Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00474

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PAGE 1

D o u b l e r a i n b o w Double rainbow By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netLate last week, a no swim advisory was issued for Shell Point Beach by the states Department of Health due to unsafe levels of enteric bacteria found in the water. According to the countys Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez, water quality testing is done every other week on beach water around the state. In this particular case, said Juarez, the tests were done in Franklin County and taken to a lab in Tallahassee where they were analyzed. Juarez said that such tests used to be done more frequently, but due to frequent low levels of harmful bacteria, the state reduced testing to its current rate of once every two weeks. Our beaches are normally very safe,Ž said Juarez. This is the “ rst time in quite some time that we have had to issue a no swim advisory.Ž He went on to say that a lot of beaches along the gulf coast have ran into issues lately … a phenomena which he says is most likely attributed to the amount of rain the area has seen lately. Juarez speculated that copious amounts of stormwater runoff have carried higher than usual levels of human and animal waste near the coast, putting swimmers in harms way. It could be that there is some sort of sewer break,Ž Juarez said. But, while that is possible, it hasnt happened in quite some time.Ž For those who might be wondering when the no swim advisory might be lifted, that is something Juarez says will most likely depend on the rain. Turn to Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 31th Issue Thursday, August 1, 2013 Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read DailyPublic Notices ................................................................Pages 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 13A Christmas in July photos .........................................Pages 14-15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 4B Comics .............................................................................Page 8B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 9B Travel .............................................................................Page 10B INDEX OBITUARIES Nicholas Keith Anderson Terry Brown Richard Edward Hartman Maylo Irene Kaiser Dr. Anne C. Petty newsThe WakullaNo-swim advisory for Shell PointDistrict grade falls to B for local schools High levels of bacteria cause health department to warn residents out of the water; heavy rains cited as adding to problem T h e f u t u r e o f S t M a r k s The future of St. MarksBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netIf you visit St. Marks 10 to 15 years from now, its likely that you will be visiting a much different place as, lately, the city has had its sights set on development projects of many kinds and is currently pursuing grant funding for two different projects … future projects that will only continue the slew of recent ones already “ nished.Last month, city officials held a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the “ nished product of a recent streetscape funded by the Community Development Block Grant and its program aimed at small city community revitalization. We renovated the whole town,Ž says City Manager Zoe Mansfield about the project. From landscaping, to period lighting, partial underground utilities, benches and new sidewalks, the monies that were applied for in 2010 were put to good use and “ nally “ nished recently. Prior to that, as Mansfield explained, the city had been the “ rst in the county to get its hands on federal stimulus money with which they had put in sidewalks and crosswalks in the area of the post of“ ce and city hall on Port Leon Drive. Additionally, St. Marks has recently been noti“ ed that they are to receive a grant in the amount of about $200,000 in order to fund the cleanup of a 55 acre lot found near the northern edge of the city. Plans are to make it an area available for commercial businesses. For that, funds will be released Oct 1. It seems, though, as if plans for revitalization will not come close to stopping there. The city commission meeting recently voted to give consultant Fred Fox the go-ahead to pursue federal monies for two high priority projects. Fox has played a big role in many the success of many of their funding pursuits, says Mans“ eld. One project that St. Marks commissioners have eyed is for a new boardwalk, which will connect the bike trailhead to the bike path leading to the San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park.Turn to Page 3AAMANDA MAYOR RON PIASECKI/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.net School grades released by the state last week show Wakulla schools earned a B grade overall after several years of being graded an A district. Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce said the drop in grade was entirely due to the grading measures used by the state and not because of anything different being done in the district. Pointing to Medart Elementary, where he formerly served as principal for years as it ran up 10 straight years as an A school, plus last year under his replacement, Pearce said Medart getting a B was not because of any change. Do you really think they did anything different than they did in the past? Thats the question parents need to ask themselves,Ž Pearce said. The rest of the state was impacted even more,Ž he said. And what changed was outside the district … and was the rubric used by the state to measure progress.Ž Riversink, Riversprings and Wakulla Middle all earned A grades, other schools got a B. Wakulla High Schools grade wont come out until later in the year, but Pearce believed it could earn an A. (COAST Charter School, which is not calculated into the districts score, got a D.) There were only “ ve A districts in the state, 16 B districts, 36 C districts, and the others were Ds. Turn to Page 3A P h o t o s P a g e s 1 4 1 5 A Photos, Pages 14-15ASuperintendent Pearce attributes change to how schools are gradedNew streetscaping in front of the St. Marks City Hall. Signage across from the trailhead of the bike trail. Shell Point resident Ron Piasecki shared this photo of a July 20 double rainbow over Shell Point. e historic riverfront city is looking to remake itself as a destination C h r i s t m a s i n J u l y Christmas in July Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Every Monday from 9 a.m. until about 3 p.m., a disease called Alzheimers brings a group of people together at Lake Ellen Baptist Church. Mary McMahans experience with Alzheimers goes back about 13 years, when she became a caregiver for her father who had the disease. Pat Ashley, whom McMahan describes as the projects spearhead, also had a parent with Alzheimers. Pat really got this going, and then I came in on it with her,Ž McMahan said. But we really saw the need for the respite care. Something that gives caregivers one day a week where they can go to the doctor or go to the grocery store or whatever they need to do.Ž Ashley explained that she had gotten involved with caregiver support groups back in 1995. After a while, the caregivers just need a break,Ž she said. So we tried to get a respite going.Ž She explained that the program went from a realization of need to actuality in June of 2009. Back then, the group met only twice a month. However, two years later in 2011, the group went from meeting on the “ rst and third Mondays, to meeting every single week. We have about 12 clients come each week,Ž said Ashley, adding that upwards of 40 volunteers rotate in and out at halfday intervals. In just the last quarter, from April to June, we were able to serve about 128 different clients,Ž she said. But were always looking for more volunteers and donations of course.Ž When asked what she was most thankful for, she expressed gratitude for the communitys support. We have so many supporters throughout the community who contribute to the success of this program,Ž she said. Restaurants, churches and other civic groups donate lunch to us each week, which is a huge help.Ž The program aims to serve those with Alzheimers as well as any other memory impairment. Ashley explained that the program is nondenominational and provided to the general public at no cost. Also, that Lake Ellen should be credited as their major sponsor, providing them not only with a place to meet each week, but many church members volunteer their time and efforts as well. A run-down of a typical Monday at the respite shows a day packed with activities, crafts, games and music. The social interaction really keeps them alert longer,Ž she said. We get them doing different exercises both mentally and physically and it seems to really help.Ž Additionally, McMahan brings a special guest that really seems to brighten at least one frequenters Monday. Her personal pet, 2-year-old Maltese, Charmaine … or Charlie for short … accompanies her to the respite each week. Shes our special volunteer, we even keep track of her hoursŽ said McMahan, adding that Charlie has been volunteering her time since she was four months old and that by now she has over 1,000 volunteer hours under her belt. She has one very special buddy, a client who comes every week named Franz,Ž she said. His face just lights up when he sees Charmaine. Shes not a trained therapy dog, but she does make a difference,Ž McMahan said. One of the best parts, Ashley said of respite, is seeing the faces of the clients when they come in. They come in with a smile,Ž she said. They recognize us as friends and they all look forward to coming. Thats the best part.Ž The programs leaders would like the community to be on the lookout for their future events. One thing to keep in mind, said Ashley, is a health fair that they will be holding in the fall. Come to an event or stop by the church on a Monday,Ž she encouraged. Come and see what a blessing it is for our workers. We all have fun.Ž Alzheimers is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. It is a progressive disease in which dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In the early stages, symptoms are mild memory loss, but eventually an individual loses the ability to do things such as carry on a conversation or respond to their environment. Those with the disease live, on average, about eight years after symptoms become noticeable. However, survival has been known to range between four and 20 years, depending on health conditions and age. The respite program is a part of The Alzheimers Project, which is based in Tallahassee. For more information, contact Pat Ashley at 9845277 or Mary McMahan at 510-1253.Respite care offers a break to Alzheimer’s caregivers PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYORCharmaine, a 2-year-old Maltese, held by Franz, a client. While not a trained therapy dog, Charmaine has logged 1,000 hours at respite care. FOR ALL YOUR AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRSHOURS OF OPERATION: Monday Friday 8am 6pm Saturday 8am 2pm. WE HAVE MOVED! 2235 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 across the street from Beef O’ Brady’s.Ribbon Cutting Ceremony scheduled for 11:45 AM Friday, August 16th, Grand Opening celebration will start at Noon, please join us for food, beverages and fun.STOP BY OUR NEW LOCATION FOR ALL YOUR MECHANICAL NEEDS.www.FAIRCLOTHAUTOMOTIVE.com850 926 8350Over 22 years experienceMV60575 10% OFF Expires 8/31/13 *not valid with any other offer.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Narcotics Unit investigators arrested a 31-year-old Crawfordville man Tuesday, July 30 following the execution of a search warrant at 4 Graham Trail in Crawfordville, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Benjamin Franklin Graham Jr. was charged with possession of methamphetamine, sale of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana with intent to sell and sale of marijuana. The WCSO Narcotics Unit began an investigation into Grahams activities in May 2013. Earlier this month the unit conducted undercover operations that resulted in the purchase of marijuana and methamphetamine from Graham. A search warrant was obtained for Grahams residence on July 29 and it was served at 6:40 a.m. July 30. Graham was taken into custody and the residence was secured. Two other adults and “ ve juveniles inside the home were taken out of the home for safety reasons. Deputy Sean Wheeler discovered an active chemical reaction in a bathroom and an active gas generatorŽ was located in a tub. All of the items located in the bathroom were necessary components for the manufacture of methamphetamine. A search of the home resulted in methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia and baggies of marijuana being seized during the bust along with a surveillance camera, computer and televisions. Detectives Rob Giddens and Derek Lawhon also assisted the Narcotics Unit in executing the search warrant. Detectives recovered approximately 40 grams of marijuana. Graham was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. He is being held in the jail under a $250,000 bond. Additional charges are anticipated. Crawfordville man busted in meth labWCSOBenjamim Franklin Graham Jr. From Page 1AWere not saying that you cant go to the beach,Ž he said. Go play, have a great time. But we highly recommend not getting in the water. If you do, make sure not to ingest any of it.Ž The recent tests have shown a strong presence of enteric bacteria or Enterococci, which is normally found inhabiting the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Namely, it puts swimmers at a high risk of developing gastrointestinal illness such as vomiting and diarrhea, infections or rashes. He likened the scenario to going to Mexico and how everyone knows not to drink the water there. Its exactly like that,Ž he said. Classi“ cations for water quality are based on the EPAs recommended standard for Enterococci and range from good to poor with the mid-level labeled as moderate. Levels that are designated as good are 0-35 which is the number of enterococci colony forming units or CFU per 100 milliliters of marine water. Moderate levels hold a range of 36-104 CFU per 100 mL of marine water, and the lowest is poor, which identi“ es any level greater than 104 CFU per 100 mL of marine water. In the most recent test, Shell Points Enterococci levels tipped the scale at 180 CFU per 100 mL, which is way above the level to qualify the beachs water as poor. The current advisory will remain up at least until the next water quality test is done sometime in the next two weeks. The results for which will be immediately updated on the website: www.” oridashealth.com/ beachwater. Swimmers should look for levels below 104. The testing program is part of an initiative called the Healthy Beaches Monitoring Program run by the Fla. Department of Health and, as the website shows, provides information for beaches throughout the state. Its a good thing to check before you go visit any beach,Ž said Juarez. Its updated as soon as the test results are in.ŽNo-swim advisory for Shell PointBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Monday July 29, The appointed Citizens Advisory Task Force voted to approve the ranking system that will go before the board of county commissioners for approval at their Aug. 19 meeting. The ranking system will determine, if approved by commissioners, which applicants will bene“ t from a recent Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) obtained by the county in the amount of $750,000 for housing rehabilitation. The county had been accepting homeowner CDBG applications from April 18 until May 9, during which time 23 applications requesting rehabilitation assistance were received. Meridian Community Services Groups Director of Administration and Project Development Esrone McDaniels met with the task force to present the details of the ranking system. According to McDaniels, he and his company had already begun collecting information from those who had satis“ ed preliminary quali“ cations. We are way ahead of schedule,Ž he said. By the task forces meeting on Monday, the 23 received applications had been evaluated based on criteria found in the countys Housing Assistance Plan, which gives special considerations to the elderly, those with documented disability, as well as those households earning very low incomes. He noted other factors that were taken into account, such as whether or not the applicant had previously received assistance, what household size is, its location and the structure type … just to name a few. He explained that the county had received 23 applications that passed the income level quali“ cation and that, of those 23, there were likely 10 that would not be funded. Of those 10, there were seven whose reason for rejection or delay was that the property is located in an area labeled as a ” ood plain and that being labeled as such requires too many hoops to jump through with federal regulations. A future option, said McDaniels for those ” ood plain properties would be to pursue state funding for them, but that they probably would not be funded through the CDBG grant. The other three were rejected because either the property was outside of jurisdiction, a non-conforming property that couldnt receive a permit, or a property on which the owner hadnt yet resided for at least one year. But four properties are ready to go,Ž McDaniels said, meaning that they have been checked against all quali“ cations and have been approved as far a funding requirements go. Hopes are, said McDaniels, that the remaining nine applications would be designated as such in the upcoming week. The guidelines of the grant say that housing rehabilitation will be the “ rst priority and that housing replacement would be addressed if funds permitted. Our construction guy already has already done a drive-by of the properties to get a sense of what would need to be done at each in terms of demo versus rehab,Ž said McDaniels. He found that most of the properties will probably have to be demolished and replaced with site-built homes.Ž McDaniels said that according the stipulations of the grant, properties could not be replaced with a mobile home.Task force moves housing project forward How applications are ranked for housing rehabilitation grants From Page 1AThe boardwalk will allow pedestrians and bikers a safe route, walking or riding over the St. Marks River, rather than navigating the potentially dangerous street curves and corners along Riverside Drive. A map and scale shows that plans are for the boardwalk to be about 1,000 feet long stretching out along the St. Marks River. The second project that the city is hoping to receive funding for is for a large recreational park to be called the St. Marks Bike Trail Park, which they intend to build on a chunk of raw land … the use of which was given to the city by the state. The uncleared area is found just inside the trail and would be visible to passersby traveling along Riverside Drive. Plans are for the park to house a large stormwater retention pond, dressed up with a lighted fountain. Other features include a large open “ eld for picnics and events and a stage overlooking the open area to be used for events such as concerts and other programs. A kids playground will also reside at the park, as well as paths and areas for adult “ tness and several small personal pavilions. Mans“ eld highlights the smaller pavilions, saying that unlike larger covered areas, they will provide a more intimate space to gather with friends and family. Mans“ eld says that it is not yet clear if they will receive all or any of the funds that they plan to apply for, or when they might expect to know about their applications exception or rejects. However, she says, certain aspects and features that they plan to include in the projects … such as the citys incorporating a stormwater pond in the Bike Trail Park … give them reason to be optimistic. But if we dont get the money this time, well just keep applying,Ž she says. Further down the road, as Mansfield explained, the city would like to see a “ shing pier put in where the proposed new boardwalk would end on the path to the San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park. It would be nice to have a place where people could go out on the dock and spend some time “ shing or just enjoying the river,Ž she sys. We have so many ideas for improvements and projects, we just need the funding.Ž But if the past is any representation of the future, odds are that eventually, the city might get most of its wishes granted to it. With three fairly recent projects already funded, there are hopefully many more to come for St. Marks. e future of St. Marks From Page 1A Pearce noted that Wakulla is one of only three B districts in the Panhandle Area Education Consortium, along with Calhoun and Walton counties. Along the I-10 corridor, Pearce said, Santa Rosa at one end of the state, and St. Johns at the other, both earned As, Pearce said. As superintendent, what Im taking from it … has delivery of instruction really changed? No. Do we have highly effective and high performing teachers in the classroom? Yes. Same high-performing administrators? Yes. So what changed?Ž he asked rhetorically. When all of these stay consistent, its something we cant control.Ž Pearce said the state Department of Education Commission increased the degree of dif“ culty of the state exam, and ratcheted up expectations. Pearce said he fully expected the district schools to bounce back and continue improving. He expressed pride in Riversink rising from a B to an A, going against the trend and joining the two middle schools as A schools. He added that the changes disproportionately affected elementary schools/ All I can tell you … I know how hard our people are working and how hard our students are working, and Im very proud,Ž Pearce said.District grade falls to B Sealed bids for RFP 2013-23 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL DESTINATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 14, 2013. AUGUST 1, 8, 2013 City of Sopchoppy AUGUST 1, 29, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE 2013-14 BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYThe City of Sopchoppy will hold two public hearings on Ordinance 2013-02, An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2013-2014 “scal year. The “rst public hearing, followed by the “rst reading of Ordinance 201302, will be held Monday, August 12, 2013 at the regular meeting of the Council. The second public hearing and adoption of Ordinance, 201302 will be held September 9, 2013 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. … 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. … 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks of“ce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. City of Sopchoppy AUGUST 1, 2013NOTICE OF CLOSED EXECUTIVE SESSION CITY OF SOPCHOPPYA Closed Executive Session of the City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy is scheduled to be held Monday, August 12, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. during the regularly scheduled Commission meeting. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Ave., Sopchoppy, Florida Pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes, this Executive Session will concern matters related to pending litigation to which the District is presently a party. The discussions regarding the pending litigation will be conducted in a closed session. The Mayor shall announce the commencement and estimated length of the Attorney/Client Session and the names of the persons attending. The persons who may attend the meeting are the Commission; Ms. Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk and Daniel Cox, City Attorney. The entire closed session shall be recorded by a certi“ed court reporter. The court reporter shall record the times of commencement and termination of the session, all discussion and proceedings, the names of all persons present at any time and the names of all persons speaking. No portion of the session shall be off the record. The court reporters notes shall be fully transcribed and “led with the Citys minutes within a reasonable time after the meeting. However, the transcript will not be a public record until conclusion of the litigation. The subject matter of the meeting shall be con“ned to settlement negotiations or strategy sessions related to litigation expenditures.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Ouzts’ Too mentioned in Cooking Light • Don’t build a new trap, build a better mouse • Harden’s financial information online • Rick Ott and Nelle Mccall: They do it all From the Heart • Hyde Park families celebrate 24th reunion • WHS dress code policy has changes • No-swim advisory issued for Shell Point Beach • Riesling: Oregon’s best-kept secretthewakullanews.com Follow us on More views on the wetlands ordinance:By RALPH THOMASCounty commissionerI voted, along with three other Commissioners to eliminate the Wakulla County wetlands ordinance. On one side, you have those who believe that our current wetlands ordinance is the only means of protecting the fragile resources that exist in our county. On the other side, you have those who believe that the ordinance is another layer of government regulation that is unnecessary and an assault to property rights. Since I was elected, no issue has captured more of my time than this one. When this issue came forward, I started researching everything I could get my hands on to make sure that I thoroughly understood the issue. Our current ordinance was adopted in 2010, after an extensive process that included input from a committee made up of citizens, environmental professionals, and attorneys. Prior to adoption of the new ordinance, wetlands in Wakulla County were regulated by the State of Florida through the Department of Environment Protection and the Northwest Florida Water Management District. Some wetlands were also regulated by the U.S. Government through the Army Corps of Engineers. Even with these three state and federal agencies regulating wetlands, there was still a hole in the system that was supposed to protect the environmentally sensitive areas within our county … none of the three agencies regulated isolated wetlands in Wakulla County. So when the prior board adopted the current ordinance, they included the regulation of isolated wetlands. Shortly after the Wakulla Wetlands Ordinance was adopted, state regulations were changed to include protection of isolated wetlands. Those safeguards remain in place today. After my research, I came to the conclusion that our current ordinance was for the most part a duplicated effort that was already adequately addressed by the state and federal governments. Meaning that if we left our current ordinance in place, we were effectively requiring our citizens to jump through additional unnecessary hurdles to use their property. During my research, a major Florida wetlands case was ruled upon by the U.S. Supreme Court. In Koontz vs. St. Johns River Water Management District, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the property owner who claimed that a regulatory takingŽ of his property occurred when the water management district denied a permit for Koontz to use his land, because of impacts to wetlands. Consider how a similar case could impact Wakulla County. Given the fact that the state and federal governments are already regulating wetlands, if we keep our current ordinance, which duplicates their efforts, we are inviting ourselves to be involved in defending legal actions. If we “ nd ourselves on the losing side of a similar lawsuit, we would then be responsible for a very expensive process of defending our actions. Since the state and federal governments are already responsible, they would be on the hook for defending their actions. I think our county is better served by letting them do their jobs while eliminating the possible “ nancial liability to Wakulla County. I would also like to take to opportunity to clarify some areas that seem to be widely misunderstood among our citizens. Probably the most popular comment that I hear is, Without our local ordinance, people will be able to “ ll in wetlands.Ž This is as far from the truth as you can get. All dredging and “ lling of wetlands in Wakulla County requires a permit issued by DEP or the Northwest Florida Water Management District. When I say all, I mean all, without exception. The second comment I hear most is, The state has no regulation over isolated wetlands.Ž As I mentioned, this changed in 2010. I have also heard comments acknowledging that the state regulates isolated wetlands, but only when the wetlands exceed two acres. This is incorrect. Every single isolated wetland in the entire county is subject to state permitting, regardless of size or location. Dredging and “ lling of isolated wetland greater than 5 acres will be permitted through DEP. Less than 5 acres will require a permit from the Northwest Florida Water Management District. I have also heard a lot of comments about stormwater impacts and the possibility of “ lling a wetlands and creating ” ooding on a neighbors property. As I have already mentioned, no “ lling is allowed without the proper permit, which means that this possibility would be considered through the permitting process. I was surprised to discover that a state permit is required, even if there are no wetlands on the property being developed. For example, if someone develops a property in the uplands that could potentially create a stormwater runoff problem on an adjacent, low-lying property, they would not be allowed to do so without a state permit. I have also heard many citizens are concerned that our current ordinance contains buffer zones, but the state guidelines do not. This is also not correct. Buffers are required with a minimum width of 15 feet and an average width of 25 feet abutting wetlands, unless additional measures are needed for protection of wetlands. It is my sincere desire that my comments here will help the citizens of Wakulla County understand that my decision and my vote was based on facts, only after extensive research on this issue. I also hope this explanation will alleviate the fears that our wetlands will be destroyed without a local ordinance. If I believed that was true, I would not have voted to eliminate the current ordinance. If I have not addressed your concern, please send me an email to rthomas@ mywakulla.com or give me a call at 597-3858. May God bless you and our beautiful county!Ralph Thomas is county commissioner for District 1.By JACK RUDLOEof Gulf Specimen If we allow the four well-meaning but misguided Wakulla County commissioners to repeal our wetlands ordinance, that so many people have fought for, and spent long hours deliberating over, we will further the demise of seafood and recreation in our economically depressed county. Four men with ties to real estate and development have no business making such a critical decision when so much is at stake. Claiming that the State of Florida is providing suf“ cient regulations is an out and out lie. The fact is that the Florida Department of Environmental so-call Protection does a lousy job of protecting our resources. If you have any doubt, behold the Tide Creek Development in Panacea where developers trashed a large wetland and coastal forest without the bene“ tŽ of permit, and received the merest slap on the wrist for it. Let us demand a county-wide referendum that gives permanent protection to all our wetlands. There are no such things as isolated wetlands, sooner or later they all ” ow to the sea bringing the Godgiven nutrients and food that makes our seafood and economy grow. I do not believe the vote to repeal our wetlands ordinance re” ects the will of the people, but re” ects the will of Realtors, developers and contractors only. Lets put it to a vote and see whos right. If Wakulla County wants to preserve its seafood industry, it must save its wetlands, and not succumb to developers pressures to eliminate ordinances and regulations that protect them. Its been shown again and again that when land speculators and developers move in, wetlands diminish and fisheries collapse. When developers seal off the land from the sea with seawalls as one study in Texas has shown, they rob the shrimp and other marine life of organic materials and diatoms that occur in the marsh-mangrove interface. Then shrimp landings drop catastrophically. Two and a half times as many brown shrimp and 14 times more white shrimp were found along a natural shoreline than along a bulkheaded shoreline in one study. Another scientist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stated that the loss of organic material along bulkheads in Florida, Louisiana and Texas dropped shrimp down to one eighth of their normal population. Of all the negative environmental impacts that humans create in the ocean, the dredging or digging out of marine bottoms and the “ lling of intertidal and subtidal marine wetlands for marinas and other waterfront real estate is one of the most harmful. Associated building then dumps fertilizers and pesticides into the bay, leading to eutrophication and further loss of marine resources throughout the system. The destruction of salt marshes by dumping “ ll dirt on them creates economically valuable real estate but it destroys the nursery habitat that is essential for the survival and growth of young stages of virtually all inshore marine species. It also destroys the feeding grounds of coastal birds. Since 1964 when I started Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea and wrote my “ rst book, The Sea Brings ForthŽ I described the great abundance of life along our panhandle coast. Since then I have witnessed its serious reduction. The sponges, sea shells, star“ sh and other creatures that my wife and I gathered simply by beach combing and wading around tide ” ats have become scarce. To “ ll our orders at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, we no longer go beach combing. To collect the same specimens for schools and research laboratories now requires vessels dragging in deeper water, and much more effort to get less and less. Many of the creatures, such as the giant scale worms and sea hares that I wrote about in my earlier books, such as the Sea Brings Forth (Knopf, 1968) and the Erotic Ocean, (World, 1971) havent been seen in decades in any numbers. Many environmental factors have contributed to the downward spiral. As the Florida panhandle metastasizes with urban sprawl, we cant tell whether the declines are caused by more frequent drought and hurricanes that cause lurches in salinity, sewage, agricultural runoff laden with pesticides and fertilizers, or from the rising salinity in the estuaries that are being starved of fresh water because it is held back by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the toilets, car washes and lawns in Atlanta. Or from too much rain that comes all at once, and abruptly drowns the estuaries with low salinity, instead of the gradual and gentle mixing of fresh and saltwater that once was. But we do know that with climate change “ ddler crabs no longer swarm in great abundance in our coastal marshes, and the thousands of horseshoe crabs that came ashore on the new and full moon each spring, now come by the hundreds, or even the dozens. While the loss of the obscure sea anemones, hermit crabs, pipefish and bat“ sh that make up the fabric of life on the Gulf coast may pass unnoticed by most people, the loss of commercially important shrimp, blue crabs, oysters, mullet and other commercial “ sh are having a catastrophic economic impact. The Tourist Developments new logo urging people to eat Wakulla seafood is a joke. Commercial “ shermen laugh and say What seafood?Ž Mullet, what few there are, have undersized roe, and large robust blue crabs have practically become an endangered species. Now we wish to “ nish them off, by taking off what little restrictions we have on protecting their habitats. We must save our wetlands. Demand a referendum, let the citizens decide the issues, not the special interests. Jack Rudloe is an author and founder of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea.Editor, The News: An open letter to Wakulla County commissioners: While we would love to keep the Wakulla Wetlands Ordinance for all of Wakulla County, we are aware of your recent vote to repeal the ordinance for the whole county. As we indicated last year, when you designed a new Septic System ZoneŽ which was actually smaller than the Wakulla Springs Protection Zone, we met with the state Department Economic Oppportunity, and then met with the Florida Geological Service (FGS). The FGS indicated to you how vulnerable the land was within the protection zone. Based on their recommendation, the BOCC changed the proposed Septic System Zone back to match the Wakulla Springs Protection Zone. The land within the protection zone is still very vulnerable and contains many sinkholes and other critical karst features. We request that if you proceed with repealing the Wakulla Wetlands Ordinance you retain the wetlands protections within the Wakulla Springs Protection. Our group of scientists and professionals from the Wakulla Springs Alliance are available to further discuss this issue and provide you with any additional information you may require concerning this critical area of Wakulla County. Ron Piasecki Chairman Wakulla Springs Alliance Demand a referendum Vote came after research Keep ordinance around Wakulla Springs

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Special to The NewsRich English is the Executive Director of Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend located in Tallahassee. However, he and his wife Joanne choose to call Wakulla County their home after recently buying a home in the Crawfordville area. The couple both love the down-home feel of Crawfordville, the beauty of the county, and the closeness of both the area beaches and Tallahassee. Joanne is a grade school teacher of 26 years with a tremendous passion for teaching. They have three children who are all grown and are either in college or married and are living in other states. English served in both the U.S. Marine Corps and the Ohio Army National Guard and previously worked for the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank in Akron, Ohio. English holds multiple degrees recently graduating from Boston University with a Masters in Criminal Justice. He moved here last December after accepting the Executive Director position at Second Harvest and lived in Tallahassee while waiting for Joanne to join him here in Florida. With Americas Second Harvest serving an 11 county area of the Big Bend region, feeding the areas hungry is a daunting task. The foodbank is currently feeding between 44,000 and 55,000 people per month through many different programs and these numbers are expected to increase over time. English is committed to ensuring that the hungry people in the Big Bend region are fed and has revealed a deep desire to implement child, senior, and mobile feeding programs within Wakulla County, an area currently struggling to meet the needs of all who are facing hunger issues. The foodbank distributed a record 6.7 million pounds of food last year with almost 650,000 pounds of that being distributed here in Wakulla County and over 300,000 pounds of that being fresh produce. We need to increase awareness to the growing problem of hunger in Wakulla County and create and develop programs to meet the needs of our community,Ž he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: What was your favorite song when you were a senior in high school?BILL GREEN RetiredOh I cant remember a speci“ c song back in 63. I remember studying to graduate more than I remember songs. DAN CRAMER MechanicBad Company by Bad Company, and Born to be Wild by Steppenwolf!Ž JACK RUDLOEGulf SpecimenI Cant Stop Loving You by Ray Charles. I guess it had to do with some girl.Ž MELISSA MUSBEC Stop n SaveWorlds Greatest by R. Kelly, an R&B song. My CD broke and I wish I still had that song to listen to!Ž MERLE ROBB Gulf Coast LumberAll Along the Watchtower by Jimmy Hendrix, and the Woodstock album.Ž … Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Members of the Rotary Club of Wakulla served pizza and ice cream to disabled campers at the Rotary Youth Camp in Gadsden County last week. The group included William Snowden, club secretary, Niraj Patel, president-elect, Jo Ann Palmer, past president, Richard Russell, president, Cindy Russell, Woody Palmer, and Sarah Marie Russell. Jo Ann Palmer and Richard Russell also built a wheelchair ramp for campers a few days earlier. Rotary CampDirector of Second Harvest lives in Wakulla SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJoanne and Rich English. Name __________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone ____________________ Email __________________________ Payment Enclosed Bill MeSign up online Promo Code: SCHOOL Clip, complete and mail to:Expires 8/31/13. In-County OnlyP.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Call 1-877-401-6408 or fax: 850-926-3815www.TheWakullaNews.netGet ready for the next school year with the BEST of local news, sports, events, coupons and more! For 10 Months$2013 000FMQY Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville • 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 – 11:30 and 3:00 – 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102  Back to school event at Hudson Park on Aug. 3F.R.E.S.H third annual back to school event at Hudson Park on Aug.3, from 11 a.m to 3 p.m. The event will feature a DJ, live entertainment, kid zone, talent and fashion show, food, school supply giveaway, vendors and more. Everything is FREE! Also school physical and clothes giveaway at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Indoor garage sale set at fundraiser for missionaryThe final fundraiser to support missionary Lynnette Andersen has been set for Saturday, Aug. 3, as First Baptist Church of Crawfordville will host its annual indoor garage sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Christian Life Center. Proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to Andersen’s upcoming nine-month mission trip. She has been accepted to participate in the Passport: Immersion program sponsored by Adventures in Missions. Participants are called to live out of a backpack and tent as they travel to Central America, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to sharing and living out the gospel, contending for justice on behalf of orphans, the poor, and the traf cked mark the ministry experience of the Passport program. Andersen leaves Aug. 3. Thank you for your support. You can follow Andersen’s blog or contribute at http://lynnetteandersen. myadventures.org. Bene t set to aid bishop now at Eden SpringsThere will be a bene t program for Bishop Walton Reed, pastor of Whosoever Will Church in Midway. Bishop Reed has been ill for some time and is currently in Eden Springs for rehab. The bene t program will be held at the Greater Mount Trial Church in Sopchoppy, Elder Bernard Plummer, pastor, on Saturday, Aug. 3, beginning at 7 p.m. Thessalonia sets back to school giveaway Aug. 10Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church Rev. Frederick Bell, pastor, will be having a FREE back to school giveaway on Aug. 10 at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to noon. Everyone welcome! For more information please contact Deacon Preston Triplett at (850) 925-6041. ‘100 Women in White’ set at Miracle Deliverance CenterApostle R.G. Williams and members of Miracle Deliverance Center #2 will host a “100 Women in White” program on Sunday, Aug. 4, beginning at 3 p.m. Speakers will include Evangelist Barbara Ellis of East Grove Missionary Baptist Church, and Elder Patricia Smith of MDC #1 of Hawthorne. The theme is “It Is Well,” II Kings 4:26. For information, contact Minister Janice Harris at (850) 545-1308. H.E.L.P. Ministry will hold a conference Aug. 9-Aug. 11H.E.L.P. Ministry (Healing Emotions, Empowering Lives, Loving People) will hold a conference at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Highway Aug. 9-Aug. 11. On Friday, Aug. 9, starting at 7 p.m., powerhouse Pastor Sabrina Smith will bring the word. Saturday, Aug. 10, will feature four dynamic speakers, Joy Donaldson Stephens will speak on “Return to your Beauty” Tanya Price will speak on the “Silent but Deadly Stress and Depression,” Angel Harper will speak on “Mind, Body, and Soul,” and Shawanna Adams will speak on “Health and Nutrition.” That night at 7 p.m. Evangelist Erica Proctor will bring the Word, and Sunday, Aug. 11, at 3 p.m. Evangelist Erica Proctor. For more information, call (850) 459-3336 or email ptdonaldson68@ yahoo.com. Breakthrough Revival setA Breakthrough Revival featuring Apostle G.E. Washington of Albuquerque, will be held at 213 Oak Crest Blvd. in Tallahassee on Aug. 7-10 beginning at 7 p.m. nightly. The revival is hosted by Emmanuel Full Gospel Ministries. For prayer or directions, call (505) Whatever happened to those lazy days of summer? OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDERAccording to my calculations, summer is half over. I am not quite sure how this came about but the calendar has never lied to me before. It has confused me and taunted me but it has never lied to me. Looking at my calendar I can see no lazy days of summer noted anywhere in the foreseeable future. I am not sure if this is an oversight on my part and that I should have at least penciled in one lazy day of summer or if those lazy days of summer are a thing of the past. I sure hope it is not the latter. I can hardly imagine a world without any lazy days of summer. It just would not be summer in my opinion. This probably is the price people pay for getting old. When I was young most of my summer was “ lled with lazy days where I practiced the “ ne art of doing nothing. Oh how I yearn for the return of those good old days of yesteryear. Someone once told me, Sonny, dont ever grow old. At the time, I did not know what he meant. I assumed he was referring to his loss of hair or arthritis in his joints or forgetting things. I thought that was what it meant to grow old. He meant nothing of the sort. Now that I am old, I understand exactly what he was warning. There is no doubt in my mind; he was bemoaning the fact that his lazy days were gone. Perhaps, he was envious of the fact that at the time I had loads and loads of lazy days on my hands. I did not know just how rich I was. Now I do, but it is too late. Where have all those lazy days gone? I was whining about this to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage hoping to get some empathy at least. Instead of sympathizing with me, all she did was look at me and say in that tone of voice that I know so well, You just want an excuse to do nothing. To which I replied most sharply, I dont need an excuse to do nothing, all I need is an opportunity. Thinking about what I said I discovered there was more wisdom in that one sentence than anything else I have ever said. I had to sit in the corner for a few moments recovering from the shock of saying something with wisdom in it. I probably say many things with wisdom in it without even thinking. In fact, I am good at saying many things without thinking. Although I may not be good at a wide variety of things, I have mastered the art of doing nothing. I can do nothing better than I can do anything. Of course, I do not have too many opportunities to do anything; I have more opportunities to do nothing. If I had my choice, I would rather do nothing than anything. My philosophy is simply this, why be good at nothing and not put it to good use? I have invested a lot of time and energy into doing nothing and I am concerned that not having an opportunity to do nothing I might forget the “ nesse associated with that art. I do not get a chance very often to do nothing so I am anxious to practice the skills associated with nothing. In this regard, my calendar has not been very cooperative. Where are those lazy days of summer where I can do nothing? Not only has my calendar not been cooperative but also my wife has been the epitome of obstruction in this pursuit of mine. Just when I think a lazy day is looming on the horizon, she comes up with something for me to do. Even though all I wanted to do was nothing, she insists that I do her something. Either I do her something or else. I do not want to do her or else for nothing. Those lazy days of summer were the perfect opportunity to perfect the “ ne art of doing nothing. Regretfully I have to honestly face the fact that those times are far behind me. No more lazy days of summer for me. At least not as many as there used to be. The old preacher in Ecclesiastes was right when he said, To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: (Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV). I can look back with a sense of satisfaction and know that when I did have those lazy days of summer I put them to good use and developed skill in doing nothing. I know before me are some days when I will not have the strength or energy to do anything, then my ability to do nothing will come in good use. I think it is quite important to live in the time at hand. The apostle Paul understood this when he wrote, And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. (Romans 13:11 KJV). Now that I am older, (and whos to say how much older I will get) I can say with a good deal of expertise, never grow old. By that I mean, never forget those lazy days of summer.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Church Briefs

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 7ATerry Brown, 57, died on July 20, 2013, at his home in Crawfordville. Trinity Funeral Home of Perry Inc. is in charge of the arrangements. Maylo Irene Kaiser, 81, of Crawfordville died Thursday, July 25, 2013, at her residence. Survivors include a daughter, Tracey Lee Phillips; a grandson, Jason Lee ONeal (Tonya); and two grandchildren, Alexis Collins and Bailey Newkirk. A celebration of her life will be planned for a future date. Americare Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.Obituaries Nicholas Keith Anderson Terry Brown Richard Edward Hartman Maylo Irene Kaiser Dr. Anne C. PettyNicholas Keith Anderson, our beloved infant son, passed away peacefully in his mothers arms surrounded by his father, brother and grandparents on July 28, 2013. In the short time he was loaned to us on Earth, he touched many. He was born too early, yet in his six days of life he fought bravely and taught us much about love and drawing strength in the Lord Jesus Christ. Nicholas was born July 23, 2013 and is survived by his parents Keith and Jennifer (McGlocklin) Anderson of Sopchoppy, and siblings Thomas and McKenzie. In addition he is survived by his maternal grandmother, Dalene McGlocklin of Perry, paternal grandparents, Randy and Nena Anderson of Sopchoppy, and great-grandmother Eloise Strickland of Sopchoppy. Other survivors include his aunts and uncles, Karla (Scott) Nelson of Sopchoppy and David (Melissa) McGlocklin of Wentzville, Mo., and cousins Andrew and Ellie Nelson, Isis and Zane McGlocklin. Nicholas was preceded in death by his maternal grandfather, Tom McGlocklin. While we will miss Nicholas dearly, we rejoice that he is made whole and new. Visitation was held Wednesday, July 31, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and a funeral to celebrate his life will be Thursday, Aug. 1, at 4 p.m., both being held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church, 117 Curtis Mill Road in Sopchoppy, with interment to follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, memorial gifts may be made to Tallahassee Memorial Hospitals Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, in appreciation of their care of our sweet baby Nicholas. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Richard Edward Hartman, 83, of Crawfordville, passed away Sunday, July 28, 2013 in Tallahassee, FL. He was born in Philadelphia. He served in the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a school music teacher. He loved music. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints and was the organist at the church for many years. Visitation will be Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services will be Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at 10 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial will follow at St. Elizabeth Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Survivors include a son, John E. Hartman (Deanne) of California; two daughters, Jan Lynn Williams (Russell May“ eld) of California and Elin Brydebell (Larry) of Crawfordville; a brother, David L. Hartman of California; eight grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren; He was predeceased by his wife, Imogene Hartman, in 2004; and a son, Donald Hartman. The family would like to thank Big Bend Hospice of Wakulla for all their support. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Dr. Anne C. Petty passed on from this life at her home in Crawfordville on Sunday, July 21, 2013, after a long and valiant battle with cancer. The daughter of Albert and Clara Cotton of Panama City, she was born Margaret Anne Cotton on May 21, 1945. She attended Bay County High School in Panama City and received her Ph.D. in English Literature from Florida State University. Among her many achievements, she was an accomplished classical pianist, ballet dancer, editor, and writer. Her published works include essays, poetry, short stories, “ ction, scholarly works, and technical writing. A few of her books are Thin Line Between,Ž Shamans Blood,Ž and most recently, The Cornerstone.Ž She was also the founder, owner, and editor-in-chief of Kitsune Books, which published award-winning books by authors throughout the United States: an eclectic body of high-quality “ ction, poetry, and non“ ction. Annes own eclecticism and range are demonstrated in her contributions to international journals of mythology, as well as her former presidency of rock guitarist Yngwie Malmsteens International Fan Club. Survivors include her devoted husband, William Petty of Crawfordville; her loving daughter, April Petty, formerly of Crawfordville, currently residing in Washington state; and her sister, Caroline Cotton of Panama City. In accordance with Annes wishes, the family will not hold a funeral or memorial service. Anne also requested that, in lieu of sending food or ” owers, friends make a donation in her remembrance to the American Cancer Society or a cancer research and patient care organization of their choice. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com.Nicholas Keith Anderson Richard Edward Hartman Dr. Anne C. Petty Terry Brown Maylo Irene Kaiser By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGThe community is invited to a book signing with author, pastor, counselor, and radio talk show host Dr. Melanie Barton at Bay Leaf Market, 19 Shadeville Road, in Crawfordville, on Saturday, Aug. 3, at 2 p.m. Dr. Melanie wrote The ABCs of Childrens Sermons,Ž a book based on childrens sermons she wrote to accompany her regular Sunday sermons. The book and CD set include her telling the stories. It is a great resource not only for people who tell childrens sermons (pastors and laity), but also for parents, grandparents, teachers, libraries, camps, colleges, and schools. It is also good for an adult discussion group. Another book written by Dr. Melanie is Crisis Preparedness for Professionals.Ž It was written based on the crisis of having to close her pastoral counseling practice within a week of being diagnosed with colon cancer. It is a prevention guide for professionals to help them be prepared if they have a crisis or a natural disaster, so they will not be sued by their clientscustomers for not having these procedures in place. Dr. Melanie is an ordained Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) minister and currently serves as the Associate Pastor of Blessings, a Disciples of Christ new church started in Tallahassee which will begin worship services Nov. 3 in the Southwood area. She was called into ministry in April 1968, but at that time it was uncommon for women to serve in ministry. She responded to that call through missionary work and had planned to go to Australia to work with teenagers. Much of her service was directed toward social work because it was more marketable than ministry for women at that time. She married at 18, went to seminary, was “ rst licensed in 1976, and served in co-pastorates beginning in 1977. She was later ordained in 1998. A transformational moment in Dr. Melanies life occurred Feb. 26, 1991, when she had a near-death experience during surgery that changed everything … it opened her eyes to spiritual things and connected her to God in a whole new direction. As a result, she opened a holistic psychotherapy practice. She has a Masters degree in social work and a Doctorate in Pastoral Counseling. She is licensed as an independent social worker and is a member of the National Association of Social Workers. She teaches meditation and visualization. She is an advocate for people lost in the maze of the social services system and is a mentor to people in recovery. She also specializes as a consultant to churches in transition and con” ict. She has published a magazine article, Who gets the Church when Couples Divorce,Ž poetry, and other writings. In 2008 she was named Social Worker of the Year in Huntsville, Ala. Dr. Bartons technique for healing is to focus on six key areas of life: spiritual, mental, emotional, physical, social, and “ nancial. She encourages others that in order to help yourself, help someone else. She believes connecting people to mentor one another shortens healing time. She has a knack for linking people, information, resources, and her own experience to enrich ones life. Dr. Melanie will be available to sign books and answer questions at the Aug. 3rd event at Bay Leaf Market. For more information, check out the websites www.blessingsdoc.org or www.thedrmelanieshow. com or email her at drmelanieblessings@gmail.com.Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSYMeet Dr. Melanie Brown at book-signing Dr. Melanie Barton and one of her books.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 8 TAYLOR STREET, PANACEA, FL PANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL Join Us For A Superhero WeekDate: August 5 9, 2013 Time: 6:00 pm to 8:00 pmV B S V B S Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The News The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners announces the new start time of their regular scheduled meetings will now start at 6 p.m. The new time change will take effect on Aug 5. The board continues to look at ways to increase community involvement. Changing the time to later in the day will allow citizens who have full-time day jobs the opportunity to participate and is anticipated to increase transparency of our local government. The Board of County Commissioners meetings are typically held on the “ rst and third Mondays of each month excluding July and December; the Board holds one meeting in the months of July and December. For a complete list of board meeting dates, visit the website at www.mywakulla.com. The commissioners would also like to remind any citizen who is not able to attend the meeting, to watch it live on Comcast Channel 16. If you have any questions, please contact Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director at (850) 9260919 ext. 706 or jwelch@ mywakulla.com.Special to The NewsBreastfeeding Wakulla is hosting an event in two weeks called The Big Latch On in celebration of World Breastfeeding Week. Basically, people from around the world register to host one of these events and at 10:30 a.m. on Aug. 3, all babies must latch and remain latched for 60 seconds. This is to promote and help normalize breastfeeding. For more information go to www.biglatchon. org.Special to The NewsWorld Breastfeeding Week is celebrated around the world on Aug. 1 through Aug. 7 each year. Wakulla County WIC will celebrate World Breastfeeding Week 2013 at the Florida Department of Health in Wakulla County (DOHWakulla), on Wednesday, Aug. 7, from 10 a.m. until noon., at 48 Oak Street in Crawfordville. WIC staff and volunteers will provide fun prizes and refreshments along with information about nutrition and breastfeeding for WIC participants. This year's World Breastfeeding Week theme, Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers,Ž highlights the importance of providing support to breastfeeding families. The WIC program plays a vital role in providing support to breastfeeding moms. The WIC program offers a breastfeeding friendly environment with support from trained breastfeeding peer counselors. Deciding what and how to feed an infant is one of the most important decisions that new families make. Evidence is clear that breastfeeding is the ideal way to feed an infant. Research shows that infants who are not exclusively breastfed for their “ rst six months of life are more likely to develop a wide range of chronic and acute diseases, including ear infections, diarrheal diseases, asthma, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, obesity and respiratory illnesses. Mothers also bene“ t from breastfeeding with a decreased risk for breast and ovarian cancers. World Breastfeeding Week is coordinated globally by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). For more information, visit the WABA website at www.waba.org.my.World Breastfeeding Week is celebrated Aug. 1-7 e Big Latch On is slated for Aug. 3County announces new start of time for BOCC meetingsTips on how to make the most out of this year’s sales tax holiday Special to The NewsAdd color to your landscape year-round by joining the Arbor Day Foundation in August. Everyone who joins the nonpro“ t Arbor Day Foundation with a $10 donation will receive 10 free white ” owering dogwood trees through the Foundation's Trees for America campaign. The trees will be shipped postpaid at the right time for planting in each member's area, which falls between Oct. 15 and Dec. 10. The 6to 12-inch trees are guaranteed to grow or they will be replaced free of charge. Planting instructions are enclosed with each shipment of trees. "Dogwood trees will add color and beauty to your yard throughout the year, with their showy spring flowers, scarlet autumn foliage and red berries that attract songbirds in the winter," said John Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book,Ž which includes information about tree planting and care, and a subscription to Arbor Day, the Foundation's bimonthly publication. To receive the free white ” owering dogwood trees, send a $10 membership contribution to Ten Free Dogwoods, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City NE 68410, by Aug. 31, or join online at arborday. org/august.Join the Arbor Day Foundation to get 10 free dogwood trees Paces have been married 55 years Donald and Rosalie Pace of Sopchoppy will celebrate their 55th wedding anniversary on August 16. The Paces were married Aug. 16, 1958 in Cheriton, Va. They have two children, Alan Pace and Crystal Seley; two grandchildren: Brad Seley and Tricia Weber; and one great-grandson, Mason Weber. Don is a native of Tallahassee and Rosie grew up in Seaford, Del. They are now retired and living in Sopchoppy enjoying small town life. Special to The NewsThe upcoming sales tax holiday will be Aug. 2 through Aug. 4. Florida law directs that no sales tax will be collected on sales of clothing and school supplies. For the “ rst year, personal computers and certain related accessories selling for $750 or less per item will be included. The Better Business Bureau offers the following suggestions for a successful sales tax holiday weekend: € Plan ahead. Set a realistic budget and stick to it. Make a list of items you need to purchase to avoid buying on impulse. € Shop carefully. Tax holiday salesŽ and promotions may not be what they appear to be. Compare prices and sales at similar stores. € Ask questions. Find out how refunds and exchanges are handled after the sales tax holiday has ended. € Shop with reliable retailers. Always check with your BBB for a Business Review on the business. € Collect store discount coupons. The store discount coupons reduce the sales price of an item. Manufacturers coupons are not paid by the retailer and do not reduce the selling price of an item during taxexempt weekend. € Some business locations are not included. Theme parks, entertainment complexes, public lodging establishments, and airports are excluded from participating in the sales tax holiday. € Not all items are tax-exempt. Clothing does not include watches, watchbands, jewelry, umbrellas, or sporting equipment. Personal computers do not include cellular telephones, video game consoles, digital media receivers, or devices that are not primarily designed to process data. If you buy tax-exempt items and the store charges you tax, take the receipt back to the store owner and ask for a refund of the tax. For a complete list of tax exempt items or any questions visit the Department of Revenue website:www.my” orida. com/dor. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! GARAGE SALE & SWAP MEETSaturday, Aug. 10th 8am-2pm at the vacant lot next to Lindy’s Chicken Restaurant on Hwy. 319, north of CrawfordvilleGarage sale and swap meet start at 8 am. Fish Fry starts at 11am. $5 per platecat “sh “ngers, baked beans, cole slawIf you are interested in setting up a booth call our of ce at 926-1033 for booth applications, booth space is $15 for a 12’X12’ space. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Beverly CouncilJune 2013 WinnerHer name was drawn fromƒI thought I had won the Lottery !!! I encourage more people to participate. OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! C C Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n t Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAThe decision by legislative leaders to call for Florida to withdraw from a group of states preparing new tests for student learning has set off a round of battles over the future of Florida's involvement in the "common core" standards project. And it causes complications for Florida education of“ cials, many of whom support common core. The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, is a consortium aimed at coming up with tests that will measure students' achievements under common core. Common core, in turn, is a set of standards agreed to by the overwhelming majority of states. States that participate in the program, supporters stress, would still be free to come up with their own curricula within common core. But House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville, raised several concerns about PARCC in a letter last week recommending that Education Commissioner Tony Bennett pull Florida out of the group and develop a "Florida Plan" for testing students. "We cannot jeopardize 15 years of education accountability reform by relying on PARCC to de“ ne a fundamental component of our accountability system," Gaetz and Weatherford wrote. "Our schools, teachers, and families have worked too hard for too long for our system to collapse under the weight of an assessment system that is not yet developed, designed nor tested." The two legislative leaders' list of concerns about PARCC included: the program's cost; a belief that it could require up to 20 days of testing for students; questions about the security of data gathered on students; how long it would take the state to receive the results; and whether the necessary technology will be in place. Leaving PARCC would not necessarily mean leaving common core; PARCC is simply a set of tests that would measure how well students are learning the new standards. Bennett was noncommittal in a statement last week about the letter from Gaetz and Weatherford. "They are valued partners in our mission to help students and they raise critical issues that deserve serious consideration as I make a decision in the coming days," he said. Some of the concerns in the legislative leaders' letter are inaccurate, according to Chad Colby, communications director for Achieve, which manages the PARCC project. For example, he said, students wouldn't be tested for 20 days; states would merely have a 20-day window to administer the tests, which would probably take about eight hours for third-graders and nine and a half hours for students in higher grades. And while the state doesn't have the correct amount of equipment under some recommended standards for the tests, Colby said those recommendations are not universal, and some systems could potentially do the computer-based testing with less. Colby also played down other concerns with the tests, saying any student data shared with the consortium would not include data that could be tied to individual students, and that Florida would get its results back before the end of the school year. The consortium also put out estimates Monday saying the tests would likely cost an average of $29.50 a student, about a dollar less than the state pays per student for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, according to the Department of Education's website. That puts Florida in a different position than Georgia, which announced Monday that it would pull out of PARCC. That state spends around $12 on its current assessments, Colby said. "That was going to be a more than doubling of their testing budget," he said. State of“ cials still largely back the wider common core project, which is strongly supported by former Gov. Jeb Bush, who remains in” uential on education policy in the state. However, even Bush signaled in a recent column for the Tampa Bay Times that he might not oppose the state reconsidering its role in PARCC. "I do not know what path Bennett will recommend to the Board of Education," Bush wrote. "But I do know he is an expert on Common Core and PARCC. I am con“ dent he will not rush into a decision and that what is best for students will be at the forefront of his decision-making." Despite the far-reaching support for common core among state leaders, some conservatives oppose the standards, which they see as a precursor to a national curriculum dictated by federal of“ cials. Those groups are somewhat divided on the significance of the letter. Randy Osborne, who has lobbied against common core in the Legislature on behalf of the Florida Eagle Forum, said he was pleased with the letter -though his organization would still work to get rid of the all of common core. "Some of the most damaging things in common core directly relate to the PARCC issues," he said. But John Hallman, who lobbies for conservative groups like the Florida Campaign for Liberty and Liberty First Network, said it was too early to be encouraged by the news. "To me, I'm not going to get excited until I know what their plans are," Hallman said. And at some point, if Florida were to decide to scrap PARCC but continue with common core, the state will have to develop its own test, both sides agree. Colby said that could actually end up costing Florida more, because it wouldn't be able to share the burden with other states. And it could raise concerns about quality. "The real question is, when a state leaves and goes out on its own, what kind of a product do they get by working alone?" he said.Leaders’ concerns draw new attention to testsSpecial to The NewsIt is that time of year again when students start to think about their new classes for the fall, the old friends they will see, new ones they will make, and the possibilities that await in the 2013-14 school year. Wakulla County public school Open Houses for the new school year are: MONDAY, AUG. 12 € Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School from 4:30 to 7 p.m. € Wakulla High School from 5:30 to 8 p.m.l. TUESDAY, AUG. 13 € Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. € Crawfordville Elementary, Medart Elementary, Riversink Elementary, and Shadeville Elementary from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. If parents or guardians are registering a student in the Wakulla County School System for the first time, they can check online under the Wakulla County School District website for the Registration Packet and other essential information needed to register students, such as proof of residency. It is important to register students as soon as possible before school starts. All parents and guardians are encouraged to look on school websites or contact schools if they are unsure of what is needed to start school, including proof of immunizations.By BETH ODONNELL Assistant SuperintendentWakulla High School has several Career and Technical Education (CTE) opportunities for its students. These programs, formerly termed as Vocational, offer students the chance to learn many skills that can lead directly to employment after high school graduation; to certi“ cate programs in postsecondary schools like Lively Technical Center; and/or on to college degrees. For the second year, Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School technology teachers Scott Rossow and Jessica Mapes are teaching a high school credit CTE course. It is the “ rst course in a series called Computing for College and Careers. It articulates to several programs at WHS should students choose to continue in the areas of Digital Design, Web Design, or Accounting. It also meets their vocational credit requirement for high school graduation. Many students work in the areas they were trained in during high school or afterwards in order to work their way through college or other training programs after high school. They often can get higher paying jobs with high school training in a CTE area than if they had no training and were working for minimum wage. For example, students who graduate from the WHS Medical Academy with their Certi“ ed Nursing Assistant certi“ cate can “ nd work right away. In the Engineering Academy started in 2012-2013, students will be able to earn college dual enrollment credits that lead to certi“ cates in areas of manufacturing engineering before they even graduate from high school. A new CTE program for 2013-2014 started by Superintendent Bobby Pearce as a partnership with Lively Technical School is Automotive Service Technology. Wakulla High School students will be able to earn automotive repair industry hours and then articulate into a certi“ cate program at Lively. Other CTE programs of study include Culinary Operations, Accounting, Web Design, Digital Design, Carpentry, and TV Production. Students can also take other CTE classes at Lively Technical Center at no cost while in high school. Students who complete a program or who are close to completing one can also work in their area while in high school and get paid for their On the Job Training (OJT) experience. Courses are open to all students in general education and in exceptional education classes who are seeking a standard diploma. There are no prerequisites to the initial CTE classes, and anyone may apply to the academies. The Engineering Academy does have a prerequisite of passing Algebra I in middle school. In addition, there are specialized career preparation programs for students with disabilities seeking a special diploma. They also have OJT work experience opportunities in which they are paid. Schedule requests are made during the second semester of the school year with the help of a high school administrator or guidance counselor as they meet with students one on one. Parents are encouraged to be involved in the process. It is a good idea for students who are in attendance at WHS to take the time to learn about the programs they might be interested in for the next school year. Incoming 8th graders are given presentations, videos, visits, and a Curriculum Night to learn more about the programs before they enter the high school. For more information about career training, WHS Career Specialist Sarabeth Jones or WHS Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy can answer questions about the CTE programs at 926-7125. Administrators at the Wakulla County School District of“ ce at 926-0065 can answer questions about the following to ensure access and equity in CTE programs: Title IX … Sue Anderson, Director of Special Programs and District Assessment; 504 compliance … Tanya English, Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education and Student Services; and high school and postsecondary CTE courses … Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction and District CTE DirectOpen houses are set for Aug 12, 13Career and tech courses will gi ve students opportunities Special to The NewsSummer is almost over and in just a few weeks school will begin. On Aug. 15, the “ rst day of school, students will be dismissed at noon. At 7:33 am, students will report to their homeroom and get a copy of their class schedule. The students will spend the rest of the day, locating and attending their seven classes and eating lunch. Aug. 16 will be a full school day. Students are expected to attend all seven classes and be prepared in each class. Wakulla High School offers a wide variety of classes and courses of study, so there is no way to list all the supplies a high school student may need, however we were able to compile a basic supply list. ALL high school students will need a 3-inch D-ringed binder, seven dividers for the binder, pencils, blue or black pens, a highlighter, and three-hole notebook paper. Open house is on Aug. 12 from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and provides a good opportunity for students and their parents to meet the teachers and to get those additional supply lists before school starts. Along with their schedules and supply lists, all students will receive important packets that parents and students need to read, fill out, sign and return to the high school. Students and parents are also expected to read and understand the Student Handbook and the Student Code of Conduct, available on the school website at whs. wcsb.us. If you do not have computer access to these documents, please contact Student Services at 850-926-7125 and a hard copy will be provided for you.WHS announces school supplies M a n a t e e T i m e s Adver sing Networks of Florida Statewide advertising—one low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 OWNER MUST SELL! Nicely wooded lot in prime recreational area. Crystal clear mountain lake, ski area and brand new golf course. All within 1 mile of property.Only$79,900!Adjoining lot sold for $249,900Bank will finance! Call now: 877-888-7581ext 62Brokerage services provided by: GLS Realty, LLC € Office: 301-387-8100 € Robert Orr, BIC 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy ALAN ROSS Ryan Newman won the 20th Brickyard 400 Sunday, and there couldnt have been a happier NASCAR community saluting the native Indianan. The congenial Newman, whose fate for the 2014 season is unknown with no de“ nite ride at this date, chose the grand stage that is the Indianapolis Motor Speedway to make his case. Starting from pole, Newman led the first 28 laps before pitting under green and cycling back in behind Jimmie Johnson. With 95 laps left in the 160-lap race, on the restart following the “ rst caution, it was still Johnson and Newman lining up 1 and 2. On Lap 100, it was the same pair yet again, though the Penske duo of Joey Logano and Brad Keselowski were now on an alternate strategy. The 48 and 39 pitted with 52 and 51 laps to go, reentering fourth and eighth respectively. As the laps wound down, the story on the track came down to the tire strategies being played out on pit road as green-flag racing prevailed. Due to a lengthy pit stop for the 48, Newman had come out ahead of Johnson for the “ rst time since the opening stint. Now, with 11 laps to go, could Newman hold on for a sweet win? Yes, as long as it stayed green, because Newmans worn tires and previous two-tire change would not hold up on a restart. But this time, there would be no cautions, no restarts, and Newman flew under the checkered ” ag, only the third driver to win this crown jewel event from pole. Dale Earnhardt Jr.s day appeared over early. On Lap 12, the driver of the 88 experienced what he thought was a loose right rear tire and headed for the pits from 14th place. He returned dead last in 43rd, one lap down, then swiftly dropped down the freepass ladder as more cars were lapped under the green ” ag. Yet thanks to NASCARs wacky Lucky Dog rule, cars that are lapped get rewarded, so eventually Earnhardt got back up near the front, running as high as third. He “ nished sixth. Johnson leads Clint Bowyer in the championship points race by 75. Its off to Pocono. ROADSIDE RANT: Kissing the Bricks has become a major postrace photo-op staple of the Brickyard 400, and one soda pop company was determined to make the most of it. But putting a super-sized Coke bottle as a stage prop in front of Ryan Newmans toddler makes one wince at the rank commercialism of it all. Forget the tasteless message it sent: promoting a caffeine-ridden, sugarlaced drink through the helpful happenstance of a nearby baby. They actually showed a production assistant straighting the prop in front of the child. HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX: Mercedes Lewis Hamilton claimed his first Formula One victory of 2013„an eleven race dearth going back to the U.S. Grand Prix last November„winning from pole to record his fourth career victory at the Hungaroring, tying him with Michael Schumacher for most all-time wins at Hungary. Hamiltons 22nd career victory came almost 11 seconds ahead of Kimi Raikkonen in a Lotus, followed by three-time incumbent world champion Sebastian Vettel of Red Bull Racing in third. Differing tire strategies with the unreliable Pirellis lent some late-lap drama to the event, particularly when Hamiltons teammate, Nico Rosberg, exited with a blown engine with just four laps remaining in the 70-lap race. The victory was also Hamiltons inaugural win for his new team, Brawn Mercedes, since making the switch from McLaren over the winter. Vettel leads the championship hunt by 38 points over Raikkonen after 10 of 19 races. Read Alan Ross article on the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2013 in Lindys Sports 2013 Pro Football Preview at newsstands everywhere. E-mail: alanross_sports@yahoo. com. Sportland 2013THE COOL DOWN LAP VOLLEYBALL CROSS COUNTRY FOOTBALL Brickyard victory timely for Newman; Hamilton record-tying 4th win at Hungary Special to The NewsFall practice will begin on Monday, Aug. 5, and will run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. until school begins, at which time practice will run from after school until 5 p.m. STUDENTS MUST HAVE A RIDE and MUST BE PICKED UP BY 5 p.m. Please, make sure that your child has dependable transportation arranged.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Middle School football team will start try-outs and practice on Monday, Aug. 5. Practice will run from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. for the “ rst three days, and from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. until school starts. In order to be able to participate in football practice, your child must have the appropriate paperwork on “ le with Mrs. Peck in the front of“ ce. This paperwork includes Pre-Participation Physical Evaluation, Consent and Release from Liability Certi“ cate and Concussion & Heat Related Illnesses Information Release Form. These forms can be found on our school website, by clicking on the AthleticsŽ link. That website is http://wakulla.wms.schooldesk.net. Make sure you have transportation provided for your child. This will ensure the be dropped off and picked up at the appropriate times.Tryouts are set Practice starts RMS fall practice begins Aug. 5 WMS tryouts, practice begin Aug. 5Wakulla High School volleyball Head Coach Elizabeth Andrews announced try-outs for the volleyball team will be held at the WHS gym on Aug. 1 and Aug. 2 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. FOOTBALL BASEBALL FO FO OT OT BA BA LL LL Gridiron Club offers seating BA BA SE SE BA BA LL LL FSU Day at Tropicana Field The WHS cross country teams (boys and girls) will begin of“ cial practices on Monday, August 5. The practices will be held daily at Azalea Park (directly across from Wakulla Gas) in Crawfordville, beginning at 6:30 p.m. and lasting until approximately 8 p.m. Once school starts on the 15th, the practices will move to the high school, beginning daily at 2:45 p.m. There will be no practice on Aug. 12 because of the scheduled open house at the high school. Anyone interested in cross country is encouraged to come out. There are no tryouts or cuts, everyone has a place on the team and everyone will have an opportunity to race during the season. As a reminder, every runner must have a current physical before they can practice and should bring a copy of the physical with them to the “ rst practice. EL 3 (Parental Consent) and EL3CH (Concussion and Heat Injuries) forms are also required. They can be obtained by going to the high school website, clicking on Athletics, then forms and then printing them out. Any questions, please contact Coach Paul Hoover at (850) 509-7861.Special to The NewsIt is almost time for War Eagles Football! The boys have been working hard all summer and we are ready to come out on Friday nights and support our War Eagles. We are expecting a big crowd this year so hurry up and purchase your Gridiron seats as we only have 100 seats left for this season. All seats that have not been paid for have been opened for purchase. If you have not already paid for your seat renewal, please contact Kathi Douin, President at (850) 5196531 as soon as possible. Sponsorship opportunities are still available if you would like to help support the War Eagles. Remember the only way to purchase a sponsorship is through the Wakulla Gridiron Club. We would like to encourage anyone who wishes to sponsor the War Eagle Football to please contact Kathi Douin at (850) 519-6531, Ginger Franks at (850) 980-4202 or Carolyn Hurst at (850) 566-1523. We have different levels of sponsorship and no contribution is too small! The Wakulla Gridiron Club will also have a booth set-up at the Wakulla High Open House on Aug. 12. Anyone who has already purchased a Gridiron seat or who wishes to purchase a Gridiron seat can stop by and pick up their tickets and parking passes. Also, we will be selling T-shirts, pre-paid custom T-shirts and hoodies, hats and our new camo hats. Prices are listed on our website at http://www.wakullagridironclub. com/ for your convenience. We hope to see everyone at the preseason game on Friday, Aug. 23.FSU Sports InformationThe Tampa Bay Rays are hosting FSU Day at the Rays on Sunday, Aug. 4 at Tropicana Field when the Rays take on the San Francisco Giants. Game time is set for 1:40 p.m. with Florida State head coach Mike Martin tossing out the games “ rst pitch. Fans who purchase a discounted Lower Reserved seat in the designated FSU seating block for $35 will receive a commemorative Garnet and Gold Tampa Bay Rays hat. To purchase tickets, visit www.raysbaseball. com/noles and enter password: Noles2. Hurry as limited tickets remain in the designated FSU seating block. For questions regarding general tickets, group tickets, or handicapped seating, please contact Tom Breslin at (727) 825-3396. CHOP AT THE TROP PREGAME TAILGATE WITH COACH MARTIN Prior to the game, join your fellow Seminoles for a pregame tailgate featuring FSU Baseball Head Coach Mike Martin! The party will kick off at 11 a.m. at Fergs (1320 Central Ave., St. Pete) located just steps from Tropicana Field. Entry is FREE! Pre-register by going to the Seminole Boosters site at http://one.fsu. edu/community/page. aspx?pid=520 to secure your spot for the tailgate and to receive a special FSU give-away item at the door! Seminole Boosters, the FSU Alumni Association, the Pinellas Seminole Club, and the Tampa Bay Seminole Club look forward to seeing you at both of these events. FSU Head coach Mike Martin will throw out the rst pitch before the game on Sunday, Aug. 4 FSUCoach Mike Martin LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE:1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES … 5 … 7 DIVISION AND 8 … 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/13 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 6 … 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9 … 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 126 LBS. LINEMEN MAY WAY UP TO 155 LBS. JUNIOR DIVISION … AGES 12 … 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. LINEMEN MAY WAY UP TO 175 LBS. COST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILDA COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 5 … 8 PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms)A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/10/13 and SATURDAY 8/17/13 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON MONDAY 7/29/13 TO FRIDAY 8/16/13, 8AM 5PMSATURDAY 8/17/13, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1, 2013WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION DEPARTMENT2013 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com or visit our facebook page.

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By MARJ LAW Just like in the fullsized handguns, choosing your concealed-carry gun depends on your own needs and preferences. A friend and I went to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Range on Saturday and we compared five small handguns: two .25 caliber, two .380 caliber, and one 9 mm caliber. We discussed how long and hard the trigger pull is, how hard it is to jack the slide, how much kick you get and how hard it is to get the magazine out of the grip. We also talked about each guns special features. Each gun is approximately 5 inches in length and 3 inches in height. Some are wider than others. Starting with a Baretta 21A .25-caliber, we didnt have to jack the slide. You tilt the barrel down and drop in a bullet. Put in the magazine and, with your thumb, pull back the trigger. This action takes the place of needing to pull the slide back. The pull is short. When using a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the longest pull, we gave it a 2. For dif“ culty of trigger action … the actual moment of “ ring … we gave it a 1.5. It is easy to shoot. We gave it a 1 for kick. Easy. A button disengages the magazine and it pops right out. There is a safety. The Deutsche Werke .25-caliber is an old gun. Once loaded, the trigger pull is light: about a 2. It is somewhat long, so we gave it a 3.5. Once you shoot, its kick is light, too. About 1.5. This guns safety is in the grip and is actuated by the web between your thumb and fore“ nger as you grip the gun to “ re. We found it dif“ cult to extract the magazine. We gave that a 4.5. The Sig P238 .380 has a slide that is easy to pull back, so we gave that feature a 1.5 for ease of use. The trigger pull is easy at a 2 for both length and ease of pull. The kick is also light. We gave it a 2. A button releases the magazine and it shoots out nicely. This one came with easy-to-see night sights. The Smith and Wesson Bodyguard .380 has a very hard and long trigger pull. You pull and pull and pull, and one of us couldnt shoot after so much pulling. The gun “ nally trips at the end of that very long pull, and this last action is very dif“ cult as well. We gave it a 5 for length of pull and a 4.5 for ease of pull. The owner of this gun is not satis“ ed, and plans to return it to S&W for “ xing. The kick of this .380 is hard. We gave it a 4.5. The slide is also dif“ cult to pull back. We gave that a 3.5. There is a safety, and a button pushes out the magazine. A nice feature on the Bodyguard is the laser. Shooting is accurate. The Rohrbaugh 9mm also has a very long pull, so we pronounced that a 5 on our scale of 1-5. It was not a hard pull, so we gave that a 2. One person said, I was surprised when the gun went off!Ž You feel it when it does, so we gave it a 4 for kick. The stainless slide is tight and requires effort to jack it back. There is no safety. Its highly unlikely to go off by itself because of the very long trigger pull. In summation, one person cautioned about small guns that You cant limp wrist the small ones, or theyll jam.Ž Im sure thats true. Hold “ rm. We shot these guns at the 7.5-yard station. They are all pretty accurate. The Baretta and the Deutsche Werk .25 shot easily and had little kick. They have more stopping powerŽ than .22s, but not a whole lot more. Some people say youll have to remember to shoot several times to stop Mr. Bad, or hell keep coming. That doesnt make me feel too con“ dent. The .380s have more stopping power. The Sig is far easier to handle than the Smith and Wesson Bodyguard. It may be only this particular S&W, I dont know. The Sig is fun to try out and Id like to see those night sights in the dark! The Rohrbaugh 9mm is not easy, with a long trigger pull and a pretty fair kick, but the bullet makes a big hole in the target. When Mr. Bad is in front of you, your adrenaline will make the trigger pull much easier. I dont want to ever meet Mr. Bad. I dont want to meet him holding a .22 or a .25, unless my other only option is a cast iron frying pan or a baseball bat. Some have said to empty the magazine with .22s to make sure Mr. Bad doesnt get back up. Id feel better with a .380, and that Sig sure is easy and a pleasure to shoot. Id practice doubletapping, just to make sure he goes down and stays down. With the Rohrbaugh, Id have the most con“ dence of all. Its a 9 mm and its accurate. And when it comes to protecting yourself from Mr. Bad, dont leave your gun home in your other purse.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, we “ nally had a nice weekend. A little rain but late enough in the day that it didnt keep folks from getting in a good day of “ shing or scalloping. Capt. David Fife had a charter on Saturday and they came in with seven flounder, two trout and two nice reds. He fished last night after catching bait and caught two reds. David primarily fishes from Spring Creek to Piney Island and uses live mud minnows. When he was getting bait the other night on a low tide he said he saw some huge schools of mullet. Capt. Randy Peart is still fishing over at St. George and he said this week had been pretty good. The Bob Sikes Cut is full of big trout, mangrove snapper and 22 to 25 inch reds. He thinks all the fresh water in the bay has moved them closer to the ocean. He has been using dead shrimp or pilchards on the bottom. He said on Monday they eased offshore about 100 yards and caught the biggest whiting he had ever caught. On Saturday Phil Sharp, Joe Camps and my brother-in-law went out to the Ochlockonee Shoals and we came back with 12 big trout and a ” ounder. We caught everything on pearl white Gulps or pearl white with a chartreuse tails. While we were out “ shing on Saturday, the FWC pulled up and checked us. On board were two FWC officers and a beautiful 2-year-old black lab, which had a lanyard around his neck and FWC badge. I asked if he was a drug-snif“ ng dog and was shocked when I was told he sniffed fish, turkeys and deer. They asked if we wanted to see him work and I said de“ nitely. They brought him on board and he sniffed all around the front of the boat and then moved to the back where our cooler with the trout was. When he got to it you could tell he was getting excited. He started scratching the cooler and trying to get the top off. There was no doubt he knew there were “ sh in that cooler. They opened the cooler and showed him what he had sniffed out. They said he was a seeing-eye dog that had been donated to the FWC and they use them until they are about 10 years old and then they retire. So if you see the FWC coming and theres a black lab on board your catch better be legal. On Monday a bunch of us went to Lanark Village scalloping. I had walked in the store and was talking with the gentleman there and asked if they had been busy. He said that on Saturday they launched 100 boats, the most that had ever gone out of there. Their parking lot was full, the parking lot next door was full and people were parked for a half-mile up and down Highway 98. We ended up with 5 gallons of scallops, a suntan and long slow ride back to the ramp. I had forgotten how shallow that bay was but fortunately we were in Capt. Davids 24-foot Carolina Skiff and that thing just about runs on a heavy dew. The water was dirty but you could see good when the sun was out but when there was cloud cover it was pretty tough. The scallop meat was a lot bigger than I remember at St. Marks last year. I had forgotten how tiring scalloping could be, especially being in the water and sun all day. When Im out “ shing Im under my T-Top most of the time. It was fun and now I look forward to doing it again next year. Once was enough. This weekend, Aug. 3rd and 4th, will be the 10th Annual King“ sh Shootout. It will be held at C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle and all proceeds will go to the Leukemia Research Foundation to help “ nd a cure for leukemia. This tournament was started 10 years ago in memory of Jimmy Crowders daughter who died from Leukemia. So far they have donated over $600,000 to the foundation. I hope you have another successful tournament and the weather is beautiful. In October, Warriors and Quiet Waters Southern Chapter plans on bring more heroes from Fort Benning for a week of fishing and relaxing. If you would like to make a donation to this very worthy cause you can send a check to Warriors and Quiet Waters, 5032 Capital Circle SW, STE 2 PMB, Tallahassee FL 32305. Capt. David and I are already excited about “ shing with these guys. Remember to know your limits and beware of the Black Lab. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Met the FWC’s badge-toting, sh-snif ng Black Lab The best small pistol for concealed carry HOME ON THE RANGE SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFour of the “ ve pistols rated in the article, which included two .25s, two .380s, and a 9mm. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Many thanks to Bob Asztalos for sending in the following article. Every sailor delights in exploring waters that he or she has never been on. Such was the case for the crew onboard the patrol last Saturday in the bay and gulf that surrounds St. George Island. Our Flotilla recently changed its name from Flotilla 12 St MarksŽ to Flotilla 12 Apalachee BayŽ to better re” ect an expansion of its Area of Responsibility (AOR). Originally, the Flotillas AOR ran along the coast from the Eco“ na River to the waters around St. Marks. Flotillas located in Shell Point, Carrabelle/St. George and Chattahoochee covered the areas west of us. However, over time those ” otillas disbanded and these areas were added to our AOR. To be true to our mission of showing a Coast Guard presence in our entire AOR, the Flotilla has been conducting patrols to the west. We are very fortunate to have David Rabon as a member who is boat crew quali“ ed, a boat owner whose vessel has quali“ ed as a USCG Auxiliary patrol vessel, and a resident of St. George Island. Saturday morning at odark thirty, Phil Hill and Bob Asztalos met Mike Harrison and Dave on St. George Island. Dave and Mike had spent the night before preparing for this patrol. The boat had to be quali“ ed as meeting all the Coast Guard standards for a patrol vessel, including equipment to handle any emergency situation that they may be called up to respond. As the sun rose, with “ nal inspections completed and equipment was stowed, dock lines were heaved and the patrol commenced. Because these were new waters for all of the crew except Dave, charts were laid out on the galley table and great care was placed to follow pre-set courses. The last thing a crew wants to do is run a patrol vessel on an oyster or sand bar, which there are many in the waters around St. George Island. In addition to improving their plotting and navigation skills, the crew practiced response drills and search patterns used if called upon to “ nd a person who is in the water because they fell overboard or their boat sank. Patterns such as Expanding SquaresŽ and Victor SierrasŽ are used to thoroughly search an area where we suspect there may be a person in the water. But to get them right takes practice, practice and more practice. In addition to search patterns, the crew practiced person in the water drills and tossing a heaving line to a victim in the water. After an eight-hour patrol the crew returned to the dock. Though tired and hot they took delight in honing their rescue skills if ever called upon and having sailed over waters that are no longer new to them. This is a good example of the importance of using caution in waters where you have not been before. In the Auxiliary, we are called upon to be always ready, practice and familiarity help us be as ready as possible. On Saturday, Flotilla 12 will hold its monthly meeting beginning with fellowship at 9 a.m. and the business meeting at 9:30 a.m. We will meet at the “ re station in Crawfordville. If you are interested in attending, please contact Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Taking the time to learn the waters can save time, money and lives. a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting Narcosis is real! Most of us have gone out for a few drinks. Sometimes in celebration, other times in mourning or usually just to help relax a bit. Alcohol is considered a depressant and as a such it slows ones ability to react, clouds their judgment, and can even cause memory loss. In diving you hear the term nitrogen narcosisŽ and its often compared to having a few drinks. Textbooks sometimes call it the martini effectŽ and movies use the phrase rapture of the deep.Ž The general rule was that for every atmosphere, or about 33 feet of depth, you descend in the water column what you feel can be compared to drinking one beverage. Most people would argue they dont experience this until closer to 100 feet but sometimes as shallow as 60. Other factors besides depth can contribute to the onset of narcosis, most notably colder temperatures and poor visibility. During my dives in Minnesota, where the bottom temperature was 36-42F, I frequently dove in excess of the recreational depth limit and dove them on air. In the summer time, when the sun was high in the sky, I would feel remarkably clear-headed but doing that same dive in the colder months or at night was usually far more disorienting and I had trouble remembering much of the dive. Growing up in Minnesota and very close to what I would consider a 220-foot deep pool meant that I would regularly dive to these deeper depths and test my own narcosis threshold. In 2007-08 we started playing with adding helium to our breathing gases by blending in our garage. On an experimental dive, to evaluate if we thought helium was truly worth the added time and expense, I took a heli-air (a mixture of 15 percent oxygen and 27 percent helium) cylinder to 205 feet. I didnt use that cylinder from the surface down but instead used ordinary air to get to the bottom and then switched to the breathing mix containing helium. Narcosis is something I really experimented with. I knew that at about 140-150 feet my hearing would fade away and the sound of bubbles became little more than a whisper. My breathing slowed, my air consumption improved, and I calmed down. At 160-180 feet my vision would start to narrow and by 210 feet I could see only what is directly in front of me. Switching to the helium based gas was like turning on the lights in a very dark room. With clearer vision came memory of details I had never recalled seeing on previous dives. I was pretty well sold on the concept but the price of helium was a huge deterrent. Helium is not the only answer to limiting narcosis, simply ascending in the water will usually clear ones head. However, under the effects of narcosis it is sometimes dif“ cult to make the decision to ascend as some people become rather carefree about the dive, forgetting to check pressure gauges or the mounting decompression obligation. Hal Watts and the late Sheck Exley both regularly did record-setting dives on air often in competition. Hal still speaks on narcosis management and had a training agency that offered courses on deep air diving. In conversation with him it was clear that he was a proponent of diving air to depths shallower than 200 feet. Several training agencies are backing off the 130 feet recreational limit to 100 feet and instead offer recreational TrimixŽ classes to extend ones range back to a 130 foot threshold. Diving to these greater depthsrequires training and equipment designed for it. The effects of nitrogen shouldnt be taken lightly. But instead of having a drink at the bar Id much rather be diving! ST. GEORGE PATROL: Clockwise from above, Bob Asztalos, Dave Rabon, and Mike Harrison.PHOTOS SPECIAL TOTHE NEWSCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 2.7 ft. 12:51 AM 2.9 ft. 1:32 AM 3.1 ft. 2:07 AM 3.3 ft. 2:38 AM 3.4 ft. 3:07 AM 3.6 ft. 3:35 AM High 2.1 ft. 3:39 AM 2.1 ft. 5:08 AM 1.9 ft. 6:17 AM 1.7 ft. 7:09 AM 1.5 ft. 7:52 AM 1.3 ft. 8:31 AM 1.1 ft. 9:07 AM Low 3.2 ft. 10:26 AM 3.3 ft. 11:46 AM 3.5 ft. 12:40 PM 3.7 ft. 1:22 PM 3.8 ft. 1:58 PM 3.9 ft. 2:31 PM 4.0 ft. 3:05 PM High 0.7 ft. 6:26 PM 0.5 ft. 7:14 PM 0.4 ft. 7:53 PM 0.3 ft. 8:26 PM 0.2 ft. 8:54 PM 0.2 ft. 9:20 PM 0.2 ft. 9:44 PM Low Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 2.0 ft. 12:43 AM 2.2 ft. 1:24 AM 2.3 ft. 1:59 AM 2.4 ft. 2:30 AM 2.6 ft. 2:59 AM 2.7 ft. 3:27 AM High 1.6 ft. 3:50 AM 1.5 ft. 5:19 AM 1.4 ft. 6:28 AM 1.3 ft. 7:20 AM 1.1 ft. 8:03 AM 1.0 ft. 8:42 AM 0.8 ft. 9:18 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:18 AM 2.5 ft. 11:38 AM 2.6 ft. 12:32 PM 2.8 ft. 1:14 PM 2.9 ft. 1:50 PM 2.9 ft. 2:23 PM 3.0 ft. 2:57 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:37 PM 0.4 ft. 7:25 PM 0.3 ft. 8:04 PM 0.2 ft. 8:37 PM 0.1 ft. 9:05 PM 0.1 ft. 9:31 PM 0.1 ft. 9:55 PM Low Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 2.3 ft. 12:28 AM 2.5 ft. 1:27 AM 2.7 ft. 2:08 AM 2.9 ft. 2:43 AM 3.0 ft. 3:14 AM 3.2 ft. 3:43 AM 3.3 ft. 4:11 AM High 1.9 ft. 4:43 AM 1.9 ft. 6:12 AM 1.8 ft. 7:21 AM 1.6 ft. 8:13 AM 1.4 ft. 8:56 AM 1.2 ft. 9:35 AM 1.0 ft. 10:11 AM Low 3.0 ft. 11:02 AM 3.1 ft. 12:22 PM 3.3 ft. 1:16 PM 3.4 ft. 1:58 PM 3.5 ft. 2:34 PM 3.6 ft. 3:07 PM 3.7 ft. 3:41 PM High 0.7 ft. 7:30 PM 0.5 ft. 8:18 PM 0.3 ft. 8:57 PM 0.2 ft. 9:30 PM 0.2 ft. 9:58 PM 0.1 ft. 10:24 PM 0.2 ft. 10:48 PM Low Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 2.1 ft. 12:35 AM 2.2 ft. 1:16 AM 2.4 ft. 1:51 AM 2.5 ft. 2:22 AM 2.7 ft. 2:51 AM 2.8 ft. 3:19 AM High 2.1 ft. 3:18 AM 2.1 ft. 4:47 AM 1.9 ft. 5:56 AM 1.7 ft. 6:48 AM 1.5 ft. 7:31 AM 1.3 ft. 8:10 AM 1.1 ft. 8:46 AM Low 2.5 ft. 10:10 AM 2.6 ft. 11:30 AM 2.7 ft. 12:24 PM 2.9 ft. 1:06 PM 3.0 ft. 1:42 PM 3.1 ft. 2:15 PM 3.1 ft. 2:49 PM High 0.7 ft. 6:05 PM 0.5 ft. 6:53 PM 0.4 ft. 7:32 PM 0.3 ft. 8:05 PM 0.2 ft. 8:33 PM 0.2 ft. 8:59 PM 0.2 ft. 9:23 PM Low Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 2.7 ft. 12:48 AM 2.9 ft. 1:29 AM 3.1 ft. 2:04 AM 3.3 ft. 2:35 AM 3.5 ft. 3:04 AM 3.6 ft. 3:32 AM High 2.3 ft. 3:36 AM 2.3 ft. 5:05 AM 2.1 ft. 6:14 AM 1.9 ft. 7:06 AM 1.6 ft. 7:49 AM 1.4 ft. 8:28 AM 1.2 ft. 9:04 AM Low 3.3 ft. 10:23 AM 3.4 ft. 11:43 AM 3.6 ft. 12:37 PM 3.7 ft. 1:19 PM 3.9 ft. 1:55 PM 4.0 ft. 2:28 PM 4.1 ft. 3:02 PM High 0.8 ft. 6:23 PM 0.6 ft. 7:11 PM 0.4 ft. 7:50 PM 0.3 ft. 8:23 PM 0.2 ft. 8:51 PM 0.2 ft. 9:17 PM 0.2 ft. 9:41 PM Low Thu Aug 1, 13 Fri Aug 2, 13 Sat Aug 3, 13 Sun Aug 4, 13 Mon Aug 5, 13 Tue Aug 6, 13 Wed Au g 7, 13 Date 3.0 ft. 9:09 AM 2.4 ft. 2:13 AM 2.5 ft. 2:41 AM 2.6 ft. 3:06 AM 2.7 ft. 3:28 AM 2.7 ft. 3:48 AM 2.7 ft. 4:04 AM High 0.2 ft. 5:41 PM 1.9 ft. 4:15 AM 1.9 ft. 5:29 AM 1.8 ft. 6:25 AM 1.7 ft. 7:11 AM 1.6 ft. 7:51 AM 1.5 ft. 8:28 AM Low 3.0 ft. 10:09 AM 3.0 ft. 11:11 AM 3.0 ft. 12:08 PM 3.0 ft. 12:59 PM 3.0 ft. 1:45 PM 3.0 ft. 2:29 PM High 0.1 ft. 6:30 PM 0.1 ft. 7:12 PM 0.1 ft. 7:48 PM 0.1 ft. 8:19 PM 0.2 ft. 8:45 PM 0.4 ft. 9:06 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 1 Aug. 7First Aug. 14 Full Aug. 20 Last Aug. 27 New Aug. 6Major Times 9:34 AM 11:34 AM 9:58 PM 11:58 PM Minor Times 2:33 AM 3:33 AM 4:35 PM 5:35 PM Major Times 10:22 AM 12:22 PM 10:46 PM 12:46 AM Minor Times 3:20 AM 4:20 AM 5:23 PM 6:23 PM Major Times 11:10 AM 1:10 PM 11:34 PM 1:34 AM Minor Times 4:08 AM 5:08 AM 6:08 PM 7:08 PM Major Times --:---:-11:57 AM 1:57 PM Minor Times 4:59 AM 5:59 AM 6:50 PM 7:50 PM Major Times 12:21 AM 2:21 AM 12:44 PM 2:44 PM Minor Times 5:52 AM 6:52 AM 7:30 PM 8:30 PM Major Times 1:07 AM 3:07 AM 1:29 PM 3:29 PM Minor Times 6:45 AM 7:45 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 1:52 AM 3:52 AM 2:14 PM 4:14 PM Minor Times 7:39 AM 8:39 AM 8:42 PM 9:42 PM Average Average Good Better Better Best Best++6:56 am 8:30 pm 2:34 am 4:36 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:56 am 8:29 pm 3:20 am 5:24 pm 6:57 am 8:28 pm 4:09 am 6:09 pm 6:58 am 8:28 pm 5:00 am 6:51 pm 6:58 am 8:27 pm 5:53 am 7:31 pm 6:59 am 8:26 pm 6:46 am 8:08 pm 6:59 am 8:25 pm 7:40 am 8:43 pm34% 28% 22% 16% 10% 4% 2% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 13A On July 24, five downed tree complaints were received in a short period of time. Three of the trees were down on Woodville Highway and two others were reported down near the Recreation Park on U.S. Highway 98 and on Council Moore Road in Crawfordville. The Council Moore Road tree caused total road blockage. The Woodville Highway trees caused three traffic crashes that were worked by Florida Highway Patrol. Minor injuries were reported on the scene of the traf“ c crashes. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week:THURSDAY, JULY 18€ Ernest Coles of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed three suspicious charges on his account. The charges were created at two locations in Newberry, S.C., and totaled $228. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € John Madden of Crawfordville reported the theft of a boat trailer tag. The loss of the tag is valued at $40. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated.FRIDAY, JULY 19€ Jason Davis of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim noticed that his vehicle mirrors were tampered with and also determined that $5 had been stolen from the unlocked vehicle. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Meagan Black of Crawfordville and Naudia Delozier of Sopchoppy were involved in a minor traffic crash in the Winn-Dixie parking lot. There were no injuries and minor damage was reported to both vehicles. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Tessa Bramblett of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who has been identified, kicked the side of the victims vehicle creating $500 worth of damage. Damage was also created inside the victims home. Several days later, Derek Steele Jordan, 29, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for kicking the vehicle. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Detective Cole Wells investigated.SATURDAY, JULY 20€ Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a single vehicle traf“ c crash on U.S. Highway 98 near Carraway Cutoff. A Dodge pickup was observed on its side following a rollover. John Ashton Kerr, 36, of Tallahassee was outside the vehicle and uninjured. The victim reported falling asleep at the wheel prior to going off the roadway. He overcorrected and rolled over in the opposite lane woodline. He refused EMS treatment. Damage was estimated at $5,000. € Johnnie Woody of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle. The bicycle was located on the victims property and is valued at $125. A lock, valued at $20, was cut. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € Robert Underwood of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A shed window was broken and $4,300 worth of tools was reported missing from the shed and a porch. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Christopher Henderson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Mail was tampered with and red dye was observed inside the box. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated.MONDAY, JULY 22€ Sandra Riley of the Spring Creek Highway Stop and Save reported a retail theft. A suspect took beverages from the store without paying for them. Deputy Anthony Paul located Riley Patrick Waters, 18, of Crawfordville less than one mile from the store. Waters was reportedly observed in possession of alcoholic beverages. He was charged with retail theft and possession of alcohol by an underage person. The beverages were valued at approximately $18. €Curt Daniels of Wakulla Carpet Brokers in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as the business mailbox was knocked to the ground. The mailbox is valued at $100. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Angela ONeal of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the loss of medications, camera equipment, coins and frozen meat, valued at $760. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. € James Godwin of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to Crawfordville property. Holes were observed to the interior and the exterior walls of the home which is vacant. The holes were created by projectiles from a “ rearm. Multiple holes were observed and damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Karl Burgess of Crawfordville reported the theft of a water hose and three spray nozzles from the porch of his residence. The property is valued at $110. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Valerie Hicks of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The items were stolen from the victims shed following a forced entry. Baby items, dresser drawers, pictures and other household items, valued at $400, were reported missing. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated.TUESDAY, JULY 23On July 23, Angela Godwin of Dollar General in Panacea reported a retail theft. A female suspect was allegedly observed taking underwear and socks from the store without paying for them. Elizabeth Limardo-Torres, 22, of Panacea was charged with retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Detective Nick Boutwell and Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € A 15-year-old male was allegedly observed taking an energy drink from the Stop and Save at Spring Creek Highway without paying for it. When confronted by the store staff the juvenile turned the drink back over to the store. A juvenile civil citation was issued to the teenager the next day. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Jonathan Vaillancourt of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief. The victim placed his vehicle on Coastal Highway in an effort to sell it. The tires were damaged and the vehicle was scratched. Damage was estimated at $1,100. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Deborah Humphries of USA Groceries in Crawfordville reported recovering a bicycle at the store. The bike is valued at $20 and was left at the store multiple days. The bike was turned over to the sheriffs of“ ce. Joshua Manning of Crawfordville reported his relative had a bike stolen from Crawfordville. Manning was able to identify the bike as the one that was stolen. Deputy Evelyn Brown and Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated.WEDNESDAY, JULY 24€ Christine Kelley of Centennial Bank reported a grand theft. Numerous items were taken from a property that had gone through a foreclosure process. Many items from inside the home were taken. The exact value is undetermined but is estimated at more than $1,000. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € James Anderson of Tallahassee reported a credit card offense. Suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank account. Telephone charges out of Nevada were observed at a value of $237. The case was determined to be in the Leon County jurisdiction and was sent to the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce for further investigation. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Harold D. Thurmond of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A compressor, chain saw and battery packs were stolen from the victims garage. The property is valued at $844. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Karen Wise of Panacea reported a grand theft of jewelry. The jewelry is believed to have been lost at a Crawfordville business. It is valued at $7,500. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Lana Stokley of Panacea recovered a lost cell phone at Woolley Park in Panacea. The owner was discovered in St. Petersburg and the phone has been placed into the Property and Evidence Division until it can be claimed. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. On July 25, Shannon Nicole Pate, 31, of Crawfordville was charged with introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Deputy Lisa Hummel observed Pate with rolling papers, tobacco and a rolled cigarette in the female dorm. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On July 25, Roy Bragg of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two suspicious transactions were observed on the victims bank account. Transactions took place Indiana with a value of $250. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 1,101 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 81 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 36 investigations; 53 medical emergencies; 10 suspicious vehicles; 42 traf“ c enforcements; 93 traf“ c stops; 12 disabled vehicles; and 14 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce sponsored Summer Stokley as a counselor at the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Summer Program in Barberville, Fla. during the months of June and July. Stokley is sharing her life experiences with other youths during the two month program that concludes on July 26.The Youth Camp operates to serve hundreds of dependent, neglected and troubled youths by giving them a camping experience in a wholesome, loving, educational and carefree atmosphere in a natural setting where they can be themselves. The camp gives youths an opportunity to deal with some of their problems as they interact with camp staff and volunteer law enforcement of“ cers to reinforce positive attributes and overcome negative attitudes. Some of the activities include: swimming, canoeing, archery, sports activities, hiking, arts and crafts, “ eld trips and more. Stokley will be able to put her experience to use for college credits where she is a senior at West Virginia Tech in Montgomery, WV. The Youth Ranch Program was designed for her as an internship. She knew the experience would help the young ladies she was exposed to but Stokley was surprised what an impact the young ladies have had on her own life. I have been keeping in contact with three girls,Ž said Stokley. They have definitely touched my heart. I know they have learned a lot from me and I have learned a lot from them.Ž Stokley is the daughter of Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Deputy Taff Stokley and Geneva Stokley of the WCSO Finance Division. My dad is a big in” uence in my life and a role model for me,Ž she said of Deputy Stokley. Stokley graduated from Wakulla High School in 2010 after an outstanding volleyball career. She cashed in on a volleyball scholarship at Faulkner State College in Alabama before moving on to Gulf Coast State College in Panama City. She will graduate from West Virginia Tech in the spring of 2014. I want to thank the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce for giving me the opportunity to do this,Ž she added. If I touched one persons life it was worth it.Ž Stokley is a Criminal Justice major and hopes to get into law enforcement in the fraud detection “ eld after she “ nishes her school work. We are certainly proud of her,Ž said he mother, Geneva. She worked hard and accomplished something that she set out to do.Ž Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel recognized Robert Hancock, 8, and Trevor Mathis, 9, for their part in assisting the WCSO locate an 89-year-old Crawfordville man who wandered off from home and was reported missing by his wife. The boys spotted the elderly man and told deputies where they could nd him. WCSO road patrol of cials located the missing man behind a vacant home he thought was his own. Sheriff Creel recognized the boys with plaques for their heroic efforts in assisting law enforcement. Summer Stokely is a counselor at Florida Sheri s Youth RanchWCSO WCSOSheriff Charlie Creel with Summer Stokely. Sheriff Charlie Creel presents awards to Robert Hancock and Trevor Mathis, who helped deputies “ nd a missing man. Boys help deputies HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Christmas in July e annual fundraiser for the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center was held Wednesday, July 24. Sherrie Alverson sits on Santas knee.Santa hears more Christmas wishes. Superintendent Bobby Pearce and his wife chat with Jo Ann Daniels.Judy and Maurice Langston, senior center director. Leonard Tartt in conversation. Looking at the items for sale in the silent auction. Jared Miller and Sandy Gandy. Chef Wendy, with hand raised, is introduced. Virginia Moore and husband, County Commissioner Jerry Moore, prepare to eat Christmas dinner. Lassie Williams introduces her daughter.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN MORE PHOTOS ONLINE AT THEWAKULLANEWS.COM

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 15A Christmas in July Beverly and R.H. Carter, former senior center director. Richard Russell of Wal-Mart and wife Cindy.County Commissioner Ralph Thomas and wife Cynthia. Cleve Fleming of ESG and County Administrator David Edwards. Ossie Jackson, Jared Miller, and Jackie Martin. Ed Brimner looks over the silent auction items. CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Shirley Howard and Dustin Grubbs of Centennial Bank; volunteer Harriet Rich; Courtney Peacock of Capital City Bank looks over the silent auction items; Tiffany and David Conn of Bevis Harvey-Young Funeral Home. July 24 was Alice Veasmans birthday and she was serenaded with Happy Birthday by the crowd. Tax Collector and Senior Center Board member Cheryll Olah.

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comHolding title to being the eighth of 10 Biblical plagues is pretty impressive on the divine scale of arm-twisting Pharaoh. More severe than the af” ictions of boils, lice and hail is no mean feat. After all, Pharaoh had an impressive army which had humiliated the Hittites and the Amorites. He also had a generous supply of chariots, the stealth fighter of the Bronze Age. Moses warned Pharaoh of the impending plague of locusts. Even Pharaohs administrators recommended he let the Israelites go rather than endure the devastating effects of a locust infestation. Henceforth, locust or, as they are commonly known today, grasshoppers have been considered at least a nuisance and at worst a pestilence. Individually, there is little threat from a grasshopper, but if one brings 250,000 of their family members there is a problem. From a biological perspective, locusts are the swarming phase of certain species of shorthorned grasshoppers in the family Acrididae, such as the American bird grasshopper, a Wakulla County native. It is worth noting there are flightless grasshoppers in Wakulla County which never achieve the status of being a locust. Grasshoppers are among the most abundant herbivores in the local grassland ecosystem. On the bright side, they are an important source of food for wildlife, especially for birds. In total there are about 70 difference species of grasshoppers in Florida, most of which frequent Wakulla County. Some species, however, are quite rare, endangered, or are unique to Florida. Grasshopper species tend to have similar life histories. Eggs are deposited in soil clumped together in pods. Typically there are “ ve or six nymph stages between the egg and adult stages. Normally there is only one complete life cycle per year, but several species can have more than one generation. This high reproduction rate is a hallmark of locust or ” ying grasshoppers. The females and males look alike, but they can be distinguished by looking at the end of their abdomens. The male has a distinct boat-shaped tip. The female grasshopper has two serrated valves which can be either apart or kept together. These valves are used for digging the hole in which an egg pod is deposited. Grasshoppers are most likely to be noticed in mid to late summer and to earn their status as pest at that time. While they have been present during the entire warm season, their growth and increasing size raise their pro“ le as the season progresses. Like with many insects, feeding habits can vary greatly among the species of grasshopper. Some will feed only on grasses, some only on broadleaf plants, while others feed on a wide variety of plants. Many species will consume dried plant material as well as green vegetation, and even exhibit cannibalism when the situation dictates. Usually grasshoppers will disperse when chosen food plants are depleted and stripped bare. At that point they move to the next meal site. To support the group this maybe into nearby crops in cultivated “ elds and pastures. To learn more about grasshoppers in Wakulla County contact the UF/ IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u” .edu/. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Grasshoppers are one of the Biblical plagues Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTwo grasshopper species in Wakulla County: the ŽObscure grasshopperŽ above, and the Wrinkled grasshopper,Ž below. Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterWe are excited to announce additions to our staff!Contact Our of ce with any questions or to check your vision insurance bene ts.( 850 ) 926-6206edgardneroptical@yahoo.comEXAM PRICING:Comprehensive Eye Exam and Eyeglass Prescription ...........$50New Patient Eye exam and Contact Lens Fitting ....................$90For Dr. Gardner’s returning Contact Lens Patients: $50 Contact Lens exam Ed Gardner, O.D. has been a licensed optometrist in Florida since 1983. He is an active grade school and Special Olympics volunteer. As a member of the Lion’s Club, he provides eye exams and glasses to needy Wakulla County residents. He believes in treating patients by using personalized eye care catered to each individuals’ needs. He practices in a convenient location, offering competitive pricing which allows all patients to receive the quality eye care they deserve.She’Carri Findley began interning at our of ce in early July after relocating to Wakulla County. She is gaining experience and working towards her Associates degree in Science, specializing in Medical Of ce Administration. Her “go get ‘em” attitude is tting in perfectly at our of ce. Tim Babcock Tim Babcock has worked at our of ce part-time since 2011. This Wakulla County resident joined the doctor’s staff full time in late June. With 16 years of medical experience, Tim is knowledgeable and informative, so stop by the Wal-Mart Vision Center and welcome him to the team!Mali Rowe began working as Dr. Gardner’s assistant in November 2012. Under Dr. Gardner’s guidance, she is an apprentice working towards becoming a licensed optician. She is committed to giving quality patient care and believes that the patients’ visit should exceed their expectations. Using drive and creativity, she is helping to build a thriving optical practice that will bene t the community. She’Carri Findley Mali Rowe Ed Gardner, O.D.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Exploring and discovering exotic Thailand Travel, Page 10B WEEK IN WAKULLA Page 2B The Currys perform at From the HeartArts, Page 3B By JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The NewsSince 2004, the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards has become an important Chamber event, recognizing the achievements and contributions of businesses, and organizations. Categories include Business of the Year, Non-Pro“ t Organization, Environmental Stewardship, Wakulla Area Business and Start-Up Business of the Year. Nine years later, we are excited to announce the addition of a Chamber Board of Directors Member of the Year, an honor that will recognize a member of the board of directors who has shown commitment and dedication in the representation of our Chamber both personally and professionally. We received 114 nominations, and congratulate the nominees for this years awards. Nominees have been noti“ ed of their nomination and have been emailed an application form to complete and return by Aug. 19. This part of the process allows the business or individual to explain their business goals, accomplishments, philosophy and history for our panel of judges. Each nominee is evaluated on a number scale based on the relevance of each category questions. Good luck to everyone! Award winners will be announced on Sept. 19 at the Business Excellence Awards … an event that brings together business, government and community leaders to reward and recognize your neighbors and clients for outstanding business performance. With extraordinary exposure and prestige, the BEA is an exciting night and has become an important event. It is truly a special evening, drawing over 125 Chamber members and guests in past years. We hope you will mark your calendars to attend and show your support for the Wakulla County Chamber. The Wakulla Area Business of the Year award nomination deadline is Aug. 12. There is still time to nominate your favorite local business. Forms can be found on our website, a previous copy of The Wakulla News or by stopping by the Chamber of“ ce.Put in your nomination for Chamber’s annual Business Excellence Awards PRESIDENT’S MESSAGEOld courthouse is venue for historical play FILE PHOTONiraj Patel of Best Western Inn & Suites accepts last years award for Business Excellence to the applause of then-Chamber president Amy Geiger. By TAMMIE BARFIELDChamber PresidentThe old Wakulla County courthouse serves as the of“ ce of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce but is also a unique venue for certain types of events. There have been a few small gatherings at the building: a beautiful wedding, several small social gatherings, a few productions hosted by Palaver Tree Theatre, and throughout the year business and educational workshops. History introduces us to our future by revisiting our past.Ž Bev Lewis, historian for Lopes (small) New World, spoke to the audience in attendance for the performance of the production which was held at the old Wakulla County courthouse last Saturday evening. I attended the production as I have other productions and events held at the old courthouse, and I thought about Lewis words in terms of our county and our history, and in particular, our old county courthouse, beautifully restored to be appreciated by all who enter. The warmth of the wood and the softness of the sea green interior create such a comfortable environment for attending events Im always lured to try to attend every time I can. The fact that it is actually an old courthouse makes the design a little funky for just any type of event, which I think makes the events that are held there even more interesting. If you have an event, a workshop or social gathering, and are looking for a charming, nostalgic location at which to host it, consider our historic Wakulla County courthouse. The building is available for a reasonable price. Being a county-owned building, a few certain restrictions apply, but you wont “ nd a more interesting and beautiful location by which to revisit the past while enjoying the present or introducing the future.Tammie Barfield is president of the Chamber. TAMMIE BARFIELD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe play performed at the old courthouse. By JOHN SHUFFSpecial to The News I hope that the beginning of dog days finds you all well, it is rather ironic that we started this column just last month to keep you informed about the Wakulla County RESTORE Act Committee, and our very next meeting gets cancelled! The reason for the cancellation was that the Feds were about to release the RESTORE Act guidelines but as of just a couple of days ago no guidelines and no word. We have been struggling along trying to get our evaluation process in place without knowing all of the rules, thinking that we will only have to make minor changes to our process rather than beginning at square one. We wanted to be as far along as possible because the timelines for submission of projects were already established. We now feel that we are in pretty good shape relative to the rest of the disproportionately affected counties, (Escambia east to Wakulla) and are on hold. The Chamber RESTORE Act Committee has decided to strongly support the Wakulla Environmental Institute in their quest for additional funding from pots 2 and 3, the large (30 percent each) Federal and State portions of RESTORE Act funds. We have also held two roundtable meetings with two goals in mind: one, to gather some ideas from business leaders within the county and surrounding areas; and two, to get the word out that there may be incentives available from the RESTORE Act for businesses that expand in our county and provide jobs for our people. It goes without saying that the economic development portion of RESTORE Act funding is available also for our local businesses that have good growth plans. If you have something in mind please feel free to call me at the below number and lets talk about it. The Chamber committee has also been considering proposing a plan for a business park that could augment the opportunities that the Wakulla Environmental Institute will bring to our county. Our thought process here is that nowadays businesses that offer jobs make their location decisions based on several factors and generally there are several locations that work for them. Typically, the deciding factor is which community offers the business the best incentive package, whether it be property tax reductions, favorable lease terms, or whatever, we will have to compete if we want to attract businesses that offer good paying jobs. A properly structured business park could give the county a business incentive plan that lasts well into the future. This is just one idea that we are kicking around, we look forward to hearing from you about other ideas, please dont hesitate to call!John Shuff can be reached at 567-3989. RESTORE ACT UPDATEWakulla is in good shape with timelines See Chamber Business Spotlight on Page 3B IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning, Probate • Real Estate Transactions and Title Insurance • Francis Casey Lowe, P.A. • Business Planning & IncorporationsCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties NOW OPEN10AM 7PM • Mon-Fri9AM 4PM • Sat 2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926…2281

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Aug 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Aug 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Aug 3 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Aug 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Aug 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Aug 6 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO is starting up its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Aug 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, Aug 5  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Aug 8  BUDGET DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP for scal year 2013-2014 will take place in the commission chambers at 5 p.m.  CITY OF ST. MARKS will hold a public hearing on a request for variance beginning at 6:45 p.m. at City Hall. Monday, Aug 12  PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 7 p.m.  CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Commission Chambers. Thursday, Aug 15  TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at the welcome center in Panacea at 8:30 a.m. Monday, Aug 19  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. BIG LATCH ON CELEBRATION 10 a.m. BOOK SIGNING for REV. DR. MELANIE J. BARTON Bay Leaf Market 10 a.m. 2 pm. COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING 6 p.m. WORLD BREASTFEEDING WEEK CELEBRATION Health Department 10 a.m.SaturdaySaturdayMondayWednesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Weekly meetings Special EventsSaturday, Aug 3  BREASTFEEDING WAKULLA will host The Big Latch On in celebration of World Breastfeeding Week at 10:30 a.m. People from around the world register to host one of these events. All babies must latch and remain latched for 60 seconds. This is to promote and help normalize breastfeeding. For more information go to www. biglatchon.org.  BOOK SIGNING for Melanie J. Barton’s “The ABC’s of Children’s Sermons” will be held at Bay Leaf Market from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Children’s sermons are often inadequately prepared and leave youth wanting something to which they can relate. This book will help you keep stories brief and to the point using simple and age appropriate words. Rev. Dr. Melanie J. Barton is a holistic psychotherapist with a Master’s degree in Social Work and a Doctorate in Pastoral Counseling. She has an internet based international radio show called “The Dr. Melanie Show” on the Health and Wellness channel of Voiceamerica.com. The show airs Thursdays at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug 4  THE JOHN S. TRICE 55 YEAR REUNION will take place at Myron B. Hodge Park in Sopchoppy. Lunch will be served at 1 p.m. Wednesday Aug 7  COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT will host a World Breastfeeding Week celebration with Women, Infants and Children (WIC) from 10 a.m. until noon. Come nd out about how WIC supports breastfeeding, why you should breastfeed your baby and who and where to go to for breastfeeding help. Bring another mom or friend for fun, prizes and more! For more information call 606-8300.Upcoming EventsFriday, Aug 9  WHS CLASSES OF ‘76-’80 will be holding their collective reunion on Friday and Saturday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Shriner’s Club in Medart. Friday night’s theme is Urban Cowboy and Saturday night’s theme is Saturday Night Fever. $35.00 per person for all events. Please contact Brent Thurmond at forgump60@gmail.com or Pollie Lawhon at pollielawhon@hotmail.com or 591-2358. Saturday, Aug 10  BIG HEARTED ANGELS will sponsor its 7th annual back to school shopping event for disadvantaged children. The goal of BHA is to take 150 children on our annual Back to School shopping spree, whose families are in need of assistance. Sponsorship for one child is $50. Donations of any amount will be greatly appreciated and are tax deductible. Sponsorships or donations may be made at AMERIS Bank. Please make checks payable to “Big Hearted Angels Inc.” Visit www. bigheartedangels.org for more information.  NAMI WAKULLA will host a sh fry and garage sale swap meet from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the vacant lot next to Lindy’s Chicken Restaurant on Hwy 319. The Garage sale and swap meet will start at 8 a.m. while the sh fry will begin at 11 a.m. Fish fry plates will cost $5 per plate and will have cat sh ngers, baked beans and coleslaw. If you are interested in setting up a booth call 9261033 for booth applications. The cost is $15 for a 12x12 foot booth space. Monday, Aug 12  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES’ (WILD) Governing Board will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the library. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call 997-7400. Saturday, Aug 17  CATHERINE CAMERON BOOK LAUNCH will be held at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. to celebrate the release of her book “Are You Looking for an Administrative Job?” Refreshments, books for sale and, of course, great fellowship will be offered. RSVP to bluewater5@centurylink.net by August 10. Book is also available on www.amazon.com and www. bn.com. Thursday, Aug 22  SUSTAINABLE BIG BEND INC will be holding a planning meeting at the IFAS Extension Ofce at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be in preparation for a Green Living Expo to celebrate Earth Day on April 26 of next year. Contact Shelley Swenson (sswenson@u .edu) if you have questions. Saturday, Aug 31  ARBOR DAY FOUNDATION will give away 10 free white owering Dogwood trees if you become a member by Aug 31. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and a subscription to Arbor Day, the Foundation’s bimonthly publication. To receive the free white owering dogwood trees, send a $10 membership contribution to Ten Free Dogwoods, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410 or join online at arborday.org/august. Aug 1 –Aug 8 BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER THIS SATURDAY! This Saturday the 3rd from 9 a.m. until noon were holding our bimonthly Book Extravaganza Fundraiser to bene“ t the Friends of the Library! As always well have 1000s of books, audio, and video for your browsing pleasure. Pamela Moss, a sales director for Melaleuca Products will also be on hand to tell you how purchasing great products from Melaleuca can also help raise funds for the Friends. We encourage everyone to arrive early to get the best stuff as we usually have 2 or 3 dozen people waiting to be let in at 9. Please come by and join us for all the fun and thank you for your continued support of the Library! KATIE ADAMS RETURNS TO WCPL ON AUG 1 Storyteller Katie Adams returns on Thursday Aug 1 to WCPL! The coasts of Florida were once crawling with pirates. In colorful pirate garb Katie brings these stories to life with singing, a treasure chest of props and costumes, audience participation and more. Stories include The Ballad of the Pirate Queens, The Three Wishes, Short Tales of Florida Pirates and others. Her always lively stories will entertain the entire family so please come out for all the fun. The great times start at 7 p.m. 2ND ANNUAL WCPL TALENT SHOW Sign up has begun this week for our 2nd annual end of summer talent show! We had a lot of fun last year with this and hope to get even more kids participating this year. This show is intended for our 12 and under Summer Program participants and each performance must be 3 minutes or less and require no more than 1 minute to set up. Well be accepting signups through Tuesday the 6th and the Talent Show will be held on Thursday the 8th at 7 p.m. so please get you children signed up quickly and join us for a great show! WIN JASON ALDEAN TICKETS BY SUPPORTING PALAVER TREE THEATER As part of our ongoing partnership with Palaver Tree Theater to support the theatrical arts in Wakulla County, we are helping them with a drawing to win 2 tickets to the Sept. 5 Jason Aldean concert at the Civic Center in Tallahassee. The drawing tickets are $5 and are available through myself at the library or by contacting Palaver Tree at palavertreetheater.org. Please help us support this great organization and maybe win approx. $100 worth of tickets for as little as $5. The drawing will be held on Aug 10 and the winner will be contacted then. THE COMPUTER DOCTOR IS IN ON AUG 8 Carly Peary from Wilderness Coast Public Libraries will be at WCPL on Thursday Aug 8 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. to answer any computer questions that you may have. This is not a class but is intended to be an informal one on one setting to help you with any issues your may have with your computer, tablet, etc. Please come by and take advantage of this free assistance!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...

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Tell us about your business: Our “ rst store opened in 1931 by Maurices Labovitz in Duluth, Minn. Our home of“ ce is still located in that same spot. We have almost 900 stores open and have even branched out to Canada! We started off in small town areas and now are branching out to even larger cities. The store used to carry mens and womens apparel but a few years ago they traded out mens for the plus section. What services, products do you offer? We have womens casual and dressy apparel from sizes 0-24. There is something for every woman, no matter what age. We offer a reward program called the Take 10. You get points for purchases you make which turn into $10 off coupons that never expire! We also offer a Maurices credit card! When you sign up, you automatically get 10 percent off your entire purchase when approved and receive all of our great coupons in the mail! When used together, double Take 10 points are rewarded on select days throughout each month! We always have a sale or promotion going on in the store so you can get more for less! What sets your business apart from the competition? At Maurices, our customers “ nd a place to express their individuality and feel good about who they are. With styles that match the budget and the occasion, the fashion always “ ts. Whether our customers are looking for something to wear to work, for home or for a night out, theyll “ nd it at Maurices. Our customers are our number one priority, and that is what really sets us apart from other fashion stores. Our customers become our friends and we will do anything we can to make sure they walk out of that door happy with their purchase! What should a customer expect when they visit your business? They should expect to be greeted with an excited and friendly associate ready to help them find the perfect out“ t they are looking for! The community can expect us to help out in any way that we can. We try to be involved in the community as much as possible such as holding local donations, participating in parades, etc. How long have you been a Chamber member? About three years. Why did you join the Chamber? We joined the chamber because Maurices is all about being involved in the community and being important to our customers. We want to get ourselves out there and volunteer for events as much as we can. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Shopping local is very important to us because when we interact and recognize the people that shop our area, we can continuously build new relationships and grow as a community together. By doing this our local businesses will thrive, and in turn, they will be able to provide more for loyal and new customers. If anyone is interested in yourproducts/services, how do they contact you? We can be reached at Maurices by calling (850) 926-6175. You can also visit our website www.maurices.com. Address: 2000-B Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. & www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 3B New members: Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union specializing in loans, mortgages, investment Twinkle Toes Shoe Boutique … specializing in footwear for women, toddlers and children GPI Southeast, Inc. … specializing in engineering, survey and mapping, environmental sciences, construction inspection, water resources, protective coatings Upcoming ribbon cutting: Join us for a ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration! Faircloth Automotive & AC Specialist has moved to 2235 Crawfordville Highway in Cr awfordville. Join us for a ribbon cutting ceremony scheduled for 11:45 a.m. Friday, Aug. 16. Grand Opening celebration starting at noon. Next networking luncheon: Aug. 28 from noon to 1:15pm, hosted by TCC Wakulla Center and catered by Myra Jeans.By JENNY ODOMSpecial to The NewsParked cars lined the rain drenched streets of Sopchoppy last Saturday evening as people from all directions came to From the Heart Recording Studio to listen to the rich vocal harmonies of The Currys … Tommy, Jimmy and Galen. A little after 8 p.m., and to a packed house, they began the concert with an entirely acoustic number, a new song by Jimmy. Their gentle voices all worked together, the room of people still and silent, as they were drawn into a musical trance. When the opening number ended the audience erupted in loud applause. And that was just the beginning. During their opening set, they talked about the pounding rain that greeted them that afternoon as they arrived to set up for the concert. It seems like every time we come to Sopchoppy, it rains,Ž said Tommy. Jimmy jumped in, We drove all the way here with no rain at all and as soon as I got out of the car, I felt a huge raindrop hit my forehead.Ž Everyone laughed. The Currys consist of brothers Tommy, 26, and Jimmy, 23, Port St. Joe natives, and their cousin Galen, 26, who grew up in Potsdam, N.Y. Their dads are brothers. Tommy and Jimmy have been playing music together at venues and bars around Port St. Joe for years. During annual trips south for the Curry family reunions in Florida, Galen started joining his cousins for gigs. Between songs, the three had a raucous banter between them which gave the audience a sense of the family connection. And they admitted to the small tightly-packed crowd that they were being used as guinea pigs, and trying out some new songs on them. Weve got some new songs you probably havent heard yet,Ž said Tommy, Jimmy has been writing up a storm,Ž During the Saturday evening performance, they also played a few covers by musicians they admire … Gillian Welch, Ray LaMontagne and Irish folk musician Glen Hanson. Some local musicians turned up to listen to the trio. In attendance was Mimi Hearn, of Mimi and the Hearndogs, a local musician who toured with the Currys along with From the Heart Recording crew last summer around Ireland. I just love them all. We had so much fun in Ireland together,Ž laughs Hearn, I never had to drive anywhere. It was great.Ž They took a break about an hour into the concert and offered people to stretch their legs. Concertgoers mingled in the kitchen, munched on Rick Otts homemade pimento cheese spread, and enjoyed their BYOB libations. After the break, Tommy opened the second set with a popular song with the crowd titled, Hold on,Ž a catchy love song about a girl, of course. It is the third song on their six song CD, simply titled The Currys:Shes got a way of holding everything against me … like Im the only man she knows with the devil inside. Shes got a way of knowing just what gets to me … And every word she needs to say to make it turn out right.ŽNext up, the three songwriters are headed to New York City in August for a few performances, and then will be focused entirely on recording their first full length CD together in Virginia. They raised over $12,000 through kickstarter.com, a fundraising site for creative projects, to produce the album. They are now attempting to raise more money in order to promote their CD and to tour, taking it on the road.Ž As they wound down the evening, the audience demanded an encore. So, the three paid homage to gospel music and their own southern roots with a medley of Amazing Grace,Ž Swing Low Sweet Chariot,Ž and “ nally Down in the River to Pray.Ž On their website they explain, The Currys music re” ects the experiences theyve had growing up in the South. In a sense, their songs are not just theirs „ they belong to all the people theyve played for over the years.Ž To listen to The Currys, and to follow them as they begin their next musical phase, visit their website, www.thecurrysmusic.com.The Currys perform at From the Heart in Sopchoppy S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Chamber ChatterBusiness: Maurices; manager: Lyndsay LaCasse PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Currys … a trio of two brothers and their cousin … perform at From the Heart on Saturday. In the kitchen during a performance break for pimento cheese. Tommy Curry autographs a CD for a fan at the concert who was from Amsterdam.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Spy Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $450. 1st $450. Last NO PET References required (904) 548-8342 CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Duplex all appliance, ceiling fans, washer/dryer, newly renovated, carpets, $875 monthly $850 deposit, small pet ok (850) 694-6184 CRAWFORDVILLEWell maintained 3br/ 2 ba in Crawfordville. Convenient to excellent schools and the Gulf. Big shady yard with lots of room to park your boat. $950/ mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 850-926-7865 SHELLPOINTAmazing views from 3rd story deck. Studio apartment with full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Fully furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease minimum. Linda 850-591-3306 Todays New Ads Metal Roof InstallersNeeded immediately Tallahassee & surrounding areas, paid health insurance and weekly pay, paid vacation, must have valid Fl drivers license, will consider non experienced, and will train call 850-575-1168 Metal Roof InstallersNeeded immediately Tallahassee & surrounding areas, paid health insurance and weekly pay, paid vacation, must have valid Fl drivers license, will consider non experienced, and will train call 850-575-1168 PANACEALevy Bay Road Household SALE! furniture, kitchen goodies, office supplies, books, CDs, handbags, stained glass windows, art and artifacts. Everything you could want! Follow the signs. Saturday, July 3rd only. 9-5. 850-658-8974 Todays New Ads WAKULLA STATIONSat. Aug. 3 8am-2pm RAIN OR SHINE Love seat, Tvs & Stands, antiq. dressers, antiq. hutch, bedside tables, kitchen wares, other household items baby items, girl clothes & other misc. items 539 Rock Road off HWY267, West of Wakulla Station Raker FarmsVegetables are Here! U Pick -We Pick peas, squash & cucumbers 850-926-7561 or 850 -274 -8033 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51 per mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www .OakleyT ran sport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Metal Roof InstallersNeeded immediately Tallahassee & surrounding areas, paid health insurance and weekly pay, paid vacation, must have valid Fl drivers license, will consider non experienced, and will train call 850-575-1168 TIDY NOOK NEEDS handyman / landscaper / cleaner to service properties in area.Travel required. Will train. Must have access to internet and own tools. 888-389-823 7 Busy Automotive Shop needs:Shop helper, Tires, light mechanical experience helpful but not required. must have dependable transportation, good attitude and a willingness to work and learn. Apply in person at 2170 Crawfordville Hwy.Crawfordville Auto & Tire DRIVERS:Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 MAINTENANCE POSITIONPart time Experience a plus.Call (850) 984-4811 10:00 to 2:30Mon. through Fri. PART TIME HANDY MAN WANTEDHistoric Wakulla Springs Lodge is looking for a jack of all trades to assist with facility and grounds upkeep. Job includes: responding to trouble calls preventative maintenance tasks, and janitorial duties. Experience in carpentry, painting, plumbing, and electrical required. HVAC experience preferred. Qualified applicants may pick up an application at the Lodge front desk, located inside Wakulla Springs State Park, 550 Wakulla Park Drive. Wakulla Springs, FL 32327. Wakulla Springs is an EEO/Drug Free Workplace. AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC Train can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! (888)212-5888 ASODA/SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCALAREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com Premium Metal Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoast supply.com HUGE INDOOR GARAGE SALE Saturday August 3rd, 8am-3pm First Baptist Crawfordville (across from Subway) CLC building, behind the main sanctuary HUGE INDOOR GARAGE SALE Saturday, August 3rd, 8am-3pm First Baptist Crawfordville (across from Subway) CLC building, behind the main sanctuary PANACEALevy Bay Road Household SALE! furniture, kitchen goodies, office supplies, books, CDs, handbags, stained glass windows, art and artifacts. Everything you could want! Follow the signs. Saturday, July 3rd only. 9-5. 850-658-8974 WAKULLA STATIONSat. Aug. 3 8am-2pm RAIN OR SHINE Love seat, Tvs & Stands, antiq. dressers, antiq. hutch, bedside tables, kitchen wares, other household items baby items, girl clothes & other misc. items 539 Rock Road off HWY267, West of Wakulla Station Stop scratching & gnawing. Promote healing & hair growth. St amp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch No More, apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet... Ashley Fee & Hardware (850) 421-7703 (www.happy jackinc.com) CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $450. 1st $450. Last NO PET References required (904) 548-8342 CRAWFORDVILLELake Ellen Drive 3/2 Doublewide, cold cental a/c, fenced yard, dishwasher, new carpet, recent paint. $715 + deposit, app and references, available now. 850-524-4090. MEDART3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $600mo., $400/Security (352) 493-2232 SHELLPOINTAmazing views from 3rd story deck. Studio apartment with full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Fully furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6month lease minimum. Linda 850-591-3306 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualify.Call (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. Crawfordville2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $750 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Duplex all appliance, ceiling fans, washer/dryer, newly renovated, carpets, $875 monthly $850 deposit, small pet ok (850) 694-6184 CRAWFORDVILLEWell maintained 3br/ 2 ba in Crawfordville. Convenient to excellent schools and the Gulf. Big shady yard with lots of room to park your boat. $950/ mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 850-926-7865 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. 117 S Lunar Terrace Inverness 2 bedroom. 2 bath. CB home, big yard, Move in ready. Clean as a whistle. Big Garage, plus Carport. GREAT BUY! $79,500. Owner 352-344-9290 FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 Seth Scotts Heat & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12yrs Exp. 850-509-2405 www.coastalgems.comPO Box 1268, Crawfordville, FL 32326850566-9293 Est. 2000 BUY NOW FOR BEST DEALS! Need more listings ƒ almost sold out!Carol Ann Williams, Licenced Real Estate Broker/ OwnerOPEN BAY, WALK TO THE BEACH Canal Front, Deep Water, Home Owners Swimming Pool, Tennis Court, Security Gate, Parking area for boat trailers. And A wonderful home in a bird sanctuary. AS-IS! MAKE OFFER! Lush green acreage, overlooking “eld. 5 acres being broken out of a larger piece. Mostly high land on a paved road. $29,000. OCHLOCKONEE RIVER FRONT Beautiful home high above the river, with wetlands below you to catch the water. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, Warm woods throughout. Short Sale. $159,000, make offer. F&L AUCTION, Hosford, FL ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES AUCTION Sunday, August 4 2PM EST to view photos go to www.auctionzip.comAlso, on Saturday, August 10 at 4PM EST, we will have a “eld and equipment auction. Antything from pots and pans to tractors. Consignments are welcomed! 3Br 2Ba Hs $850 mo 2Br 2Ba SWMH $675 mo RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSTORAGE RENTALS AVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž Call Denise to place a Service Ad Today! 850926-7102 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net g Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403A-1PRESSURE CLEANING 850-926-3399 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK C & P T OWING AND RECOVERY 2 2 C C C & & P P O W O W O W HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC 850290-4058 # T156394LUXURY CRUISES & TRAVEL, INC. Linda Carterwww.Luxury-Cruising.comfor ALL Your Travel NeedsTrust your Vacation to your Local Agent! Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTSPROFESSIONAL, DEPENDABLE SPECIALIZING IN COASTAL PROPERTIESLICENSED& INSURED TERRY NELSON, JR. 850 933-0057 TERRY NELSON, JR. 850-933-0057 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C C N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 5B 5787-0801 TWN Fictitious Name Notice PUBLIC NOTICE Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.08, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of SYNAR GROUP located at 5 Shoreline Drive, Panacea, Florida, 32346, in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of July, 2013. /s/ Scott A. Synar, Owner Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 1 2013. 5793-0801 TWN Fictitious Name Notice PUBLIC NOTICE Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.08, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of APALACHEE BAY AQUATIC ADVENTURES located at 3297 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy, Florida, 32358, in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 23rd day of July, 2013. /s/ Mark A. Brent, Owner Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 1 2013. 5794-0801 TWN Fictitious Name Notice PUBLIC NOTICE Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.08, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of FORGOTTEN COAST AQUATIC ADVENTURES located at 3297 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy, Florida, 32358, in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 23rd day of July, 2013. /s/ Mark A. Brent, Owner Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 1 2013. 5775-0801 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Pre-qualified bidders are invited to bid on a General Contract for the construction of the Guidance Office Renovations at Wakulla High School in accordance with Contract Documents. All bids must be a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be accepted. -PROJECT: Guidance Office Renovations -PROJECTNO.:13/14-05 -BID DATE:August 14, 2013 -TIME:2:00 pm The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida will receive sealed bids until 2:00 pm local time on August 14, 2013. Bids received after this time will not be accepted. All interested parties are invited to attend the Bid Opening; Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at the following location: -Wakulla County School Board, Florida -Administration Building (Board Room) -69 Arran Road -Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Drawings and Specifications may be viewed and purchased from Seminole Blueprint at their online plan room at Seminoleblueprintinc.com or by calling 850.671.2714, in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. All materials furnished and all work performed shall be in accordance with Drawings and Specifications. Each Bid shall be addressed to: -Wakulla County School Board -Administration Building -P. O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road and be marked: 1.Guidance Office Renovations, Wakulla High School 2.(Name of Bidder) 3.(Address of Bidder) 4.City, State, Zip Code) 5.OWNERS BID NO. 13/14-05 All bids shall be delivered by a representative of the Bidder or by registered mail with return receipt requested. Bid security in the amount of five percent of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instruction to Bidders. In the event the Contract is awarded to the Bidder, Bidder shall, within eight (8) Owner business days after the award by the Owner of the Contract shall furnish the required Performance and Payment Bonds; failing to do such, Bidder shall forfeit their bid guarantee as liquidated damages. The Performance and Payment Bonds shall be secured from any agency of a surety or insurance company, which agency shall have an established place of business in the State of Florida and be duly licensed to conduct business there. The Owner reserves the right to waive irregularities and/or informalities in any Bid and to reject any or all Bids in whole or part, with or without cause, and/or accept the Bid that in its judgment will be for the best interest of the School Board of Wakulla County, Florida. THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPOSTOFFICE BOX 100 CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32326-0100 BOBBYPEARCE, SUPERINTENDENT July 25 & August 1,2013 5782-0801 TWN Auction Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF AUCTION SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Downtown Storage Center, 57 High Drive, Crawfordville, Florida will hold a sale of contents of mini warehouses containing personal property of: Britt, Devon Lawrence, Scott Williams, Toyianna Payment of past due rents and fees must be made on or before Friday, August 1 2013, by 5:00 p.m. before the sale date of Saturday, August 2, 2013. The owner(s) may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting Downtown Storage Center, 850-926-2562 or, by paying in person at the warehouse location. July 25 & August 1, 2013 5785-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2000-dv 76 Summons PUBLIC NOTICE 5796-0801 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless is proposing to build a 199 monopole tower at 1440 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, Wakulla County, FL, 32327. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30-days from the date of this publication to Virginia Janssen, Principal Archaeologist, Dynamic Environmental Associates, Inc., 3850 Lake Street, Suite C, Macon, GA 31204, (877) 968-4787, Sec106@DynamicEnvironmental.com. Re: 21211018. August 1, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2000-dv 76 MELISSA CLIFTON Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent SUMMONS: PERSONAL SERVICE ON AN INDIVIDUAL TO: MELISSA CLIFTON, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL IMPORTANT A lawsuit has been filed against you. You have 20 calendar days after this summons is served on you to file a written response to the attached complaint/petition with the clerk of this circuit court, located at: ___________________ A phone call will not protect you. Your written response, including the case number given above and the names of the parties, must be filed if you want the Court to hear your side of the case. If you do not file your written response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, money, and property may be taken thereafter without further warning from the Court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book). If you choose to file a written response yourself, at the same time you file your written response to the Court, you must also serve a copy of your written reaponse on the party serving this summons at: Steven P. Glazer, 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327. 850-926-1234. If the party serving summons has designated e-mail address(es) for service or is represented by an attorney, you may designate e-mail address(es) for service by or on you. Service must be in accordance with Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.516. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents, upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be served at the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.ly Law Rules of Procedurejail Address. July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 5784-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2003 DV 093 Summons PUBLIC NOTICE 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS • 47B Dispennette – 3 BR/2BA, $750 mo., $750 security dep. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250.00 pet fee. • 52 Deer Run – 1BR/1BA on the Sopchoppy River. $700 mo. $700 dep. Available August 1st. Tallahassee Rentals: • 1903 Larette – 2 BR/2.5 BA $725 per mo., $725 dep. • 1519 Jacks Drive – 2 BR/2BA $850 mo. $850 dep. Pets ok with approval and pet fee $250. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!6 River Cove $550 mo., 2 BR/1BA, BAY VIEW. Near Community Boat Ramp. Pets Considered. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550. mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo. 3049 Crawfordville Hwy. Commercial building in downtown Crawfordville. Across from the courthouse, perfect building for professional of ce. TO BE CONSIDERED FOR EMPLOYMENT:Beginning on Tuesday, August 6, 2013, please register online at www.employ”orida.com and submit your resume to the Workforce Career Center located at 705 East Base St. Madison, Florida 32340. The Center is open Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. and their toll free phone number is 866-367-4758. You may also submit your resume to the Workforce Mobile Unit which is located in Perry, Florida each Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday between 9 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. in the Save-A-Lot parking lot located near the intersection of Byron Butler Pkwy and Jefferson Street. Resumes may be e-mailed to EFM-Employers@nfwdb.org or faxed to Workforce at 850-973-9757. Registration must be completed and resumes received by Friday, August 9, 2013 to be considered. The number of submissions that will be reviewed is limited; submission is not a guarantee that your submission will be reviewed. If you have any questions or need assistance preparing a resume, please contact the Workforce Employer Center. Buckeyes evaluation of employment applicants includes validated written tests, interviews, and post-offer physical exam. Pre-employment drug screening and criminal background check is required. BUCKEYE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, M/F/D/V.Buckeye Florida, LP is a leading producer of specialty cellulose and absorbent products located in Perry, Florida. Buckeye Technologies, Inc. (NYSE symbol, BKI) is our parent company with manufacturing facilities located in the United States and Germany. We are seeking reliable and motivated individuals who are comfortable working as part of a production team in a high performance work system. All openings are for entry-level production technicians at our manufacturing facility located in Perry Florida. The Perry facility is a large paper manufacturing complex with a continuous around-the-clock operation (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) which includes Saturday and Sunday. All openings are on teams which work rotating shifts. Positions become available throughout the year.WE ARE LOOKING FOR CANDIDATES THAT POSSESS:€ High School diploma or GED € 2+ years of general work or military experience € Vo-Tech, college, military technical training or manufacturing experience is a plus € Pro“cient math, mechanical reasoning and reading comprehension skills € Ability and willingness to learn new work procedures and work well with others € Work schedule ”exibility and ability to work all overtime € Ability to prioritize and carry out responsibilities independently with minimal supervisionAS A MEMBER OF OUR TEAM YOU WILL ENJOY:€ A very competitive wage and bene“t package € Medical, dental and prescription drug insurance € Life and disability insurance € Thirteen paid holidays € Paid vacation € 401(k) with matching contribution € Retirement plan with company contribution

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 5764-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2003 DV 093 Motion to Dissolve Injunction PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2003 DV 093 TINA MARIE HAMEL Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent MOTION TO DISSOLVE INJUNCTION COMES NOW, the respondent, MICHAEL CROSBY, by and through undersigned counsel to petition this honorable Court pursuant to F.S. 784.046 to dissolve the injunction in this cause and as grounds states: 1. On July 31, 2000, this honorable Court granted Ms. Cliftons petition for injunctive relief. 2. Since that time there has been a circumstantial change in circumstances in that Ms. Clifton no longer lives in the State, in fact, it has been discovered through local investigations, so far that she is currently on the run from the law. 3. There has never been any violation in the 13 years this injunction has been in place. There is obviously no danger to her. The scenario underlying the injunction no longer exists so that continuation of the injunction would serve no valid purpose. 4. Mr. Crosby request this relief because of the stigma attached to his record. He is greatly harmed by the stigma of having a DVI on his record. Whenever he applies for work the injunction serves as highly prejudicial in his pursuit of a job. WHEREFORE, Mr. Crosby seeks relief consistent with this Motion. Respectfully submitted, /s/STEVEN P. GLAZER 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-1234, Florida Bar No. 0789798 July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 5765-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2000-DV-76 Motion to Dissolve Injunction PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2000-DV-76 MELISSA CLIFTON Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent MOTION TO DISSOLVE INJUNCTION COMES NOW, the respondent, MICHAEL CROSBY, by and through undersigned counsel to petition this honorable Court pursuant to F.S. 784.046 to dissolve the injunction in this cause and as grounds states: 1. On July 31, 2000, this honorable Court granted Ms. Cliftons petition for injunctive relief. 2. Since that time there has been a circumstantial change in circumstances in that Ms. Clifton no longer lives in the State, in fact, it has been discovered through local investigations, so far, that she is currently on the run from the law. 3. There has never been any violation in the 13 years this injunction has been in place. There is obviously no danger to her. The scenario underlying the injunction no longer exists so that continuation of the injunction would serve no valid purpose. 4. Mr. Crosby request this relief because of the stigma attached to his record. He is greatly harmed by the stigma of having a DVI on his record. Whenever he applies for work the injunction serves as highly prejudicial in his pursuit of a job. WHEREFORE, Mr. Crosby seeks relief consistent with this Motion. Respectfully submitted, /s/STEVEN P. GLAZER 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-1234, Florida Bar No. 0789798 July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2003 DV 093 TINA MARIE HAMMEL Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent SUMMONS: PERSONAL SERVICE ON AN INDIVIDUAL TO: TINA MARIE HAMMEL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL IMPORTANT A lawsuit has been filed against you. You have 20 calendar days after this summons is served on you to file a written response to the attached complaint/petition with the clerk of this circuit court, located at: ___________________ A phone call will not protect you. Your written response, including the case number given above and the names of the parties, must be filed if you want the Court to hear your side of the case. If you do not file your written response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, money, and property may be taken thereafter without further warning from the Court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book). If you choose to file a written response yourself, at the same time you file your written response to the Court, you must also serve a copy of your written reaponse on the party serving this summons at: Steven P. Glazer, 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327. 850-926-1234. If the party serving summons has designated e-mail address(es) for service or is represented by an attorney, you may designate e-mail address(es) for service by or on you. Service must be in accordance with Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.516. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents, upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be served at the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.ly Law Rules of Procedurejail Address. July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 5770-0801 TWN vs. Nunnery, Frances Case No. 2013-CA-000007 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCASE NO.: 2013-CA-000007 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking Corporation, Plaintiff, v. FRANCES ARLENE NUNNERYF/K/AFRANCES ARLENE RHODES, KENNETH RAY RHODES, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ARLENE NUNNERYF/K/AFRANCES ARLENE RHODES, N/K/ASTEVE ALLEN NUNNERY, and WAKULLACOUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on August 8, 2013, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 5 and 6, Block H of REPLAT OF AGUADE VIDA, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 12, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. This Notice dated this17th day of June, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk July 25 & August 1, 2013 5777-0801 TWN vs. Gibson, Lanette Case No.2011-CA-000081 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2011-CA-000081 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURYHOME EQUITYLOAN TRUST2005-4,Plaintiff, vs. LANETTE GRIGGS GIBSON III A/K/AL.G. GIBSON, ETAL.Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-000081, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURYHOME EQUITYLOAN TRUST 2005-4 (hereafter PlaintiffŽ), is Plaintiff and LANETTE GRIGGS GIBSON III A/K/AL.G. GIBSON, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBYof the Courthouse; 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, at 11:00 a.m., on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 369 AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY567.97 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 184.45 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF PINE WOOD STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY520.12 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 369, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY 190.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. (SEAL) BRENTTHURMON, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT BY:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033, Pleadings@vanlawfl.com July 25 & August 1, 2013 5779-0801 TWN Estate: Evans, Julie Mae File No. 2013-54CPNotice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE # 2013-54CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JULIE MAE EVANS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Julie Mae Evans deceased, whose date of death was May 19, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 25, 2013. Personal Representative: Jeanne Lynette Sorrell PO Box 93, Sopchoppy, FL32358 Michael Wayne Sorrel l 36 Mathis Road, Sopchoppy, FL32358 Attorney For Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, Florida Bar Number: 517143 Attorney for Jeanett Lynette Sorrell P.O. Box 176, Apalachicola, FL32329 Telephone: (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256, E-Mail: info@kbblawfl.com July 25 & August 1, 2013 5780-0801 TWN vs. Jessie B. Tudor Case No. 65-2010-CA-000435 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 65-2010-CA000435 HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, Plaintiff, vs. JESSIE B. TUDOR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 19, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000435 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Household Finance Corporation III, is the Plaintiff and Jessie B. Tudor, Jessie B. Tudor, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: TRACT 2 COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 1377.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 29.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 406.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 659.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 297.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 239.61 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 61.20 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 469.83 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY (CARTER ROAD AND POSEY ROAD), THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 127.65 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 224.29 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 720.17 FEET TO A RE -ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN WEST 291.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING TRACT 3 COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 1377.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 29.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 406.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 659.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 297.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN EAST 291.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 720.17 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60 FOOT ROADWAY (POSEY ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 32.29 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 343.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 299.05 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 35 EAST 220.09 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 142.98 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN WEST 354.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 30.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 363, PAGE 282 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA LYING OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 30.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 1377.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 29.70 FEET TO 5781-0801 TWN vs. Nelson, Terry 2012-CA-000435 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA-000435 CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. TERRY C. NELSON, an individual, CLAYTON C. OAKS, SR., an individual, and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 19, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2012-CA-000435 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and TERRY C. NELSON, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse,3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 15 day of August, 2013, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EXHIBIT AŽ). Dated at Wakulla County, Florida this 19 day of June, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. EXHIBIT AŽ LEGAL DESCRIPTION COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 12, A DISTANCE OF 978.40 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 394.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3337.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 24 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 557.70 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 04 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 557.05 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 372, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 82 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 137.20 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1106.28 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 221.93 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 298.31 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE,THENCE RUN NORTH DEGREES 42 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 151.36 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 06 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 228.84 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 62 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 162.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 356.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY NO. 372, IN SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 82 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 137.20 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1106.28 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 07 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.59 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 62.29 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 100.04 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 70.10 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 04 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 100.12 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 70.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: THAT CERTAIN PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 882, PAGE 273, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH all personal property (tangible and intangible) located on or used in connection with the real property described above and as more particularly described in the Mortgage. July 25 & August 1, 20137269491_1 5788-0808 TWN Vs. Maxey, Wendy L. Case No: 2012-CA000245 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012 CA000245 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL. Plaintiff, vs. WENDYL. MAXEYA/K/AWENDYL. MILLER;UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYL. MILLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYL. MAXEYA/K/AWENDYL. MILLER; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTLL; MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 22nd day of August 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 52, MALLARD POND, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 56-57 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 15th day of July, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954)-779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Katrina D. Lacy Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E., Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 August 1 & 8, 2013B&H #292974 5789-0808 TWN Vs. Gill, William Case No: 652012CA000372 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000372 J JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff vs. WILLIAM GILL, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WILLIAM GILL, 1782 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32311 WILLIAM GILL, 2308 SPRING CREEK HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, 32327 WILLIAM GILL, 9013 SILVER OAK LN, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 TINA GILL, 1782 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32311 TINA GILL, 525 MASHES SANDS RD, PANACEA, FL 32346 TINA GILL, 1438 N MERIDIAN RD #1N, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 AND TO:All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the afore said Defendants. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION TWENTY SEVEN, TOWNSHIP THREE SOUTH, RANGE 5791-0808 TWN vs. Cook, Teressa Case No. 65-2010-CA-000101 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000101 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : TERESSACOOK et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000101 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NAis the Plaintiff and TERESSACOOK; DANIELL. GUILDAY; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the22nd day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AST. JOE PAPER COMPANYMONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 60 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 60 ADISTANCE OF 1135.23 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLYBOUNDARY19.93 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 197.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 37 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 12.72 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 39 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 233.77 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 160.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 37 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 404.80 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 229.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A359 ALEXANDER ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on June 20, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10007362 WELLSLPS-CONV-R-csarwark-Team 1 -F10007362 Copies Furnish to: eservice@wolfelawfl.com **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. August 1 & 8, 2013 F10007362 5792-0808 TWN Sumner, Alpha L. 12-283-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 12-283-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking Corporation, Plaintiff, v. ALPHAL. SUMNER Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on August 22, 2013, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 3 of CEDAR CREEK ESTATES, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 33, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. This Notice dated this 20th day of June, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 1 & 8, 2013 ONE EAST, (S.W. COR. OF E. 1/2 OF N.E. 1/4 OF N.W. 1/4 OF SEC. 27, T 3 S, R 1 E); THENCE RUN NORTH 510 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN EAST 1026.58 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 363; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 363 FOR 219.17 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 963.82 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 210 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS on or before August 31, 2013; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Copy furnished to: A copy of this Notice of Action, Complaint and Lis Pendens were sent to the above-named Defendants at the last known address. IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 850-577-4401. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System. August 1 & 8, 2013 (23472.3834/AG) A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 406.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 659.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 297.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN EAST 615.89 FEET TO THE PONT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID PONT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 142.44 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 220.82 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 39.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 39.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 220.09 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 142.98 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN WEST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A 1999 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBER(S) H86440GR AND H86440GL AND TITLE NUMBERS 0079811246 AND 0079811126. A/K/A 10 POSEY ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-4874 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this day of 19th day of June, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) Wakulla County, Florida, Tiffani Deschner Deputy ClerAk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com TS -10-57474 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. July 25 and August 8, 2013 5778-0801 TWN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-67-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS ELMER CLARK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Thomas Elmer Clark, deceased, File 13-67 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is July 25, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.,Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Thomas Eric Clark 55 Cheri Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 JULY25 & AUGUST 1, 2013 5795-0808 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 8/17/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, August 17, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Timothy White Elizabeth Joyner Shane Maynor Denver Cyr Laura Moneyham William Keith Stalvey Before the sale date of Saturday, August 17, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 1 & 8, 2013 657-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 052 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 7B 2279Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10526-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 12 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 852 Name in which assessed M H GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 647-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #804 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-03979-00024-2S-1W P13-M-65 1/2 ACRE IN NE 1/4 of SEC 24 DB 56 P 537 Name in which assessed SAMP GAVIN SR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day of September,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 648-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #812 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-04008-00024-2S-1W P-41-M-65 S 1/2 of SE 1/4 OR 106 P 142,143 OR 141 P. 337 Name in which assessed WILLIE T JENKINS II AS PER REP OF WILLIE T JENKINS & ELOISE JENKINS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 649-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 042 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1204Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:33-2S-01E-189-04995-D07SPRINGWOOD SUBD. PHASE 1 LOT 7 BLOCK D OR 121 P 140 Name in which assessed JOE HILL GREGORY III & SUSAN RENEE PATTERSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 650-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 44 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #272 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: 651-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 045 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1724Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08811-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 19 LOTS 34 & 35 OR 23 P 699 Name in which assessed MRS. MARLENE P CHEWNING said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 652-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 046 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #986 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:05-3S-01W-131-04291-022BOYNTON ESTATES EAST 1/2 LOT 14 LOTS 15 & 16 OR 538 P 708 OR 546 P 691 Name in which assessed AMANDA ALLEN GLOVER & LAURA ALLEN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 653-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 048 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1784Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-09373-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 40 LOTS 6 & 7 OR 9 P 521 Name in which assessed WINDER VI LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 654-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 049 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #263 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-019LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK B LOTS 11, 12, 13, & 14 OR 254 P 151 OR 263 P 119 Name in which assessed HEIDI J PARMARTER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: 655-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 050 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property,and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #629 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03480-000AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK N LOT 27 DB 56 P 335 Name in which assessed THAXTON C YANCY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1,8, 15 & 22, 2013 656-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 051 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2278Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10525-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 11 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 853 Name in which assessed OPAL J GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-142LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK H LOTS 1 2 3 & 4 OR 57 P 793 Name in which assessed J C & FRANCES LONG said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Brain Teaser 1 13 16 19 24 31 36 39 45 48 56 59 62 2 25 46 3 26 42 4 27 43 5 22 40 17 37 49 57 60 63 6 14 32 50 7 28 58 8 20 29 47 51 9 30 44 21 23 41 61 64 15 18 38 52 10 33 53 11 34 54 12 35 55 ACROSS 1. Timber wolves 6. George Michael's old musical group 10. Poke with an elbow 13. Be wild about 14. Astronomical ring 15. Region containing modern-day France 16. Mild, white cheese 18. With 31-Across, "Ripostes" poet 19. Mistake catcher 20. "The StarSpangled Banner" quartet 22. Start of longdistance dialing 23. Brittany seaport 24. Hoong it 28. Picnic carrying case 31. See 18-Across 32. French textile city 33. Trucker's place 36. Auto executive Ferrari 37. Spitting mad 38. Owls prey 39. Baker's no. 40. "Going Rogue" author 41. The younger Obama daughter 42. "Ali" or "Ray" 44. Something to vent 45. Taters 47. Fold, spindle or mutilate 48. Put forth as fact 51. Goes up 56. Quartet member 57. Brig structure 59. Swarm 60. "Each Dawn __" (Cagney lm) 61. Far from windy 62. Be mistaken 63. Coventry containers 64. Be a busybodyDOWN1. Street xture 2. "P-U!" inducer 3. Old TV clown 4. Pasta served in soups 5. Scungilli, calamari, etc. 6. Info on an invitation 7. Linden of "Barne y Miller" 8. Shakespeare title start 9. Zoo barrier 10. Fitness industry giant 11. Vibes 12. Do demolition work 15. Cinema vrit, e.g. 17. Broadway musical with the song "Will I?" 21. Highly adroit 24. Newspaper page for essayists 25. Forbidden thing 26. Radar detector 27. Yoko __ 28. Honda with a palindromic name 29. Chemicals giant 30. Like MacDonald of song 32. 1953 Leslie Caron lm 34. Suer from a charley horse 35. Noodle 37. Drink dog-style 38. Prex with content 40. From pillar to __ 41. Some track and eld events 43. Reg ional phrase 44. With the exception of 45. Sudden gush 46. Gondola guide 47. Place mat puzzles 49. Give o, as light 50. Actress Conn 52. Congregation's assent 53. Hawaiian tuber 54. "Happy Motoring" gas brand 55. Interval on a scale 58. California wine, for short American Prole Hometown Content 7/28/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 3 4 5 167 85 73 68 2956 4913 93 584 69182 200 9 HometownContent 172 9386 4 5 435162978 968457231 713 625489 829341567 546879123 287 596314 351284796 694713852 L A M P O P E D S P A T O D O R N O N O P O L E B O Z O F U Z Z B U S T E O R Z O O N O I D I O M S E A F O O D P O S T R E N T L A P E M I W H E R E L I L I D I D H A L C I V I C Z I A L L S O L I N M A Z E M O A T O L D S A V E A B L E S P R I N T G E N R E M A L A M E J A Z Z E R C I S E T A R A U R A S A C H E E S S B L A S T B E A N S T E Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 1. ASTRONOMY: What are the Van Allen belts? 2. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What kind of animal is described as ursine? 3. U.S. STATES: What is the only state that has a one-syllable name? 4. FAMOUS QUOTES: What comedian once said, “Human beings are the only creatures on earth that allow their children to come back home”? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What percentage of people are left-handed? 6. FOOD & DRINK: What is the spice that gives curry powder its yellow color? 7. ADVERTISING: What peanut butter brand advertises with the slogan, “the No. 1 choice of choosy moms and dads”? 8. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What was the only state that presidential candidate George McGovern carried in the 1972 election? 9. GEOGRAPHY: What is the largest man-made lake in the U.S.? 10. PSYCHOLOGY: What kind of fear is represented by phasmophobia? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Regions of trapped radiation surrounding Earth 2. Bears 3. Maine 4. Bill Cosby 5. About 10 percent 6. Turmeric 7. Jif 8. Massachusetts 9. Lake Mead, created by Hoover Dam 10. A fear of ghosts Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 – Page 9BBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, July 26 … As the Trayvon Martin-inspired siege of the state Capitol closed out its second week, testing Gov. Rick Scott (and the patience of some Capitol denizens), there were plenty of other discussions about tragic fatalities, treatment of young people and tests. State agencies were defending Floridas record of caring for children on at least two fronts, with the U.S. Department of Justice suing over the placement of children with disabilities in nursing homes and critics continuing to raise questions about whether the Department of Children and Families did enough to prevent the deaths of children. Meanwhile, the state Department of Education released the current report cards for elementary and middle schools just a week after legislative leaders had pushed for the agency to chuck its plans for joining a group of other states in using a new test in the near future. And when it was all over the Dream Defenders-led protesters remained camped outside Scotts of“ ce, demanding the governor call a special session to address the states self-defense laws and other policies. DAYLIGHT COME AND (DONT) WANNA GO HOME As the second week of the sit-in dragged on, there was no sign that the protesters were giving up. On Thursday night, the evening before musical artist and political activist Harry Belafonte visited to show his support for the group, 86 people spent the night outside Scotts of“ ce as FDLE of“ cers rang up overtime hours standing watch. Early in the week, Scott had drawn a hard line against giving into the protestors main demand: a special session to repeal the stand your groundŽ law, which became a subject of national debate during the Martin shooting case that ended in George Zimmermans acquittal. Zimmerman was accused of second-degree murder after he fatally shot the 17-year-old Martin last year. Though Zimmerman claimed self-defense, his attorneys didnt use stand your groundŽ as a defense in the trial. Theyve asked for something that you know Im not going to do, Im not going to call a special session,Ž Scott said early Monday after meeting with Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters. In addition to their opposition to the stand your groundŽ law, the students have tried to leverage the state and national attention to discuss juvenile justice laws, such as a zero-tolerance policy in schools and issuing civil citations to juveniles with clean records who are accused of misdemeanors. Scott, who steered clear of the Capitol building all week, dispatched Walters to try to calm the activists. It didnt seem to work. Many of the concerns that you brought to (Scott) are concerns that he feels very strongly about, that he shares,Ž Walters told the protesters. We have been working very hard to reform the juvenile justice system.Ž But Dream Defenders spokeswoman Ciara Taylor noted that the group had pushed legislation including their ideas during the 2013 session. And you were silent the entire legislative session on those bills,Ž Taylor told Walters. So what exactly are you pushing that you feel is going to make a positive change?Ž ANYBODY BUT DCF Also showing little sign of slowing down was the fallout from the resignation of DCF Secretary David Wilkins, who abruptly stepped down July 18 after the deaths of four children who had at least drawn the attention of childwelfare of“ cials. A “ fth died in the days after Wilkins resignation. On Friday, interim DCF Secretary Esther Jacobo directed Assistant Secretary Pete Digre to head up an investigation into the deaths. This analysis is the departments Number One Priority and I want you to deploy whatever resources are necessary to accomplish this as expeditiously as possible,Ž Jacobo wrote. The latest child to die, 2-year-old Jayden Villegas-Morales, was taken off life support Sunday. His father, Angel Luis Villegas, is accused of shaking him in frustration over the boys repeated vomiting, according to The Miami Herald. At least one judge said, in so many words, enough was enough. They need to get out of the child-protection investigation business,Ž Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Cindy Lederman said of the department. Whether law-enforcement agencies or local community-based care organizations conduct the investigations doesnt matter, Lederman said. Anybody but DCF.Ž Meanwhile, the federal government filed suit against the state over Florida children with disabilities who are placed in nursing homes. In a 23-page complaint “ led Monday, the Department of Justice argued that Florida should have taken greater steps to provide services to children in their family homes and communities, rather than in nursing facilities. The state discriminates against children and young adults with disabilities by administering and funding its programs and services for these individuals in a manner that has resulted in their prolonged and unnecessary institutionalization in nursing facilities or placed them at risk of such institutionalization in violationŽ of the Americans with Disabilities Act, said the lawsuit, “ led in federal court in South Florida. The state has pushed back. Liz Dudek, secretary of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, said the state has taken steps this year that, in part, led to 31 children being discharged from nursing facilities and others being diverted. CAN COMMON CORE PASS THE TEST? By the time the state released its annual report card on elementary and middle schools Friday, it felt a bit like the states education establishment had been cramming for an examination of its own. Controversy continued to swirl around whether the state should continue its involvement with the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC. The partnership is a consortium aimed at coming up with tests that will measure students achievements under common core -a nationwide set of standards developed by states that some conservatives consider the precursor to a curriculum backed by the federal government. After House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, sent a letter the previous week asking for the state to pull out of PARCC, supporters and opponents of common core itself clashed. Five former chairmen of the Republican Party of Florida wrote a letter calling for the state to stand behind the common-core program, which is also supported by former Gov. Jeb Bush, still an in” uential voice on education policy. Unfortunately, there has been a tremendous amount of misinformation about the movement to raise academic standards, especially among our fellow conservatives,Ž they wrote. We implore our fellow Republicans to judge the Common Core State Standards by what they are: academic standards, not curriculum and not a national mandate.Ž Those signing the letter were state Sen. John Thrasher, Carole Jean Jordan, Al Cardenas, Tom Slade and Van Poole. It also chided those who might attack the other side of the debate. But Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, seen as a potential presidential contender in 2016, knocked the idea in an interview with The Shark Tank, a conservative blog. And I am very concerned, and quite frankly opposed to any effort to try to create some sort of national curriculum standard and then try to leverage the power of the federal governments funding to force states to adopt a certain curriculum standard,Ž Rubio said, according to the site. State and local levels are the best places to come up with curriculum reform, and its something the federal government shouldnt be deeply involved in.Ž As for the grades under the current system, they showed a decline that educators say is due to a series of changes the state has made as it tries to ratchet up standards -in part with common core in mind. In all, 107 elementary and middle schools … slightly more than 4 percent … received failing grades on the preliminary report cards. (The numbers also include combination schoolsŽ and high schools that dont have graduating classes.) In 2012, 40 schools got F grades, amounting to just more than 1.5 percent. The department graded 21 more schools this year. That marked the highest number of schools to get an F at least since the program started including learning gains as part of the report card in 2002. And it came despite the State Board of Education agreeing to extend by a year a rule preventing schools from dropping more than one letter grade on the report cards. But without the changes, of“ cials said, 261 schools would have received failing grades. Still, the states main teachers union ripped into the new results and the system that produced them. The constantly changing measures the Florida DOE uses in grading schools renders them meaningless as a comparison of school progress,Ž Florida Education Association President Andy Ford said. This system is ” awed and does not re” ect rising student achievement and the dedicated and caring efforts by our public school teachers and other school employees to provide our children with a high quality education.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: Protesters continued their sit-in at the Capitol in an effort to pressure lawmakers to deal with what activists call problems in the states self-defense laws and policies for disciplining students and juveniles. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Well, Ill tell you, its hard to sleep when youre “ ghting for District 8.Ž … Rep. Alan Williams, D-Tallahassee, talking to WCTV in Tallahassee about his residency. The station reported that Williams owns a homesteaded property outside his district and is partial owner of a property within the district. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Controversies dog Scott, DCF, DOEBy SLIM RANDLES We heard about the lemonade stand later, of course, as it was several blocks from where the rest of us lived, but it was only a couple of houses from Herb Collins. He had to go there. He couldnt resist. The stand was set up by Heather and Tim Naismith, a brother/sister team whose ages added together wouldnt hit 18. Herb watched them set it up on that hot afternoon and “ nally couldnt stand it. He had to have some fun. The lemonade was “ fty cents, a bargain in anyones book, as canned soda pop is running about a buck these days. And anyone can see that a lemonade stand set up by two youngsters is something to be encouraged. The free enterprise system at its very best. Ingenuity. American spirit. Besides, those Naismith kids are kinda cute, having worked so hard to get the lemonade made and the card table set up out under the tree in front. Herb explained later that what he was really setting out to do, besides giving the kids some business, was to teach them a few harmless lessons in how to succeed in retail. Years ago, before he got into the trucking business, Herb ran a pawn shop in the city. He was known to be a sharp trader, and he delighted in telling us how little he paid for things and how much he sold them for. Hi kids,Ž he told them. Pretty good lemonade?Ž The best, Mr. Collins,Ž Heather said. So ... fifty cents a glass? Well, all right, Ill have a glass.Ž He put down fifty cents and they filled a tall paper cup nearly to the brim for him. It was good lemonade. So how much for four glasses of lemonade?Ž Tim did some silent figuring. Two dollars, sir.Ž Well, thats the retail price, of course,Ž Herb said, but now were buying in bulk. What you do when someone wants to buy in bulk is you adjust the price. I think I should be able to buy four glasses of lemonade at, say, forty cents a glass. What do you think?Ž The kids whispered in each others ears. Mr. Collins,Ž said Heather, if you buy four glasses for forty cents each, how much would you expect to pay for a dozen glasses?Ž Heartened by their interest in business, Herb said, Oh, probably about thirty cents a glass, I guess. You have to make allowances for volume, you see.Ž Good,Ž said Heather. Well sell you a dozen glasses of lemonade, then, because we want to sell a lot of it, and well only charge you $3.60 for them.Ž Herb pulled out the money. But youll have to drink them all here,Ž Heather said. We dont have a license for carryout.Ž --------------Brought to you by the dogs and cats at your local shelter. Visit them and bring home a new best friend. Youll never be sorry. HOME COUNTRYBusiness lessons learned at the lemonade stand The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com -Janet

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 1, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comExploring Thailand – something exotic to discoverBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsNothing conjures up more exotic images than the mention of Thailand with its distinctive landscapes, unusual temples, and unique food. From the air, Thailand enchants with its many tiny islands, verdant green droplets, strung across the aquamarine sea. Although similar in some ways to our own local limestone geology, Thailand appears very different. Instead of sinkholes, much of the soft limestone has eroded away leaving giant karst outcroppings jutting skyward. On land these hills appear stark and dramatic against the jungle sky. In the ocean, these islands, called Ko,Ž spring up out of the sea. Favored by rock climbers, these islands are home to the small bird whose nests are used in birds nest soup. July through October is the rainy season, when prices are cheaper and more negotiable. Dont assume their rainy season is like ours however, where a daily shower develops and then clears. Instead it is possible to have torrential rain for several hours or several consecutive days, then not even a raindrop for weeks. Only you can decide if it is worth the savings. Beautiful beaches abound, and roads wind their way up the hilly terrain and away from the beach. Transportation between beaches is typically by local long-tail boats. Distinctive, these boats are adorned with a ribbon, and powered by a pivoting car engine, with open headers and a long straight shaft sporting a propeller. Expect the driver to wait until his boat is full before leaving, no matter how long that takes. Powering through the glass clear water, the boat ride is an experience itself. For longer trips to famous Ko Phi Phi, or Phuket, opt for a traditional powerboat, to reduce the transportation time. Where else would you ride an elephant? Giant and lumbering, these gentle creatures still transport Thai royalty for ceremonies. Steered only with a stick, a trek through the jungle makes a great excursion. When you complete your journey your elephant waits patiently for his reward for a trip well done. Synonymous with Thailand is massage on the beach. Whole markets have nothing but vendors offering massage. Relax to waves crashing, gulls crying, gentle ocean breezes, and the gentle strokes of your professional masseuse. On a quiet roadside scooters appear. Next, tables fold down from the scooters, and grills, and woks sizzle. Soon locals are lined up, and the aroma of exotic food “ lls the air. For only a few U.S. dollars, sample the local cuisine. Spicy peppers, coconut, noodles, and rice are a mainstay; skewers of meats, roasted corn on the cob, banana nutella pancakes, and fruits unknown. Then just as suddenly, they pack up and go home. Wedding cake shaped temples, spires reaching skyward, some blinding white, with pointed roofs, and trim like ” ames pointing everywhere. Giant golden Buddhas sit serenely gazing on, while crouching tigers, and hissing serpents guard the temple doors. Climb the 1,237 steps to the top of the Tiger Cave Temple and marvel at the landscape, so ” at with scattered hills. Everywhere you turn in Thailand, there is something new and exotic to discover.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruising.com. PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCrouching tigers guard the entrance to a temple in Thailand. Street vendors pop up on roadsides offering local cuisine. Riding elephants in the Thai jungle. Giant karst outcroppings called KoŽ spring up out of the sea. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). 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