossfire Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (HD) An Unreal Dream A new trial. (N) An Unreal Dream
CSPAN 18 1818183712109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 6 4 6464 4871118 Special Report (N) (HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 3 8383 83 185 40103 PoliticsNation (N)H(1I) ) Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (HI)) All in with Chris Hayes
SNN 66T611 11 News(N) News (N) Paid Paid Evening News (N) Paid News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CSS 282828284970 o The Best Hurricane SEC College Football: Miami vs Pittsburgh (Replay) College Football: Ole Miss vs Mississippi State SEC
ESPN 29 29 29291258 70 SportsCenter (HPD) ) College College Foolball: I.:, ,: ,ll- Cardinals at Cincinnati Bearcats (live) (HD) ISportsCenter (HlD)
ESPN2 3030 3030 6 5974 Horn (HI)) lnterruptn QCollege Basketball: West Virginia vs Missouri College Basketball: Ole Miss vs Kansas State Olbermann (HI))
FS1 484848484269 83 Football Daily (HPD) j( College Basketball: Long Island vs Seton Hall College Basketball: High Point vs Georgetown FOX Sports Live (HI))
SFSN 72 727272 56 77 Canes Ext Games Panthers 1- NHL Hockey: Winnipeg Jets at Florida Panthers (live) (HD) IPanthers IPanthers Wrld Poker (Replay)
GOLF 494949495560 304 Golf Cntrd European Tour Golf (Replay) (HPD) )PGA TOUR Golf: Northwestern Mutual World Challenge: First Round Golf Cntrl 119th Hole
NBCS 717 71 54 61 90 (5:30) Pro Fantasy Premier League Rev. World Series of Fighting (Replay) (HD) World Series of Fighting (Replay) (1HD)
SUN 38 384014014557 76 SEC Gridiron Live (H1I) Lightning / NHL Hockey: Ottawa vs Tampa Bay (iWe) (H1)) Lightning Lightning Ski Classic (HI))
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(5:50) Good Will Hunting ('97, Drama) **--* Robin Jackie Brown ('97, Drama) ***, A flight attendant is busted for using (35) 21 Jump Street (12, Comedy) Two cops
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his past and plan his future. (R) she devises a plan to keep herself out of jail. synthetic drug ring.
(5:45) Spanglish ('04, Comedy) *** Adam Sandier, Tea Getting On Identity Thief ('13, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Melissa Ja'mie: Downtown Girls: The
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a a a a a a a a1ffkj11g =8 11 L


Today's Live Sports

3 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
Northwestern Mutual World
Challenge: First Round (L)
7 p.m. ESPN2 College Basket-
ball Big 12/SEC Challenge West
Virginia at Missouri. (L)
FS1 College Basketball Long
Island at Seton Hall. (L)
TNT NBA Basketball New York
Knicks at Brooklyn Nets. (L)
7:30 p.m. ESPN College Foot-
ball Louisville at Cincinnati. (L)
FSN NHL Hockey Winnipeg
Jets at Florida Panthers. (L)
SUN NHL Hockey Ottawa
Senators at Tampa Bay Light-
ning. (L)
9 p.m. ESPN2 College Basket-
ball Big 12/SEC Challenge Ole
Miss at Kansas State. (L)
FS1 College Basketball High
Point at Georgetown. (L)
9:30 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls. (L)
12 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf Hong Kong Open: Second
Round. (L)
4 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf Nedbank Golf Challenge:
Second Round. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
Carrie Underwood discusses "The
Sound of Music"; Mary J. Blige. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actress
Zoe Saldana; actor Mandy Patinkin;
singer Leona Lewis. (N)
10:00 a.m. CBS Rachael Ray
Scheduled: Buddy Valastro joins a
cake decorating challenge with a
blindfold on. (N)
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: from "Austenland" actress
Jane Seymour guest co-hosts. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Scheduled: James Pickens
Jr. from "Grey's Anatomy"; Padma
Lakshmi. (N)
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: actor Joe Manganiello pro-
motes his new fitness book. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
actress Anjelica Huston; director
Linda Bloodworth-Thomason. (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: from "Millionaire
Matchmaker" host Patti Stanger. (N)
2:00 p.m. MYN The Test Sched-
uled: an older woman suspects
that her 27-year-old boyfriend is
cheating. (N)
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors Sched-
uled: actress and author Niecy
Nash shares dating strategies. (N)
3:00 p.m. ABC Rachael Ray
Scheduled: Buddy Valastro joins a
cake decorating challenge with a
blindfold on. (N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Sched-
uled: chef Art Smith; dog trainer Dina
Zaphiris; Chicago Sky Squad. (N)
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
Scheduled: how to ditch your pain
pills for alternatives to deal with
pains. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
a woman stopped outside of a de-
partment store for a handbag. (N)
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Jim Parsons; Steve Coogan; Daniel
Sloss performs. (N)
11:30 p.m. FOX The Arsenic Hall
Show Scheduled: musician R. Kelly
performs; comic Mike E. Winfield
performs stand-up. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kim-
mel Live Scheduled: actor Jason
Schwartzman; actor Guillermo
Diaz; musician Jake Owen. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled:
actress Jennifer Lawrence; actress
Taraji P Henson.

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, December 5, 2013


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

ROASTER MAGNALITE 4265
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SEWIING MACHINE KEN-
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SEWING MACHINE & Cabinet
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SHARK FLOOR CLEANER
3 attachments, 8 pads. Like
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Employ Classified!


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

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SPODE CHINA service for 8
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STAND MIXER, Kitchen Aid
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STEAM MOP Thane House-
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2017
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VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $499
828-777-5610 (cell)


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9 lasses Lismore pattern,
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WINE RACK(TABLE) Cabinet
underneath, nice. $50
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bie doll ornaments $25 941-
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CHRISTMAS TREE pre-lite,
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CHRISTMAS VILLAGE 33
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1 Employ Classified!


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH & BOB JONES
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
GOOD IDEA, BAD EXECUTION


Neither vulnerable. North deals.


WEST
48742
2Q105
1083
4984


NORTH
*A63
(9843
0 KJ5
*AQ7
EAST
A*J109
SJ6
OA9764
4KJ5
SOUTH
AKQ5
2AK72
0 Q2
4 10632


The bidding:
NORTH EAST
14 Pass
2 Pass
Pass Pass


SOUTH
1)
41)


WEST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: Two of A
South won the opening lead in
hand with the king and cashed the ace
and king of trumps. Next came the
queen of diamonds to knock out the
ace. East won the ace and continued
with the jack of spades. Declarer won
the ace in dummy and cashed both
the king and jack of diamonds,
discarding a club from hand, and then
led a spade to his queen.
South had now eliminated both


pointed suits from his hand and
dummy. Good technique! Next came
a low club toward dummy. West
inserted the eight, dummy the queen
losing to East's king. East now led a
low club and South had a difficult
guess to make. He decided to play
low from his hand and thus lost the
contract. West's nine forced dummy's
ace and South still had an
unavoidable club loser to go with the
outstanding trump.
South was a bit unlucky, but he
could have done better. Did you spot
his error? After eliminating the red
suits, declarer should have led a
trump, not caring who won. West
wins his queen and must play a club
to avoid giving declarer a ruff-sluff.
South would play low from dummy,
East would win the jack, but would
now be endplayed he would have
to play a club or give a ruff-sluff!
Note that West could have defeated
this contract with an opening club
lead. That was too much to expect
after North had opened the bidding in
that suit.

(Tannah Hirsch and Bob Jones
welcome readers' responses sent in
care of this newspaper or to Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison,
TX 75001. E-mail responses may be
sent to tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


ACROSS
1 Tall
6 Cut timber
11 Schmooze
14 Hair-raising
15 Martini garnish
16 Buckeye st.
campus
17 Coffee shop
lure
18 Wined and
dined
19 Bygone auto
ornament
20 Get through to
22 "Das Boot" craft
(hyph.)
24 Exposes as
false
28 Squirrel's hoard
29 Slip by
30 Advise against
32 Circus routines
33 Public spat
35 Diplomat
Abba -
39 Laugh-a-minute
40 Roswell crasher
41 Mist
42 Ferber or Millay
43 Notched,
as a leaf
45 Bone, in
combos
46 Avant- -
48 Contradicted
50 Moray catchers
53 Must-do feeling


Degrade
Type of pool
Peace offering
Genetic factor
Lack of interest
USN rank
Theater
audience
Ice floe dwellers
Strong alkali
More competent
Cut flowers
DOWN
Grassy field
Above,
poetically
To's opposite
Cratchit's son
Longs for
Couches
Mr. Baldwin
Escorted by
Day before
Gather
Like very much
(2 wds.)
Sampan owner
Baseball ploys
Scrapes by
Core-sample
source
"The Wreck of
the Mary -"
Heston title role
(2 wds.)
Twirler's gear
Steals the show


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
THOLE MI FEICOOT
REPAY ORAJL ALPO
ERASE LEAY A RAPLEA
VOL BIRANMUFF INS
SRE R AS ElARB L E AT
vo B AN I NWSEEL

I IIKIO I R IA I
R EN EW TIARACOW
CO SBiU RNT uH U H
AS|HEAS ED CREDO
H ICK SNE A
MARK WORLDLY
G ALLTEAYTSLAVE RI AE
-GNAT AEN ANITA
DYE DSDAD scE N T
12-5-13 2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS


28 Had brunch
30 Crusoe's creator
31 "Dukes of
Hazzard" deputy
34 Whey opposite
36 Yacht spot
37 Montezuma
subject
38 Flat broke
43 Pause fillers
44 River in Spain
47 "Lady Soul"
49 Way out
50 Gauguin's prop
51 Piano-key wood


52 Expire
53 Downright
55 Claw badly
56 Seine tributary
59 Break in
61 After expenses
62 Kilt-wearer's
refusal
63 Einstein's
hometown
64 Soyuz
destination


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.
D
CLUES SOLUTIONS >

1 transverse building support (9)

2 got the better of (8) _____

3 things that are sure (11) _______

4 making an effort (11) ______ _
5 roadside illumination (10) _____

6 like paperback books (9) ______

7 like unproven gossip (7) _____



RUM CROS EAM STRE AIN


END MP CERT ND OUT


BOU FO ETLA SB RING


XED ORED EAVO TIES SOFT

Wednesday's Answers: 1. COWBOYS 2. NURSED 3. MINOLTA
4. BANTERING 5. ASNER 6. CHLOROPLAST 7. AIRPOWER 12/5


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 5, 2013





Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


HOLIDAY ITEMS

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CHRISTMASTIME NIKKO
china (8) 6 pc & extra ser
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CLUTCH, Silver Glitter silver
chain/clasp. As new. $16
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GOLDPLATED FLATWARE
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$50 941-743-4321
ICICLE LIGHTS
48ft. color! $10
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KITTY GIFT Basket Books,
mug, stationery 8pcs New
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1 Advertise Today! ]
NATIVITY SCENE 20 pcs Ital-
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PRO DANCE HEELS Silver
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SNOWMAN DECORATIONS
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WATER FORD-NIGHT BEFORE
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7577
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474-3194
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with 2 electric powered reclin-
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ACCENT CHAIR with ottoman
light blue fabric 39x $150
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ANTIQUE ITALIAN Florentine
end tables set of 2/16 $150
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ANTIQUE OAK CHURCH PEW
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575-9197
ANTIQUE OAK Curio Cabinet
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ARM CHAIR Florida Print Tan
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941-423-5701
ARM CHAIR w/ottaman Rust
Color Paisley Print Like New
$75, OBO 941-423-5701


FURNITURE / FURNITURE
'01 6035 LoolIZ6035 ^


ARMOIR, Large, Maple, Like
New Condition. $275, OBO
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ARMOIR/ENT. CENTER Dk
wood, Italian, new, Pd 5000
$295 828-777-5610 (Cell)
BAKERS RACK Metal w/five
glass shelves Nice $75 502-
387-8417
BAR STOOLS (2) SOLID
WOOD/NEW $120
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BAR STOOLS 3, swivel seats.
padded seats & back. $25
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BED FRAME by Broyhill, King
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BED QUEEN, CHERRY,
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mattress. $35 941-875-6272
BEDRM SET, 6 pcs king
Bedrm set, 6 pcs Kin $450
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BEDROOM SUITE, QUEEN
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$499 941-429-7914
BROYHILL SLEEPER Sofa
Queen VGC rust color $150,
OBO 941-423-5701
CARD TABLE wood frame
30X30 vinyl top $25 941-585-
4661
CARPET PROTECTOR for
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CHAIR, LLOYD/FLANDERS
Ex. Cond. Ash Wicker. pic.
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COCA-COLA PUB TABLE W/4
MATCHING BAR STO $299
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COCKTAIL TABLE 48x24
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664-8789
COFFEE AND end tables End
tables. $35 941-347-4741
COMPUTER AMOIRE
Large solid oak $200
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COMPUTER DESK L-shaped
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COUCH (90") & LOVESEAT,
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DESK CHERRY, MARSEILLE
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SUN



CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


CALL







1 e3487ll- IA' AI


Ofic Hus: Mo-Fi 8MIP


Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
|o sunnewspapers.net
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DINING ROOM SET
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DINING ROOM TABLE
beveled Glass top 46"x80" 4
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pine wood must sell $120
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DINING SET Kincaid, Mid-
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sell $800/obo 941-505-0541
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KITCHEN TABLE/CHAIRS
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LA Z BOY QUEEN SLEEPER
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LARGE BURGUNDY recliner
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LOVESEAT CREAM color,
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$125 734-625-4318
LOVESEAT SLEEPER Free
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MATTRESS & BOX.
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MATTRESSES(2), TWIN LIKE
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METAL WALL ART/LIGHT
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OAK ENTERTAIN. CENTER
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PATIO SET Glass top 4 swivel
chairs, used in side like new.
$150 814-853-8031
PATIO TABLE 42" RD GLS.
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496-7569
POKER TABLE, Wood, fold-
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RATTAN GLASSS OF A TABLE
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READING LOUNGER floral
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RECLINER(ROCKER) GOOD
condition $50 774-526-7538
RECLINER, Lazyboy
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$185 941-822-3837
ROCKER, LADIES Petite
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avail. $225 941-266-6718
SECTIONAL, 2 Piece
Microfiber caramel brown
$400 716-807-8778


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SLEEP SOFA, LA-Z-BOY
Like new with extras
$100 941-661-7377
SOFA & CHAIR, sage/pillows
like new 3ftx8ft $375
859-654-5498
SOFA & Love Seat Cream/flo-
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SOFA (SLEEPER) Loveseat
Excellent condition $225 774-
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SOFA BED like new, 2 yr old,
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SOFA BROWN, 1 yr old. Plush
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SOFA SET Tan, Queen sleep-
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SOFA, Flexsteel Carnal Tan
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Bought in 2013. $1,200 obo
Paid $1,876. 941-629-8171
SOFA, NICE beige fabric full
size Sofa nice $100
941-204-1277
SOFA/CHAIR FLORAL w/pil-
lows GOOD condition $200
941-286-3238
SPIDER LAMP 5 Domes w/Its
Brass $75 941-496-7569
STAGE YOUR HOME,
SOLD IN 3 DAYS WITH
THIS FURNITURE. Classy
Oriental Desk & matching
Chair, 2 Oriental Lamps,
Cabinet with mirror, Screen.
YOU HAVE TO SEE TO
ADMIRE! Call 941-627-4462
STORAGE BED, new,
twin, white wicker/rattan,
incl. nightstand & vanity $450
828-777-5610 (cell)
TABLE, 5' with 4 leather
chairs on rollers. VG cond $75
517-238-2628
TRIPLE DRESSER 67L x 19W
x 31H, matching mirror, Mint
cond. $75 941-488-4120
TV STAND 58Lx20Dx24H
Black glass/black metal-li $95
630-664-8860
VINTAGE OAK Mission Chairs
reclinerrocker $200 941-
916-5570
L ELECTRONICS
Z:^ 60380 ^


3COM PALM III Organizer
(still in the box) $25
941-235-2017
GALAXY S3 MINT SENIOR NO
CONTRACT ATT $350 941-
391-0042
GARMIN 3006C Gps Map call
for info. $475 513-368-7874
GPS, TOMTOM 1535M NIB
with live services $100, OBO
941-391-3766
PHONE 4 16GB AT&T Black
Waterproof case. $190 941-
575-6700
I ADVERTMSE-!
KINDLE FIRE, New in
Box 7" screen $140
941-764-7957
LAPTOP HP Screen 14" $250
941-347-8825
PROJ. SCREEN
FOLDING 40" $50
941-480-0433
PROJECTOR,
EPSON W/CASE 2 YO GOOD
$250 941-480-0433
ROCKBAND GUITAR, bass,
drums, mic deal $110
941-769-0163
SIRIUS/STARMATE SATAL-
ITE Radio $75 OBO 941-575-
4364
TAPE DECK Dbl Casette
Onkyo TAW55 needs repair
$20 941-235-2017
TV 37"FLAT/HD w/Quality
Enter.Ctr $325 941-637-
3801
TYPEWRITER, SEARS
161 ELECTRONIC $25
941-480-0433


S ELECTRONICS
Z ^60308


VCR CURTIS Mathes 4-head,
hi-fi stereo,tapes $3. $30
941-240-5540
VCR PLAYER w/remote;
Philips Magnavox $20
941-235-2017
Wll FIT PLUS game acces-
sories. Brand new in box.
$40.00 941-697-6977
L TV/STEREO/RADIO

: 6040 ^

32" SHARP TV works great
good deal $45 941-769-0163
CAR CD Receiver Pioneer
DEH-1900MP 50X4 $20
941-486-0189
HITACHI 55" Projection TV
Good Condition. $125 941-
763-0875
NEW 32" TV in box LED quali-
ty,moving $175 786-306-
6335
SAMSUNG GALAXY 2
ANDROID GREAT PHONE $50
941-460-8189
STEREO SYSTEM, Sony,
Like New, includes turn table,
tuner amp, power amp, dou-
ble cassette deck & multi play
compact disc player.
(Manual included) $250
941-204-8403
TV RCA old fashion 26",
remote FREE 941-235-0593
TV, 26"SANYO tube beautiful
picture $50, OBO 603-887-
4775

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
444 6060 i

CAMERA & COMPUTER
case, Pelican on wheel
$100 941-474-2419
CANNON PRINTER works
good with manuals $15 941-
228-1745
COMPUTER WORK STATION
30"w 19" $40 941-627-6780
E-NOOK NEVER USED B&N
GLOWLIGHT $60 941-380-
3000
IPAD 32GB AT&T Apple
Care+, retina display $330
941-426-0090
KEY BOARD works good $10
941-228-1745
KEYBOARD KEY
board&mouse $9 941-227-
0676
PRINTER HP 1006 laser exc.
cond. $20 941-585-8149
USB ADAPTER TP-LINK
150mbps like new $15 941-
426-1686
CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
I ACCESSORIES


COAT 39 in long blk
jacquard/fur collar sz 10-12
EXC $30 474-3194
DOONEY & Burke Hand Bag
like new taupe $100 941-
628-2616
GILDEN T-SHIRTS men &
women $2 941-626-5736
GILDEN-T SHIRTS brand new
$2 941-626-5736
LEATHER COAT-LADIES size
20, full length, black $50 941-
743-4321
MINK CAPE blonde small-
medium excellent cond. $200
941-426-1686
- -


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734


CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
L ACCESSORIES


MINK STOLE Autumn Haze,
Like new $200 941-429-9305
WRIST WATCH-GOLD with
stretch band. Time, d $20
941-889-7592

L ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
^ 6070 ^



ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques, Paintings; All Sub-
jects, Silver, Ivory, Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs, New England
Items. Anything Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
AFRICAN QUEEN Collectors
set vhs, movie 8 X 1 $25 941-
467-1700
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
AMERICAN FLAG WWII 48
stars 5'x9' $75 941-445-
5619
ANTIQUE OAK Vanity Beauty!
3-way mirror $250 941-575-
9800
ANTIQUE SONJA Henie Doll
Original with skates and frame.
$300 941-505-7755
ASIAN PORCELAIN Large
Ginger Jar Mint condition $25
941-493-1391
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COINS CANADA mint set
Expo 1967 $65 941-697-
6592
COINS CANADA Silver Dollar
Voyager 1959 $45 941-697-
6592
COINS KENNDY proof set
1961 collector $25 941-697-
6592
COINS US Mint set Phil 1960
$50 941-697-6592
COKE A-COLA items for sale
Make offer 941-204-0167
COMIC BOOKS
BATMAN/SUPERMAN 2000
books $1 941-496-7569
DESERT ROSE FRANCISCAN
Cup & saucer sets ea $5
941-639-0838
DESERT ROSE, FRANCIS-
CAN cup & saucer sets, each
$5 941-639-0838
DINKY TOYS, 1950's
6whl recon veh-AA gun
$385 941-735-1452
FINE CHINA, Mikasa Serv/8
Many ex. Pieces, pic aval.
$300 OBO 941-575-4364
FLO BLUE selling whole col-
lection 40pcs, 1800-1900's
Lg & sm pcs, 1st $2200.
takes all. 941-769-2389
1 Employ Classified!
GLOBE SANFRANMUSICBX-
CO Snowman LetltSnow $25
941-830-0524
LIONEL PASSENGER sta.
like new with box $110
941-735-1452
M&M NOVELTY Phone Very
Colorful and it works. $25
941-889-7592
MURANO CLOWN candy dish
5.5 in blue/purple $35 474-
3194
NAPOLEON COURVOISIER
cognac full bottle/b $450
941-735-1452
NATIVITY SCENE 1950s Ital-
ian made w/case $200 941-
451-4910
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
NEWSPAPER HONOLULU
Star bulletin dec 7th 1941
$150 941-697-6592





The Sun Classified Page 16 :IN/C,


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December5, 2013


L ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070 ^ "

OAK TABLE 42" round
oak table/ lion cl $250
401-9524380
ORIENTAL JARDINIERE
PLANTER Fish Bowl Geisha
Mint $35 941-493-1391
PITTS.STEELERS SHOWER
curtain, nipnever $25 941-
979-6362
PLYMOUTH & DESOTO
STORY published 1978 by
$100 941 639"838
REMINGTON BRONCO
Buster bronze 1 $100 941-
769-0163
ROY ROGERS double holster
EC $45 941-623-0346
SOLID "PEWTER" PLATE
VLANDEREN' $20 941-475-
7577
TRAINS, HO&N GUAGE.
Complete Set Up. $450. 941-
468 8847 Leave Message
VICTORIA WARE Ironstone
Letter Holder Blue&Write $40
941493-1391
VINTAGE BURGER Xing Star
Wars Glasses 2 $20 941467-
1700
WEDDING DISH blue/green
glass, 4"dia x 6"high; $12
941-639-0838
WWI BRIT. medals mint cond
& w/orig Tank $135
941-735-1452
/ _tUSICAL

LWI 6090 ^

BANJO 5 string Rover banjo
soft case DVD books. $150
941-6264540
CLASSICAL GUITAR NEW
Jasmine with case $150 941-
637-0515
DOBRO LOADED! Must
see/play. Extras $500 941-
627-9689
GUITAR ELEC Godin Gig
bag.'str .."uable/+-+ $500
941-627-9689
MICROPHONES SHURE
Beta 57/58. Like new. $120
941-627-9689
ORGAN LOWERY, EZ 2, virtu-
al orchestra, like new, less
than 1 yr old $1,900 OBO
941-626-0478
ORGAN LOWREY with bench
2 keyboards $150
941-697-1413
ORGAN, Lowry Legacy 300,
smaller desk style with
retracrable cover 46" L x 27"
W, Includes 52 song books
excellent cond. S31 ,000 new.
$15,000 obo 941-875-2017


Excellent condition $1,800
941-380-0357
VINTAGE CLASSICAL guitar
clean.great sound $95 786-
306-6335
YAMAHA KEYBOARD PSR
290 W/cover & stand $150
941-637-0515
AILEDICAL
L ^ 6095 ^

2 WHEEL Walker OR Shower
Chair.NICE each $20 941-
268-8951
BACKPAIN STIMULATOR
with new pads $250 941-743-
0582
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296


L MEDICAL
1m44:6095 ^

BED SAFETY rail, twin d:Jbl
queen mesh rail folds down
$24 25503/2
LIFT CHAIR recliner orig 900.
up/down $375 941-580-
4460
NEW KNEE Walker alternative
to crutches $190 941697-
0822
POWER LIFTING Sea)t Carex
Uplrt Premium $200 941-
257-8839
SHOWER BENCH by CAREX,
New Cond S45 941-268-
8951
SHOWER CHAIR W Arms,
NICE $35 941-268-8951
| HEALTH/BEAUTY

Z :^ 6100 _

BACK MASSAGER Dr.
Scholl's used 2x. orig. pkg.
$15 941-544-5755
DISPOSABLE BED pads have
625 pads S150 941-244-
2456
UNDERWEAR WOMEN
large disposable each $3
941-244.2456
| TREES & PLANTS

L: 6110 _

941-743-2333
FROST BLANKETS ]2x.250'
1,5mil Trckrne;ss heavy duty
Brand new $90 941-228-6345


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARRE L.SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMV PALmS & MORE
Suts NusuRy 941-488-7291

BABY ITEMS/
^^ 61'20 ^

BABY CAR SEAT weigh 5 22
pounds good condi $15 941-
235-1910
BABY SWING natures touch
cradle swing fisher $65 941-
275-3579
CUBBY W/DRAWERS 9 cub-
bies-6 animal drawe $50 941-
626-5736



PACK&PLAY Graco sheets,
blankets good cond. $25
941-4744120
L CGOLF ACESSORIES



2000 EZ GO GOLF CART
"Green" Brand New Batteries
(K3). New rear -olding seat,
new lights Excellent condition!r
$2550 941-716-6792





2002 Club Car DS
4 Passenger
New Batteries (111/2013)
New "Blue' Paint
Hi Speed Motor
Recent Annual Service
Garage Kept
Fantastic Ccondition
$3350 0o0o
941-830-5312
2010 EZ GO GOLF CART
Ex cond. with charger $2,700
941-257-8751
3 WHEELED GOLF CART W/
GOLF BAG. EXCELLENT
COND. $75 941485-1967
CLUB CAR DS GOLF CART
4 Passenger, Brand new bat-
teries 1 1/2013), new tires.
rear seat & lights. With charg-
er. S2495 941-716-6793


GOLF ACCESSORIES
^^ 6125 ^


CLUB CAR, 2006
Excellent Condition $2600
OBO 941-o 75-9023
DRIVER, ADAMS RPM 460
RHR, 10.5*, draw. Exc. cond.
$70 941488-7774





FACTORY
RECONDITIONED
2010 CLUB CAR
PRECEDENT
4 Passenger Golf Carts
Folding Rear Seat
New TROJAN Batteries
New Colored body,
Lights & Interior
Lifted with custom wheels
or stock height
1/2 the price of new
From $4275
941-716-6793
G5 PING DRIVER,
9 degree offset, soft regular
5125 734-6254318
GOLF BALLS NIB 7 Sleeve of
Pro V1, NXT. Caliaway all 7 for
$40 828-371-3623
GOLF BALLS, Like new, no
scuffs, logos or markings $6
per dozen. 941488-7774
GOLF CARD Play 6 courses
S10.00 each with card, total
60 941-743-6452
GOLF CLUB RI Taylor made
Driver, RH, 10.5 deg adjust,
$75 OBO 941-876-3391
GOLF CLUBS Ping eye 2
Irons 2-PW, $125 941-426-
1670
HAND GOLF CART, Aquit
nardly used $35. 941-697-
8347
PUTTING GREEN, Club
Champ, 3ft. x 8r.. Ten gravs
panels $35 941-255-0372
TAYLOR MADE Wedge $25
941-423-5701
EXERCISE/
FITNESS
6128 ^

50LB BARBELL weights (2)
ex. cond! $60 941-286-2339
AB LOUNGER $20
941-204-1277
BOWFLEX ULTIMATE all
attachments and books &
great work out $325 941416-
8364
ELLIPTICAL PRO-FORM
935s, great cond. North Port
$175, OBO 6038874775
RECUMBENT BIKE $90
941-629-6447
RECUMBUNT BIKE $75
941-286-5920
TREADMILL PRO-FORM XP
590S $75 9414740462
TREADMILL PROFORM
$200 OBO 941-575 9197
TREADMILL, PRO FORM,
Calrber2, Like new, fold up.
$200 941-766-7466
SPORTIN( GOODS
*f 6130 -

AIR HOCKEY TABLE
7lt4ft, like new! $290
941-766-9525
CANOE CARRIER KIT canoe
carrier for vehicle $15 941-
5854661
COATS M&L new wthrprf
hood fleece mned ea $20 941-
8300524
COLD WATER WET SUIT mn
2XL JACKETJOHNHOOD+ $95
941473-2470
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
-he firepir!
941-468-4372


SPORTING GOODS
^^ 6130 ^

BOSTON CELTICS Jacket
New.XL $75 941661-7434
DOWNRIGGERS TWO
Penn920 with 48"shaft $200
9414744411
FISHING LURES New in
boxes. Sold for $8 new. $4
941-2664731
GUN CASE Black plastic
18"x20" $20 941-445-5619
KAYAK EMOTION, CARBON
PADDLE, LIFE VEST $485
941-286-5990
KAYAK, 12' Ocean, Sit on
top, Dolly & roof craddle, pad-
die. $450 941 266-8274
LIFE VESTS USCG Life Vests.
New Inflatable. $75 $75
941979 8803
PING ZING IRONS 11 total Ex
cond + b $225
803-215-9410
POWER POLE 6 ft. Ex Cond.
S500 440-231-0772
REELS PEEN open face
#310, 26, 85, 109, 200, 285
$250 941-575-2675
ROD & Reel Saltwater conven-
tional. $35 941-266-4731
SWINGSET 2 swings, slide,
tettertotter $50 941-626-
5736
THULE KAYAK CARRIER
2/CAR TOP.FOLDABLE/ $350
941-286-5990

ZFIREARAIS
^^ 61i31

AR-15 NIB Lifetirne Warr
$800 AK-47 ammo 20rnd
boxes $18/ca. 941-662-5232
BROWNING COLLECTORS
Renriaisarice Hi-Power. Last
Imported 1979. Spur Hammer
Model.100%. $1,500. (941)-
505-8588















Hi her Power uffittrs
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns* Ammo *CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*SelleTrade
941-347-8445
SHOTGUN, CZ 20 ga, SxS,
double 26 in, new + extras,
$600 941-882-3328
SIG P229 357 Cal., 250
Rounds of Ammo, New 2013.
$900. obo (941-6284187
WASR RIFFLE AK 47 7.62
X39CAL UNDERFOLD STOCK. (6)
30 ROUND MAGAZINES, RED DOT
SITE WITH LASER, 800 ROUNDS OF
AMMO. $1600.941451 3726


ACtESSO( IE.i


WALNUT GUN cabinet Like
new etched glass $275 941-
4740639
l BICYCLES/
I TRIC-CLES I
^ ^ 6135 -1

BICYCLE BOrS 24"
Like new cruiser, $65
941-629-6096
BICYCLE MURRAY Ladies
good condition $25 941-235-
1910


BI'YCLEMS
TRICYCLES
~6135~

BIKE RACK 2 bIKE RACK
WITH 2 INCH RECV $65 612-
308-5787
BIKE RACK, Yakima 2" recv.
mount 5125 314609-1540
BOY'S BIKE Screamer Rhino-
Brand New Never $50 941-
735-8371
HELMETS (2) Unused. $35
each, both for 560 $35 941-
627-9689





TANDEM: CANNONDALE
MT800 $1,200 941-375-
8802
TRICYCLE E-Z Roll Regal
Traiimate. wide seat, chrome
fenders, $135, 941-623-5178

TOYS
^_ 6138 ^

941-830-4937
LIONEL TRAIN $400 941
735-1452
MINI HESS trucks (16) SI50
941-914-6945

i PHOTOGRAPHY/
I VIDEO~
66140.e

CAMCORDER, JVC
VHS w/access needs battery
$50 941-235-2017
CAMERA TRIPOD quantray
QSX9500 by Sunpack never
$20 941-624-4244
CAMERA, 4 separate
lenses AE-1 Canon $200
941-204-1277
CANON AE-1 CAMERA inci
macro telephoto 70210 $115
941.7648989
POOJL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES


Local Manufacturer
offering to sell direct
to public! .5 IFRSCN
SPl. S 1895.0 S6W1I, Sl
.OAIHi$ S7995,0 I IFniiu-
I;i\ 0JL Q'20 $67(x)
LOCAl: 941-421-0395





**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
HOT TUB 6 person hot tub 6
person $200 941-445-7666
HOT TUB 86x86 new cover &
heater, can deliver $400 941
697-7558
POOL CLEANER Automatic,
Great White. Brand New! 2 Yr.
Warr. $250 941-575-8558
LAWN & GARDEN
^^ 6160 _

CHAINSAW HOMELITE,
33cc v/case. good cond.
$50 941276-3565
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the tirepitr!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus.
941-4684372
GARDEN FOUNTAIN 15"tall,
7"diam, nautical design $40
941.497-7196
HEDGE TRIMMER 22' elec
trick Black & Decker $20 941-
497-7196


LAWN & GARDEN
Z^6160 ^

LAWN MOWER Troy Bilt Brig-
gs & Stratton 21" self pro.
peeled w/bag-mulch-side dis-
charge. $225 941-587-5162
MOWER TIRES Carlisle Tud
Master 22-11-10 New $90
941-697-3979
PATIO SET 5 pc. patio set,
white, 48" r $125
941-488-5595
PRESSURE WASHER DEVIL-
BISS 5HP 2400PSI $125
941-275-7350
RIDING MOWER 12 h.p. brig
gs&stratten engine $350
941-467-6077
ROYBI BIG Wheel Mower
6.5hp $85 941-650-1258
TRANSMISSION RIDER
mower good 5 speed $85
786-306-6335

BUILDINGS
Z!6165~

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES..NO PROBLEM
941-626-4957
LICENSE #CBCI259336

BUILDING
SUPPLIES
~6170~

2 EXTERIOR fg entry doors 6
panel 36" $100 630747-
9506
BRASS BALL Valves
New 1/2" and 3/4" $6
314-609-1540
EXTENSION CORD,
10/3 ELECT W/PLUG
$40 941-223-4368
OIL MOD POLY pro qualty-
539V0C-1 gal $22
803-2159410
RETRACTABLE DOOR
SCREEN 36x80" bronze, cus
$100 941-627-0775
TOOLS/MACHINERY
^^ 6190 ^

28FT. ALUM.EXT.LADDER
Ex.Cond. 28ftAIEtlLadder
$125 941-828-1423
4 1/2" bench vise works fine,
4"opening $10 941445
9069
AIR COMP. Kobalt Kobait
30gl,155psi.twin ci $275
9416501258
BAND SAW 9" Ryobi table top
with stand $65 941-626-6224
CHAIN SAW Home Lite 33cc
chain saw with case $50 941-
276-3565
I Advertise Today! I
COLEMAN GENERATOR
6250watt,10rp $275 941-
650C1258
FINISHING SANDER,
Craftsman 1/4 speed ha
$25 941 764-6493
GEN ENERGY Pro Brigs &
Stratton 5250/7350 $200
941-626-6224
HONEYWELL CONTROL
T991A1194 NEW $100
941-429-7914
JOINER/PLANER VERY
heavy on base $150 941-626.
6224
LADDER, ALUMINUM 20fh
extention $60- $50 941-587.
5162
MASTER TORCH
Propane torch in metal case
$15 941.764.6493
MITER SAW DELTA 12" New
80 tooth blade. $85 941-266-
4731
PIPE THREADER (Ridgidi
5 dies exc.cond. $120
941-585-8149
POWER MITRESAW Delta-
10" W/ Carbide tip bl $50
941-275-7350





Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


TOOLS/ MACHINERY

Z 6190 ^

COMPRESSOR HOSE 50FT
$20 941-639-5537
RADIAL ARM SAW
DeWalt, $75 Call Jim
@ 941-286-0536
ROOFING NAILERS Hitachi
and ABC Used roofing $90
941-549-1232
ROUTER AS new in box with
bits $40 941-624-4244
SAW, Sears like new 10"
compound miter saw w/ stand
$150 941-766-7466
SHOP VAC,
CRAFTSMAN Wet/Dry
$45 732-616-9016
SHOP VAC, Ridgid, 5 HP $25
941-258-0654
SHOP VAC, sears 16 gal. EC
$45 941-623-0346
SKIL JIGSAW looks and
works fine,bottom tilts $10
941-445-9069
TABLE SAW 10 inch on base
with accessories $150 941-
626-6224
WETSTONE SHARPENER
complete, little use $15 941-
445-9069

| OFFICE/BUSINESS
I EQUIP./SUPLIES I
^^ 6220 i

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
OFFICE PARTIONS. herman
miller office partion $450
941-456-1100
CATS
L 6232 ^


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
FREE to Good Home, Christ-
mas Kittens, (3) Black, Black &
White, Grey & WH. 863-993-
9049
FREE to Good Home, Tuxedo
Kitten, Male, 5 to 6 mths old,
Friendly 863-993-9049
DOGS
Leo 60233S ^


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES,
A great gift for X-mas. Reserve
yours now! 5 (F) $600 ea. 3
(M) $700 ea. Parents are AKC
& NKC, Reg. puppies have first
shots. Joe 661-998-5536 P.C.
LIVESTOCK
L0444 6235 ^

RIDING INSTRUCTION
Horse Training, hunters,
jumpers, lifetime A Show exp.
941-575-1646 leave msg.

SPET SUPPLIES
I & SERVICES I
^^Z 6236 ^

A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins
AQUARIUM 55GAL. 2
stands, filter, tops, 30 gal.
tank & access. $180 OBO
941-626-4570


S PET SUPPLIES
I & SERVICES I


AQUARIUM, 125 gal, Fresh
water, w/black cabinet & all
equip$500 obo 941-628-4903
BIRD CAGE w/ round metal
stand, 63" tall; $60 941-639-
0838
CAT TREE, 3 tiers with house
on top floor, 6 months old,
paid $350, asking $250. Like
brand new. 941-625-7754.
DOG CAGE Black Wire, 29
Long 23 $40 941-764-8068
DOG CRATES 2 medium, 2
small. $25 941-255-3446


NEED CASH?

APPLANCES7



APPLIANCE SMOOTH Top
Range & Microwave $200
863-494-2734
DEHUMIDIFIER-KENMORE
40-PINT $50 941-268-5227
DISHWASHER, Whirlpool
white, good cond $125
941-766-9525
DRYER GE ELECTRIC
dcvh515 white 7.0 cu. ft. ,
$250 941-257-8325
DRYER LG, WHITE, SUPER
CAPACITY $250 863-494-
3891
DRYER W/ATTACHED
DRY CLEANING UNIT
Maytag Neptune
White. Exc. Cond.
$250, 941-204-8403
DRYER, WHIRLPOOL 3
CYCLE, HD, LG CAP, 220VAC
$100 941-268-5227
FRIDGE MAYTAG side by side
ice maker water $325 941-
467-6077
GIBSON REFRIGERATOR
Older-Runs Great $95 727-
906-1754
HOOVER FLOOR MATE
SCRUBBER $35
941-223-4368
MICROWAVE SHARPS
w/carousel counter top $25
941-624-4244
MICROWAVE WHIRLPOOL-
EXCELLENT condition $50
313-405-4543
MICROWAVE/CONVECTION
OVEN GE Wt, Ex. Run $65
941-505-6290
MINI REFRIG AVANTI 3.4cf
NEW $85 727-906-1754
REFRIGERATOR, STOVE,
DISHWASHER, BUILT IN MICRO
Best Offer. 941-828-1342
REFRIGERATOR & Dishwash-
er $200 863-494-2734
REFRIGERATOR AMANA
$50 941-493-3623
REFRIGERATOR LIKE new
18 cube ft. 2 door whirlpool
$200 941-639-4936
STOVE GE brand, white, coil
type, VG cond! $95 941-429-
8186
STOVE WHITE GE clean self
cln. glass door $160 786-
306-6335
TOASTER OVEN Digital
Convection, Oster $25
941-505-6290
VACUUM CLEANER
Oreck XL $35
941-223-4368
WASHER & DRYER $150.
/Pair, STOVE, $100., FRIDGE,
$100. 941-276-9201
Washer & Dryer FRONT Load
$200 863-494-2734
WASHER, Kenmore
Advantage $100
941-423-7611
WASHER-GE SELECT Energy
Star, 8-cycless $149 941-
268-5227
WASHER/DRYER white runs
good $200 Pro Pool Table 9'5"
heavy anchor $25. 625-7658


APPLIANCES
L 6~250 ^


Washers, dryers, refrigera-
tors & stoves w/warranty
$100 & up. 941-468-84891
WHIRLPOOL DISHWASHER
Excellent condition! $150
313-405-4543
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
clothes dryer Excellent condit
$100 630-747-9506
WHIRLPOOL REFRIGERA-
TOR Excellent condition. $300
313-405-4543
WHITE STOVE very clean self
cln.,glass door $160 786-
306-6335
| MISCELLANEOUS

L : 6260 ^

2 WHEEL Yard Trailer
33"x43"xl12"New tires/whls
$75 941-697-5989
64 GAL TOTE trash container
cost 69.98 new $30 941-
627-0775
A/C CONDENSATE pump
New in box $40
314-609-1540
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
ToP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
AQUARIUM, 55GAL. includes
fish, stand, tops, filter &
access. $170 obo 941-6264570
BACKPACK/DUFFLE
W/wheels, Expands,HD, nev
$30 941-505-6290
BOAT TRAVEL COVER
Fits a 1720 KEY $125
941-391-6211
BOAT WINDSHIELD
off a 1720 KEY WEST $75
941-391-6211
BOOKS 500+GOOD PAPER-
BACKS $200 941-380-3000
BOOKS MANY to choose
from almost new $1 941-445-
5619
CARD TABLE card table w/2
chairs fair condition $25 941-
624-4244
CARGO CARRIER, EXPLOR-
ER Sportrack, hard carrier
w/locks. Mounts to your
car/suv roof racks. $200
941-587-5162
CHRISTMAS TREE 7' like new
700 GE lights $75 941-766-
7466
CHROME WHEEL SKINS (4)
New 16" Fits '02-'07 Jeep Lib-
erty $60 941-661-1091
COMPUTER MOUSE golf
club it looks like driver its n
$5 228-1745
CRAB TRAPS Comp. w/
Rope, Float, Zinc, Rebar $35
941-830-0998
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELY
$120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FOREIGN CURRENCY 15
DIFFERENT COUNTRIES $25
941-475-7577
FREDERIC REMINGTON
"Bronco Buster" bronze 1
$450 941-769-0163
GAZEBO, FIRST Up, 10 X 10,
Like New $50 941-258-0654
HARLEY WINDSHIELD
20" from Road King $100
314-609-1540
MAGNET PAD/3'X6' Euro-
pean Health $250 941-575-
0690
MICHIGAN beautiful shoulder
mounted 6 point BUCK with
feet $185 941-629-4973


MISCELLANEOUS

Z 6260 ^

HARRY POTTER hard cover
excellent $10 941-426-1686
MINI HESS trucks (16) comp
set excellent condition $150
941-914-6945
MINI HESS TRUCKS, 16
exce cond great gift s $150
941-914-6945
MUSTANG WHEEL COVERS
13" FOR 70s cars $5 941-
445-5619
NUWAVE COOKTOP Brand
new in original box. $88 941-
473-0268
PUTT & RETURN GAME
great XMAS gift $35
941-391-6211
RAMP 8 ft trifold with carry
case $225 941-429-6699
S/S REFRIGERATOR s/s
GE refridgerator,cl,vn,work
$100 941-875-1519
SCOOTER CARRIER NIB
NEVER OPENED $299 941-
429-6699
SEWING MACHINE,
TV/BED table, file cabinets
$75 941-412-4266
SHUR FLO Pump Never used
$75 941-575-0690
SKY KENNEL ANIMAL Crate
Medium excellent condi $50
941-257-8325
TROLLEY TOTAL Trolley,
Multi Use, Like New $50 941-
258-0654
US ARMY DRESS SHOES New
in box Size 9R $5 941-445-
5619
WELL WATER equipment for
home $450 401-952-4380
WINE COOLER terracotta
like new $15 941-228-1745

I WANTED TO
I BUY/TRADE
^ 6270 ^



Cash paid FOR WWl WWll
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280
USED 8'-10'-12' Single Axle,
enclosed, ramp door trailer.
941-639-6098

7000


TRANSPORTATION

| BUICK
Loa 7020 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!
1-877-211-8054
LWAL"IE
iLlKUjS OF saiM5SOTO.


~~p D. ./ UWILW LZO I Al t
WAGON VGC, New tires,
rebuilt Chevy Engine transmis-
sion R-4 trans $2,000 obo
607-742-7455
2001 BUICK CENTURY
Custom, Good running cond.,
135k mi., Asking $2800
Call Len 941-964-0410
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
58,720 mi, $10,875
877-219-9139 DIr


BUICK
L v 7020 ^


2005 BUICK LESABRE
Loaded, Mattas Motors
Was $7995 Now $6868
941-916-9222 DIr.
2008 BUICK LACROSSE
61,842 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL 34K $28,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 BUICK LACROSSE
NAVI, 13K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
7 CADILLAC
L ^ 7030 ^


1985 CADILLAC ELDORADO,
Tan, 90K mi, Garage Kept,
$3,100 obo 941-629-9161
I Classified = Sales
2004 CADILLAC 6 CYL SRX
White w full sun roof, lots more
extras. Looks & runs like new
$ 8900/obo 218-348-0338
2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
Gorgeous gloss black/vanilla
Ithr. 40k mi., beautifully
equipped. 1 senior owner,
car faxed, garaged & acces-
sories. meticulously maint'd
$12,395 MUST SEE!
828-777-5610 Cell
2007 CADILLAC CTS
29,923 mi, $17,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CADILLAC CTS
24K $25,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 CADILLAC CTS-V
Coupe Limited Edition.
8,330. miles, Asking
$54,900/obo 941-286-
3540 or 239-994-6455
2013 CADILLAC XLR
13,956 mi, $37,958
877-219-9139 DIr
| CHEVY
Los 7040Y ^


1987 CHEVY T20 V8, Auto-
matic, A/C. New tires. FL vehi-
cle. $2800 603-534-7589
2000 CHEVY CORVETTE
80K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 CHEVROLET CAVA-
LIER, Runs good. $1,300
941-623-3983
GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2006 CHEW AVEO LS,
4 Door. $4,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car DIr.
2006 HONDA PILOT EXL,
Loaded! 3rd Row Seat!!
$10,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2008 CHEVROLET COBALT
88,904 mi, $7,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CHEVY IMPALA
70K $8,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 CHEVY COBALT
41K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO
22,542 mi, $11,845
877-219-9139 DIr
SCHRYSLER



2001 CHRYSLER 300M
Extremely Nice Car! $5995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LTD, CONV., $5995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 PT CRUISER LTD
$6995 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222


L CHRYSLER
wmra: 7050 ^


GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2007 CHRYSL. PT CRUISER
CONV. 58K Mi! $7,988.941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
2008 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER 80,462 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONVT, 3,126 MI, $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| DODGE
L m^: 7060 ^


2002 DODGE RAM250
75,849 mi, $13,958
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 DODGE CHARGER,
V8, 5.7, Loaded! $14,988.
941-639-1601, DIr P.G.
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Was $7995 Now $6987
941-916-9222 DIr.
L FORD
/0 /

Low 7070 ^




GENE GORMAN 'S
DIT CHEAP CARS
COME MEET OUR NEW
SALES MANAGER,
BRANDON!!
GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE
FINANCING. RATES AS
LOW AS 1.9%!
3305 Tamiami Tr. South
Punta Gorda
941-639-1601
2000 FORD CONVERSION
VAN, WAS $6995 NOW
$5973 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 FORD MUSTANG
10K $9,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 FORD FOCUS 49,086
mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
47,024 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD MUSTANG
27,839 mi, $17,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD FLEX
30,143 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
40,959 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr



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The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 5, 2013


FORD
Late 7070 ^


2012 FORD FUSION
35,758 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 FORD EDGE
NAVI 23K $29,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 FORD MUSTANG
21,058 mi, $20,987
877-219-9139 DIr
| GMC
L w 7075C ^


2005 GMC CANYON
58,862 mi, $11,987
877-219-9139 DIr
| JYEEP
L ^ 7080p ^


2003 JEEP WRANGLER
SAHARA 135K $10,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 JEEP WRANGLER
59K $28,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
25,489 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
LINCOLN
L ^ 7090 ^


Cartier 63K,. very good cond.
$5,200 OBO 941-661-5181
2003 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Signature $3995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
L MERCURY
W,4:7710 0


2010 MERCURY BASE
55,551 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
SOLDSMOBILE
M 11 0


1993 OLDS EIGHTY EIGHT
Was $2395 Now $1995
Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
L PONTIAC
oomm:713'0


2002 PONTIAC FIREBIRD,
Only 90K Miles!
$4,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2007 PONTIAC G6
46,238 mi, $10,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 PONTIAC VIBE
77,325 mi, $10,477
877-219-9139 DIr
7SATURN
LOM1171U35 ^

2007 SATURN OUTLOOK
LEATHER 58K $16,988
877-211-8054 DLR

IPRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


98 SW2 Wagon
01 SL1 Sedan
02 L200 Sedan
4 Ion Sedan
94 Vue SUV
96 Vue SUV
06 Saturn Vue
08 Vue SUV


$2,50C
$2,80(
$3,499
$3,40C
$4,20C
$5,899
$6,099
$7,80C


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822


S SATURN I I HONDA
Lm w 7135 Ll J L 7160 ^


2008 SATURN VUE
65K $13,988
877-211-8054 DLR
USED CAR DEALERS



Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

ACURA
Lwmr: 714 5


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
LIRI/'rI'a 0-F
IEW ILO BRAO~

2011 ACURA TSX
25K $23,990
877-211-8054 DLR
BMW
L 7148 J


2010 BMW X5X35D
42K $35,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 BMW 3281S
68K "AS IS" $22,990
877-211-8054 DLR
HONDA
aw4:7160


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

WLEAIL i 5F SmAQ-
2005 HONDA CR-V
85,551 mi, $9,899
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
77,158 mi, $11,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC
73,935 mi, $11,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
58,909 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
64,446 mi, $15,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
50,943 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC
57,901 mi, $13,685
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID
69,782 mi, $12,584
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CR-V
40,674 mi, $17,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
49,825 mi, $16,984
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC
59,221 mi, $17,255
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC.,
Blue! Low Miles!
$10,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2009 HONDA CR-V
36,615 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
47,600 mi, $17,867
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
65,002 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr


2009 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 44,659 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
61,161 mi, $13,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
33,949 mi, $13,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
15,399 mi, $24,625
877-219-9139 DIr
I|APVERTmSET-1
2010 HONDA CR-V
33,066 mi, $16,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 56,555 mi, $18,990
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ELEMENT
35,748 mi, $20,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
29,249 mi, $14,545
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
26K $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 HONDA ACCORD
29,998 mi, $17,998
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
31,645 mi, $18,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,050 mi, $15,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,420 mi, $23,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT, 21,812 mi, $18,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,621 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,987 mi, $15,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT, 16,112 mi, $17,896
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
24,873 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
27,234 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
29,940 mi, $18,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
30,451 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,013 mi, $22,536
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
38,727 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 16,087 mi, $19,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 24,605 mi, $17,998
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 28,040 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 KIASORENTO
47,404 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
19,809 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
33,519 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,478 mi, $17,452
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,308 mi, $16,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 24,519 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
7,258 mi, $20,875
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
LW444 7160 ^


2013 HONDA ACCORD
V6, CERT, 2,958 mi,
$27,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CRV
EXL 5,091 Ml, $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR

L IIYUNDAI
mmw4:7163


2005 HYUNDAI XG350L
6cyl, leather, all pwr, sunrf
48K, $9000 941-627-6263
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2006 HYUNDAI TUSCAN,
Extra Clean! $9,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used CarD.
2008 HYUNDAI TIBURON
109,569 mi, $8,577
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT,
Ony 30K Miles! $9,988.
941-639-1601 DIr.
2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON
46,619 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
43,513 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SANTAFE
59,176 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
30,802 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HYUNDAI STERLING
16,612 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
S INFINITI
004:7165IT'


2004 INFINITI G35 SPORT
COUPE w/Premium Pkg.
Lady driven, 69K. Excl. cond.
$12,900 941-276-7410
2011 INFINITI G37
17K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 INFINITI G37
CONVERT. 11K $35,990
877-211-8054 DLR

L r 7177 ^


2010 KIA SOUL
20K $13,988
877-211-8054 DLR
| LEXUS
L 7178S ^

2003 LEXUS LS430
46K $18,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2004 LEXUS RX350
59K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2005 LEXUS E330, Drop Dead
Gorgeous! $11,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used CarDealer
2005 LEXUS LS430 Excel.
cond., white, 46K. Garage
kept! $21,000 941-637-9874
2007 LEXUS ES350
77K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS IS250
85K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS IS250
AWD 104K $14,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS LS460
72K $29,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS LS460L
CERT., 44K $35,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS ES350
53K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR


I LEXUS
Less 7178S ^


2008 LEXUS IS250
53,275 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS IS350
70K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 LEXUS ES350
CERT. 37K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS IS250C
CONVERT. 26K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS GS350
CERT. 22K $32,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS GX460
CERT. 38K $43,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS IS250
46,962 mi, $25,478
877-219-9139 DIr

LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LEM V O AERASO

2013 LEXUS GS350
NAVI 39K $40,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| MAZDA
770
L ^ 7180 ^


2003 MAZDA MX5
63,925 mi, $10,857
877-219-9139 DIr
SMERCEDES
4Z^7190 ^


1982 MERCEDES 380SL
Orig. cond., 18,600 miles,
Pristine, Showroom condition!
All original both tops, w/color
Anthricite grey metallic.
$29,500 305-525-1564 Ven.
2009 MERCEDES SL550R
19K $52,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 MERCEDES C300
37,062 mi, $24,850
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 MERCEDES C300
25,911 mi, $24,985
877-219-9139 DIr
MINI COOPER
L Z 71902


2007 MINI COOPER, Red!
Double Moon Roof! $12,988
941-639-1601 P.G. DIr
2009 MINI COOPER S,
30,271 mi, $15,575
877-219-9139 DIr
S MITSUBISHI
L 7195 ^


2010 MITSUBISHI OUT-
LANDER 48,216 mi,
$17,854 877-219-9139 DIr
NISSAN
L ^ 700 ^


2007 NISSAN 350Z
47,243 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
Employ Classified!
2007 NISSAN QUEST
50,961 mi, $12,997
877-219-9139 DIr


Convertible, 19,900 mi.,
$23,900 941-626-9053


NISSAN
L ^ 7200 ^


2008 NISSAN ALTIMA
SL 77K $11,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 NISSAN CUBE
43,705 mi, $13,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
83,646 mi, $16,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN VERSA
86,168 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 NISSAN FRONTIER
63,890 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 NISSAN JUKE
15,237 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN 370Z
TOURING, 38K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
L SPORTS CARS
0L0::7205 ^


2003 PORSCHE BOXSTER
115K "AS IS" $17,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| SAAB
L 7206 ^


2006 SAAB 9.3 CONVERT-
IBLE, Low Miles! Warranty!
$6,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.

L SUBARU
1404:7207 U ^


2006 SUBARU LEGACY
51,639 mi, $12,745
877-219-9139 DIr
STOYOTA
Lwow 7Y2100 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LEMUS OF SO^O*
2001 TOYOTA SOLARA
RED, 33K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 TOYOTA AVALON
107,986 mi, $9,978
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA CAMRY
58,851 mi, $11,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA RAV4
73,005 mi, $13,788
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA SIENNA
57,107 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY
44,325 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA RAV4
85,438 mi, $11,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
43,462 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA RUNNER
58K, BLACK $27,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY
5,466 Ml $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
50,780 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
Seize the sales
with Classified!
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA
33,115 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA RAV4
20,717 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr





Thursday, December 5, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


TOYOTA
7210


2012 TOYOTA MATRIX
9,670 mi, $18,987
877-219-9139 DIr
SVOLKSWAGEN
L ^ 7220 ^

2006 VOLKSWAGEN
TOUAREG 70,114 mi,
$13,245 877-219-9139 DIr
2013 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
DIESEL 19K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR
VOLVO
L 72300 ^


2006 VOLVO C70 Hardtop
Cony! Red! $13,988 941-
639-1601 P.G. DIr.
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
^^, 7250 ^

1932 FORD 1/4 TON ST. ROD
1930 FORD WOODY WAGON
1927 CHRYSLER ROADSTER
9000 ORIGINAL MI., MUST BE
SEEN! 941-426-5282
1940 PONTIAC COUPE,
69,400 mi, all orig, great
cond. $12,000 941-882-3515





1988 FORD MUSTANG
Convertible, 61k original mi.,
everything original, full power.
$7000 OBO 941-575-9023
CASH FOR OLD Corvettes,
muscle cars, hot rods,
classics & old motorcycles.
717-917-0856
SBUDGETBUYS
L44 L725T2





GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1995 TOYOTA AVALON, Sun-
roof, Leather. $1,688. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1997 MAZDA PROTEGE,
5 Speed! $1,188 941-625-
2141 CC#1UsedCar DIr
1998 AUDI A4,
2.8 Sedan! $988.
941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
1998 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
GT, Low Miles! $2,488 941-625-
2141CC #lUmdCarDedw
BAD CREDIT? No CREDIT?
No PROBLEM!
IF YOU HAVE A DOWN
PAYMENT...YOU HAVE A CAR.
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM!
941-467-8812
2002 CHEVY IMPALA,
4 Door! Great on Gas!
$1,588. 941-639-1601, DIr
| AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 ^

L z~





WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204


AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 J


t./., lrI I i rji JUInImi.I\
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550


ACCESSORIES
^ 7270 i

327 CHEVY engine only block
rebuilt $495 786-306-6335
CARGO CARRIER, EXPLOR-
ER Sportrack, hard carrier
w/locks. Mounts to your
car/suv roof racks. $200
941-587-5162
DIRECT LIFT Car body and
Frame Rotisserie. All access.
Hyd. Lift $900 941-380-5678
/ GET RESULTS

( USE CLASSIFIED! )
HARDTOP STG HOIST elect.
winch pd 600 ask $250 941-
764-8989
HITCH HAULER Steel 60" by
17" Like New $40 941-661-
8194
LEER TRUCK CAP 7' red,
$75.00, (941) 613-9595 $75
941-613-9594
TIRES 225/65R17 4 each
Bridgestone duelers HT
w/alum. rims, new all season,
$150. 941-661-0999.
TIRES 4-235/40/18 New
T/O'S ContiPros 50% off $400
941-447-8512
TIRES, (4) All Season
P205/55R16. Used only 3
mos. $200 941-204-8403
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
USED TIRES 14"& 15" all
good $15 786-306-6335

1& REPAIR
7280 ^i

HEADLIGHT JENIE--
Repair hazed, cloudy or dull
headlights... GUARANTEED!
We come to you!
941-587-0584
VANS
7290

2001 DODGE CARAVAN,
Low Miles!
$3,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2006 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT, 7 pass, Stow-n-Go,
45,800 mi, new tires, super
clean. $7,950. 941-548-8539
2006 PONTIAC MONTANA
SV6, Loaded! Low Miles!
$8,988 941-639-1601 DIr.
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
57,353 mi 22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,822 mi, $30,987
877-219-9139 DIr


VANS
L 7~290 ^


2011 HONDA PILOT
21,428 mi, $24,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT, 53,050 mi, $30,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
20,440 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
24,762 mi, $28,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
CERT., 17,759 mi, $29,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT, 10,719 mi, $34,950
877-219-9139 DIr
STRUCKS/PICK-UPS

Z 7300 ^

1994 DODGE PICK-UP
2500 V-10. $2,195 OBO. Call
941-276-1300.
1998 CHEVY SILVERADO,
Looks Rough, Runs Good.
$500. 941-380-2104
2001 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500, runs great, great work
truck $3,495 941-681-1141
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2001 DOGE RAM 1500,
Quad Cab! $1,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
2003 GMC SIERRA 1500
Ext. Cab, Z71 4x4, Tow Pack-
age, Bedliner. Great Condition!
$9,900. 941-416-8364
2003 GMC SONOMA SLS,
reg. cab, auto, cruise, cd.
78K, $6,300 941-493-0961
GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2008 CHEVY SILVERADO, 4x4
1 Owner. $18,988 941-6252141
C.C. #1 Used Car Dealer!
2008 FORD RANGER King
Cab, 135K, Super Nice!
$6000. ALSO 2011 Ranger
4x4 Brand New $24,000
941-764-7519
2011 HONDA RIDGELINE
27,424 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr
r TOLJ-'1 r i

DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
APPROVAL
941-473-2277 I
www.pctcars2.com
I. -- W---B--Y--CR' "
WE BUY CARS j
STop Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
W---E FINANCE l

EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
941-473-2277 I
I www.pctcars2.com
--NEED A JOB?--
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
L: 7305 1

GENEGORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
2001 CHEVY TRACKER, Only
81K Miles! $4,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C. #1 Used Car Dealer
2005 SUBURU FORESTER,
Low Miles! Red! $9,988. 941-
639-1601 DIr. P.G
2008 SATURN VUE Excl.
condition inside & out. 51K
$11,500 OBO 941-276-6465
2008 TOYOTA RUNNER
66,502 mi, $23,758
877-219-9139 DIr


SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
^^ 7305 ^1

2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
44K $22,784
877-219-9139 DLR
LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WRILEI
LEfTVS OF SAAST
2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER
2,826 mi, $33,754
877-219-9139 DIr

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
|4140Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


02 Saturn Vue
04 Saturn Vue
03 Kia Sorento
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
07 Chevy HHR
08 Saturn Vue XE
08 Saturn Vue XR


$3,299
$4,20C
$4,299
$5,299
$5,89S
$6,099
$6,60C
$7,80C
$11,50C


I 941-627-8822

BOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^

15' LUND Aluminum, 1990,
30 HP Mariner, with trailer.
$1,900, OBO 715-505-2844
17.5' SCOUT 2000, Walk
around 90HP Honda, Bimini
top, trailer, live well, etc.
Ready to go! $4,500 OBO
Leave msg. 941-769-8790
17.6' 2007 KEY WEST. 90
HP Yamaha, Minn-Kota Power
Pole, Garmin 440S, SS Prop,
Alum. Trailer. ONLY 58 HOURS!
$13,800. 423-967-3884





18' GLASTRON GS 180, 130
HP Johnson Outboard. Excellent
Condition! Many Extras! $4,995.
231-835-0059
20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121
22.5' 2012 SEAHUNT TRI-
TON, 200HP Evinrude E-Tec,
Saltwater Model, Aluminum
Trailer, 70 Hours. Warranty
Until 8/17! 315-482-9523





25'11" STAMAS 1980, fiber-
glass, sport cruiser, V8 mus-
tang. A good boat for the bay.
Open back for fishing. Made in
Tarpon Springs. Refurbished in
2007. $4,500 Trailer Avail-
able, not incl'd 941-474-9498


GLACIER BAY 2240 Excel-
lent shape with 215 hrs.
$50,000 701-238-6270
L SAILBOATS
7331


'16 FT. will trade for popup
camper or motorc $500 941-
467-6077
22' CATALINA, outboard
fiberglass sailboat 1975
$3,500 941-626-4540
1 Advertise Today! .
32' 1985 MORGAN, Needs
engine, otherwise sound cond.
$7,500 941-637-1439


MISC. BOATS

%Z^ 333 ^

13.5' 1994 SEA RAY SEA
RAYDER Merc 90 HP Jet Drive
Galv. trailer good condition
$2,995 941-697-0940
| BOAT STORAGE/
DOCKING
^^ 7336^ i

DOCK FOR RENT, No Bridges,
Good Water. Close To Harbor.
Up To 36'. Chris 941-627-1414
SLIP, Water & Elec. 5 Min. to
Stump Pass. Up to 36' Boat.
$11.00 a foot 941-460-9698

MARINEE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
^^ 7338 ^

ANCHOR, 101b Mushroom
$20, SlipRingAnchor 150'Rope
$45 630-248-3596
BIMINI TOP 88" Navy
Sombrella Exc. Cond. $130
941-423-9371
BOAT OARS DURABLE
ALUM.&PLASTIC LIKE NEW
$100 941-391-6211
BOAT SEATS White plastic
w/pedestals each Good $25
941-423-9371
CAPTAINS CHAIRS Pedestal
w/base w/cushions. $100
941-266-4731
DISC ZINCS 3 inch $20 941-
697-0940
FENDER HOLDER for 10"
Fenders $15 941-697-0940
LADDER-GUNWALE TYPE
FOLDING 3 STEP $49 941-
391-6211
PADDLES CAVINESS
brand Exc Cond. $20
941-423-9371
PROP STAINLESS STEEL
14-1/2 X 19 Good cond. $60
941-423-9371
TROLLING MOTOR MIN
KOTA ENDURA PRO 55 $250
941-391-6211
ZINC dream diver 12" x 6
1/2" $25 941-697-0940
S TRAILER I
I & ACCESSORIES I
^^, 7341

2014 RC Cargo Trailer 5X8,
w/ Original Reg. $2,500 OBO
616-460-3627
DUMP TRAILERS (2) 14'
$3000. Also 12' trailer $2000
941-628-8388
LARK V-NOSE ENCLOSED
7X14 Was $4095 Now $3350
941-916-9222 DIr.
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Cargo- Utility
Trailers Parts Repairs-Tires
Welding 941- 575-2214.
4760 Taylor Rd P.G.

| CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
L: ^7360 ^
2006 SUZUKI BLVD., Low
Miles! $2,788. 941-639-
1601, DIr.
2008 HD SPORTSTER 883
LX, 6K mi, mint cond, vance &
hines pipes. $4,300 941-979-
2940
2010 HD Streetglide, beauti-
ful black all orig. with 5500 mi,
garage kept 941-883-1223










3315 Tamiami TrI. PG
We Repair Scooters too!
941-347-8705
[ HARBOR
SCOOTERS
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...


S CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
7370 i

WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171

| MOTOR HOMES/
i RVs
LZ 73S80^


2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

HOLIDAY RAMBLER
A MUST SEE MOTOR HOME
MANY MODELS
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182










LUXURY MOTOR HOM[S
2014 MODELS UP TO 45
COME SEE........LETS TPADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182
RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

Need a new
Home?
Look in the
Classifieds!

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/RADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,150. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.
WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls,
Pop-Ups, Van conversion &
passenger vans. Cash
paid on the spot. for quick
sale. 941-347-7171




The Sun Classified Page 20 EINIC ads .you rsun net Thursday, December 5, 2013


With


Warm Regards


At The Holidays


We're sending our best for all to see,


Because there is


no place we


'd rather be


At Christmastime,


than here with you


To thank


you


for


the things


you do!


S6M iW aI -


^----.-.---- Pa
I .: q -o'm- g g -


The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 5, 2013


P- mm.,--m=. _m=




Full Text

PAGE 1

AND WEEKLY HERALDCharlotte SunTHE SUN: Police Beat 3,6 | Obituaries 5 | Viewpoint 8 | Opinion 9 | Legals 11 | THE WIRE: Nation 2,8 | State 3 | World 5 | Business 6-7 | Weather 8 | SPORTS: Lotto 2 | CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-12 | Dear Abby 12 | TV Listings 13 VOL. 121 NO. 339 AN EDITION OF THE SUN AMERICAS BEST COMMUNITY DAILYTHURSDAY DECEMBER 5, 2013www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00 Comfortable with plenty of sun83 63 High Low Look inside for valuable couponsThis years savings to date ...S UN COUPON VALUE METER CHARLIE SAYS ...I thought I was the only talking animal around here.INDEX | 705252000258 Daily Edition $1.00 $82,674US-China: Talks but no consensus on air zone rowTHE WIRE PAGE 1 WINSTON LEARNS FATE TODAY RADIOACTIVE THEFTA missing shipment of radioactive cobalt-60 was found Wednesday near where the stolen truck was abandoned. With the investigation complete, the prosecutor is expected to reveal the findings at 2 p.m.THE WIRE PAGE 1 Pick of the DaySky kennel, $50In Todays Classifieds! CALL US AT 941-206-1000 SPORTS PAGE 1My friend Mitch contacted me recently. What in the heck is going on? His health insurance premiums for his little software company were going up 38 percent for the new year. There is no way he can afford that. I laughed at my friend, the liberal Democrat from Philadelphia, and said, Welcome to Obamacare. Mitch says the fault lies not with Obama, but with those greedy health insurance companies taking advantage of the chaos in the market to stick it to us again. Well, I have to partially agree with him. In Obamacare, big insurance companies and big government, if not married at the hip, sure cohabit the same apartment. What in the heck is a company to do? Well, in Mitchs case, he is probably giving most everyone a raise for the dollar amount of health insurance the company was providing. The employees then will go purchase subsidized insurance on the exchanges. A huge advantage of this strategy is Mitchs little technology company mostly will be out of the health insurance business for good. Mitch asked what our company was going to do. I said I wasnt sure yet. Weve been to multiple seminars put on by attorneys, health care companies and benet consultants often with directly conicting advice about what to do. We hired an outside consulting rm to help us navigate the shoals. The cost of the consultant is about $300 per employ ee. Thats a lot of money. I dont want to say it is a great waste of money, because the consulting rm is great. Lets just say the investment is an unfortunate diversion of money from more productive uses. We were fortunate to be able to hire a consulting rm. I feel sorry for the small companies and individuals that are dealing with this challenge. Make a bad decision, and, if you are on a modest income, you could be in a world of hurt. Our company is proceeding on multiple levels to navigate through the health care rapids. We think our paperwork will be in order, and we likely will make some changes to our health care plan in the new year, designed to attack the two areas that have the highest impact on our health care costs: urgent care visits and chronic care. Our overall health care cost to cover a family is now more than $20,000 a year. It was $10,000 a year seven years ago, and $5,000 a year seven years before that. In seven years, the costs are likely to be $40,000 a year for family insurance, if nothing changes. We asked at the seminars and queried our consultant what other companies are doing to adjust to both Obamacare and the long-term trend of spiking prices. Almost universally we are told most companies are gradually getting out of company-paid spouse and family health insurance coverage. Employee-only health insurance coverage by businesses may be what is left after the dust settles. Neither the Republicans nor the Democrats have a plan to solve the growing health care and insurance cost spiral. My friend Mitch deserves better. America deserves better. David Dunn-Rankin is publisher and president of the Sun Newspapers. Email him at daviddr@sun-herald.com.Obamacare BRADENTON In a brief but heated exchange, Sarasota County Commissioner Nora Patterson told Charlotte County Commissioner Chris Constance theres no legitimate beef over an estimated $7 million that water users in his county must pay for repairs and upgrades to the Peace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority plant. My back is getting a little up, Patterson, who chairs the water board, told fellow member Constance during Wednesdays authority meeting in Manatee County. To say we blindly are following (the authoritys recommendations) is an insult. Give us a little more credit on this end I have not taken a single action without getting staff to weigh in. I spent an enormous amount of effort learning, and know you do not have a legitimate beef intelligent people can disagree. Lawyers can get involved. God bless you and go forward (with a lawsuit). Pattersons challenge came after Constance read a statement to the board. He was the lone vote against the four-member authority signing a $12.8 million contract to rebuild portions of the water plant, located in DeSoto County, that was built in the late 1970s. Charlotte, Sarasota, Manatee and DeSoto counties, along with the city of North Port, draw millions of gallons of water from the plant each year. All must pay different amounts for the rebuild, based on usage. Charlotte which uses about 90 percent of the plants capacity will pay about $8.5 million; Sarasota, $1.2 million; North Port, $869,892; and DeSoto, $213,124. The water authority also is kicking in about $900,000 from its General Fund. The counties and city can use money left over (credited by the authority) toward paying the bill from other plant-related projects that came in under budget. Charlotte is owed about $2.2 million; Sarasota, $4.8 million; North Port, $3.6 million; and DeSoto, $61,965. Constance said an independent engineer studied the rebuild project and told Charlotte ofcials fewer than half of the proposed plant repairs need to be done immediately. Constance said Charlottes portion, which must be paid to the authority by next October or be bonded over 20 years through the authority, will create a hardship for the countys 60,000 water users.Tempers boil over projectBy ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHNORTH PORT COMMUNITY NEWS EDITORCharlottes water authority rep: Litigation imminentWATER | 6 Appreciating nature at an early agePUNTA GORDA Parents like Jennifer Deke took their children to the Alligator Creek Preserve on Wednesday to enjoy the great outdoors. They joined the Charlotte Harbor Environmental Centers Young Children in Nature program. The program, which is for children ages 2 to 5, combines early childhood development activities with hands-on nature lessons and outdoor activities once a month. When Deke heard about the Young Children and Nature program, she thought it would be a good oppor tunity to get (her daughters) out of their princess dresses and into nature. Splitting their time between the screened lanai that served as the lesson room and the preserves trails and visitor center, the children had lessons in numbers, grouping, animals and local plants. Eileen Tramontana, the environmental program coordinator who led the activities, said the outdoors provides an excellent setting for children in this age range to learn. A lot of kids really respond to using nature in lessons, Tramontana said. She also said research shows that being in nature helps children with autism and attention-decit disorder to focus, and reasons that it probably does the same for all children. Deke agreed that getting her children away from the distractions was a good thing. The biggest part is getting them unplugged and unglued from the iPad and TV, she said.By IAN ROSSSTAFF WRITERNATURE | 6ENGLEWOOD Just a few days into December, some Grinch is trying to steal Christmas already. About two dozen Christmas trees were stolen from a fundraising project at Lemon Bay High School. The incident was reported Tuesday. Its heartbreaking, said Beth Harrison, the schools Project Graduation treasurer. The Christmas tree sale serves as a major fundraiser split equally between Lemon Bays Project Graduation and Thieves take Christmas trees from LBHSBy ADAM KREGERSTAFF WRITERTREES | 6 DavidDUNNRANKINPRESIDENT AND PUBLISHERPUBLISHERS INBOX CORRECTIONThe Englewood Area Fire Control District will hold an estate-garage sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the districts administration office, 516Paul Morris Drive (off South River Road), Englewood. The sale will benefit scholarships to student firefighters. For information, call 941-4743311. An story in Wednesdays Englewood and Charlotte papers misstated the days of the sale. SUN PHOTO BY STEVE REILLYLemon Bay High School Navy JuniorROTC instructor William Rennie and principal Bob Bedford have nothing to look at under a tent that should be housing Christmas trees. Someone stole more than 20 Christmas trees that the NJROTC and Lemon Bays Project Graduation sell as part of a major fundraiser. SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSSKatherine Lawrence, 3, and her father Brandon played with small objects found in nature like shells, pebbles, twigs, and stone crab claws on Wednesday at the Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center. Y r 'teror i oar% K -iICE}: MnALL,ta, f!(1{)t.'Itli(f114NU. 451 J1rYsi7Y`1 i.' ,,.::_ E9 r 5L1 1'Dliii IIII II 1111111 ^AIL-

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Our Town Page 2 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 The SUN (USPS 743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1001 Publisher ................................... David Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1003 Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter .................................941-206-1134 Advertising Director .................. Leslee Peth ..................................941-206-1262 Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero ....................................941-206-1300 Arcadian Editor ......................... Susan E. Hoffman ........................863-494-0300 DeSoto General Manager .......... Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300 Charlotte Sun Editor .................. Rusty Pray ...................................941-206-1168 North Port Sun Publisher .......... Steve Sachkar ..............................941-429-3001 North Port Sun Editor ................ Lorraine Schneeberger ................941-429-3003 Englewood Sun Publisher ......... Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031 Englewood Sun Editor ............... Clinton Burton ............................941-681-3000 SUN NEWSPAPERSMember of the Audit Bureau of Circulation SUBSCRIPTIONS Home Delivery Rates: Newspaper designated market: City ZoneCarrier home delivered 7 days. Rates as follows plus 7% Florida Sales Tax: Monthly Bank/ Credit Card .........................$16.47 3 Months ............................$66.51 6 Months ..........................$113.05 1 Year ...............................$197.69Does not include Waterline and TV Times. Above rates do not include sales tax.Subscribers residing in outlying areas may incur additional delivery charge. DESOTO COUNTY RATES Monthly Bank/ Credit Card .......................$16.40 3 Months ..........................$74.09 6 Months .......................$119.54 1 Year .............................$196.70 Arcadian home delivery $29.99 per year. Mail subscription rates: Rates as follows (advance payment required): 7 Days 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $120.88 $216.81 $386.10 Sunday Only 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $58.81 $110.56 $186.19 Single Copy rates Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00 Unclaimed account balances under $10, inactive for 15 months, will be used to purchase newspapers for classroom use. CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe or to report any problems with your service, please call or visit your local office. Englewood: 941-681-3000 120 W. Dearborn St. Charlotte: 941-206-1300 23170 Harborview Rd., Port Charlotte North Port: 941-429-3000 13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port DeSoto: 863-494-0300 or toll-free at 877-818-6204 108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia GOVERNMENT TODAYBeaches and Shores, Advisory Committee meeting, 9 a.m., 18400 Murdock Circle, PC. 764-4909. Marine Advisory, Committee Pre-Agenda meeting, 9:30a.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg.B, Room 106-B, PC. 764-4909. Board of County, Commissioners Pre-Agenda meeting, 1:30 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg. B, Room 106-B, PC. 743-1944. Construction, Industry Licensing Board meeting, 6 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC. 743-1245. EVENTS TODAYAmerican Legion 103, Cafe opened for Bfast/ Lunch Thu-Sun 7a-2p Public invited. Help us support our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd PG 639-6337. Sierra Club Hike, Sierra Club Prairie Shell Creek Preserve Hike 8:30-11 with master naturalists. Reserve required: 941-639-7468. Project Linus, Make and quilt blankets for kids every Thurs 9-11am Huckys Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave., Nancy 627-4364. GOVERNMENT TODAYCounty Commission, Retreat, 9am,Twin Lakes Park, Green Room, 6700 Clark Road, Sarasota. 861-5000. DRC meeting, Development Review Committee, 9am, Conference Room 2, 1001 Sarasota Center Blvd., Sarasota. 861-5000. Planning & Zoning, Advisory Board meeting, 9am, North Port City Hall Chambers, 4970 City Hall Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000. ESLOC meeting, Enviro Sensitive Lands Oversight Committee, 2:30pm,3rd floor Think Tank, Admin Ctr, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. 539-4083. Planning Commission, meeting, 6:30pm, commission chambers, R.L. Anderson Admin Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, South Venice. 861-5000. EVENTS TODAYTable tennis, 9:00-11:00 am, North Port Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., equipment, provided, $2.00, 426-6276. Currant Events/Conve, 10-11:30am NP Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., 426-2204 Bring a topic/joke join in the discussion. North Port Moose, 11-2:30 Lunch. Liver/Onions, Burgers, Phillys 5-7., meat bingo 7:30. Member/Qualified Guest, 14156 Tamiami 426-2126. Lunch VFW Post 8203, Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in canteen. NARFE Chapter 1713, Christmas Party, Officer Installation11:30am Olde World Restaurant, 240-6127 for info. Mexican Dominos, 12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn the game & join all the fun. Bridge Club, Duplicate Bridge. 1 pm, Temple Beth El, 3840 S. Biscayne Dr., North Port, $6.00 pp. Includes The Common Game. AMVETS 2000 Dinner, LAUX Meatloaf 4-7pm $6. Members & guests welcome. QOH @ 7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd., NP, 941-429-1999. Italian nite, Spaghetti dinner 6-8pm meatball, salad, garlic toast, desert. $6.00, info.Brenda 941-258-6550. Tree Lighting, Ceremony at City Hall Thursday, from 6-7pm. Call 941-429-7275 for more information FRIDAYNorth Port Moose, 11-2 Lunch. Fish,Prime Rib 5-8. Bad Moon Karaoke 7-11. Member/Qualified Guest 14156, Tamiami 426-2126. Basic Exercise, $40/8wks or $2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., Marcelle 235-0346 Join/feel better. GOVERNMENT TODAYSouth Gulf Cove, Waterway Benefit Unit Advisory Committee meeting, 10 a.m., 6874 San Casa Dr., Englewood. 575-3656. EVENTS TODAYCrafty Ladies, Handcrafted items every Thursday 9-11:30am (except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533. Ewd Country Liners, 9:3011:30 AM, Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed. line dances. Open to all. Nancy 474-6027. Line Dancing(Beg), 10:00 to 12:00 at Dance Etc. Oaks Plaza, South McCall Rd. Phone Eve 941-697-8733. Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample to be identified @ New Englewood Library, 3450 S McCall, 475-6903. Bingo mania, 11-1, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., PC Elks, Join the Fun, & help the CC Homeless Coalition, Every Tues., Thurs. and Fri. Story Time, Thursdays 11am Stories, rhymes, music & play for children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W Dearborn 861-5000. Englewood Bridge Cl, Contract bridge is played every Thurs & Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 at The Hills Rest. RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2. Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Rib Night 5-7 p.m. Dance to the Music of Two Fifths Band 5-8p.m.!, Public Welcome. 474-7516. Legion Cornhole, Indoor Cornhole Games 7 pm, light menu 5-7 pm. Smoke free Post Indiana Rd, Rotonda 697-3616. FRIDAY Line Dancing, 9:30 to 11:30 American Legion Post 113, 3436 Indiana Road, Rotonda West, Phone Eve at 941-697-8733. Legion Fish Fry, Mike & Carols Famous Fish Fry, 1/2 Rst. Chicken or burgers. Post 113, Indiana Rd. 697-3616. Music by: Just Duet. Ukrainian Dinners, Friday 4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call about takeout. St. Marys Church at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427. Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Fish Fry or Wings 5 to 7p.m. Music in the lounge by Henry 5-8 p.m., Public Welcome 475-7516. VFW Seafood Night, VFW10476 3725 CapeHaze Dr 5-8 The best fresh haddock shrimp or scallops in the area $10+ 697-1123. SATURDAYFC Mens Breakfast, Prayer Brkfst @ 8:00am @ Church prop. corner of Parade & Rot. W. Blvd. All men are invited, 475-7447. | NORTH PORT EVENTS Family Fun Fest, Today, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., games, food, silent auctions, holiday store, cake walk, prizes. Murdock Middle School, 17325 Mariner Way, PC, 941-255-7525. Faithful Friends Service Dec. 8, 10 AM, Suncoast Christian Church is a small group of believers in Christ. Join us for a special service. Our intent is to build on our acreage in North Port. Currently meeting at the Port Charlotte Elks, 20225 Kenilworth Ave. (Veterans Blvd. to Atwater N., L. on Kenilworth). Dec. 8, 10 am. Info: 204-9805. The Many Sides of Glass Art, Dec. 10, 10am-2pm. Mary Cavanagh, accomplished glass artist, will show you the steps needed to create wearable art, serving pieces, musical delights and decorative ideas. Free; open to the public. Gifted Gator Boutique, PGICA, 2001 Shreve St., PG. www.pgica.org or 941-637-1655. PG Garden Club Holly Days Home Tour, 11 am 4pm. Dec. 6 & 7. Tour 4 festively decorated Historic Dist. homes & 1church. Poinsettia Market & cookies at 1st United Methodist Church, 507 W. Marion Ave, PG., $15. Proceeds fund club scholarships & community projects. Call 575-4653 or go to www.pggc.org. Ring Bells for Sandy Hook Children, Public may gather Dec. 14 at 11 a.m. at Gilchrist Park, 400 W. Retta Esplanade, PG, for a one year memorial reading of the names of the children killed in Newtown, Ct. Please bring bells to ring! Religious leaders are invited. For info, call 941-347-8738. Peace River Republican Womens Forum, Wed., Dec.11, at 11:30 a.m., at Isles Yacht Club, 1780 W. Marion Ave., PG. Join us for our Annual Luncheon Meeting and election of officers. Members $17; guests $20. Contact Martha at 456-6558 by noon Fri., Dec. 6 to register. PG Tea Party General Meeting, The meeting will be held Dec.5, at 6:30 PM, at 420 Pompano Terrace, Punta Gorda. Guest speaker: Captain Matt Bruce, Radio Personality and strong Tea Party Supporter. Open to public; no charge; bring a friend and enjoy. For info, call 941-655-8627. Peace River Baptist Church choir sings, The Peace River choir will sing the Christmas musical, Come, Messiah King, at 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 6, at Fishermens Village center court, 1200 W. Retta Esplanade, PG. Call 941-628-9789 for more info. Featured EventsPAID ADVERTISEMENTS Christmas Bazaar, The Brook to Bay Mobile Home Park will hold its annual Christmas Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Sat., Dec. 7, in the clubhouse at 1891 Englewood Rd., Englewood. There will be crafts, gifts, raffles, baked goods, and lunch will be available for purchase. For info, call 474-5295. Featured EventPAID ADVERTISEMENTRUBY TUESDAY GIVEBACK EVENTSRuby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte Town Center mall offers a Community GiveBack Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and others. This is a great way to raise money for your cause while enjoying lunch or dinner, organizers say. Ruby Tuesday gives back 20 percent of net sales to each organization. The following organizations have GiveBack events scheduled for this month. If you are interested in supporting any of these, visit the orga nizations website for a flier or contact the group/ individual and request a flier to attend. Today and Friday Charlotte County Concert Band The fundraiser is for scholarships for high school students music equipment. The Concert Band is comprised of adult musicians and qualified high school students. It promotes music in the commu nity and provides adult musicians the opportunity to perform. Contact: Peggy Mock at 941-625-0170 or peggym1tuba@gmail.com. Saturday and Sunday Hearing Impaired Persons of Charlotte County HIP is a service and resource center to help those who are deaf or hard of hearing. Contact: 941-743-8347 or hipkgaut@yahoo.com. Monday through Wednesday, and Dec. 15 Church of the Good Shepherd The Church of the Good Shepherd, 401 W. Henry St., Punta Gorda, welcomes everyone. Contact:Sheila Stidham at 941-766-1367 or sheila33980@hotmail.com; fliers will be available after church services. Dec. 14 Meals on Wheels of Charlotte County Inc. Prepares and delivers hot, nutritious meals to the homebound or those who otherwise require assistance. Contact: Henry Ereth at 941-625-4343 or at the MOW office, 3082 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte. Dec. 16 Temple Shalom Temple Shalom is awelcoming reform Jewish congregation at 23190 Utica Ave., Port Charlotte, that strives to meet the spiritual, educational, cultural and social needs of its members. Contact: Joyce Gelfand at jteachu@yahoo.com. Dec. 28 Cultural Center of Charlotte County-Cul Cen Productions Musical Theater Cul-Cen Productions is an all-volunteer, nonprofit group that produces an annual variety show raising funds for the Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte. Contact: http://theculturalcenter.com/ccp.html. HAVE YOU SEEN THE LIGHTS?Email a location (street address and town/area), along with a brief description of your featured attractions, to Marion Putman, assistant Charlotte editor, at marionmputman@gmail.com, or call 941-206-1183. You can even email a photo, and well try to get it in the paper. Port Charlotte area Collingswood Boulevard at Godwin Avenue, Port Charlotte: Lights on block from 6 p.m. to 10p.m. daily. 1552 Eppinger Drive: 75,000-80,000 lights, 12inflatables, many other decorations. Punta Gorda area Lakewood Village, 5601 Duncan Road (U.S.17): Entrance decorated with Santa with sleigh, pack ages, Christmas trees, candy canes, snowmen. Gulfview Road cul-de-sac, PGI: A neighbor hood effort for two decades; easily viewed driving by or while enjoying the boat tour. North Port area 4525 Avanti Circle: Music, animation, thou sands of lights. 2866 Escambia Circle: Multicolored light display synchronized to music. House on Chamberlain Boulevard, heading toward Cranberry Boulevard: Yard full of displays, and two other houses along with them. Chamberlain Boulevard and Boca Chica Avenue. 5364 Greenhouse Ave. 2399 Oracle Lane (off Chamberlain Boulevard, take Snowflake Lane to Cynthia Terrace, and then to Oracle). Gerona Terrace, off North Cranberry Boulevard. 1553 Log Lane, off South Cranberry Boulevard. | CHARLOTTE | EVENTS | ENGLEWOOD | EVENTS In the CLASSIFIEDS! Find The Perfect Companion NEW ARRIVALS! Monday-Friday10-7Saturday10-6Sunday11-5Look for Special Offers only on www.anthonysa.com & www.facebook.com/anthonysa Exclusives Web LADIES APPARELSPORTSWEARDRESSESSWIMWEARACCESSORIESPETITES*Not valid on Spanx, Jara, Not Your Daughters Jeans, Kristin Crenshaw, Seabreeze, Beachpointe, I.O. Sport Leggings, Bali, Leon Levin Solid Knit Tops & Cardigans, Foxcroft, Isadela, Neyelle, Flair, Belldini, and Coobie Bras. Cannot be combined with any other discount. Selection may vary by store. No adjustments made on previously purchased merchandise. A clearance item is one that has been reduced at least twice.Plus, Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday Bonus Coupons! Plus,Thursday thruSunday Takean AdditionalAll Clearance Merchandise. NOLIMITS!40%OFF BONUSCOUPON Sunday Dec.8th Saturday Dec.7th Friday Dec.6th Thursday Dec.5th Repeat of a Sellout!LightweightFrench Terry CardiganComes in White, Black, Sistal (Natural), Blue & Red. Sizes: S-M-L-XL NOW $34.504 Days Only! $25.88 BONUSCOUPON25%OFF*TAKEAnyOneRegularPricedITEMSEE EXCLUSIONS. Valid 12/5/13 12/8/13 only Cannot be combined with any other discount. Selection may vary by store. No adjustments made on previously purchased merchandise. Must present coupon to receive savings. Limit (2) 25% off coupons per customer. BONUSCOUPON25%OFF*TAKEAnyOneRegularPricedITEMSEE EXCLUSIONS. Valid 12/5/13 12/8/13 only Cannot be combined with any other discount. Selection may vary by store. No adjustments made on previously purchased merchandise. Must present coupon to receive savings. Limit (2) 25% off coupons per customer.40%OFF*TAKEAnyOneRegularPricedITEMSEE EXCLUSIONS. Must have 40% off coupon to receive discount. Valid 12/5/13 12/8/13 only. C annot be combined with any other discount. Selection may vary by store. No adjustments made on previously purchased merchandise. Must present coupon to receive savings. Limit (1) 40% off coupon per customer .Punta Gorda (in Cross Trail Center) 941-505-2177 Fort Myers (at College Parkway Center) 239-275-3111 Nokomis/Venice 941-488-7643 50463177 WAXy t.... tySUN! RSllmL-I

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The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net ENC Our Town Page 3 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS VENICE Authorities went looking for a registered sex offender Tuesday and instead found two small children living in deplorable conditions, according to the Sarasota County Sheriffs Ofce, which claims the childrens mother was high on prescription med ication and not caring for her kids. Donnalee Elizabeth Ballard, 22, invited deputies into her trailer around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday to wait for James Russell Denegall, 36, who had violated his probation on lewd or lascivious and sexual battery charges, and was living with Ballard. But as authorities stepped into the trailer they found something else entirely: The oor was covered in garbage, rotting food and dirty clothes, while the kitchen sink was overowing with dirty dishes and moldy food. They also found used feminine hygiene products on the kitchen oor, according to a report, although Ballard later would claim they were not hers. In the middle of all of this, two toddlers came wandering into the room among the lth, themselves covered in dirt, the report states. Both children, ages 1 and 2, walked barefoot across the oor, which was soiled with dirty diapers, garbage and used needle caps. The childrens rooms were an equal mess, the report states, as their beds were dirty, had no clean sheets and were littered with empty beer cans. There was also a lighter in the bed where the 2-yearold slept, the report states. Ballard told authorities the mess had just taken place, but they did not believe her story. She also told them she had just injected 30 mg of OxyContin, and she did not have a job. She provided for the children by asking people for food and money, but did not currently have any cash, the report states, despite having $160 in her bra, authorities later would discover. The state Department of Children and Families placed the toddlers in foster care, pending an investigation. Ballard was charged with two counts of child neglect, and was taken into custody. She was transported to the Sarasota County Jail, where she remains on $5,000 bond. Denegall also was located and arrested Tuesday. He violated his probation stemming from a 2005 incident in which he had sex with a 15-year-old girl in North Port, according to court records. Its unknown how he violated his probation. He also remains jailed without bond.Report: Man threatens bouncers with knifePORT CHARLOTTE A homeless man has been accused of threatening two bouncers with a knife after he was kicked out of a local bar early Wednesday, according to a Charlotte County Sheriffs report. Christopher Glen Gilbert, 30, was cut off from drinking late Tuesday by a bartender at the Portside Tavern in Port Charlotte. The patron allegedly had been drinking for most of the night and was belligerent and spilling drinks. He was asked to leave. A pair of bouncers escorted Gilbert out, but he was physical with them, the report shows. A folding knife with a 6-inch blade fell out of Gilberts pocket during a scufe. Gilbert allegedly grabbed it, ipped it open, and threatened the bouncers with it. The knife was wrestled away from the suspect and thrown across the parking lot, the report shows, but Gilbert retrieved it and returned to threaten the bouncers again. Authorities responded around 12:30 a.m. and saw Gilbert arguing with the men. Gilbert was charged with two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, and one count each of carrying a concealed weapon and resisting an ofcer after reportedly struggling with deputies who were trying to handcuff him. Once detained, Gilbert allegedly told authorities, Im a felon, and Im going to (expletive) someone up when I get to jail. The suspects background then was checked, and he was found to be a convicted felon in Texas. Gilbert additionally was charged with failure to register as a convicted felon and possession of a concealed weapon by a convicted felon. He was held at the Charlotte County Jail Wednesday on $52,500 bond. He has been ordered to not drink alcohol if he bonds out. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: Steven Ronald Hensel, 38, 27000block of Curitiba Road, Punta Gorda. Charge: battery. Bond: none.Woman charged after toddlers found living in filth | POLICE BEATThe information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system. SARASOTA COUNTY State and county ofcials claim that 150 infants have died in Florida this year from sleep-related accidents. Its often due to suffocation, either from blankets or at the hands of caregivers who make deadly mistakes. Two of those deaths took place in Sarasota County. In an effort to combat what many fear is a growing trend, the Sheriffs Ofce, state Department of Children and Families, and the Healthy Start Coalition are partnering for the Safe Sleep campaign, an education effort that aims to also provide new portable cribs or playpens to families who need them. Sheriff Tom Knight said during a press conference Wednesday that anyone, at any time, can drop off a new portable crib or play pen at the Sheriffs Ofce in downtown Sarasota. The agency will then work with DCF and Healthy Start to distribute the cribs to families who might not have the nancial means to buy one themselves. Knight hopes the community rallies behind the cause. Its a simple solution for the people who might not have the means, Knight said. And it can help families avoid a senseless tragedy. Mike Carroll, a regional director for DCF, said families often rely on generational knowledge when it comes to raising kids. He said it was often well-intentioned, citing his own mothers technique of laying him on his stomach in his crib as a baby, a technique that has since proven fatal in some cases. Carroll said it was important for new parents to bond with their baby, but it was more important to keep the child safe. Having a crib that is clutter-free and ensuring the infant is laid to rest on his back will go a long way toward ensuring the child doesnt suffocate. Theres nothing wrong with wanting to bond with your child, but its not safe to sleep with the child, he added. A sleeping adult could roll over and unintentionally smother an infant. Jennifer Highland from Healthy Start offered some simple reminders for parents: All kids under a year old should be kept in a safe sleep environment, meaning laying the child on his back. Dont keep blankets in the crib with the baby. Dont get caught up in pretty cribs as theyre displayed in stores. Cribs should be empty, Highland said. All parents need to be vigilant in making sure their baby sleeps in a crib, not with them. A parent might do it right 99 times, Highland said. But its that one time out of a hundred when mistakes happen. For more information on the campaign, visit www.MyFlFamilies.com/ SafeSleep or contact the SCSO Community Affairs Ofce at 941-861-4005. Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.comSafe Sleep campaign wants infants to rest easyBy DREW WINCHESTERSTAFF WRITER PHOTO PROVIDEDDCF Regional Managing Director Mike Carroll, left, Healthy Start Executive Director Jennifer Highland, and Sarasota County Sheri Tom Knight announce the Safe Sleep campaign Wednesday in Sarasota.ARRESTS | 6 Hire Craftsmen, Not Installers A+ Rated 50442750 Across from Jackies Auto Body K U S T O M I Z E D K U R B I N G K U S T O M I Z E D K U R B I N G K USTOMIZED K URBING W E W A N T Y O U R B U S I N E S S WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS!!! D I S C O U N T R O C K D ISCOUNT R OCK 19888 VETERANS BLVD. 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HOMELESSCOALITION CHARLOTTE COUNTY FOUNDATION, INC. rfntbfrn rrr HOMELESSCOALITION CHARLOTTECOUNTY r r rrf rr n n r OPEN PUBLIC!TO THE HOMELESSCOALITION CHARLOTTECOUNTY 50458001 50461649 Thomas Quigley, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon F R E E E Y E E X A M F O R N E W P A T I E N T S complete medical exam with one of our board certified eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. O f f e r a p p l i e s t o n e w p a t i e n t s 5 9 y e a r s a n d o l d e r Coupon Expires 1/14/2014 No Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of reimburse within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 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Our Town Page 4 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS Nearly 100 percent of teachers in both Charlotte and Sarasota counties are effective educators, according to preliminary statistics released by the Florida Department of Education this week. As of Nov. 25, 163,986 of nearly 190,000 Florida classroom teachers had been evaluated. In Charlotte County, 97.2 percent of district teachers were ranked either highly effective or effective. The percentage was slightly higher in Sarasota County, with 98.1 percent achieving a highly effective or effective rating. Statewide, 97.9 percent of teachers were effective or better. This is the second year the state has released evaluation data. This years ratings are similar to 2012 results, but the ratings and the method of arriving at them varied widely. Asked about the discrepancy, state education officials noted districts have flexibility in how to evaluate teachers. An updated report will be released in January. Despite high numbers, Charlotte County Public Schools Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources Barbara Melanson cautioned against reading too much into them. Right now, what I see is just data. What we will be doing is looking at it a little more closely, she said Wednesday. The evaluation systems are still works in progress, and our teachers are still learning. Charlotte teachers are evaluated on 60 elements, and Melanson said the district is taking them in digestible bites. For example, this year, were keying in on 17 of those. And as were training teachers in the elements, were also continuing the training of our administrators in how to go in and evaluate, she said. Charlotte County Schools superintendent Doug Whittaker echoed Melanson, questioning the scores reliability. Were still looking at five people who go in and do observations and give three different scores (on) the same lesson being taught by the same teacher, he said. We want their ratings to be similar. We know who our poor-functioning teachers are, and we have a system of improvement. We have 16-plus teachers on improvement plans around the district. Kelly Ellington, director of professional development and teacher evaluation for the Sarasota School District, was pleased with the preliminary numbers county teachers posted. Her district uses a hybrid of two evaluation platforms to assess teachers across 24 competency areas, adding there are four domains the district looks at, and each one encompasses several competencies. If Im a principal watching a teacher, in domain one Im looking at a what theyve done to set up the classroom, their rules and expectations and procedures, Ellington said. In two, Im looking at how the teacher planned. In three, Im actually looking at the instruction and (student) assessment are the students engaged, is the teaching asking high-quality questions The fourth domain is professional behavior. In DeSoto County, only 37.4 percent of teachers were scored effective or better, and 44 percent need improvement. Assistant Superintendent Christina Britton said, Our No. 1 goal is student achievement. As that improves, these scores will also We believe our teachers and kids are working very hard. All three counties saw only three teachers rated unsatisfactory. Some newer teachers also were rated years-developing. In the first three years of their careers, they arent subject to the evaluation methods like their more experienced peers. Arcadian Editor Susan E. Hoffman and the Associated Press contributed to this report.Email: annek@sun-herald.comTeachers get high evaluation marksBy ANNE KLOCKENKEMPERSTAFF WRITERHOW TEACHERS IN AREA COUNTIES STACK UPLocation Highly Effective Effective Needs Improvement 3 Years-Developing Unsatisfactory Not Evaluated Charlotte 22.8 percent 74.4 percent 2.4 percent 0.0 percent 0.3 percent 6.9 percent Sarasota 50.5 percent 47.6 percent 1.3 percent 0.5 percent 0.1 percent 15.4 percent DeSoto 4.8 percent 32.6 percent 44.0 percent 17.5 percent 1.0 percent 10.7 percent Florida 32.3 percent 65.6 percent 1.4 percent 0.6 percent 0.2 percent 13.7 percent According to the Florida Department of Education: A performance evaluation must be conducted for each instructional employee and school administrator at least once a year, and twice a year for newly hired classroom teachers in their first year of teaching in the district. District evaluation systems must be based upon sound educational principles and contemporary research in effective educational practices, and must support continuous improvement of effective instruction and student learning growth. Evaluation procedures for instructional personnel and school administrators shall be based on the performance of students assigned to their classrooms or schools, as appropriate. Source: Florida Department of Education Applications accepted for holiday helpApplications are available for Toys for Tots. Households must be Charlotte County residents, and must provide proof of residency and ID, as well as proof of the last four weeks of income with the applica tion. All applications will be put in a database, screened and have the information veried. Also, applicants must have a working phone number or email address so the family can be contacted by their sponsors. There is no guarantee of assistance. Applications will be available at the Department of Children and Families lobby, and at Pilgrim United Church of Christ and many other area churches. Elementary school students who receive free or reduced lunch will bring home an application, and those applications should be returned to their school. Each family can be sponsored by only one sponsor, and this process is in place to avoid duplication. Many more sponsors still are needed to help make this 2013 holiday season successful. Organizations or individuals who are interested in sponsoring a family for the holiday are asked to contact Carol Pickford, the Charlotte County Holiday Assistance intake coordinator, at 941-626-6215 or carol@ carolpickford.net.Auto shop supports Toys for TotsA & E Auto Repair, 1464 Market Circle, Port Charlotte, is giving away free brake pads in exchange for new, unwrapped toys that will be donated to the Marine Corps Leagues Toys for Tots program, until Dec. 12. Labor costs are required if a brake job is completed, typically $85 plus sales tax. A & E Auto is also an ofcial Toys for Tots drop site for those individuals whose cars do not require brake work. For more information, or to make an appointment, call 941-627-3111.Mens senior softballOpen practice sessions for the mens senior softball league are at 8:30 a.m. every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the adult softball elds at the Englewood Sports Complex, 1300 S. River Road, Englewood. The league starts in January and runs through the middle of March. There are two divisions Division 1 (over 60 years old) and Division 2 (over 70 years old). You are encouraged to come out to practice, meet the players, sharpen your softball skills, and have some fun. Registration forms for the 2014 season are available at the Englewood Sports Complex ofce building. For more information, call 941-460-9645. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS 50446736 50458860 3440 Conway Blvd. #2A (Behind Post Office) Port Charlotte DR. SUSAN R. BROOKS New Patients Welcome 629-4311 www.susanrbrooksdds.com General Dentistry Implants Cosmetic Nitrous Oxide Dentures & One Day Repair Laser Periodontal Therapy FINALLY IN PORT CHARLOTTE LOW COST DENTURES rfr rnfrrtrb1-866-463-1638 Click Buy & Placing your classi ed ad in Floridas Largest Classi ed Section has never been easier!Visit our new & improved website at sun-classi eds.com and schedule up to 5 free 3-line classi ed ads each week. Upload up to 6 photos! BESTI 50435698 Holiday Greetings Publishesr ffntbtnbGreeting Sizes:rDeadline:bbfrr 50435701 SUN'6NEWSPAPERSti.:: "ai... r1 United 8 0 present:'..."Letter Carriers & WOToR b.01111 ITM I 110 1If rained out,`; please drop off ofs R /' any local WalgreensWAawV"J SUN1.1-11buffalo graffixJ l 1, t::,!-' ._F VW4v wi!i7 SUN NEWSPAPERSAmerica's BEST Community DailyCall your Sun Sales Representative today at:866-463-1638 or 941-429-3110

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The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net ENC Our Town Page 5 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS ENGLEWOOD The Lemon Bay Conservancy hopes to recruit water testers for its Wildower Preserve. Working with the University of Floridas Lake Watch program, the conservancy has been testing water in Lemon Creek and the ponds on the defunct 80-acre Wildower golfcourse-turned-preserve on Placida Road. Since taking over the preserve, the conservancy discovered that Lemon Creek is a haven for juvenile tarpon. The conservancy now has three individuals who regularly test water in the creek and ponds, said Eva Furner, the conservancy member overseeing the water testing. However at least six to nine individuals are needed for the testing. Also, the conservancy hopes to have year-round volunteers. Volunteers need to devote three hours once a month for the testing. They should be willing to take water samples using a kayak launched into the ponds, and to analyze samples onshore. The water samples are analyzed for nitrogen, phosphorous, chlorophyll and trophic state. The conservancy expects the results to help it assess water quality over time, and to plan changes to improve the aquatic habitat. The actual testing is done by Lake Watch. Lake Watch is a statewide volunteer water-quality monitoring program. Locally, Lake Watch also tests water samples from the Rotonda West Associations canals. More information can be found on Lake Watchs website, http://lakewatch. ifas.u.edu. Because of the diverse geology and soils throughout Florida, Lake Watch coordinator Dan Willis said, Every area has a different water chemistry. Lake Watch operates with a state budget of $285,000 representing a 40 percent cut from previous years and has ve lab technicians testing from 500 to 1,500 water samples a month. According to its website, Lake Watch samples water from more than 600 lakes, rivers and coastal sites in more than 40 Florida counties. To volunteer for the Wildower Lake Watch, or for more information, contact the Lemon Bay Conservancy at 941-8308922 or lbconservancy@ comcast.net.Email: reilly@sun-herald.comLemon Bay Conservancy calls for water testersBy STEVE REILLYSTAFF WRITER | OBITUARIESCHARLOTTE Paula E. AdamsPaula E. Adams, 66, of Port Charlotte, Fla., died Monday, Dec. 2, 2013, in Port Charlotte. Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Port Charlotte Chapel.Marvin Wayne Coulter Jr.Marvin Wayne Coulter Jr., 55, of Punta Gorda, Fla., passed away Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013, at his home. Wayne was born Feb. 28, 1958, in Volga, S.D. He grew up in the Sioux Falls, S.D., and graduated from Hills Beaver Creek H.S. in Minnesota in 1976. Wayne served in the U.S. Air Force and met his future wife Christine Chris while they both were stationed in Okinawa, Japan. He retired from MacDill in 1994, and then worked for the Punta Gorda Airport as the Airport Security Director. He was a HarleyDavidson enthusiast for many years, and enjoyed nothing better than going on weekend excursions or long vacations with his wife on their Harley. Wayne will be greatly missed by his wife of 26 years, Chris; father, Marvin Wayne; stepmother, Betty Coulter of Sioux Falls; sister, Brenda Rappaport of Tampa, Fla.; sons, Brandon W. (Lauren Borchardt) Coulter of Vacaville, Calif., Daniel B. Lamb-Coulter of Port Charlotte, Fla., and Dustin W. (ance, Rebecca Gooding) Coulter of Lewisville, Texas; grandchildren, Hayden Rae, Aiden Michael and Avry Lee Coulter; and many loving aunts, uncles, cousins and family friends. He was preceded in death by his mother, Joyce Grifn; and grandparents, Florence Sheppard, Lee James Hanner, and George W. and Elsie R. Coulter. Visitation will be from 11 a.m. until a service to celebrate Waynes life at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, at Larry Taylor Funeral and Cremation Services. Burial will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 9, 2013, at Sarasota National Cemetery in Sarasota, Fla. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, with emphasis on head and neck cancer research. To express condolences to the family, please visit www.Ltaylorfuneral.com and sign the online guest book.Wayne M. Irons Sr.Wayne M. Irons Sr., 72, of Port Charlotte, Fla., passed away Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013. Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Port Charlotte Chapel.ENGLEWOOD Mary Jean BauerMary Jean Bummie (nee Haberberger) Bauer, 88, of Cape Haze, Fla., passed from this world Monday, Dec. 2, 2013, at Tidewell Hospice House in Venice, Fla. She was born Jan. 4, 1925, in St. Louis, Mo. Bummie is survived and lovingly remembered by her children, Richard Bauer of Wheaton, Ill., and Susan Bauer of Chicago, Ill.; grandson, Graham Rosby of Andover, Mass.; lifelong friend, Millie Soldano; cousin, Jean Schutt of St. Louis; daughter-inlaw, Donna Bauer; and son-in-law, Sam Rosby. For those who wish to memorialize Bummie, donations may be made to the Suncoast Humane Society, 6781 San Casa Drive, Englewood, FL 34224.Raymond Foster HarrisRaymond Foster Bud Harris, 88, died Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, at his home in Rotonda West, Fla. He was born May 16, 1925, in Streator, Ill., to Raymond and Josephine Harris. His family moved shortly afterward to Kansas. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1943, serving in the Pacic Theater during World War II. He loved playing golf and watching football. Bud was very friendly; everyone liked his humor and smiling face. He had a great heart. Bud was loved by all because of his quick wit and winning smile. He will be missed dearly. Bud and his rst wife, Cheryl Dereck, now deceased, had two children, Todd (Rhonda) Harris and Leslie Gomez. He and his wife of 32 years, Beverly, were blessed with a family of eight children; she is the mother of six children, Marijon (Ralph), Jeanne (Bill), Francine (Richard), Robert, Daniel and Ronald, now deceased; and they are grandparents to 19 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, at Hope Lutheran Church in Gulf Cove (Port Charlotte), Fla. In lieu of owers, memorials in Buds name would be appreciated to Hope Lutheran Church, 14200 Hopewell Ave., Port Charlotte, FL 33981.Judith A. PearceJudith A. Pearce, 71, of Rotonda West, Fla., died Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013. Arrangements are by Englewood Community Funeral Home Inc., with Private Crematory.NORTH PORT Patricia S. KingPatricia S. Patty King, 48, of North Port, Fla., died Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, after a tough twoyear battle she fought with cancer. Patty was born May 20, 1965, in San Jose, Calif. She was the very popular shop manager at Nicks Auto Clinic. Patty grew up in Sarasota, Fla., and was married for 31 years. She is survived by her husband, Nick King; children, Kirk and Cassie, all of North Port; brother, Steve Laskowsky of Oklahoma; and her parents, Pete and Monica Laskowsky of Murphy, N.C. A service will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, at Lighthouse Baptist Church, 14251 Chancellor Blvd., Port Charlotte (near North Port), Fla., followed by a get together at the King household. Anybody wishing to make a donation, please give to Lighthouse Baptist, for their work with the local youth; or your local nokill animal shelter.DESOTO Clement E. HutzelClement E. Hutzel, 94, of Arcadia, Fla., passed away Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013. He was born Aug. 28, 1919, in Deer Park, Ohio, to Joseph and Ida Speller Hutzel, the last living of eight siblings. Clement joined the U.S. Army and served as a Medic in the South Pacic, including the Philippines, during World War II. During his Tour of Duty, he received four Bronze Stars, a Combat Medical Badge, a Victory Medal, the Asiatic Pacic Theater Ribbon, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon and the American Theater Ribbon. His service to the people of the South Pacic spanned decades and blessed him with many friends along the way. After his service to our country, he returned to Ohio and became a Dairy Farmer (Hutzels Farms) and Breeder of Jersey Cattle for 49 years. Clement was a member of the VFW, the Knights of Columbus, the American Legion and the American Jersey Cattle Club. When he found time, he enjoyed golng. Clement is survived by his beloved wife of 40 years, Fern Logan Hutzel; sisters-in-law, Betty Hutzel and Patricia Hutzel, both of Ohio; and numerous nieces and nephews. A visitation will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., with a Rosary beginning at 7 p.m., Friday, Dec. 6, 2013, at Ponger-KaysGrady Funeral Home. The Funeral Mass will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, at St. Pauls Catholic Church, with Father Vincent Clemente ofciating. Burial will follow at Joshua Creek Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations in Clements name may be made to either: Typhoon Fund, c/o Diocese of Venice, 1000 Pinebrook Road, Venice, FL 34285; or to St. Josephs Indian School, 1301 N. Main St., Chamberlain, SD 57325. Online condolences can be made at www.ponger kaysgrady.com. Arrangements are by Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home, Arcadia.Thomas Newpor t Sr.Thomas Newport Sr, 88, of Lake Suzy, Fla., and formerly of Punta Gorda, Fla., passed away Monday, Dec. 2, 2013, at his home. He was born Aug. 29, 1925, in Bloomeld, N.J., the son of Walter and Mary Newport. Thomas formerly resided in the Blairstown, N.J., area. He served proudly in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Thomas retired from HoffmannLaRoche in Belvidere, N.J., after 18 years of service as a Safety specialist. Prior to that he was a dairy farmer. He is survived by his loving wife of 65 years, Helen Pat; daughter, Virginia (Raymond) Davis of Blairstown; son, Thomas (Joyce) Newport Jr. of Hardwick, N.J.; brother, Robert Newport of Toms River, N.J.; ve grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Thomas was preceded in death by his sister, Elizabeth Buckenmyer; and his parents. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 6, 2013, at San Antonio Catholic Church. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to San Antonio Catholic Church, St. Vincent de Paul Society, 24445 Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 33980; or the American Cancer Society, 922 Tamiami Trail, Unit C-2, Port Charlotte, FL 33953. Arrangements were made in Port Charlotte, Fla. OBITUARY POLICY Obituaries are accepted from funeral homes only. Theres no charge for publishing an abbreviated death notice. Full obituaries and repeat death notices will be subject to an advertising charge. Obituaries must be received by 2p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday publication. For Sunday publication deadline is noon on Saturday. For Monday publication deadline is noon on Sunday. In Loving Memories must be received by 2p.m. for Tuesday through Friday publication. For Saturday through Monday publication deadline is noon on Friday The American ag accompanying an obituary indicates a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to obituaries@sunletter.com. The delivery of 84,000 new residential recy cling carts throughout Charlotte County is complete three weeks ahead of schedule. The 64-gallon, yellow-lidded carts were provided at no cost to residents beginning Nov. 4. The roll-out wrapped up this week, prompting Waste Management and Charlotte County Solid Waste ofcials to claim success with the program. It went off without any major issues, concerns or delays, said Richard Allen, county solid waste operations manager. Allen added that the public seemed to welcome the new carts. The people Ive talked to say its about time, he said. Overall, people are happy. Compared with the previous 18-gallon bins, the wheeled carts are more convenient and easier to manage for residents, ofcials said. Todd Peres, senior district manager for Waste Management, hopes this will help increase the residential recycling rate, conserving resources and preserving landll capacity. Currently, recyclable materials account for 39 percent of all the household trash collected in Charlotte County. The federal government has set a recycling goal of 75 percent by 2020. These new carts provide a great oppor tunity for the residents of Charlotte County to recycle more, Peres said. Our next step in this process is more educational outreach to our residents to reduce contamination of items that do not belong in the recycling carts such as garden hoses, plastic bags, batteries and medical sharps that pose a serious safety hazard to our employees. If residents did not receive their recycling cart, or there was an issue with delivery, they should call 941-629-1106, or visit CharlotteCountyFL.gov to submit a replacement request.Email: groberts@sun-herald.comCharlotte closes lid on carts deliveryBy GARY ROBERTSSTAFF WRITERMedicare Assistance & More todayMedicare Assistance & More is held from 10 a.m. to noon Thursdays in the North Port Library conference room, 13800 S. Tamiami Trail. The library offers one-on-one Medicare counseling sessions with a trained counselor. All services are free and unbiased. Review your Medicare Part D, Advantage and/or Medigap plans. To make an appointment, call 1-866-413-5337.Bluegrass band to performThe Banyon Bluegrass Band will perform a free concert from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday on the historic Train Dock, 1009 Taylor Road, Punta Gorda. Bring a chair, and sit back and enjoy the music. The Depot Museum and Mall will be open. For more information, call 941-639-6774. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS 50461622 JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A. LAW OFFICE JAMES W. MALLONEE PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM 9 46 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953 901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285 (941) 207-2223 www.jameswmallonee.com (941) 206-2223 50451508 TAYLOR FUNERAL and Cremation Services L arry www.LTaylorFuneral.com Now Available to you 24 hrs A Day At Your Convenience Old Fashioned Service at a Price You Can Afford A sk Larry:I m a v e t e r a n b u t c a n w e Im a veteran, but can we s t i l l u s e a N a t i o n a l C e m e t e r y still use a National Cemetery i f m y w i f e d i e s f i r s t ? if my wife dies first? Yes, you can, and the cost is still free for the cemetery lot, marker, vault, and opening/ closing. We believe in giving straight answers to your questions.N o b o d y l i k e s u n e x p e c t e d s u r p r i s e s Nobody likes unexpected surprises. 1515 Tamiami Trl, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 (941) 833-0600 2002-2013 ztd we a. ba4ama 1, Lend"i'mg wee Nobody fi ke: M0lezODed'1te&M Andd zurptim.

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Our Town Page 6 ENC www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE Jonathan David Hubbard, 31, 1200block of Price Circle NW, Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts of possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $6,000. Jason Tymauldin Dunlap, 31, of Naples. Charges: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of less than 3 grams of synthetic marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of a county ordinance. Bond: $3,250. Courtney Lashay-Marie Dennis, 23, of Miramar, Fla. Charge: battery. Bond: none. John Keith Ewing, 49, 23100 block of Seneca Ave., Port Charlotte. Charge: disorderly intoxication. Bond: $500. The North Port Police Department reported the following arrest: Heather Michelle Russell, 41, 4100block of Pomeroy St., North Port. Charges: grand theft and contempt (original charge: driving without a vaild license). Bond: $2,000. The Sarasota County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: William Edward Hoatson Jr., 60, of Venice. Charge: open container. Bond: $120. Thomas Nestor Jr., 28, 400 block of Bayside Lane, Nokomis. Charge: possession of narcotic equipment. Bond: $500. Sean Albinski, 20, 2100 block of Chenille Cort, Venice. Charge: violation of probation (original charges: possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and possession of drug paraphernalia). Bond: none. Joshua Jade Barmes, 28, 19400 block of McMullin St., Port Charlotte. Charge: contempt (original charge: driving with a suspended license second conviction). Bond: $2,000. Joshua James Correa, 25, 5100 block of Melbourne St., Port Charlotte. Charge: Charlotte County warrant for driving with an expired license for more than six months. Bond: $2,000. Katie Lyn Atwood, 27, 900 block of W. Xanadu Ave., Venice. Charge: violation of probation (original charges: possession of cocaine and petty theft). Bond: none. Christopher Zebley, 27, 100 block of Lakeview Lane, Englewood. Charge: assault. Bond: $10,000. Compiled by Adam Kreger and Drew WinchesterARRESTSFROM PAGE 3 the Navy Junior ROTC program. Im not sure how many years weve been doing the Christmas tree sale, Harrison said. But its been a long time, and weve never had any problems. The Fraser rs are purchased and shipped in from North Carolina. They range in height from 3 to 13 feet, and go for between $25 and $250. Ofcials estimate the theft to have cost fundraisers around $1,000. Thats probably conservative, Lemon Bay principal Bob Bedford said of the estimated loss. Sales were doing well. NJROTC instructor William Rennie said he was surprised when he heard of the theft. This is a third of the prot for the ROTC, he said. Well have to nd other fundraisers. We will do it somehow. Nov. 26, the fundraising group received the rst shipment of trees. All 130 were accounted for when they arrived to the sales lot on the schools campus. The lot was closed Nov. 27 and 28, but has been in business since then. Sunday, a second tree count was taken factoring in units sold and at least 21 trees were found to be missing. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Ofce investigated. Authorities said they found no sign of forced entry into a locked, fenced-in area where the trees were kept. There were no witnesses. CCSO spokeswoman Debbie Bowe said Wednesday afternoon she hadnt heard of any of the trees being recovered. The school had almost sold out or been robbed of the rst 130 trees, so a shipment of about 170 more arrived Wednesday afternoon to replenish the lot. Customers can pur chase a Christmas tree by visiting the tent near the tennis courts at the school, 2201 Placida Road, Englewood. The tent is open from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Anyone with infor mation concerning the tree theft should call the Sheriffs Ofce at 941-639-2101, or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477). Anyone who would like to donate to the fundraising effort can mail a check to LBHS Project Graduation, P.O. Box 191, Englewood, FL 34295; or call the school at 941-474-7702. Staff writer Steve Reilly contributed to this report.Email: akreger@sun-herald.comTREESFROM PAGE 1HOW TO HELPBuy a tree: Visit the tent from 4p.m. to 7p.m. Monday to Friday, and 9a.m. to 7p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at the school, near the tennis courts, at 2201 Placida Road, Englewood. Send a check: LBHS Project Graduation, P.O. Box 191, Englewood, FL 34295; or call 941-474-7702 for more info. Turn in the thieves: Call the Charlotte County Sheriffs Office at 941-639-2101, or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477). With nary an electronic in sight, except for parents cell phones out for picture-taking, tactile objects took center stage. Things like pebbles, seashells, feathers and stone crab claws were provided in the screened classroom, along with magnifying glasses. When it was time to move the class outside, the children became the tour leaders. Look what I found! Whats that? Those words became the battle cries of the day as the group moved out into the preserve, picking up sea grape leaves and pointing out their observations. Martha Clemente, a nat uralist at the center, said she enjoys experiencing nature with young children, because kids this age see things that we dont really notice. By far the favorites of the day were the gumbo limbo tree, which drew the children to it almost magnetically with its peeling bark and tall exposed roots, and a gopher tortoise burrow under a rock. I love seeing young people out here experiencing nature because nowadays, its all computers and phones, said Jim Thomson, chief executive ofcer for the center. Thomson said the center has a variety of programs for people of all ages that it provides for free. The centers activities are sponsored by a grant from the Mosaic Co. Foundation. Without them wed really be shorthanded in providing these services to the community, Thomson said. Tramontana said she has room for more parents with toddlers to take advantage of Youth Children and Nature which will happen at 10 a.m. the second Tuesday of the each month, from January through May. The program is free, but parents should register in advance by going to http://childrenandnature. eventbrite.com, or calling 941-575-5435.Email: iross@sun-herald.comNATUREFROM PAGE 1YOUNG CHILDREN AND NATURE DATESWhat: A nature lesson and morning of activities for children ages 2to 5 and their parents. When: The second Tuesday of every month at 10a.m. from January through May. Where: Alligator Creek Preserve, 10941 Burnt Store Road, Punta Gorda. Cost: Participation is free, but preregistration is requested so the center can prepare materials for the children. Register: http://childrenandnature.eventbrite.com or 941-575-5435. SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSSLeft: Mother and daughter Allison and Haven Turner, 2, glue animal cutouts into a booklet at the Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center. Haven is learning to classify animals based on whether they are arboreal, aquatic or terrestrial.Constance said the authority has a healthy reserve fund and should draw money from it to pay for repairs. He said the water authority wants Charlotte to pay a much higher rate through the rebuild project in order to force the county into a new common-rate system. Currently, Charlotte pays a lower rate than other municipalities because it has been there the longest and contributed the most. Sarasota users pay a higher rate to draw water from the plant. Creating a commonrate system would make both rates meet in the middle. Constance maintains it would be an unfair increase for Charlotte water users, who already have paid millions. Constance said his commission recently voted not to participate in any discussions about common rates until issues with the rebuild project are addressed. The authority set three workshops to hash out common rates. Patterson urged Charlotte County to send representatives to those workshops because it may help the situation. However Constance said after the meeting, They have given us no other way out than litigation (as Charlotte previously threatened to do). Patrick Lehman, authority executive director, who was given a 3 percent raise by the board during the meeting, said Charlotte could use its $2.2 million in credits from the authority, and the cost would be only about $5 million for the facility repairs. If you divide that out over 20 years, its only pennies a day, Lehman said.Email: eallen@sun-herald.comWATERFROM PAGE 1PROTECTING NORTH PORTS INTERESTSDuring public comment in Wednesdays meeting, Mayor Jim Blucher of North Port a nonvoting member of the Peace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority addressed board members about a the citys amended contract with the authority. The document was revised several times and agreed upon by attorneys only just before the meeting began. The agreement secured the citys $3.6 million in credits from the authority. The North Port City Commission could choose to use that money toward the $869,892 it owes for the rebuild project. We wanted to make sure that money was not used for anyone but North Port water users, Blucher said. The city does not have a seat on the water authority, but monitors the boards activities closely because it impacts North Port. If the board voted to move forward with the rebuild contract before resolving the issue with North Port, it would have violated the interlocal agreement with (the city), Blucher said. He thanked the board for taking care of North Port first. I applaud the city manager and his staff for catching this back in September, Blucher said. We see the struggles Charlotte County is going through. Were glad we have resolved our issue. Otherwise, we were ready for a dispute resolution with the board. North Port City Commissioner Cheryl Cook, who is Bluchers alternate representing the city, attended the meeting in Bradenton, along with City Manager Jonathan Lewis. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFSBehavioral Health seeks guardian advocatesCharlotte Behavioral Health Care Crisis Stabilization Unit is in extreme need of guardian advocates. GAs will be appointed by the court to act as an informed decision maker for a person who has been deemed incompetent to consent to his own mental health treatment. They will serve on a voluntary basis as needed for patients who do not have a close family member willing or able to make medical and psychiatric treatment decisions on their behalf. GAs usually are granted authority to provide or revoke consent for general medical and psychiatric medications. They will seek to provide informed decisions regarding a patients treatment, and protect the patients rights. GAs are required to be trained in duties and submit to a background investigation. They serve approximately three to four hours monthly, depending on the clients needs. For more information, call Jessica K. Boles at 941-347-6407.Wading trips gear upThe Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center Inc. will conduct free Seagrass Adventure Estuary Wading Trips at Cedar Point Environmental Park, 2300 Placida Road, Englewood. The trips are set for 9 a.m. today and Wednesday, and Dec. 26 and 31. After an introductory program about aquatic environments, participants will walk a short distance to Lemon Bay where, using dip nets and hand viewers, they will wade into the shallow waters in search of the plants and animals that reside there. This hands-on activity is both educational and fun for people of all ages. Participation is limited, therefore preregistration is necessary for this free program. All children must be accompanied by an adult. For more information and to register, call 941-475-0769. Visit www. ChecFlorida.org for additional wading trip dates in 2014. Seagrass Adventures are made available with funding support from the Mosaic Company Foundation, in cooperation with Charlotte County Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources, and are conducted by CHEC.Sandy Claws Beach Run setThe Sarasota County Parks and Recreationsponsored 37th annual Sandy Claws Beach Run is scheduled for Dec. 14 at Siesta Beach, 948 Beach Road, Sarasota. Race-day registration is $30 for the 5K race and $20 for the fun run. Race-day registration begins at 7 a.m. The fun run begins at 8 a.m., with the 5K starting at 8:20 a.m. The event, sanctioned and co-sponsored by the Manasota Track Club, will use MyLaps bib timing. Those interested in participating may preregister online at parksonline. scgov.net or complete and return a registration form available at any county recreation center, library or government building. Awards will be presented to rstthrough sixthplace nishers in each age group. Firstthrough third-place nishers will receive trophies ,and fourththrough sixthplace nishers will receive ribbons. All registered 5K participants will be entered into a rafe drawing for prizes. For more information, call the Sarasota County Call Center at 941-861-5000 or visit www.scgov.net.Current events conversationA Current Events/ Cultural Commingle Conversation Group meets from 10 a.m. to noon Thursdays in the North Port Library Juliano Room, 13800 S. Tamiami Trail. On the first, second and third Thursdays of the month, bring a news article you would like to discuss, or just come catch up with whats going on in the world, in a fun setting. On the fourth Thursday, come share what youre reading, a film or PBS show youre enthused about, or a recent trip youve taken. The group always ends with a joke, so you can bring one of those too. Moderated by Pat Petersmark. Open to all. For more information, call 941-423-0598.Oh, Just Sit!The H2U (Health to You) program at Englewood Community Hospital will offer Oh, Just Sit! chair exercise classes at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Suncoast Auditorium, 779 Medical Drive, Englewood. Flex, stretch, and tone your muscles to music. The halfhour activity is peppy and energetic, yet caneand walker-friendly. For more information and to register for the class, call ConsultA-Nurse at 941-473-3919.Time to decorate cookiesThe Punta Gorda Historical Society will play host to a cookie-decorating event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at the History Park, 501 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Santa will be on-site at this event, which will be held in the historic Price House. Admission is free, and the public is welcome. For more information, call 941-380-6814.Wreaths Across AmericaAlmost 6,800 wreaths are set to be placed on veterans graves Dec. 14 at the Sarasota National Cemetery for Wreaths Across America. Members of AMVETS Post 312 in North Port are inviting others to meet at the post, 7050 Chancellor Blvd., at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 14 and car pool to the location (in uniform if you have served) to help. Post 312 sponsored 200 wreaths; 100 through the posts recent golf outing and 100 from the Sons of AMVETS Post 312. Wreaths will arrive at 9:30 a.m. and placement begins immediately. A ceremony will follow the placement. For more information, call 941-429-5403. 49ier

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The Sun /Thursday, December 5, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net ENC Our Town Page 7 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS Look for a third crossword in the Sun Classified section. SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTSFlorida Department of Transportation crews were busy all day Wednesday cleaning up the mess left by Mondays four-vehicle crash, which ruptured a dump trucks gas tank, spilling about 80 gallons of diesel fuel just o U.S. 41 on West Tarpon Boulevard. Workers rst had to scrape o the asphalt that absorbed the fuel, which causes it to soften over time. Then they grind up the material before loading it onto a conveyor belt into waiting trucks to haul it away. A new patch of asphalt then is laid. The cleanup, which created trac backups on southbound U.S. 41, should be nished by today.Fuel cleanup squeezes traffic PUNTA GORDA For some folks, theres no sweeter sound than the roar of commercials jets landing and taking off from the Punta Gorda Airport. City Councilwoman Nancy Prakfe and a group of residents in the Seminole Lakes and Burnt Store Meadows communities arent part of that group. There are some people who say, I love the sound of money, Prafke said. But when you hear those planes right over your house, its not so pleasant. Prafke, who lives in Burnt Store Isles, supports the airport because of the many benets it brings to the city. But she also understands the legitimate gripes residents have with noise that not only potentially impacts their property values, but also directly impacts their quality of life. We need to be advocates for the airport. Its a huge economic engine for our community, Prafke said at City Council meeting Wednesday. But we need to work with the airport to achieve a win-win situation so that (residents) feel (airport ofcials) are listening. We need to be working together. What I dont want to see happen is upset residents trying to create havoc when, in fact, if were partners together working through the situation, we can try to achieve the best possible solution, she said. In September, after months of complaining from area residents, airport ofcials entered into an agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration control tower in Fort Myers, to redirect trafc around the residential communities of Burnt Store Meadows and Seminole Lakes. Punta Gorda Airport Executive Director Gary Quill said that hasnt been happening in the last two weeks. Airport ofcials will have a private meeting with FAA ofcials from Fort Myers Monday to discuss the reasons why, and expect to update the City Council next month. Our preference for take-off, candidly when they can do it is (for aircraft) to take off southwest, turn to the left, and go up the middle of the state, Quill said. It dodges everywhere we think its a touchdown. I will tell you we will be following up