Citation
SOURCE Magazine, Spring 2019 (Special Issue)

Material Information

Title:
SOURCE Magazine, Spring 2019 (Special Issue)
Alternate title:
Source The Magazine of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
Creator:
George A. Smathers Libraries ( issuing body )
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Florida
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
One online resource. : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Academic libraries -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville ( lcsh )
George A. Smathers Libraries ( fast )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
"SOURCE offers the reader an opportunity to view remarkable materials from our collections, learn about our innovative research and collaborations both in the Libraries and with other colleagues throughout the University and beyond, and explore highlights of exceptional faculty and student services provided by the Smathers Libraries". ( , )
Scope and Content:
This title is the companion publication to "News from the SOURCE", primarily published in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Fall 2018
General Note:
"The magazine of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries".
General Note:
Description based on: Fall 2018; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Fall 2018.
Creation/Production Credits:
Editors: April Hines, Barbara Hood, Jane Morgan-Daniel, Lila Sadkin, Suzanne Stapleton; Designer: Ellen Knudson; LibraryPress@UF Editor-in-Chief, Laurie N. Taylor; LibraryPress@UF Director, Judith C. Russell

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative License. This license allows others to download this work and share them with others as long as they mention the author and link back to the author, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
Resource Identifier:
1051213143 ( OCLC )
036380527 ( ALEPH )
Classification:
Z733.F56 C32 ( lcc )

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Related Item:
News from the source

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I am pleased to welcome you to our second issue, of SOURCE: the Magazine of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, published by the LibraryPress@UF. This is an open access journal, distributed primarily in electronic format twice a year. SOURCE research and collaborations conducted both in the Libraries and with other This special issue focuses on the Baldwin Library of Historical Childr ens Literature, with stories of its founding, student essays sharing baldwin), including a curated collection of books on Alice in Wonderland W e welcome your feedback and ideas. Please let us know what you SOURCE.JUDITH C. RUSSELLDean of University Libraries 22 DIRECTOR:JUDITH C. RUSSELLEDITOR-IN-CHIEF: LAURIE N. TAYLORMANAGING EDITOR & DESIGNER: TRACY E. MACKAY-RATLIFF COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR: BARBARA HOOD GUEST EDITOR & CONTRIBUTOR: SUZAN A. ALTERI ASSOCIATE EDITORS: PERRY COLLINS, APRIL HINES BARBARA HOOD, CHELSEA JOHNSTON ELLEN KNUDSON JANE MORGAN-DANIEL, SUZANNE C. STAPLETONCONTRIBUTORS: RAE X. YAN, HUGH HICKMAN, CHLOE KUKA SOFIA PADRN, TIFFANY TESKA, PERRY COLLINS PO Box 117000, Gainesville, FL 32611 352.273.2635 ISSN (PRINT): 2576-5817 ISSN (ONLINE): 2576-5825 SUBSCRIBE TO SOURCE:RSVP@UFLIB.UFL.EDU UFDC.UFL.EDU/SOURCE SPRING 2019 VOLUME I, ISSUE 2

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2 FRONT COVER: W. H. Walker (1923) INSIDE FRONT COVER, RABBIT: John Tenniel (1885) INSIDE FRONT COVER, ALLIGATOR: Charles Robinson (c. 1907) TOP, CAT: Arthur Rackham (1907) RIGHT, ALICE: Mabel Lucie Attwell (c. 1910)3 SUZAN A. ALTERI Curiouser and curiouser about Ruth Marie Baldwin? A journey through her life as a collector.8 Researching the Golden Age of Children s Literature in the Baldwin R AE X. YAN, PhD of Childrens Literature Course in 2018. Selection of student essays to follow. 12 HUGH HICKMAN Isabel Frances Bellows A Deadly Feud and CHLOE KUKA Work and Play: The Finger Plays of Edith Goodyear Alger SOFIA P ADRN Sources of Power in Alices Adventures in Wonderland TIFFANY TESKA The Dream World of Wonderland25 SUZAN A. ALTERI 28 PERRY COLLINS SPRING 2019 VOLUME I, ISSUE 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

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3SPRING 2019 Baldwin Book Collecting WHEN RUTH MARIE BALDWIN FIRST STARTED COLLECTING CHILDRENS BOOKS IN 1954, SHE HAD NO IDEA THE JOURNEY WOULD TAKE HER ON BUYING TRIPS ALL OVER THE US AND THE UK, OR THAT SHE WOULD AMASS ONE OF THE LARGEST COLLECTIONS OF CHILDRENS LITERATURE IN THE WORLD BY 1977. in the Baldwin Library BY SUZAN A. ALTERI CURATOR Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature

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4 Ruth Baldwins collection, which numbered In the more romantic writings about book collect sentiments on his own book collecting, recognizing

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5SPRING 2019 stereotypes of book collectors, in other ways she was the antithesis of the idealized collector with a no-nonsense approach cally, the origin of the Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literatures is not with Baldwin herself, but with her mother, present to her in 1953. Baldwin was 35 years old and working on 1953, Ruth wrote her mother that she was perishing to see the Although Baldwin was born into a family of collecthose childrens books. Her father, Dr. Thomas W. Baldwin, couldnt resist the bundles of books her mother sent less because she felt sentimental about her childhood and more because they represented an area of publishing that was full of small bibliographic problems. As her mother wrote to her BOTTOM LEFT: C. Collodi, Author / Illustrator (1923) The Baldwin Library realizes the whole

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6 and other out of the way bookshops. This was a trick she had learned from her mother, who bought from markets around London or in the barrows outside the Daily Worker. Her collecting philosophy also focused less on aesthetics, scholarship, or teaching, and more on the practicalities of purchasing large quantities of books on a female professors small as her library grew that she looked back and realized she was as a source for research was that she didnt want to be linked with her father. While other collectors mediated of childrens literature or materials to use in teaching for children during the long 19th century. As Carolyn Clugston Michaels summed up, the Baldwin library realizes the whole world of the 19th century childhood. she was inspired to write about American childrens books. Behold the Child: American Children and their Books, 1621-1922. [your books] that originally made me want to write something about American childrens books; [the] book owes its whole world of the 19th century childhood. Carolyn Clugston Michaels TOP RIGHT: Unknown, Illustrator Lothrop, Publisher (1885) BOTTOM RIGHT: Arthur Rackham (1907)

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7 BRINGING TOGETHER OBJECTS THAT ARE WORTHLESS ON THEIR OWN YET PRICELESS WHEN PUT TOGETHER. Benjamin, Walter. Illuminations, 1969. The Lion and the Unicorn, 2011. Michaels, Carolyn Clugston. Childrens Book Collecting 1993. Childrens Literature Association Quarterly, 2014. Baldwin also assisted bibliographer Marjorie Moon with her work, Benjamin Tabarts Juvenile Library: A Bibliography of Books for Children Published, Written, Edited and Sold by Mr. Tabart, 1801-1820, another While these small, perhaps accidental, childhood studies, it was largely the work of women, who realized that literature for children and youth was an important aspect of cultural history. Baldwins contributed much of the academic legitimacy for the and conferring upon them special (primarily historical By bringing together objects that are worthless on their own yet priceless when put together, childrens literature helped build, and now continue childrens literature. And the founding of these history, in particular the how and the why of building social and cultural history of our nation. 4

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8 Researching the Golden Age of Childrens Literature in the BaldwinBY RAE X. YAN, PhD ABOVE, ALICE: Mabel Lucie Attwell (c.1910) ABOVE, RABBIT: Blanche McManus (c.1899) ABOVE, MADHATTER: Mabel Lucie Attwell (c.1910) ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, of English in British Literature 1830-1900 admittedly crustier historical period of British and American childrens literature from the mid-1800s to early-1900s centered around genreMowgli and Baloo, Peter Pan and Wendy, and, of course, good old Pooh and Piglet. While a good number of in reconnecting with these classic characters, many more discussed their curiosity about another central research in the Baldwin Library of Historical issues of childrens literary magazines such as The Brownies Book and St. Nicholas Magazine) and compose a scholarly introduction for a work that sparked their interest from like a troupe of Alices, into the world of the Baldwin collection to bring back new stories about childrens literature turned out to be the

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9 for many of the students in the course. The process was entirely new to many introductions composed by literary with background such a scholarly introduction, students needed to conresearch into the biographical, historical and theoretical connections behind these works of childrens literature. The four scholarly intr oductions featured in this issue of SOURCE Library, and research librarians on campus, including American Literature. These introductions were selected for this issue of SOURCE and published in full on the to each other, and for their multi-layered approaches to thinking about the historical childrens literary works that we encountered in the Baldwin Library. of poetry for children commonly found in childrens literary magazines like St. Nicholas. The poems TOP LEFT: John Tenniel (1899)

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10 benign in their depictions of seemingly humdrum can directly transmit a series of sharp cultural lessons St. Nicholas Magazine in Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Ms. Teskas The Dream World of Wonderland are two projects Alices Adventures in Wonderland by comparing and contrasting the narraMaecenas Press-Random House edition of Alice Padrns introduction, Alice locates four forms power takes in Wonderland and the ways in which these forms such as the Queen of Hearts. Ms. Teskas study of Alice desire in the production of art. introductions, many students commented on how the project helped them to synthesize their academic and personal interests. Most of the projects for the course drew on students past knowledge and practices education, political science, and psychology and AABOVE:

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11SPRING 2019 This project makes me feel like a detective. Ive found all these clues and now Im showing how I solved the mystery. W ith a collection as sizable as the Baldwins the second largest historical childrens literature and thereby make a real impact on broader public the Baldwin Library will continue to grow and to public attention and into the hands of readers. by taking a turn down the rabbit hole of the Baldwin collection. 4 TOP LEFT: Arthur Rackham (1907) CENTER: John Tenniel (1899) BOTTOM LEFT CORNER: Mabel Lucie Attwell (c.1910) As the semester concluded and the introductions were drafted, several students repeated the same statement about this kind of practice:

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12 Bellows brief poem details a contentious interaction between to the Bumblebees statement and upon equally insulting the fat old creature, challenges him to a duel. Bellows blends discourses on the cultural phenomenon of the duel and the role of the police as authority into a cute, 26-line jingle, accompanied by charming anthropomorphized illustrations of the insects, complete with hats and canes. By analyzing the conception through a historical and cultural lens, circumstances of late nineteenth-century America that inform the subject matter of Bellows poetic work. BY HUGH HICKMAN From Aesops Fables to Peter and Wendy, childrens literature combines the innocent, exuberant state of childhood with the grit and grime of reality, often introducing and imprinting upon youth grave concepts beyond their grasp such as crime and death. Isabel Frances Bellows A Deadly Feud is just such an example, appearing during the heyday of the Golden Age of Childrens literature in the 9th issue of the 14th volume of St. Nicholas Magazine published in 1887. STUDENT ESSAY Golden Age of Childrens Literature Course

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13SPRING 2019 in Bellows piece might be consider ed benign or a trumpery, a rhyme to satisfy children paired with The Wind in the Willows hat, straw and law, and tones and bones the subject matter of the poem deals with decades phenomenon of dueling, an honor-based system lation, Bellows work opens the door for discussing to children may mean for many who thought they communicating this knowledge about dueling culture and police rule, the implications and audience in this case, upon the malleable minds of American children, who are young enough to be enamored by basic rhymes and talking animals. With characters wielding pistols and whips, arguing hurt one another or take anothers life, all within regulation of American law, the readers of A Deadly underlying social institutions. its rhyming bugs is an unnoticed, largely forgotten piece of childrens literature. Appearing once in a

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14 magazine in 1887, the work has an enchanting and the implications of the plot, an entire realm but display a brand of machismo unique to of control interacting teach children about a the death while the greater physical threat of the American reality into which children are brought. The implications of including the two cultural structures, designed to restrict and psychoanalytical readings for characters and order through the lens of a child. While perhaps 4 St. Nicholas Magazine, Vol. 14, No. 9, 1887.

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15SPRING 2019 visual art produced in collaboration with published in St. Nicholas Magazine I n both her work and her writings, between the illustrations and the text as well Y et as much as these two works antici The Finger Plays of Edith Goodyear AlgerBY CHLOE KUKA STUDENT ESSAY Golden Age of Childrens Literature Course

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16

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17SPRING 2019 patterns, they were also shaped by the ethos of the publication St. Nicholas Magazine Mary Mapes Dodge, the editor of the magazine, played a central role in the propagation of certain ideologies St. Nicholas Magazine were a garden, traces of any moral messages were to be by the brilliance of lurid able, unglamorous part of the childs literary landscape, tolerable only when concealed from the readers immediate detection. C hildren who engage in the fresh dampness of clean clothes, feel the warmth of the sun, hear the whoosh of the wind tousling the clothes on the line. 4A Primer of Work and Play 1901. HathiTrust. (1895)

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18 hanks to Disney, it is probably safe to assume that most Americans publication of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. fantastical world, Wonderland. While there she encounters food that makes her grow and shrink, animals who speak, an unceasingly outraged Queen, Due to W onderlands eccentricity, Alices journey has lent itself Alice BY SOFIA PADRNAlices Adventures in Wonderland CHECKMATE : TOP: John Tenniel (1885) STUDENT ESSAY Golden Age of Childrens Literature Course

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19SPRING 2019 In contrast to these dreamlike images, Alice is dependably recognizable as she skips rope through every page. AABOVE: OPPOSITE PAGE: John Tenniel (1899)

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20 from John Tenniels black and white illustrations political cartoonist at Punch magazine for decades, century independent of Alice. His contribution to what would become one of the most well-known childrens books in history established not only the artists own legacy. Alices original art interprets Carrolls words literally and depicts the fantastical bold colors melt together across blurred lines, present lends to the depiction of Alices constant growing and shrinking throughout Carrolls Alice was an through a surrealist lens as it setting of Wonderland, replete with surreal situations, but also a this world despite, and perhaps because of, its absurdity. Carrolls discussion of time in the and childlike nature is consistently depicted in seems to remind readers to look at Wonderland with all the open-mindedness of a child. While such imagery of childish innocence Alice illustrapower is a central concern for the inhabitants of Wonderland and there are many sources of power from which people draw to obtain and maintain or the awareness of facts accumulated either through the growth of knowledge may correlate with the Alice reminds readers that one does not guarantee the other. Another source of power that Alice Whether it be a royal title or a comfortable spot in the upper class, a persons social status is often cant source of power in Alice, particularly in respect to a persons physical size when greater than that of their it is largely determined through hereditary genetics. This source of all indicators of power, but Alice suggests that these traditional sources merely create a temporary illusion with sustainable power. Produced nearly 100 years after Alice depicting the irrationality of Wonderland through Alice is dependably recognizable as she skips rope 4

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21SPRING 2019 In Alices Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll ideas regarding the nature of dreams. While the original illustrations of Carrolls work in the 1969 Maegenus Press edition of Alice early twentieth century and focused on new forms dreams allow for a better understanding of how to analyze Alices Adventures in Wonderland as a whole. Accor ding to Carroll, the dream world is one that maintains autonomy from ones conscious reality. The Dream World of BY TIFFANY TESKA STUDENT ESSAY Golden Age of Childrens Literature Course TOP LEFT, ALICE:

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22 This notion of the dream world being its own, separate space is constantly mirrored one of her lessons from the real world, the lesson is presented as parody or distortion within the realm of Wonderland, which Alice about his education, he parodies the and Derision. Carrolls distortion of these mathematic subjects and formal education emphasizes his ideas regarding the autonomous nature of the dream world. Carr olls ideas about dreams are further 1969 edition of Alices Adventures in Wonderland. The surreal images created by Dali smoothly complement Carrolls beliefs regarding the independent realm of dreams. Alice lends itself The Manifesto of Surrealism. OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM LEFT: Unknown, Illustrator Lothrop, Publisher (1898) TOP LEFT, MOCK TURTLE: John Tenniel (1899) TOP RIGHT:

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23SPRING 2019 Caterpillar, a prominent depiction of Alice and the Caterpillar which emphasizes the dichotomy between the two the dream world of Wonderland. her identity through his use of abstract color washes and bleeding lines, which illustrate the capricious nature of Wonderland. Her sharp form colorful form of the Caterpillar, emphasizes the distinction between the real world and the dream world. a real and dream world, his integrated illustration of the two realms implies that there is a common ground between dreaming and being awake. depictions of the interactions between both realms. His illustrations emphasize

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24 Alice. The Looking Glass: New Perspectives on Childrens Literature. 2011. OPPOSITE PAGE AND TOP RIGHT: the ability of the dream world to mirror the situations and characters of reality, while still maintaining their own aesthetic look and agency. Thr ough the characterization of Alice as Carrolls dream child in conjunction with the of Alices Adventures in Wonderland of the nature of dreams in this work. ideas regarding the autonomous nature of dreams; his balance of forms highlights the dichotomy between reality and dreams. with tapping into the unconscious complements the arbitrary and nonsensical world of Wonderland that Carroll fabricates. 4

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25SPRING 2019 Undergraduate student internships focus more on the inner workings of special humanities work that bridges the gap between academic and community work. in the Libraries: INTERNSHIPS THE BALDWIN LIBRARY OF HISTORICAL CHILDRENS LITERATURE HAS OFFERED UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT INTERNSHIPS SINCE 2012 AND GRADUATE INTERNSHIPS SINCE 2015. BY SUZAN A. ALTERI BELOW: CURATOR Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature

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26 Movable and Toy Booksne of the hallmarks of the Baldwin Library is its large collection of pop-up, and toy books. But since they are tion. Brooks also created useful categories for books and suggested the acquisition of new titles to further enhance the Baldwin Library. Reading and Publishing in 2018. Although her internship ended in early 2018, Brooks has continued to work with the Libraries to continue a long-term digitization project 4 EMILY BROOKS INTERN Curatorial and Collection Development ABOVE LEFT: Julian Wehr (1944) LEFT CENTER AND BOTTOM: Lothar Meggendorfer (1901) INTERNSHIPSin the Libraries:

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27SPRING 2019 INTERNSHIPSin the Libraries: books related to the Caribbean and especially Cuba. Carper conducted in-depth bibliographical research into the Baldwin Librarys historical holdings of childrens literature about the Caribbean and prioritized titles for digitization and including annotations, to facilitate use of these materials and culture books written by British and American authors with a background into how special collections operate of bibliography skills when conducting humanities research. 4Historical Caribbean Childrens Literature KELSEY CARPER INTERN Curatorial and Bibliographical LEFT AND ABOVE: Daniel Defoe, Author Willy Pogny, Illustrator (1914) LEFT: Author Illustrator (1965)

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28 BY PERRY COLLINS On January 1, 2019, thousands of books, works of visual art were added to the trove of cultural resources available for all of us to use without copyright restrictions. Known collectively as the public domain, such works are free to share in the classroom, republish in anthologies, adapt for the stage or screen, and translate into new languages. A growing public domain supports the UF George A. Smathers Libraries mission as we digitize and share our collections online with a worldwide audience. SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS LIBRARIAN Digital Partnerships and Strategies Department TOP LEFT: TOP RIGHT: MIDDLE LEFT: (1923) MIDDLE RIGHT: Author / Illustrator (1923)

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29 law has allowed published works to enter the rules applies to older unpublished materials such as family photographs and correspondence.) The freeze dates back to 1998, when passage protections to titles published from 1923 to 1977. Cane, and Charlie Chaplins The Pilgrim 95 years after their initial release. The illustrations on these pages showcase just a handful of the titles in the Baldwin Library to adapt and build upon. A 1923 edition of Carlo Collodis Pinocchio features lush artwork St. Nicholas Magazine Robert Frost campus in the 1940s The Pilgrim (1923) TOP RIGHT: Thornton W. Burgess, Author / Harrison Cady, Illustrator (1923) OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP LEFT: Author / Illustrator (1923) OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP MIDDLE: OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP RIGHT: C. Collodi, Author / Richardson, Illustrator (1923) OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM LEFT: Author Illustrator (1923) OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM RIGHT: (1923) Buster Bears series includes work by Harrison Cady, the illustrator behind the Peter Rabbit comic strip As copyrights er subset of the Baldwin Librarys collections will enter the public domain. While titles such as A.A. Milnes Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) and Margaret Wise Browns Goodnight Moon obscure. With the lapse will feature a broader swath of the collection that sheds light on the ways in which childrens literature has entertained, instructed, and 4

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WITH THE LAPSE IN COPYRIGHT, THE UF DIGITAL COLLECTIONS WILL FEATURE A BROADER SWATH OF THE COLLECTION THAT SHEDS LIGHT ON THE WAYS IN WHICH CHILDRENS LITERATURE HAS ENTERTAINED, INSTRUCTED, AND REFLECTED CULTURAL ATTITUDES OVER TIME.

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SOURCE MAGAZINE OFFERS AN EXCLUSIVE VIEW INTO THE REMARKABLE MATERIALS, EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT AND FACULTY OUTREACH, AND INNOVATIVE RESEARCH THAT IS AT THE HEART OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES.UFDC.UFL.EDU/SOURCE RSVP@UFLIB.UFL.EDU SPRING 2019