Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03286

Full Text

Discover Discover: Give new life to your lifestyle /Inside


I SUNDAYI


Vt y

Sunny.
PAGE A4


CITRUUUS CNT UNTY





D d lrNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


/ 1 Due to early deadlines, late sports news and lottery results were not available for today edition.
SThe Chronicle apologizes for the inconvenience.





R6sum6 doesn't add up


Choice for Citrus tourism director admits incorrect dates in job history


OCTOBER 27, 2013 Florida's Best Community


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 81


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The choice for Citrus
County's first executive di-
rector of tourism exaggerated
credentials on his r6sum6 to
appear he spent a longer time
at two similar jobs than he ac-
tually had, according to re-
ports and interviews.
Robert "Bob" Marx, who is
set to be confirmed by county
commissioners Nov 5 to the
$75,000-a-year position, said
on his r6sum6 and job appli-
cation that he was president
and chief executive officer of


the Peoria, Ill., Area Conven-
tion and Visitors' Bureau
from January 2010 to January
2013. In actuality, he resigned
in January 2012.
Marx also listed on his r6-
sum6 an identical position in
Bakersfield, Calif, from De-
cember 2006 to September
2008. He actually only spent
six months on that job, though
he stayed in Bakersfield until
2008 as a marketing consult-
ant, according to interviews
and published reports.
Marx, in an interview Fri-
day, acknowledged the dis-
crepancies, but said they


were simple errors because
he continued work in both
communities as a tourism
consultant after resigning
from the convention bureaus.
"In actuality, I was working
with them still," he said, re-
ferring to the Peoria job. "I
was an ally and supported
what they were doing. Per-
haps I didn't sit in the chair,
per se. They realized my im-
portance and felt I was a
player"
Citrus County officials, who
offered Marx the job earlier
this month, were unaware of
the r6sum6 errors until a


reporter told them Friday
afternoon.
Later Friday, Human Re-
sources Director Sherry An-
derson said she confirmed
with Marx's former employ-
ers that Marx ended his Peo-
ria job in January 2012 and
began his next job with GF
Hotels that same month.
Marx's r6sum6 said he was
with GF from January 2013 to
July 2013.
"I think it was a typograph-
ical error, a lapse in mem-
ory," Anderson said.
See Page A2


-r


Special to the Chronicle
Robert "Bob" Marx is in the running for the
position of executive director of tourism,
a job which starts at $75,000 annually.


WITH SHELLS ON


V J,


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Eighteen-month-old Bentley Robertson and mother Elexis of Crystal River meet with Sonny Cooter on Saturday at the 10th annual Great
American Cooter Festival in Inverness.


SONNY CELEBRATES A DECADE

AS COOTER FEST KICKS OFF
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS
onny Cooter enjoyed the cooler temperatures Saturday as
he welcomed guests to his annual party.
He had to shine his shell first though, for the 10th annual GreatAmerican Cooter Fest
at Liberty Park after a late night of dancing at the Rock the Block concert Friday
Sonny was a little lost for words as he was overwhelmed by the number of friends present
at the festival. However, Inverness special events director Sharon Skeele-Hogan said Cooter
Fest represents building family relationships.
"The beauty pageant always chokes me up and last night the rock the block had 3,000 peo-
ple there," she said. "This is all for hometown awesomeness. The people here are enjoying
See Page All


Today's
activities:
6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.:
Cooter triathlon
Noon: Cooterween
registration
1 p.m.: Cooterween
costume contest
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.:
Cooter Cup turtle races
2:45 p.m.: Duck, Duck,
Cooter race
3 p.m. to 4 p.m.:
Greg Solomon magic show
4 p.m.: Trick-or-treat/
cupcake wars


Medicaid

changes

coming

to Citrus

Enrollees

being moved

toprivateplans

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The long-term care
component of Florida's
Medicaid reform will soon
be hitting Citrus County
The change is part of
the shift to the Statewide
Medicaid Managed Care
Program.
Eventually, all of
Florida's 3.2 million Med-
icaid enrollees will be
moved to private health
insurance companies.
The long-term care rollout
started
SWhile the in Au-
law pushes g u s t ,
patients with the
toward e n t i r e
private state ex-
insurers,
some serv- pected
ices must to be
be covered, covered
/Page AlO. March 1,
2014.
"It a huge undertaking,
and there have been some
problems," said Allen
Curtis, administrator of
Citrus Health and Rehab
Center "But those issues
should be resolved by the
time it gets to our area."
Citrus County currently
has approximately 23,000
residents eligible for
some type of Medicaid
services, with 3,209 of
them age 65 and older
Eligibility for Medicaid
is determined by Depart-
ment of Children and
Families or the Social Se-
curity Administration (for
SSI recipients).
According to the
Florida Agency for Health


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................ D5
Crossword ..............A14
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M enus......................A20
M ovies ..................... A 14
Obituaries ..............A18
Together...................A15
Veterans ..................A17


I6 ii liii N U I o


. Page AO10


As feds wrangle overhaul, Vt. eyes single-payer


Associated Press
MONTPELIER, Vt -As states
open insurance marketplaces
amid uncertainty about whether
they're a solution for health care,
Vermont is eyeing a bigger goal,
one that more fully embraces a
government-funded model.
The state has a planned 2017
launch of the nation's first universal
health care system, a sort of mod-
ified Medicare-for-all that has


long been a dream for many liberals.
The plan is especially ambi-
tious in the current atmosphere
surrounding health care in the
United States. Republicans in
Congress balk at the federal
health overhaul years after it was
signed into law States are still ne-
gotiating their terms for imple-
menting it. And some major
employers have begun to drasti-
cally limit their offerings of em-
ployee health insurance, raising


questions about the future of the
industry altogether
In such a setting, Vermont's
plan looks more and more like an
anomaly It combines universal
coverage with new cost controls in
an effort to move away from a sys-
tem in which the more proce-
dures doctors and hospitals
perform, the more they get paid,
to one in which providers have a
set budget to care for a set num-
ber of patients.


The result will be health care
that's "a right and not a privilege,"
Gov Peter Shumlin said.
Where some governors have
backed off the politically charged
topic of health care, Shumlin re-
cently surprised many by digging
more deeply into it. In an inter-
view with a newspaper's editorial
board, he reversed himself some-
what on earlier comments that


SPage A8


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW
50




A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


RESUME
Continued from PageAl

However, that contra-
dicts Marx's recollection
that he spent nearly a year
in the Peoria area, provid-
ing tourism consultation to
smaller communities that
partner with the conven-
tion bureau.
Anderson also said she
spoke with someone with
the Greater Bakersfield Area
Convention and Visitors'
Bureau who confirmed
Marx's employment from
December 2006 to Septem-
ber 2008. That contradicts
both published reports of
Marx's resignation in May
2007 and Marx's recollection
that he spent more than a
year consulting in the Bak-
ersfield area after leaving
the convention bureau.
A reporter called the
number in Bakersfield
that Anderson provided.
The number was for Rick
Davis, a former member of
the Bakersfield conven-
tion board who retired
three years ago. He said he
was relying on memory
when he gave Anderson
the employment dates.
Davis, who also was the
Kern County, Calif, tourism
director, confirmed he
hired Marx as a consultant
after he left the Bakers-
field job to continue mar-
keting work in the area.
"We were close friends.
He's a very likeable man,"
Davis said.

Marx sought
moving expenses,
accommodations
Marx was a last-minute
entry in the application
stack for Citrus County di-
rector of tourism, a job re-
cently created by the
Tourism Development
Council and approved by
the county commission.
Funding for the Citrus
County Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau comes
solely from the bed tax on
overnight accommodations.
Marx said he had re-
cently moved to Kissim-
mee from Philadelphia,
where he was director of
sales and marketing for


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GF Hotels, a company that
provides help at hotels in
transition between man-
agement teams.
He said he left GF be-
cause he wanted to return
to Florida. From 1998 to
2006, Marx was president
and owner of Reed Roberts
Marketing Communica-
tions in West Palm Beach.
Marx said he was serv-
ing as an adjunct professor
at the University of Central
Florida's Rosen College of
Hospitality Management
when he learned of the
Citrus County job.
One of three finalists,
Marx met with members of
the TDC, Commissioner
Rebecca Bays and Assis-
tant County Administrator
Cathy Pearson. The only
other time he had visited
Citrus County, Marx said,
was participating in a golf
tournament in Inverness
as part of his West Palm
Beach consulting company
Impressed with his cre-
dentials and background,
the TDC made Marx its
unanimous choice on Oct 9.
Pearson made the offer to
Marx for the new director's
job at a starting salary of
$75,000, plus an increase of
up to $5,000 after six months
at the TDC's discretion.
The next day, Marx sent
an email to Pearson in
which he made several fi-


During his TDC
interviews in Citrus
County, Marx said he
never mentioned to
anyone the discrepancies
on his resume because
no one asked about the
employment dates.


nancial requests, including:
The pay would in-
crease to $80,000 in three
months instead of six.
The county would pay
moving expenses from
Chicago, where his furni-
ture is stored. Marx said
moving the furniture from
Chicago to Kissimmee
would be about $4,900, but
he could get a better esti-
mate for a move to Citrus
County and let Pearson
know
Forty-five days of free
hotel accommodations to
give him time to find per-
manent residency
"Since it is the slow sea-
son I would bet that one of the
hotels would offer a very
favorable rate to the county,
plus this would provide
me an opportunity to learn
the hospitality product
and customer base in the
area," he wrote to Pearson.


In another email three
days later, Marx asked
about an expense account
and mileage reimbursement
Pearson said she flatly
told him the county would
not provide moving or liv-
ing expenses. The only
perk, offered to all hires at
a department director
level, is three weeks of an-
nual vacation.
And, because the posi-
tion is a department direc-
tor, Marx can be fired
without cause and receive
two months' severance pay
Should commissioners
confirm him on Nov 5, his
scheduled starting date is
Nov 18.

Marx: 'No intention
to hide anything'
Politics, Marx said,
forced him from both jobs
in Peoria and Bakersfield.


In Peoria, the city gov-
ernment wanted to
significantly reduce the
convention bureau's
funding.
"I thought I couldn't be
successful where there
was that strong a head-
wind of people trying to
cut our budget for no sig-
nificant reason," he said.
Two years into a three-
year contract, Marx re-
signed. He said he spent
the next eight months
working as a paid consult-
ant for smaller towns in
Peoria County to better co-
ordinate their marketing
strategies with the con-
vention bureau. He de-
clined a reporter's request
to name the towns he
worked with.
The Bakersfield job
came to an end six months
after it began. Marx said
the city wanted to take
control of the convention
bureau and he knew his
employment days were
numbered when the city
manager eliminated the
tourism board.
"I'd be lying if I said it
didn't cross my mind,"
Marx said, explaining his
reasons for resigning.
Marx's friend, Rick
Davis, hired Marx as a
paid marketing consultant
for the Kern County
tourism bureau.


"He was very knowl-
edgeable," Davis said.
"He's a team-builder with
authority He's very
positive."
Marx left Bakersfield in
December2008 for a job as
general manager of a new
Fairfield Inn & Suites in
Gadsden, Ala.
During his TDC inter-
views in Citrus County,
Marx said he never men-
tioned to anyone the dis-
crepancies on his r6sum6
because no one asked
about the employment
dates.
"It wasn't done in any
deviant, sly behavior," he
said of the r6sume errors.
"There was no intention to
hide anything."
Bays and Pearson both
said they were relying on
Anderson's background
check of Marx.
Bays, however, said
resume details are
important.
"I like people to be hon-
est with me," she said.
"Somebody put something
on their resum6, I'd like
for that to be accurate and
verified."
Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty contributed to this
report.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn.


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Page A3 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27,2013



TATER&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Crist plots political comeback


Former governor now

running as a Democrat

Associated Press
ORLANDO Charlie Crist had barely
entered the room before a throng of
teachers swarmed him.
The union delegates and stalwart
Democrats wanted autographs, pic-
tures, hugs and even kisses from the for-
mer Republican governor
"We love you, Charlie!" a woman
shouted, locking arms with Crist as some-
one snapped a picture.
"I love you all," he told those gathered
at the Florida Education Association's
annual convention this month.
Nearly three years after losing a U.S.
Senate campaign to Republican Marco
Rubio and leaving the governor's man-
sion, Crist is plotting a political come-
back that seems fantastical even by
Florida's stranger-than-fiction standards.
The man who once identified himself
as a Ronald Reagan Republican is
preparing for another gubernatorial bid,
this time as a Barack Obama Democrat.
As he travels the nation's largest swing-
voting state, Crist is emphasizing the bi-
partisanship and consensus-building that
marked his sole term as governor Most
early polls show him leading the unpopu-
lar incumbent, Republican Gov Rick
Scott, a former hospital company execu-
tive elected with tea party support in 2010.
Democratic officials, looking for a candi-


Around the
COUNTY

Health care changes
topic of meeting
A panel of local experts
will present their perspec-
tives on health care expan-
sion at a League of Women
Voters of Citrus County
meeting at 10:30 a.m. Sat-
urday, Nov. 2, at Central
Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
For information, call 352-
601-6857 or email
lwvcc2013@gmail.com, or
visit the Facebook page,
League of Women Voters of
Citrus County.
Nature Coast
Republicans to meet
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will meet at
9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 9,
with a coffee social at
8:30 a.m. The guest
speaker will be state Sen.
Charlie Dean.
The meeting will be at
American Legion Post 155,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
For more information, call
352-344-8786
Delegation to meet
Tuesday
Citrus County Legislative
Delegation will meet from
3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29,
in the Citrus County Com-
mission chamber, in the Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
For more information, call
Dawn Faherty at state Rep.
Jimmie T. Smith's office at
352-560-6020.
Fall festival planned
at Baptist church
First Baptist Church of In-
verness will host its Fall
Festival from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at 550 Pleas-
ant Grove Road.
This is a free event with
hay rides, games and food.
For more information, call
352-726-1252, or go to
www.fbcinverness.com.
-From staff reports

Correction

According to incorrect in-
formation provided to the
Chronicle, the site of the
Red Ribbon Week "mus-
tache" on Page A7 in Satur-
day's edition was incorrect.
Students at Central Ridge
Elementary School lined up
to make the pictogram.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Nearly three years after losing a blistering U
Rubio and leaving the governor's mansion
political comeback that seems fantastic
standards.
date to lead them back to power in Florida
after 15 years, have embraced the convert
In an era of political polarization,
Democratic leaders see his pragmatic
governing record as a national model for
a party trying to claim the political center
and solidify gains among the country's


City council meets

on Monday
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- The city
council on Monday will take up
the issue of allowing public input
during meetings.
City officials would like to set a
public comment policy that is in
compliance with state law
The city currently allows for pub-
lic comment during two designated
periods at each council meeting. In
addition, public comment is al-
lowed prior to any action being
taken on a public-hearing item. The
Citrus County Commission recently
began disallowing public comment
during public-hearing items amid
public outcry
This year, the Florida Legisla-
ture adopted a law that mandates
that members of the public be
given a reasonable opportunity to
be heard on a proposition before
a public board or commission. The
statute provides that the public's
right to be heard is to be subject to
rules or policies adopted by the
board or commission, with such
rules or policies to be limited to


S more popular," said Ed Rendell, the for-
S L mer Democratic governor of Pennsylva-
1 nia and ex-chairman of the National
1Governors Association. "Charlie's going
to ride a wave."
w j |According to a Gallup poll this month,
nearly half of Americans now identify
themselves as independent, an all-time
high. A separate survey found that a
record 60 percent of Americans are so
Dissatisfied with the way Democrats and
BRepublicans are governing the country
*.j that they favor the creation of a third
major party
Crist, who calls himself "the people's
^governor," might be able to capitalize on
that disenchantment- if voters are will-
ing to overlook his history of conflicting
positions in key areas.
His reputation as a moderate governor
*stemmed in part from his willingness to
break with the GOP on major issues. He
*vetoed legislation that would have re-
*quired ultrasounds before abortions,
killed a bill that would have instituted
merit pay for teachers and supported the
restoration of voting rights for ex-felons.
Associated Press Scott has since signed ultrasound and
J.S. Senate campaign to Republican Marco merit-pay bills and reversed Crist's vot-
n, former Gov. Charlie Crist is plotting a ing rights effort.
al even by Florida's stranger-than-fiction Crist calls "bringing a new tone to Tal-
lahassee of bipartisanship" his proudest
fast-growing bloc of independent voters, achievement.
A statewide victory also would give "People are so fed up with the partisan
Florida Democrats an organizational rancor that we are experiencing on a na-
edge in the 2016 presidential election, tional level," Crist recently told The Asso-
"The shutdown and the fiasco in Wash- ciated Press. "I would compare it to
ington have made that style of bring- children in a schoolyard, but that would be
everybody-together government much insulting to the children in the schoolyard."


Volunteers make a difference


Scientist


to discuss


springs


research

Special to the Chronicle
Philip Rhinesmith, a sen-
ior environmental scientist
for the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
will be the featured speaker
for the Coffee and Conversa-
tion at the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum at 7 p.m.
Nov 7. He will describe the
archaeological finds discov-
ered by divers during the
restoration of the Chassa-
howitzka Springs, a popular
recreation site in southwest-
ern Citrus County which has
had human occupation for
more than 9,000 years.
Chassahowitzka is a Semi-
nole word meaning "place of
the pumpkins." As engineers
and workers from the water
district and Underwater En-
gineering Services Inc.
(UESI) cleaned the springs,
clearing organic sediment
that was 12 feet thick in
some places, they realized
they were uncovering signif-
icant evidence of human oc-
cupation and use of the
springs.
Rhinesmith will tell the
story of researching the area
of Chassahowitzka Springs
through the Florida Master
Site File at the Florida De-
partment of State, Division
of Historical Resources,
which is the state's official
inventory of historical cul-
tural resources.
"We knew the area was in-
habited during several peri-
ods of human occupation,"
he said. "To protect and con-
serve these cultural re-
sources, the district worked
with Southeast Archaeologi-
cal Research Inc. to develop
a plan to conserve and re-
cover the cultural resources
exposed during the sedi-
ment removal process."
"That discoveries of these
artifacts and the opening of
this window to the past will
allow a whole new story to
be told on the history of the
Chassahowitzka Springs and
the community of the same
name, going back over time
some 9,000 years," said
Kathy Turner Thompson,
Citrus County historical re-
sources manager stated.
The program is free and
open to the public. For seat
reservations, call 352-341-
6427 or 352-341-6436, or
email katherine.turner
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
The museum is open from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday


those that:
Provide guidelines regarding
the amount of time an individual
has to address the board or
commission.
Prescribe procedures for al-
lowing representatives of groups
to address the board or commis-
sion, rather than all members of
such groups.
Prescribe procedures for an
individual to use in order to in-
form the board or commission of a
desire to be heard.
Designate a specified period
of time for public comment.
City officials said while the city
has previously allowed public com-
ment, it wants the council to adopt
a formal policy on public comment
in accordance with state statute.
The council also will:
Discuss the issue of the idled
harvester used by Save Crystal
River Inc. to clean up King's Bay
Recently there has been a spate of
letters, with the first one coming
from Steve Lamb and asking the
city council to write to the board of
Save the Manatee Club, requesting
that the organization not present a
legal challenge to a permit being
sought by Save Crystal River to run
the harvester Helen Spivey, co-
chair of Save the Manatee Club,
replied to the city's letter saying
while her organization is commit-


ted to the cleanup of the bay and
applauds every effort to do so, it
would not stand idly by and watch
harm done to the bay, even if the in-
tent was noble. Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, has joined the fray by
writing a letter to Jimmy Buffett,
the co-founder of Save the Mana-
tee Club, asking that a legal chal-
lenge to the new permit not
happen.
Introduce Leslie Bollin as the
city's special events coordinator
Get the latest crime statistics
from Capt. Danny Linhart, the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office's west-
side commander
Hear information regarding
legal requirements related to ex-
tending the term of the Commu-
nity Redevelopment Agency
Discuss the status of major
projects for fiscal year 2014.
At the CRA meeting at 6:30 p.m.,
the council in its capacity as the
board will consider approval of a
resolution appropriating $17,500
as matching funding for a South-
west Florida Water Management
District grant that will provide a
design for a stormwater system for
the commercial waterfront district
and portions of the northeast sec-
tion of the city.
Contact Chronicle reporterAB.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Volunteers Paul Calbacher and Wilfred Provencher pack a truck Saturday with boxes of food donated
by Citrus County residents during the 2013 countywide food drive. Food was donated by individuals
leaving bags and boxes at their mailbox to be picked up by mail carriers who, in turn, dropped the items
at the post office. From there, the food is taken to the Daystar Life Center in Crystal River for
distribution to various agencies and local food banks. The Community Food Bank of Citrus County along
with Citrus County Harvest, the United States Postal Service, Nature Coast Volunteer Center and local
food pantries teamed up to make the food drive work. Oct.26 was chosen because it is national Make
a Difference Day a Day of Caring, which is the biggest national day of community service. Since
1999 the food drive has collected more than 549,000 pounds of food donated by county residents to
help families in need.




Public comment on CR agenda


*




A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Do what works best for
you in the months ahead. Look over
the highs and lows you have experi-
enced recently and choose a path that
suits your current situation. Being a lit-
tle different will draw interest and spark
ideas that could turn a little venture into
something exciting.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Keep
your emotions in check, or you may
ruin an opportunity to enrich your life.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Offer
something if you want something in re-
turn. Your charm and carefree attitude
will attract an audience willing to follow
your lead and support your venture.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
may be tempted to get involved in an
impractical project. Don't be fooled by
someone's improbable claims.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
follow someone else. You have to
make your choice based on your own
judgment.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You will
instinctively know what will and won't
work. Journey in a direction that caters
to your skills and expertise, and it will
lead to money and success.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You will
learn something valuable from experi-
ences with people who grab your at-
tention and capture your heart.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Keep
your emotions in check when reacting
to others. Keep busy with challenging
physical activities to avoid emotionally
draining conversation.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do your
best to right a wrong or to fix a problem
that has sprung from a misunderstand-
ing. Share your thoughts and sugges-
tions with the people who count.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Do your
own thing and follow your dream. You
will meet new friends if you participate
in an event that deals with something
you know little about.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen to oth-
ers, but be careful how you respond.
Now is not the time to start a war.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Put more
into your important friendships. The
bonds you have with others will make
a difference in the quality of your life.
Caring, sharing and teamwork will
bring you the greatest joy.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Use your
imagination to find a viable solution to
your financial problems. A service or
skill you have can be turned into a sec-
ond income with a little ingenuity.


ENTERTAINMENT


Quincy Jones sues
Jackson estate
LOS ANGELES Quincy
Jones sued Michael Jackson's
estate claiming he is owed mil-
lions in royalties and production
fees on some of the superstar's
greatest hits.
Jones' lawsuit Friday seeks at
least $10 million from the
singer's estate and Sony Music
Entertainment, claiming the enti-
ties improperly re-edited songs
to deprive him of royalties and
production fees. The music has
been used in the film "This Is It"
and a pair of Cirque du Soleil
shows based on the King of
Pop's songs, the lawsuit states.
Jones also claims that he
should have received a pro-
ducer's credit on the music in
"This Is It." His lawsuit seeks an
accounting of the estate's profits
from the works so that Jones
can determine how much he is
owed.
The producer worked with
Jackson on three of his most
popular solo albums, "Off the
Wall," "Thriller" and "Bad."
Jackson's estate wrote in a
statement that it was saddened
by Jones' lawsuit. "To the best of
its knowledge, Mr. Jones has
been appropriately compen-
sated over approximately 35
years for his work with Michael,"
the statement said.
An after-hours message left at
Sony Music's New York offices
was not immediately returned.
Jackson's hits "Billie Jean,"
"Thriller" and "Don't Stop 'Til You
Get Enough" are among the
songs Jones claims were re-
edited to deprive him of royalties
and his producer's fee.
Jones' lawsuit states the pro-
ducer's contracts called for him
to have the first opportunity to
re-edit or alter the songs, in part
to protect his reputation.


Associated Press
Quincy Jones sued Michael Jackson's estate on Friday
claiming that he was owed millions in royalties and fees on
music that's been used in post-death Jackson projects.


Malaysia bans
Ke$ha concert
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
-Authorities in Muslim-majority
Malaysia have banned a
planned concert by U.S. pop
singer Ke$ha after deciding it
would hurt cultural and religious
sensitivities.
Concert organizer Livescape
said it received a letter about the
decision on the eve of the show
that was to be held Saturday at
a Kuala Lumpur stadium.
The Ministry of Communica-
tions and Multimedia said sepa-
rately that it was rejecting the
application for Ke$ha to perform
for reasons of religion and culture.
The ministry's statement did
not elaborate. Ke$ha, whose hits
include "Tik Tok" and "Die
Young," has songs that make
explicit references to sex and
liquor.
Last month, Malaysian offi-
cials also barred a performance
by American metal band Lamb
of God, accusing the Grammy-
nominated group's work of being
blasphemous.


Ke$ha and her team had pre-
viously agreed to modify their
planned show in Malaysia, in-
cluding making changes to her
song lyrics and wardrobe, to
comply with the government's
general guidelines for performers,
Livescape said in its statement.
Cleveland's rock hall
honors Stones
CLEVELAND --It was a big
day in Cleveland for fans of the
Rolling Stones.
The Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame and Museum wrapped up
a weeklong schedule of events
honoring the Rolling Stones as
part of its annual Music Masters
series.
The final day's events Satur-
day included a conference fo-
cused on the career of the
Rolling Stones and their impact
on rock music.
And Saturday night it was an
all-star tribute concert with musi-
cians who have performed with
the Rolling Stones over the past
half-century.

-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 27, the
300th day of 2013. There are 65
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 27, 1858, the 26th
president of the United States,
Theodore Roosevelt, was born
in New York City.
On this date:
In 1904, the first rapid-transit
subway, the IRT, was inaugurated
in New York City.
In 1938, Du Pont announced a
name for its new synthetic yarn:
"nylon."
In 1962, during the Cuban Mis-
sile Crisis, a U-2 reconnaissance
aircraft was shot down while flying
over Cuba, killing the pilot, U.S. Air
Force Maj. Rudolf Anderson Jr.
In 1971, the Democratic Republic
of Congo was renamed the Repub-
lic of Zaire (but it went back to its
previous name in 1997).
Ten years ago: Suicide bombers
in Baghdad struck Red Cross head-
quarters and three police stations,
killing dozens of people.
Five years ago: The body of
singer-actress Jennifer Hudson's
7-year-old nephew, Julian King,
was found in an SUV three days
after Hudson's mother and brother
were found shot to death in the
Chicago home they'd shared. (The
estranged husband of Hudson's
sister, William Balfour, is charged in
the killings.)
One year ago: Sixty million peo-
ple in the eastern United States
braced for high winds, torrential
rains, power outages and even
snow from Hurricane Sandy, which
was headed toward a merger with
two wintry weather systems.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Nanette Fabray is 93. Actor-come-
dian John Cleese is 74. Author Fran
Lebowitz is 63. Singer Simon Le
Bon is 55.
Thought for Today: "In any mo-
ment of decision, the best thing you
can do is the right thing, the next
best thing is the wrong thing, and
the worst thing you can do is noth-
ing." Theodore Roosevelt, Amer-
ican president (1858-1919).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SP HI O PR 'HI L
7 NA -182 47 NA L .73 4


City
,L'. Il'in Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
6ainesvIlle
Hourestead
J.ll.f 1 ,I [~Iti
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Lakeland


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Miami
Ocala
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Vero Beach
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MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR |HI LO PR '
77 51NA -- NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK ExeIU .,D. diy
S'................ TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 79 Low: So
Sunny

--- ~MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 55
.. 3^ CJrII cloudy

r TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 84 Low: 56
r' ,A r MA' sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75150
Record 90/40
Normal 83/58
Mean temp 63
Deparure tmm mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
, Ir...' il. 0.00 in
"''".1 i lthe montl t1l1 in,
Toial for Ihe yeai 5214 rn,
Nrmal onn i year 47,30 in
UV INDEX! 6
0-2 niIiinal,4 3l4 low.5 -6 moralte.
7-9 highr 10+ very hiqh
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saiuldiiay atI 3pm 3016mit


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 P.m 49
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 I) m 40%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 5.5/12
Monday's count: 5.5
Tuesday's count: 6.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday wis moderate wirlh.,, .i
ants mInly paml, }claes


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
' i!, .:r i i r- i j .r ,
1027 SUNDAY 12"30 643 1254 7:05
10/28 MONDAY 114 25 136 747
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
-SSET TONIGHT F
S) URISE TOMORROW. i
9 0 i0 MODMWISETOUAYt .. t 7AM
iW lille Nwi wn MK17 INV.nII 0 l O, _'_

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: MODERATE. Thore Is no burn ban.
FLi trf !Mlkw,,TIAI i ll 1fI .-l 14 i vtarl 1 F Ir7y il / ,-t777 Fir F rg
": ", ' ,'V .wertlrr.*

WATERING RULES
Lavn wa!1nng limited Iv ro days per Ywk bLton 1 0 am Gn after 4 pm -as foows:
F *' ?, n water Th sday iL or 1.,
ODD address y wter on 'r-..'; j i ... ,.i u :..
Hand ,taking with a lhul-fi ozzd or micz imgatn o( r7gras; areas su as
wgetabI garnts, towers and sutnS ca-n be d o any day and at any tm'
Cutws County Uites' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL n-w
plij nateria 352- 7-7669. Some new '' '-. .... ,:.. a6. 1 fitiooa!
watenng a~iwances
1 ", r,-i--,-, .." r.' -" ,'.!",-i", ",(all:G Cyotlnma%'e 352-726-2.32LCi yof
Cryst_ ve~r @ 353-795-4216 exi. 313. uniTcoipo1aed f I'*' II 1'/ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
ot w-m "'At King'- B1a
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
17 N4af 3aa 1H4 a'83{ p
1IAl 4.1b3 .ly '! i
/ Slj.f.4,3 935 |r341 [
l(52,i'f37,] -^- ;,7 ip


""At Ma ',>s Cwek
Monday
High/Low HighLow
ry/ia,%f,, a t i2 p:939 p
f3aagZli -- *iwvp
*237a.7Saa Wi'2 lit, 38 f


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. 3.j. and inland waters ".,i
have a Iij1il chop. 'ui-,l sulnny skies
today.


Gulf water
temperature


73
Taken M Aripoka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withiacoochee at Holder 30.39 30.33 3552
Ti;i Afl i., 4 -ijriiiij. 38.77 39.25
7-0 4r_ 0174ij ||,'.',:T||P; 40,10 41) 00.1 40.60
I< .1 ', i-[ i-'r ,i '..it, 40.82 40.80 42 40

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THE NATION

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FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
Sat3d!' Sua SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Al~tmiuerii g5 *tl s. W8 46.
fahir'nlif 55 25 pc 61 a0
Ata~a KI 36 pc 63 M
AIIBHI a 57 I,'. Bl (,, Bal moac 56 30 i 55 16
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62 3 ; 65 42
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YESTERDAY NATIONAL M1IG A LOW
HIGH Palm S Ci LOW 'C Snfey

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY IUSKY
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Alt' il Si'w y f,.'
Br;>(lino 63,'.1f"pc
B8iniii C? (flii
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Fictitious Name Notices............DIO

Meeting Notices.......................DIO

Lien Notices.............................D10

Miscellaneous Notices.............. D10


C I T R U S c COUNTY



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To start your subscription:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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LEGAL NOTICES

in Way C itrsC hoicl




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State: Trapper can no longer sell monkeys to labs


Associated Press

SILVER SPRINGS -
State officials will no longer
allow a trapper to snare
wild monkeys from a cen-
tral Florida state park and
sell them to research labo-
ratories.
A Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection
spokesman told the Tampa
Bay Times the agency is
looking for other ways to deal
with the invasive species.
Trapper Scott Cheslak
has captured about 700 of
the rhesus macaques mon-
keys with state permission
over the past decade.
The monkeys are a popu-
lar sight for tourists at the
Silver River State Park.
They have been in the area
since the 1930s, though no
one is certain exactly how
they arrived.
Some say they got loose
during the filming of a
Tarzan movie. A more plau-
sible theory is that they
were placed on a small is-
land in the Silver River as
an attempt to spice up the
Silver Springs' Jungle
Cruise ride for tourists. The
operator of the cruise, how-
ever, didn't realize the mon-
keys could swim.
The rhesus macaques
have thrived in the central
Florida woods. Their
colony grew to about 100,
but with suburban develop-
ment conflicts developed.
In the 1980s, there were re-
ports that the monkeys had
attacked a 3-year-old boy
and threatened a game war-
den, but those faded over
time.
Cheslak originally


worked for a company that
supplied monkeys to re-
search laboratories, but the
company's CEO later de-
cided to discontinue the
practice, believing it was
wrong to cage monkeys that
had been in the wild for so
long. Cheslak, however, con-
tinued the work as an inde-
pendent contractor
According to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture, he
was "selling some of the mon-
keys to a research facility."
Many of the monkeys
Cheslak caught were juve-
niles or yearlings. His li-
cense expired last year, and
he hasn't trapped any since.
He did not respond to a re-
quest for comment
State officials worry the
monkeys could pose a
health threat to humans be-
cause most of the ones
Cheslak has captured
tested positive for herpes-
B, which can be fatal. How-
ever, there have not been


any cases of people infected
by the Silver Springs rhesus
macaques. The only cases
have taken place in labora-
tories.
The manager of the Sil-
ver River State Park told
the Times last year state of-
ficials have been torn about
the species, considered
both a tourist attraction and
a health hazard.
"We know people like to
see the monkeys, but we know
they don't belong here,"
manager Sally Leib said.
The Animal Rights Foun-
dation of Florida had peti-
tioned the state to stop the
trapping.
"We are very happy that
(the park) will once again
be known for its natural
beauty and outdoor activi-
ties, not as a supplier of an-
imals for cruel laboratory
experimentation," the
group's spokesman, Don
Anthony, said a news re-
lease Friday


Dr. Shirley A. ice is going on sabbatical
Beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care
Continuity, she recommends her patients see
her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from
SSuncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our
other locations for your convenience.

Inverness Citrus Springs Homosassa
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy 10489 N. Florida Ave. 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd
341-5520 489-2486 382-8282
-. Bee ih PJ!.- M jfse


*An alpha male called
sr King Phillip, or snaggle
tooth because of his
,right fang hanging over
his lower lip, displays a
"threat call" on Sept. 17
along the shoreline of the
Silver River in Florida's
ceenSilver Springs State Park.
^ "Citizen" biologist Bob
Gottschalk of Lady Lake,
Fla., has studied on the
rhesus macaques along
the Silver River for about
six years.

Associated Press




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STATE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 AS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Sarah
Chadwick, 65
HERNANDO
Sarah Jane Chadwick, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away Friday, Oct. 18,2013.
She was the daughter of
James M. Busby and Dru-
cella Reeves, born Oct. 25,
1948, in Salem, Ore. Sarah
was united in marriage to
Phillip G. Chadwick July
17, 1966, celebrating 47
years of blissful marriage.
Sarah graduated from
Burlington High School
and attended vocational
school to become a li-
censed cosmetologist in
Colorado. Her true calling
was working with chil-
dren, operating an in-
home daycare center and
as an ESE teacher's aide
for the Citrus County
School District. Sarah
made lifelong impressions
on her students and her
colleagues. She was Sup-
port Person of the Year for
2008-09 at Citrus High
School. Sarah was also a
member of the Inverness
Order of Eastern Star, In-
verness Women of the
Moose and past president
of the Citrus Shrine Club's
Noble Ladies.
She was preceded in


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death by her father, James
Busby; and two brothers,
Danny Lee Busby and
Tommy Dean Busby Left
to cherish her memories
are her husband Phillip;
her mother, Drucella
Clausen, Beverly Hills;
daughter, Sandra (George)
Goff of Hernando; sons,
Phillip Chadwick (Corey)
of Greeley, Colo., and Paul
Chadwick (Mary) of Cedar
Ridge, Colo.; several lov-
ing grandchildren and
great-grandchildren; two
sisters, Lynda Allen
(Larry) of Fort Collins,
Colo., and Joyce Merriman
(Jim) of Kearney, Neb.; and
one brother, Doug Busby
(Tammy) of Calgary,
Canada.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations
be made to a scholarship
fund. Contact Phil at 352-
302-2770 for more informa-
tion. A memorial service
will be at 5:30 p.m. Friday,
Nov 15, 2013, at the Unity
Church in Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Frank
Esposito, 79
INVERNESS
Frank J. Esposito, age
79, Inverness, died Oct. 25,
2013, surrounded by his
loving family and under
the care of Hospice of Cit-
rus County
Frank was born on Nov.
11, 1933, in Bronx, N.Y, to
the late Frank D. and
Helen (Reiser) Esposito.
Frank served our country
in the United States Air
Force. He was employed
by Western Electric for 32
years as a supervisor. He
enjoyed gardening, bowl-
ing, music and loved to
play the organ. He was a
true Frank Sinatra fan.
Frank served as a volun-
teer for the Highlands
Civic Crime Watch for
more than 15 years.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 32 years,
Angelina 'Angie" 'Angel"
Esposito; sons, Frank D.
(Velarie) Esposito, Aurora,
Colo., John (Debra) Espos-
ito, Pawling, N.Y; daugh-
ters, Debra (Bill)


Desimone, Joann Espos-
ito, both of Ocala, Fla.,;
Mary Esposito (Chris
Williams), Fort Mont-
gomery, N.Y, and Robin
(Alan) Bisignano, Ana-
heim, Calif; his brother,
Robert Esposito, Dalton,
Mass.; and sister, Helen
Esposito, Gainesville, Va.;
13 grandchildren; six
great-grandchildren; and
his beloved dog "Lexi."
A Mass of christian bur-
ial will be offered at 10
a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30,
2013, at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from 3 to 6
p.m. Tuesday, with a wake
service at 5 p.m., at Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory Inurn-
ment will take place at a
later date at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests donations in
Frank's memory to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Ronnie
Rogers, 65
FLORAL CITY
Ronnie L. Rogers, 65, of
Floral City, Fla., passed
away at his residence on
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013,
in Floral City He was born
in Savanna, Ill., on March
28, 1948, to the late
Bernard and Marjorie
(Edie) Rogers.
Ronnie was a U.S. Army
veteran, and a carpenter
in the home-building busi-
ness. He arrived in this
area in 1989, coming from
Pinellas Park, Fla., was a
Christian and loved play-
ing cards, pitching horse-
shoes, grilling and
spending fun times with
his family and friends.
Ronnie is survived by
his loving wife of 38 years,
Ella Rogers. Other sur-
vivors include his chil-
dren, Leeanna Ford and
her fiancee, Robert, of Flo-
ral City, Melissa Rogers of
Pinellas Park, Tabitha
Lane and her fiancee, Lee,
of Crestview, Fla., and


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Renae Herndon and her
husband Ricky, of Inver-
ness, Fla.; three brothers,
Ric, Kurt and Mark
Rogers; 14 grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
A celebration of life me-
morial service is sched-
uled for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct 29, at the VEF Post No.
7122, Floral City, Fla. Pri-
vate cremation arrange-
ments are under the care
of Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Lorraine
Makin, 69
Lorraine Evelyn Pyers
Makin, 69, died Oct. 24,
2013.
Arrangements trusted to
ICS Cremation & Funeral
Home, Lake City, Fla. 386-
752-3436.


I


5B




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not much has changed, say


residents of NY casino town


Associated Press

SALAMANCA, N.Y -
Tucked in the foothills of
western New York'sAllegany
Mountains, Salamanca
doesn't appear to have
changed much in the last
100 years let alone the
last 10 since the Seneca In-
dian Nation opened a major
casino on the edge of town.
With New York about to
vote Nov 5 on a casino pro-
posal that's being promoted
as a driver of economic
growth in small upstate
communities like theirs
and the state as a whole,
residents here say that
while the casino has deliv-
ered jobs, the bustle and
din of 2,000 slot machines
and an average of 8,000 daily
visitors, its effect is barely
evident outside the gleam-
ing gambling palace walls.


"When the casino came,
I thought, 'Great, the town's
going to perk up,"' Barbara
John said as she worked in
a consignment shop near the
casino, which towers from
the landscape off Interstate
86. "I expected more."
There have been no
spinoff restaurants or at-
tractions to keep casino
patrons in town, and exist-
ing business owners say
that except for two hotels,
the fast-food chains in the
casino's shadow seem to
be the biggest winners of
any spillover business.
Nevertheless, with more
than 900 workers, it has
become a go-to employer,
several residents said, and
with its on-site restaurants
and concert hall, another
option for a night out in a
place that lacks even a
movie theater


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"In Salamanca, you can't
even go buy socks and un-
derwear There's no place
to buy it There's no stores,"
said Mayor Carmen Vec-
chiarella, who described
economic development in
the community of 6,000 as
"stagnant" since the casino.
He hopes that will change
with the city's $3.2 million
purchase of a 200-acre plot
near the casino. Sala-
manca will use casino pro-
ceeds to build roads to the
site with the goal of ac-
commodating tax-paying
developers. There has been


talk of locating a water park
or shopping plaza there.
The tribe turns over 25
percent of slot machine
revenues to New York which
shares a quarter of that
with the host communities.
Salamanca, after ex-
penses are paid, is left
with an average of $2 mil-
lion a year for economic
development, said Vec-
chiarella, who only re-
cently received the last
four years of casino pay-
ments following resolution
of a dispute between the
state and Senecas.


I OARVFfl PUMPKIN OflNTF~T ~1flfl I


Associated Press
Downtown Salamanca,N.Y., pictured on Oct. 17, hasn't
changed much since the Seneca Allegany Casino & Hotel
opened on the western edge of the city in 2004. With
New York about to vote on whether to allow more casinos
in small communities like theirs, Salamanca residents
say that the casino has delivered promised jobs.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH CARE
Continued from PageAl


Vermont would wait to fig-
ure out how to pay for the
new system. He said he ex-
pects a payroll tax to be a
main source of funding,
giving for the first time a
look at how he expects the
plan to be paid for
The reasons tiny Ver-
mont may be ripe for one
of the costliest and most
closely watched social ex-
periments of its time?
It's the most liberal state
in the country, according
to Election Day exit polls.
Democrats hold the gover-
nor's office and big ma-
jorities in both houses of
the Legislature.
It has a tradition of ac-
tivism. Several times in re-
cent years, hundreds of
people have rallied in
Montpelier for a campaign
advocating that health
care is a human right.
It's small. With a popula-
tion of about 626,000 and
just 15 hospitals, all non-
profits, Vermont is seen by
policy experts as a man-
ageable place to launch a
universal health care project
"Within a state like Ver-
mont, it should be much
more possible to actually
get all of the stakeholders
at the table," said Shana
Lavarreda, director of
health insurance studies
at the University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles' Cen-
ter for Health Policy
Research.


Vermont's small size
also is often credited with
helping preserve its com-
munitarian spirit. People
in its towns know one an-
other and are willing to
help in times of need.
"The key is demography"
said University of Vermont
political scientist Garrison
Nelson. Discussions about
health policy "can be han-
dled on a relative face-to-
face basis," he said.
Vermont also has little
income diversity, Nelson
said. In general, people
with lower incomes who
don't pay into a health care
system make it costlier for
other people.
Then there's the fact
that Vermont is close to
universal health care al-
ready Lavarreda noted
that the state became a
leader in insuring chil-
dren in the 1990s. Now 96
percent of Vermont chil-
dren have coverage, and
91 percent of the overall
population does, second
only to Massachusetts.
At this stage, no one
knows whether state-level
universal health care will
succeed, and it's an open
question as to whether
Vermont can work as a
model for other states.
"Developing a single-
payer system for Vermont
is a lot easier than in Cali-
fornia or Texas or New
York state," said U.S. Sen.


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Bernie Sanders, using an
industry term to describe a
system in which health
care is paid for by a single
entity
Sanders, frequently de-
scribed as the only social-
ist in the Senate, has been
pushing for some form of
socialized medicine since
he was mayor of Burling-
ton 30 years ago.
The nation is focused on
the rollout of the state-
based health insurance
marketplaces and the dis-
astrous unveiling of
healthcare.gov In the
meantime, Vermont's ef-
forts have largely gone un-
noticed, said Chapin
White, a researcher with
the Washington-based
Center for Studying
Health System Change.
"Vermont's thinking
about 2017, and the rest of
the country is just strug-
gling with 2014 right now,"
White said.
Even with years to go be-
fore Vermont's single-
payer plan will be in place,
several obstacles remain.


See


Associated Press
Workers take calls for Vermont's health care exchange Oct. 1 in Burlington, Vt. While
much of the nation works to implement the health insurance exchanges under the fed-
eral health overhaul law, Vermont does that and also keeps its eye on a bigger goal,
one that more fully embraces government-funded health care: The state has a planned
2017 launch of the nation's first universal health care system.


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AS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WHAT'S IN PLACE
* Beginning in 2017, the state will offer
a set package of coverage benefits to
every Vermont resident under the pro-
gram, called Green Mountain Care.
A five-member board created under the
law has already launched four pilot projects
designed to bring down health care costs.
For example, one bundles the price of
services that often come together, as in
a single, set price for the anesthesia,
surgery and follow-up physical therapy
connected with a knee replacement.
The overall goal of the law is to "ensure
universal access to and coverage for
high-quality, medically necessary health
services for all Vermonters." It aims to
prevent costs and other barriers from keep-
ing people from accessing health care.


HEALTH CARE
Continued


The largest national
health insurance industry
lobbying group, America's
Health Insurance Plans,
has warned that the law
could limit options for con-
sumers and might not be
sustainable.
"The plan could disrupt
coverage consumers and
employers like and rely on
today, limit patients' ac-
cess to the vital support
and assistance health plans
provide, and put Vermont
taxpayers on the hook for
the costs of an unsustain-
able health care system,"
said AHIP spokesman
Robert Zirkelbach.
And questions have also
arisen about the expected
cost savings of eliminating
multiple insurance com-
panies and their different
coverage levels and billing
styles.
Much of a hospital's
billing process is coding to
ensure that the right pa-
tient is billed the right
amount for the right pro-
cedure, said Jill Olson,
vice president of the Ver-
mont Association of Hospi-
tals and Health Systems.
That would continue in a
single-payer system.
Vermont also has yet to
answer how it will cover
everyone. The post-2017
system is not envisioned to
include federal employees
or those with self-insured
employers that assume the
risk of their own coverage
and are governed by fed-
eral law, including IBM,
one of the state's largest


private empl(
may not inclu
who work for
surance thro
nies headquai
state, Olson sa
At least one
year-old Gerr
has little pati
naysayers.
Kilcourse
when he and
bought a hard
Plainfield in
1980s, they s
years to find
able health
coverage.
In retiremei
has schooled
health policy
cates for univ
age. He sees h
a public gooc
the current c
the 19th-cent
the United St,


WHAT'S NEXT
* Launching Green Mountain Care will
require a waiver from the U.S. government
to use federal health care funds to run
it. A division of the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services will decide
whether to grant the waiver, likely late
in the Obama administration's final
term, said Robin Lunge, Gov. Peter
Shumlin's director of health reform.
She said Vermont had been successful
in winning earlier waivers allowing it to
make changes to its Medicaid system.
* Vermont lawmakers must also approve
a state financing plan, which has yet to
be developed. The Legislature signaled its
support for some form of state financ-
ing when it passed the law in 2011.
-Associated Press

lie schools.
"It should be similar to
education, which is pub-
from Pag Al licly funded," Kilcourse
said of health care. "If we
years It also did the same thing for edu-
de residents cation (as in health care),
* and get in- you'd have a number of
ugh compa- people being excluded"
rtered out of from public schools.
aid. Shumlin has made it
resident, 73- clear the status quo can't
'y Kilcourse, hold. As a part owner him-
ence for the self of a small business -
a student travel service
said that based in Putney he has
wife Kathy spoken often of the burden
ware store in that employee health cov-
i the early erage is to such business
struggled for owners.
good, afford- At a Chamber of Corn-
insurance merce forum in Septem-
ber, he called the federal
nt, Kilcourse health overhaul "a great
himself on improvement over the
Sand advo- past" but added it "is not
versal cover- the silver bullet that will...
health care as provide universal access
d and likens and quality health care for
campaign to all Vermonters."
ury push in That, he appears to
ates for pub- hope, will come in 2017.


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A10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013

MANDATED
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Medicaid long-term
care plans may
limit eligible health
care providers,
there are some
services that must
be covered:
Adult companion
care.
Adult day health
care.
Assisted living.
Assistive care
services.
Attendant care.
Behavioral
management.
Care coordination/
case management.
Care-giving training.
Home accessory
adaption.
Home-delivered
meals.
Homemaker.
Hospice.
Intermittent and
skilled nursing.
Medical equipment
and supplies.
Medication adminis-
tration.
Medication manage-
ment.
Non-emergency
transportation.
Nursing facility.
Nutritional
assessment/risk
reduction.
Personal care.
Personal emergency
response system.
Respite care.
Therapies occu-
pational, physical,
respiratory and
speech.




LEND



YOUR



EARZTM


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEDICAID
Continued from PageAl

Care Administration
(AHCA), current Medicaid
recipients receiving nurs-
ing facility care and cer-
tain similar services will
be required to participate.
It also affects those on
Medicaid due to a disability
requiring nursing facility-
level care.
In the future, they will
receive long-term care
services through a plan
managed by one of several
selected insurance compa-
nies. Those companies


will be paid a per-member
rate by the state for
treatment
Notification for Citrus
and the other counties in
Region 3 is scheduled to
begin Nov 1 with a pre-
welcome letter That
will be followed up with a
welcome letter Dec. 20
and a reminder letter in
January
Feb. 13 will be their last
day to choose a managed
care plan before initial en-
rollment, which starts
March 1,2014. Participants
will then have a 90-day
window to change plans.
After that plans can only
be changed for "good


cause reasons" or during
the annual open enroll-
ment period.
"Participants in the
LTC program will be
identified based on
current Medicaid enroll-
ment data," said AHCA
spokesperson Shelisha
Coleman.
She added that if a fam-
ily member feels that they
should have been notified
and have not been, they
can submit a complaint
through our online com-
plaint form at
http://apps.ahca. myflorida.
com/smmc cirts/.
"But there's no reason to
get stressed out," Curtis


said. "There is not a lot for
patients and their families
to worry about."
He said there will be
counselors available, it
will not affect the levels of
care and most of the detail
work will fall on the
providers.
Under AHCA guide-
lines, the new plans will be
required to continue exist-
ing services for 60 days or
until the patient receives a
comprehensive assess-
ment and a new plan of
care is developed.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline.conm.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle
welcomes tips
from readers about
breaking news.
Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and
be prepared to give
your name, phone
number, and the
address of the news
event.
* To submit story ideas
for feature sections,
call 352-563-5660
and ask for Logan
Mosby. Again, be pre-
pared to leave a de-
tailed message.


Hearing Aid
Cost vs. Benefit
Comparison
Study
Participants
sought by Gardner
Audiology for a new
research study comparing
the value of four new
hearing aid models. Each
has a different price level
and varying degrees of
technology proven to
deliver understandable
sound quality in difficult
listening situations.
In exchange for completing
a pre and post-fitting
opinion survey, Gardner
Audiology will loan you
the hearing aids of your
choice, for a free 30 day
study. Audiologists with
advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.
At the end of thirty days
you may return your loaner
aids or purchase them at a
discount. It's your choice.

Office
Locations:
Crystal River
& Inverness
352-795-5700


jc _IGardnerl
CO.h,dW~201


At last,

people you

can trust.


It's as easy as 1 2 3
SAFE 1. Bring any of the things below.
SMART 2. Our Estate Specialist will make an offer.
SIMPLE 3. If you decide to sell, we will pay you on the spot.
The more you sell, the better you'll feel.


. 4 -. /


Buying Diamonds
All sizes and shapes.
We even buy chipped and
broken stones.


Buying All Jewelry
No matter what it is, if it's
real, we're interested, We
often buy silver jewelry but
we rarely buy costume items,


Buying Old Watches
Most brands and types
of pocket watches and
wristwatches. They don't
need to be working.


AIM.


Buying Autographs &
Vintage Photos
Single pieces or collections,
Unusual images are best.


Buying Coins &
Old Paper Money
Please don't polish coins.
We'll help sort them for you,


Buying Old Paintings
Any subject (framed or
unframed). Even damaged
paintings can be OK.
Preferably Pre-1930.


Buying Old Sterling
All types of sterling. No need
to polish it. Sorry, no silver
plated items,





'II

Buying Gold & Platinum
All items including charm
bracelets, old settings,
class rings, dental gold
and broken jewelry.


The event is being held in conjunction with Lindstrom & McKenney, Inc., an international estate and buying organization.
All sales are confidential. For more information, visit www.lindstrommckenney.com. 2013 Lindstrom & McKenney, all rights reserved.
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LOCAL


^ ..........




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Darryl Harris with Jake's BBQ prepares for the
lunch crowd, checking turkey legs in the
smoker at Liberty Park.


Cyclists Amy Rahn, left, and Debbie Perez of
Tampa were riding along the Withlacoochee
Trail and just happened upon the festival.


COOTER
Continued from Page Al
with their hearts and are
happy to be here. It's all
about family fun. I can't
think of anything more im-
portant than doing that"
It helped that there was
some aromas leading noses
to the park's food vendors
- everything from barbe-
cue and chicken pitas to
Greek kebabs and authentic
gyros, kettle corn, boiled
peanuts and funnel cakes.
Plus, Sonny indicated
that local agencies and or-
ganizations had lots of in-
formation and there


LOCAL


Photos by STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Nine-year-old Sabrina Riley of Dunnellon waits patiently for her pretzel. To see more scenes from the
10th annual Cooter Fest, visit www.chronicleonline.com.


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-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 All
was ample opportunity to
get a jump start on holiday
gift shopping.
"We have over 90 ven-
dors here today," Skeele-
Hogan said. "We have
everything from crafts,
food court, kids' play area
and more."
From live turtle races,
bounce houses, Little Miss
Cooter Princess, children
and turtles of all ages had
something to do.
And the fun continues
today, beginning at noon
and closing at 5 p.m.
Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington can be
contacted at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. corn.


.. ......


taw%


* ^iac -










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Court to test surveillance law


Associated Press
Demonstrators protest during a rally Saturday outside of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, demanding Congress investigate the National Security Agency's mass
surveillance programs.


Justice Department intends to use information from spy program against accused terrorist


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Jus-
tice Department said for the
first time that it intends to use
information gained from one of
the National Security Agency's
warrantless surveillance pro-
grams against an accused ter-
rorist, setting the stage for a
likely Supreme Court test of
the Obama administration's
approach to national security.
The high court so far has
turned aside challenges to the


law on government surveil-
lance on the grounds that peo-
ple who bring such lawsuits
have no evidence they are
being targeted.
Jamshid Muhtorov was ac-
cused in 2012 of providing ma-
terial support to the Islamic
Jihad Union, an Uzbek terror-
ist organization that, authori-
ties say, was engaging NATO
coalition and U.S. forces in
Afghanistan.
According to court papers in
the case, the FBI investigated


Muhtorov after his communi-
cations with an overseas web-
site administrator for the IJU.
In a court filing Friday, the
government said it intends to
offer into evidence in Muh-
torov's case "information ob-
tained or derived from
acquisition of foreign intelli-
gence information conducted
pursuant to the Foreign Intelli-
gence Surveillance Act of 1978."
Last February, a sharply di-
vided Supreme Court ruled in
a 5-4 vote that a group of


American lawyers, journalists
and organizations could not
sue to challenge the 2008 ex-
pansion of the law. The court
those who sued could not
show that the government
would monitor their commu-
nications along with those of
potential foreign terrorist and
intelligence targets.
Last month, Supreme Court
Justice Antonin Scalia, who
had ruled with the majority in
the earlier 54 decision, said the
courts ultimately would have to


determine the legality of the
NSA surveillance program.
In the majority opinion last
February Justice Samuel Alito
suggested a way for a chal-
lenge to be heard. He said if
the government intends to use
information from such surveil-
lance in court, it must provide
advance notice. In his argu-
ment before the court's deci-
sion, Solicitor General Donald
Verrilli had made similar com-
ments to the justices on behalf
of the administration.


Saudi women drive in


protest with little problem


Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia
- More than 60 women
across Saudi Arabia
claimed they drove cars
Saturday in defiance of a
ban keeping them from
getting behind the wheel,
facing little protest by po-
lice in their push for eas-
ing restrictions on women
in the kingdom.
The campaign's message
is that driving should be a
woman's choice. The
struggle is rooted in the
kingdom's hard-line inter-
pretation of Islam known
as Wahabbism, with critics
warning that women driv-
ing could unravel the very
fabric of Saudi society.
Though no laws ban
women from driving in
Saudi Arabia, authorities
do not issue them licenses.
Women who drove on Sat-


Associated Press
A Saudi woman said she got behind the wheel Saturday
and drove to the grocery store without being stopped or
harassed by police, kicking off a campaign protesting the
ban on women driving in the ultraconservative kingdom.


urday had driver's li-
censes from abroad, ac-
tivists said.
Activist Aziza Youssef, a
professor at King Saudi
University, and another ac-
tivist said protest organiz-
ers received 13 videos and
about 50 phone messages
from women showing or

Nation BRIEFS


NY state creating gas
reserve to prevent shortages
NEW YORK Gov. Andrew Cuomo said-
New York is creating the nation's first state
gasoline reserve to prevent shortages during
emergencies.
Cuomo said Saturday that a pilot program on
Long Island will hold 3 million gallons of fuel for
motorists and first responders. The project is a
response to the gas shortages that created
hourslong lines in the days after superstore
Sandy. Cuomo says New Yorkers need to be
able to get around after bad weather.
The reserve will use capacity owned by
Northville Industries on Long Island. Cuomo
says gasoline from the reserve will be re-
leased as needed to meet fuel needs while
the industry recovers from an operations dis-
ruption, like Sandy.


claiming they had driven.
She said they have no way
to verify the messages.
May Al Sawyan, a
32-year-old mother of two
and an economic re-
searcher, told The Associ-
ated Press that she drove
from her home in Riyadh
to the grocery store and


Detroit bets on uncertainty
of rail, new arena
DETROIT Detroit may be too broke to
pay its bills, but it's still thinking big.
As the debt-ridden city moves through
bankruptcy proceedings, local and state lead-
ers are backing plans to build a new hockey
arena and streetcar line.
The developments would cost $800 million
and bet at least $300 million in future tax rev-
enues to attract people to a city that residents
have been fleeing for 60 years.
Skeptics said the plans are risky for a city
with so much debt that it can't fund services
as simple as streetlights. Supporters predict
the downtown improvements will expand the
tax base and lay the path to a brighter finan-
cial future.
-From wire reports


back. Activists uploaded a
four-minute video of her
driving to the campaign's
YouTube account.
Al Sawyan said she was
prepared to be jailed if
caught by authorities. She
said she was far enough
from a police car that she
was not spotted.
"I just took a small
loop," she said. "I didn't
drive for a long way, but it
was fine."
Al Sawyan's husband
and family waited at home
and called her nervously
when she arrived at the
store to check on her, she
said. She drove with a
local female television re-
porter in the car They
were both without male
relatives in the vehicle,
which in itself defies the
country's strict norms re-
quiring women to have a
male relative in public.


LONDON The former driver for dis-
graced late BBC entertainer Jimmy Savile
has appeared in court to face charges includ-
ing multiple counts of raping girls younger
than 16.
Savile's reputation as a popular if eccentric
personality collapsed after his death in 2011
at age 84, when hundreds of witnesses and
victims came forward accusing him of sexual
abuse. Police have since described him as a
serial sexual predator.
British police charged the driver, 72-year-
old Ray Teret, with 32 offenses that allegedly
took place between 1962 and 1996, including
multiple counts of rape and indecent assault.
The 15 accusers were all under the age of 16
at the time.


Associated Press
DANVERS, Mass. -
The mother of the Massa-
chusetts teenager ac-
cused of killing his
teacher
Cle inside a
school
bathroom
is broken-
hearted
over the
educa-
tor 's
Colleen death and
Ritzer seeks
murdered on prayers
Tuesday. for her
son, according to a state-
ment released Saturday
by her son's defense
attorney
Diana Chism also asked
for prayers for the family
of slain Danvers High
School teacher Colleen
Ritzer, saying her "heart
is broken for the Ritzer
family and the loss of
their daughter and sister"


Fourteen-year-old
Philip Chism is being
held without bail on
charges he killed Ritzer
after school Tuesday, then
dumped her body in the
woods behind the school.
He was arrested early
Wednesday
"Ms. Chism would like
you to know that her son
was born in love and is
dear to her, very dear,"
said the statement re-
leased by defense attor-
ney Denise Regan.
"She asks that you
know that she cares for
the world's hurt over this
and greatly hopes for your
prayers for the Ritzer
family, the Danvers com-
munity, for her son, and
all those affected by this
tragedy"
Authorities have of-
fered no clues on Chism's
alleged motive. They also
would not say how Ritzer,
a 24-year-old math
teacher, was killed.


BEIRUT Syrian Kurdish gunmen on
Saturday seized a major border crossing with
Iraq from al-Qaida-linked groups following in-
tense infighting between rebel groups that
raised concerns of a spillover, activists and an
Iraqi official said.
The latest violence coincided with a visit by the
U.N.-Arab League envoy to Iran, a staunch ally
of President BasharAssad's government, to
press efforts for international peace talks aimed
at ending the civil war, now in its third year.
The Kurdish militiamen captured the
Yaaroubiyeh post in northeast Syria after
three days of clashes with several jihadist
groups there, including Jabhat al-Nusra and
the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.
-From wire reports


Student's mom grieves

son, teacher in killing


World BRIEFS
Jimmy Savile's chauffeur Syrian Kurds capture border
charged with rape crossing with Iraq








"E Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS


It's 2:30 p.m. on a Saturday in October well past lunch, and the slowest time of year in

Sarasota, where the beautiful Gulf Coast beaches are most crowded in winter and spring.


Beth J. Harpaz expect to find at an Amish restaurant: Asian chicken
Associated Press salad, 'Amish quesadillas" (chicken, cheese and
mushrooms), and a salad of mixed greens, crumbled
SARASOTA gorgonzola cheese and dried cranberries. Breakfast
includes a veggie Benedict spinach, tomato, and av-
Sut the line for "homestyle Amish food" at ocado with hollandaise sauce and fresh fruit on the
SYoder's Restaurant is out the door, with a 45- side.
minute wait for a table. Salivating customers No meal here is complete without trying Yoder's fa-
snake past a sign listing varieties of pie as wait- mous pie, which comes in two dozen varieties. The
resses walk by carrying trays heaped with fried most popular flavor is peanut butter, with layers of
chicken, crunchy peanut butter topping and vanilla pudding.
Yoder's is located in Pinecraft, an Amish-Mennonite Also popular are coconut, banana cream, strawberry
neighborhood that swells in the cold months as buses and chocolate peanut butter Some varieties are of-
bring visitors from Amish and Mennonite communi- fered seasonally, like mincemeat.
ties in Ohio and Indiana. In some parts of the country where the Amish spurn
It's comfort-food menu reflects traditional Amish modern ways, you'll find horses-and-buggies plying
home-cooking with yummy staples like noodles, pot the roads, but here the only horse and buggy is a
roast, meatloaf and mashed potatoes. But the food is model in Yoder's parking lot.
prepared with a light touch, avoiding the oversalted Local adherents of the faith instead get around on
goo and blandness that gives this type of cooking a bad three-wheel bikes, which form a virtual parade in
name. some parts of town in winter
The menu is also sprinkled with surprises you don't Pinecraft is also famous for its post office, which the


Amish community bought from the U.S. Postal Service
after the branch was scheduled to close, and for its
simple church, called the Tourist Church. Both are
just a block or two from Yoder's. The TLC network has
even filmed some of its "Breaking Amish" episodes in
Pinecraft The reality show looks at young people who
were raised Amish and Mennonite as they experience
life outside those communities and decide whether to
go back to them.
Yoder's, which opened in 1975, has a gift shop and pro-
duce market onsite as well. The restaurant seats 130
people but on a busy day in peak season routinely serves
1,500. Customers are a mix of locals and tourists, and
only a few are Amish. It's not unusual to hear all kinds of
languages spoken on the line to get in; some vacationers
will drive an hour from Tampa-St Petersburg or even
two hours from Orlando to eat here.
And after putting away all that fried chicken, noo-
dles and pie or, if you must, a salad there's no
better way to enjoy the rest of your day in Sarasota
than at Siesta Key beach, just a short drive -
or three-wheeled bike ride away


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Ketchikan, Alaska

Special to the Chronicle
Catherine Stegemann and Paul Foss enjoyed a trip to Alaska. It was the couple's
first trip to the state. During their trip, they visited Ketchikan, the salmon capital
of the world.




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 27, 2013 C:Comcast, Citrus B:.Brght House Du Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis FP Oak Forest H. Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 16:00 6:30 7:001 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
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E S 1 6 NewsHour WEDU Extraordinary Women Secrets of the Tower of Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic (In As Time As Time
0 WPBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus 'G' N London (N)'PG, V' "The Paradise"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Goes By Goes By
SWUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up Keeping Up Appearances'PG' Secrets of the Tower Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic Austin City Limits
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 ,News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings. (N) (In Stereo News
N 8 FLA News Stereo Live)'14'm Live) m
I ABC 20 20 20 .News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge "Control" (N) i- '... Nice News Spo Night
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B 0 0 1 1 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife "Hitting The Mentalist "The Red 10 News Paid
B IW PJCBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) N (In Stereo) N the Fan" (N) '14' Tattoo" (N)'14' lpm (NJ Program
O 13 13 1 NFL Football Washington Redskins TheOT(N) 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. Game 4. From FOX1311:00 News (N)
E FOX 13 13 13 13 at Denver Broncos. (N) 'PG' Busch Stadium in St. Louis.(Time tentative). (N) N (In Stereo) N
| WCJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N)'PG' Betrayal (N)'14' News Inside Ed.
SIN 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Gary Unspoken Pastor Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Youngren Hofman Dayna Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
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1 11 News Home Videos'PG' "Good Form"'PG' 'PG'm Photos" (N)'14'
O N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "Wheels" (In Glee "Ballad" (In The Office The Office We There We There
ED C_ IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Stereo)'PG'" Stereo)'PG' '14'" '14'" Yet? Yet?
ED WIA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ***2 "Crash" (2004) Sandra Bullock. Seinfeld Seinfeld Republic of Doyle Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
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SC 1 Friends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Prey" (In CSI: Miami "Under Criminal Minds "A Real Criminal Minds (In
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IM FAM_16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living IEye
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4 4 54 2 7 Storage: Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck overnos Governor's Governor's Governor's
54 48 54 25 27 NY Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
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A J 55 64 55 Will Smith, Alice Braga. PG -13' "Infected"'MA' "Isolation" (N)'MA' "Isolation"'MA'
52 35 52r 19 21 To Be Announced Lone Star Lone Star Call- Call- Mountain Monsters (In Call- Call-
52 35 52 19 21 Legend Legend Wildman Wildman Stereo)'14' Wildman Wildman
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96 19 96 Know'14' m Harlem teen looks for a way to change her life. 'R' N Mind, Body & Soul
[BRAVOJ 254 51 254 NeNe-Wedding NWeddWedding I Dream of NeNe: The Wedding'14' IThe New Atlanta'14' Happens NeNe
7 7 3 ** "Dinner forSchmucks" (2010, Comedy) Tosh.0O Tosh.0O Tosh.O The Comedy Central Roast "James Jeff Dunham: Minding
27 61 27 33 Steve Carell. 'PG-13' '14' '14'" '14' Franco"'MA' Nthe Monsters
***2 "Die Hard" 1988, Action) Bruce Willis, Dog and Beth: On the Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops
ICMiJ 98 45 98 28 37 Alan Rickman. (In Stereo) 'R' Hunt14'" Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded
I ero'RNHut14mReloa ed Reloaded
NB 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC Secret Secret Amer. Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
N 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. "Blacdfsh"(2013) inside Man (N) '14' Anthony Bourd.
6 4 6 "Teen Wander- Austin & Austin & Austin & Austin & Liv & Jessie Dog With a Austin & Jessie Good-
46 40 46 6 5 Beach" Yonder Ally'G' Ally G' Ally' G' Ally'G' Maddie G' Bog G' Ally G' 'G' Charlie
[ 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) N BCS MLS Soccer: Galaxy at Sounders SportsCenter (N)
EPN 34 28 34 43 49 WTA Tennis Baseball Tonight (N) NHRA Drag Racing Toyota Nationals From Las Vegas. NASCAR Now (N)
WN 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live'PG' Sunday Night Prime Chester Rosary IDogmatic Theology God Bookmark
**I "The Addams ** 2 "Addams FamilyValues" (1993,,.... J,, ** -Hocus Pocus" (1993, Comedy) Bette Ravenswood "Pilot" (In
29 52 29 20 28 Family"(1991) AnjelicaHuston. 'PG-3' i ili-, Sarah JessicaParker 'PG' Bt Stereo)'14' P
J 118 170 n* "Nola" ** "The Ref" (1994, Comedy) *** "Intolerable Cruelty"(2003) ** "Mr. Wrong" (1996 Comedy) Ellen "English
118170 Denis Leary. (In Stereo)'R'" George Clooney 'PG-13' DeGeneres. (In Stereo) PG-13 1 3mPatient"
E 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
OD 26 56 26 Iron Chef Amenca Halloween Wars'G' Guy's Games Halloween Wars 'G' Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Restaurant: Im.
fS 732 112 732 Jones Moseley NASCAR UFC UFC Unleashed Being IBeing The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
[SL 35 39 35 1 NHL Hockey Panthers Panthers Panthers The Best of Pride (N) Bull Riding World Poker Tour
S 30 0 30 51 **2 "30 Days of Night" (2007, Horror) Josh *** "ParanormalActivity" (2007, Suspense) **2 "ParanormalActivity 2" (2010, Horror)
__ 30 60 30 51 Hartnett, Melissa George. R' Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. 'R' Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. 'R'
S 727 67 727 Central 1Golf CIMB Classic, Final Round. ICentral PGA Tour Golf
L 59 68 **4 "See Jane Date" ** "First Daughter" (2004 Romance- "The Good Witch's Destiny" (2013, Drama) Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
NEE) 59 68 59 45 54 (2003) N IComedy) Katie Holmes.?PGBNCatherine Bell, Chris Potter. N
**, "Cloud Atlas" (2012, Drama) Tom Hanks, Jim Broadbent. Actions Boardwalk Empire (N) Eastbound Hello Boardwalk Empire
NHOJ 302 201 302 2 2 in one time ripple across the centuries. (In Stereo) 'R' 'MA' Ladies MA 'MA'
O 30 0 3 *** "Prometheus" Real Time With Bill ** "The Hobbit:An Unexpected Journey" (2012) lan McKellen. Bilbo ** i "The DayAfter
303 202 303 (2012)'R' Maher'MA'" Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. N Tomorrow"
[HTjl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Huntlntl Hunters Huntlntl Cousins Undercover Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Reno Hunters HuntlIntl
51 25 51 3 42 Hillbilly: The Real Story American Pickers American Pickers Restoration Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars The Real Story of
51 25 51 32 42 Stories.'PG' 'PG'" *'PG' *PG' PG' PG Halloween 'PG'
24'"38 4 ...3.Ii East End Witches of East End Witches of East End Drop Dead Diva (N) Witches of East End Witches of East End
24 38 24 31 h:,1,, A '14'm Ingrid struggles.'14' 'PGC' (N)'14'B '14'm
S1 Charles Ngand The Pig Farmer Killer Killer Profile (In Stereo) Killer Profile "Timothy Family Secrets'PG, Mother of Murder (In
50 119 Leonard Lake'14' Robert Pickton N '14'" Krajcir' (N)'PG' L,V' Stereo) '14, V N
S 320221 320 3 3 ** "Ted" *** "War of the Worlds" (2005 Science *** "The Bourne Legacy" (2012, Action) Jeremy Renner, Strike Back: Origins
S320 221 320 3 3 Fiction) Tom Cruise. (In Stereo) 'PG-13 I Rachel Weisz. (In Stereo) PG-13' 'MA'm
S4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Slaves: Addiction Sex Slaves- Branded Sex Slaves in the
42 41 42 "Thieves and Thugs" .Rage" (N) (N) Suburbs
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S 109 65 109 44 53 14' "Let Her Rip" '14' "Top Survivors"'14' 14,V'
I j 28 36 28 35 25 Spong e. S on|e. Sponge. Sponge. SeeDad Ilnstant ***i "Jurassic Park" 1993) Sam Neill.'PG-13'"
[W 103 62 103___ Oprah Oprah's Next Chapter'PG' Oprah's Next Oprah's Next "Bridegroom" (2012) Oprah's Next
rX 44 123___ Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Preachers of L.A. Snapped 'PG'
ii 3 21 3 "Jay Z Made in Homeland "Game On" Masters of Sex'MA' Homeland "The Yoga Masters of Sex Homeland "The Yoga
:W340 241 3401 4 America" (2013) 'NR' 'MA'" Play" (N) 'MA' "Catherine" (N) 'MA' Play" 'MA' "
i 37 4 37 27 Bar Rescue "Broke Bar Rescue A western Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (N) (In Hing Squad "We're
37 43 37 27 36 Black Sheep"'PG' bar.'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG' the Boss" PG'
S 3 71 "Celeste- *** "The Amazing Spider-Man"(2012 Action)Andrew ** "A Knight's Tale" (2001, Adventure) Heath ** "Evil Dead"
370271 370 Jesse" Garfield, Emma Stone. (In Stereo) PG-13' Ledger. (In Stereo)'PG-13 (2013) Jane Levy'R'
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M 36 31 36 ___ at Florida Panthers. (Live) Le Exp. Blue'G'
S 1 5 2 "The Hitcher" ** "Drive Angry"(2011, Action) Nicolas Cage, ** "Ghost Rider" (2007) Nicolas Cage. A motorcycle stunt- "9th Gate'
3 3 (2007) Sean Bean. Amber Heard. N man is a supernatural agent of vengeance. 'PG-13
S 49 23 49 16 19 * "Big Daddy" (1999) Adam Sandier. BigBang I Big Bang Big Bang IBigBang IBigBang Big Bang *"BigDaddy"
S5 1 *** "Them!"(1954 Science Fiction) James *** "Mr. Skeffington" (1944, Drama) Bette Davis, Claude *** "Mrs. Parkington" 1944,
169 53 169 30 35 Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn. NR' Rains, WalterAbe.'NR' Drama)GreerGarson.N'
SAlaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Yukon Men The village Alaska: The Last
L 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14' Frontier'PG'" Frontier Exposed (N) Frontier (N)'14' wreckage.'PG' Frontier'14'"
I 50 46 50 29 30 SayYes SayYes SayYes SayYes Medium IMedium Medium IMedium Alaskan Women Medium Medium
S 350 261 30 ** "How to Lose Friends & Alienate People" *** "The Big Lebowski" (1998, Comedy) "It's a Disaster" (2012, Comedy) "Belly"
350 261 350 (2008) Simon Pegg. 'R' N Jeff Bridges. (In Stereo)'R' Julia Stiles. (In Stereo) 'R' N
48 33 48 31 34 n 11*** "300" (2007, Action) Gerard Butler, Lena **** "The Dark Knight" (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles ** "Resident Evil:
48 33 48 31 34_ Headey. 'R' (DVS) a vicious criminal known as the Joker. 'PG-13' (DVS) Extinction"(2007)'R'
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TRA 9 54 9 44 Most Terrifying Terrifying Places Making Monsters Making Monsters (N) Halloween Att. Halloween Craziest
tTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... Top 20 Funniest'PG' Top 20 Funniest'14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
TL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold GrlsGirls G irs GoldGirs The Golden Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirls GoldGirls King IKing
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U J 117 69 117 '14'm '14'" Deadest"'14'" Bomb"'14'm I A i '14'"
f J 18 118 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother IMother INews Replay Funny Home Videos


Mom worries


about playmate


D earAnnie: My son
is a second-
grader Over the
summer, while he was
staying with my ex-hus-
band, a boy touched my
son's private area over
his clothes.
This was no slight, ac-
cidental touch. It was de-
liberate. My son's
stepmother called child
protective services re-
garding the
incident, be-
cause the
family of the
other child
runs an in-
home day
care.
As I have
sole custody,
the child
services case-
worker con-
tacted me ANN
about the in- MAIL
cident I MAlL
spoke with
my ex and his wife, and
we were all in agree-
ment that our son would
not be in contact with
the other child again.
It is now four months
later, and my son tells
me that his father al-
lowed him to play at the
home of this same boy
who grabbed his geni-
tals. I called my ex, and
he doesn't seem to think
the initial incident was
serious.
He feels his wife "blew
it out of proportion," and
they've had fights about
it.
I have spoken with
child protective services
about Dad continuing to
allow our son to interact
with the neighbor boy


I
'I


who obviously has
boundary issues. While
my son has not reported
a second incident, I am
left feeling that I cannot
trust his father to parent
effectively
Dad seems more inter-
ested in proving his wife
wrong than he is in pro-
tecting our son at this
vulnerable age.
I cannot in good con-
science allow
visitation
under the cur-
rent circum-
stances. I
refuse to per-
mit my son to
be in a poten-
tially question-
able
environment,
and I can't trust
Dad to make
IE'S the right call.
How can I ef-
BOX fectively pro-
tect my son
when he's on Dad's
watch? I don't want to re-
fuse visitation alto-
gether. Mom in
Nebraska
Dear Mom: First,
please don't demonize
this neighbor boy You
were right that the situa-
tion needed to be re-
ported, not only because
the family runs a day
care program, but also
because children who
molest others are often
being abused
themselves.
We hope CPS checked
it out. Still, if you cannot
trust your ex to honor
the joint decisions you
make, your best recourse
is to request supervised
visitation.


Tod ay's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Carrie" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 4:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) In 3D.
1:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Counselor" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Escape Plan" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1: 40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Insidious: Chapter 2"
(PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,


7:50 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 7:10 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
3:55 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Carrie" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7p.m.
"Escape Plan" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Flavorful
6 Icy rain
11 Electrical problem
16 Nuisance
20 Ridge in
mountains
21 Heartbeat
22 The-,
Netherlands
23 Nebraska city
25 An alloy
26 Baker or Loos
27 Come into being
28 Sensational
29 Palmas
30 A martial art
32 Mockery
34 Tip
35 Looked at
37 "Of-and Men"
38 Slip
39 Concurs
41 Great pain
43 Cod and
Canaveral
44 Spasm
46 Kind of card
49 Lustrous fabric
50 Banknote
54 Sickly
55 Gets along
56 Make indistinct
57 Ladd orAlda
58 CIA cousin
59 Rome's river
60 Magnificent
61 Gaze
62 Gifts for the needy
64 Like some floors
65 Kent or Gable
66 Veer
67 Make secrets known
68 Golden- -
69 Throttle
70 Letter after phi
71 Ott or Brooks


Cruiser
Serious
Scale
From Z
Intelligence
Low-down guy
Burn
Forearm bone


87 Gullet
89 Analyze
grammatically
90 Fail
91 Error
92 Hard to lift
93 Flatboat
94 Hold fast
95 Bed in a sickroom
96 Bone (prefix)
97 Toward shelter
98 Not taut
99 Wrinkle
102 Female prophets
105 Paddle
106 Fried cake
107 Old-fashioned
108 Reek
109 Kilmer poem
110 Straight man
113 Horses
114 Ooze
115 Vaulted
church area
119 Time
120 Hugged
123 Contribute
125 State near Ind.
126 Private teacher
128 British measure
129 Prove false
130 Legitimate
132 Odor
133 Musical group
134 River in France
135 Eat at
136 Victim
137 Lawn problem
138 Stuck in mud
139 Saltpeter



DOWN
1 Costly fur
2 Dress richly
3 "--porridge hot..."
4 A possessive
5 Escritoire
6 Frugal
7 Madness
8 The upper crust
9 Puntadel -
10 Light meal
11 Hone
12 Badger


Pointed arch
Trick
Golf items
Plane figure
Earthbound bird
Garment for
a ranee
Old pronoun
Appends
With
On the (to be con-
sidered)
Vetch seed
Spanish painter
By and by
Refund
Liquor
Was concerned
Torso
Animal group
Waterway
Way between seats
Andes animal
Sword
Fierce look
Make fearful
Cut
Genuflect
- mignon
Stopping
mechanism
Snug
Catcher's mitt
Do the crawl
Firmament
Implied but unsaid
Pursue
Avoid
Oil-filled bottle
Loud sound
Far and -
Stuff
Big piece
Annoy
A Musketeer
The ones here
Speechify
- and penates
Hit it off
Not widespread
Loop in a rope
Subsequently
Go to extremes
Blanched
Cut of beef
Ignoble


Septs
Caught sight of
Crawled
Regret
Designer Schiapar-
elli
Anxiously
Check
Paved ways
Made


Holy
Time in office
Hardens
Get the better of
Horse opera
Dull surface
Serious
Cockpit VIP
Playground
attraction


- statesman
Gust
Paddy plant
Mr. Arnaz
Regular
Grand Opry
Edge
"Exodus" hero


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


10-27


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOC/MOCA to serve

pasta
The Military Order of the Cootie/Mil-
itary Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will
serve a pasta and meatball or sausage
dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov.
29, at Leroy Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Her-
nando (where the helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7, may be pur-
chased at the post Donation at the
door will be $7.50. Music will be pro-
vided after dinner
For more information, call Paul Kim-
merling, seam squirrel, at 352-795-4142
or the post at 352-726-3339.


Vets sought for

classroom program
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will con-
duct its annual Veterans in the Class-
room program Nov. i to 12 as part of its
21st annual Veterans Appreciation
Week activities.
Coordinated by the Citrus County
Chapter of the Military Officers Associ-
ation of America (MOAA), the Veterans
in the Classroom program brings living
history to the classrooms of the
county's public and private schools, as
well as homeschool groups. Veterans
share with students their firsthand mil-
itary experiences and travels while
serving our country in uniform around
the world.
The model Veterans in the Class-
room program was recognized in 2008
with a Florida Education Foundation
award. The program's success has gen-
erated the need for additional veterans
to share their experiences with stu-
dents. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq,
Air Force, National Guard and women
veterans are especially needed as par-
ticipants.
All interested veterans may contact
Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384,
cmcleod670@earthlink.net, or Bob
Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc
@tampabayrrcom.


Case manager aids

veterans
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa.
Third Wednesday- Coastal Re-
gional Library, 8619 W Crystal St., Crys-
tal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.


DAV helps vets get to

clinics
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to
go to appointments in Gainesville or
The Villages are asked to call the Vet-
erans Service Office in Lecanto at 352-
527-5915 to be placed on the van list
All appointments must be made before
1 p.m.


Office has help for vets
with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department offers help for veterans


who have had their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied
within the past two years are asked to
contact the office to review the case
and discuss compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans who have been
diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have been denied
are encouraged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to dis-
cuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial letter and a
copy of your compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You can get a copy
of your exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical records or from
the primary care window in Lecanto.
For more information about the Cit-
rus County Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.
Transitioning veterans can get help
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans
who have recently transitioned from
the military (or returning reservist
from tours of active duty) to Citrus
County within the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that vet-
erans and their spouses call to be placed
on a list for an upcoming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits or services
they need to help ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For
more information about the Citrus
County Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.


Reserve for Trip

to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired, will
lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and friends from
Feb. 25 to March 14. Signups are being
taken for the annual trek, which in-
cludes visits to several islands, some
golfing and a special visit to the USS
Arizona Memorial and The National
Cemetery of the Pacific.
For more information, call McLean
at 352-637-5131 or email
dmclean8@tampabayrr.com.


Memorial honors vets

in Homosassa
Purple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with centerpieces with
their names on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.


Assist Coast Guard

Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired military per-
sonnel are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs such as
public education, vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and rescue, mar-
itime security and environmental pro-
tection.
Wear the Auxiliary uniform with
pride and your military ribbons. Crimi-
nal background check and member-
ship are required. Email Vince Maida
atvsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597
6961.


Hospice assists veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering
agency with the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs (VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to illnesses
and conditions unique to each military
era or war It also provides caregiver
education and a recognition program to
honor veterans' services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits. Call the


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed. Posts
and groups may email
changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost1 55@
gmail.com, or visit www.fl
Post1 55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan at
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the
Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post
237.org or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in Inver-
ness. Call Commander Norm
Brumett at 352-476-2134 or
Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-


mosassa. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-
2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-
0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando.
Call 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com or
Google VFW 4252, Her-
nando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-


rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-447-
3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy God-
frey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League
See Page A20


The Friends of Crystal River
Natlionail % wildlife Refuge Complex, Inc.
Pri'l "n In Evening of Elegance with TIhe Fi inl "


^/eum'n mau
November 3, 2013 ,
5:00- 8:00 PM
Skyview at Terra Vista County Club
$75 per person*
A portion of the funds will support the education center
at Three Sisters :" .
Red Carpet and Champagne Welcome!
Chef-Served Food Stations!
Complimentary Valet Service!
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W For more information and to purchase tickets,
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*Online ticket and raffle purchase is available
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Downtown Crystal River

Saturday, October 10,2013


Zoe Longo, Jaidyn Storey, Justine Storey
and Jerry Storey


Amanda Couprider and Phillip Kofmehel


Susie Owens and Genia Pateracki


Brailey Stokes, Graysen Stokes Andrea Bilby, Rachel Bilby
and Sybil Stokes and Andrew Bilby


Rylee Murphree and Mandy Murphree


Sierra Brewer, Ciara Sullivan and
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Dwight Ferrell, Janice Ferrell and
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Jessica Buntine and Autumn Lasher


Janet King, Christina Barfield and
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LW


Thomasine Kennedy, Clarine Kennedy,
Karilynn Willoughby and Aryn
Willoughby


Jan DeWitt, Rosalie White and
Barbara Lee

Photos by Logan Mosby


Heather Flynn, Saundra Mercuri
and Ann Pollard


A16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS









TERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Dinner theater to honor vets
'A Sentimental Journey" a Veterans
Appreciation Week World War II dinner
theater presentation, will honor veterans
at the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W
Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 2, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov 3.
The dinner and show, preceded by
social hour, are $15. For reservations, call
352-212-1014.

Auxiliary to serve ham
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Pennon Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites
everyone to a ham dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Nov 1, at the post, 10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For
more information, call 352-465-4864.

40&8 to serve breakfast
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Primary school to honor vets
Inverness Primary School will have its
Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday,
Nov 7, at the school cafeteria.
Citrus County veterans are invited to
participate. Students will be performing
songs in honor of veterans. Three students
in kindergarten through second grade will
be honored with the Randy Aller's Picture
Contest Awards for first, second, and third
places. Three third- through fifth-grade
students will earn the Randy Aller's Essay
Contest Awards for first, second and third
places. The students will share their es-
says with the veterans in attendance.
After the program, the veterans will be
the celebrities of IPS as they walk down
the hallway full of children cheering, to
the Veterans Garden to enjoy cake and
drinks.
For more information, email Mary Tyler
at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or call
352-726-2632.

CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

VFW post plans celebration
VFW Edward W Pennon Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to a
Veterans Celebration at 11 a.m. Monday,
Nov 11, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd. A picnic will follow at noon.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Elks Ladies' sale to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will
have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the lodge, 7890 W
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to participate.
Those with items to sell may call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at
352-382-7614. Rental spaces are $15 each
or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday,
Nov 17.
Food will be available. Proceeds from
the food booth go to help the Elks' veter-
ans committee provide for our veterans in
nursing homes.

New veterans' pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A.
Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces
the design and availability of this year's
Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Com-
memorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme, "Hon-
oring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans,"
the pin is an outline of Citrus County su-
perimposed with the Iraq Campaign and
the Afghanistan Campaign service medals.
Pins are available for a donation of $3
each and may be obtained by calling the
chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the
Citrus County Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto.
During Veterans Appreciation Week ac-
tivities, Oct. 26 through Nov. 17, the pins
will also be available at various functions.


ump into isi


Parachutists

take leap of

faith from

historic plane

JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
"Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the
Allied Expeditionary Force! You are
about to embark upon a great crusade,
toward which we have striven these
many months. The eyes of the world
are upon you."
-Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's
message to Allied Forces prior to the
D-Day Invasion.

The 70th
anniversary of the
D-Day Invasion is
more than six months
away; however, that
certainly didn't stop
more than three dozen
men and women who are
likely to participate in
re-enactment cere-
monies, getting a "jump"
start on preparations for
ceremonies planned for
next June.

And perhaps there was no better
way to fully understand the historical
significance of the allied invasion-
the largest joint military operation to
this day than to step inside an air-
craft used in the original invasion of
Europe.
From her participation in D-Day,
when the Tico Belle was one of 52
C-47s that carried troops and Waco
gliders containing elements of the
82nd airborne infantry, she's held a
special place in the minds of many
She also dropped much-needed sup-
plies to troops during the Battle of the
Bulge, participated in Operation Var-
sity, an Allied assault to cross the
Rhine River, and the post-World War II
Berlin Airlift.
That history certainly wasn't lost
on those who came to prepare for
re-enactments, just jump or those who
are part of an active military group in
their home countries. All told, of the
more than 60 jumpers who partici-
pated in the two-day event Friday and
Saturday at the Dunnellon-Marion
County Airport, 11 countries were rep-
resented.
"It's unbelievable," said James
Dalueg, a member of the Canadian
Royal Air Force. "It's an honor to fol-
low in the footsteps of the men who
stepped onto that plane so many years
ago."
Sharon Kitzmiller, who served in
the U.S. Army for five years and began
skydiving in February, said there's no
way to put into words what it's like to
jump from a plane used in such an
historical event.


ory


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
A parachutist heads toward the landing zone at the Dunnellon-Marion
County Airport using a World War Il-era round parachute. The Tico Belle
received its nose art after the Valiant Air Command acquired it.


"It's unreal," she said, fighting back
tears. "It's hard to quantify what it's
like to step in there and jump out,
using the same parachutes they used.
Of course, we're doing it under differ-
ent circumstances, much different
than they were. They were doing it
under fire, unsure if they were going
to live or die. That is why they are our
greatest generation."
The National Parachute Test Center
(NPTC) hosted the event again this
year; however, unlike in years past,
opened the event to the public, giving
citizens the chance to see the Tico
Bell up close.
"The Tico Bell is a great draw, not
only for the jumpers, but the crowd,"
said Major Robert A. Mathews, U.S.


Marines, retired, and president of
NPTC, about opening the event to the
public. "She's got a lot of great history
that everyone appreciates, they under-
stand it."
While spectators are given the op-
portunity to watch almost five dozen
men and women make the jump from
1,500 feet it's the behind-the-scenes
training they don't see leading up to
the two days.
"It's a great opportunity to provide
training to those who need it," Major
Mathews said. 'And it's also a great op-
portunity for the strap jumpers (those
who only make a few jumps a year) to
keep current."


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not
guaranteed.


,' /




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Klovaches


100th BIRTHDAY

Ernie Glover


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Include your name, address and phone number on
all photos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from
left to right.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi-
mum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-
addressed, stamped envelope.



SPINE CARE

YOU CAN TRUST


Mr and Mrs. Frederick
Klovach of Inverness cel-
ebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary on
Sept 8,2013. They are
both from Long Island,
N.Y, moving to Florida in
1973. Both are retired
from the Pinellas County
School System, RuthAnne
from teaching and Fred
from maintenance.
A reunion of friends
and family was held at the
Grand Plaza Hotel, St.
Pete Beach. Renewal of
vows and reception din-
ner was held nearby at
Silas Dents' Banquet
Hall. A surprise highlight
of the celebration was
that Mrs. Klovach wore


her original wedding
gown. It was slightly al-
tered by Accents by Grace
of Inverness. Four mem-
bers of the 1963 wedding
were there for the cere-
mony The maid of honor
attended by live stream
via the Internet from
Plum, Pa.
Son Roy Klovach of
Oldsmar and son
Raymond Klovach and
granddaughter Lilly came
from Columbus, N.C.
Also attending were Mr
Klovach's sister, Marylou,
her daughter, Stacy, and
her daughter, Samantha.
Aunt Martha, New Bern,
N.C., and many friends
joined in the festivities.


For the RECORD


Oct. 7-13, 2013
Divorces
Tabetha Lynn Bryan, Inver-
ness vs. Richard Jeffrey
Bryan, Beverly Hills
Ellen M. Dixon, Citrus
Springs vs. James S. Dixon,
Citrus Springs
Virginia C Higginbotham,
Inverness vs. Johnny A. Hig-
ginbotham, Lebanon, Va.
Richard C. Iverson, Her-
nando vs. Cassandra J. Iver-
son, Hernando
Olive A. Radeker, Crystal
River vs. Lee A. Radeker Jr.,
Crystal River
Carol A. Roy, Crystal River
vs. Albert J. Roy, Chilhowie,
Va.




F


Marriages
Joshua Aaron Davis, Citrus
Springs/Suni Chantal El-
dridge, Citrus Springs
Frederick Leo Downey, In-
verness/Danielle Ann Flury,
Inverness
Wayne Allen Perry, Inver-
nessN/Valerie Dee Smart, Wild-
wood
Harley Eugene Webb, Dun-
nellon/Lisa Ann Childs, Dun-
nellon
Rickey Lynn Willard III, Cit-
rus Springs/Krystina Kimberly
Velez, Citrus Springs
Michael Paul Williams, Cit-
rus Springs/Priscilla Ann
Padilla, Citrus Springs
Steven William Wilson,
Crystal River/Kelly Brooke
Prus, Crystal River


Longtime Citrus County
resident and businessman
Ernie Glover celebrated
his 100th birthday Oct. 24,
2013. Glover was owner of
the Jolly Fisherman
restaurant and the Fort
Cooper Station restau-
rant. His family, mostly
from New Jersey, cele-
brated with him for four
days. On Friday night, his
daughter hosted a special
dinner for him, his rela-
tives and his local hon-


orary family the Dr
Trifon Dalkalitsis family
-at the Citrus Hills Club
House. On Saturday, both
families spent the day at
the Dalkalitsis' home for
a barbecue and today
both families will accom-
pany the Glovers to the
Greek Orthodox Church
service. The church is
sponsoring a luncheon in
his honor following the
service. He and his wife,
Gloria, live in Terra Vista.


First BIRTHDAY

Takoda Dale Thompson
Takoda Dale Thompson
of Fort White celebrated
his first birthday Oct. 19, .
2013. His parents are .
Jamie Edwards and
Justin Thompson of Fort
White, and his brother is
Travis. Maternal grand-
parents are Ralph and
Rhonda Smithwick of
Floral City. Paternal
grandparents are Larry
Durey and Jodie
Hoogewind of Fort White.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and mar-
riages filed in the
state of Florida are
available from the
Clerk of the Courts
Office. Call the clerk
at 352-341-6400 or
visit www.clerk.citrus
.fl.us.


Learn about
the Florida
Spine &
Neuro Center
and the
innovative
treatment
options
available.


I Attend a FREE Spine Seminar:
Monday, Oct. 28,2013


Spring Hill
Holiday Inn Express
3528 Commercial Way

call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.
IlIiit.'

SLargo Medical Center -
E 1 ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA SPINE & NEURO CENTER _-


Sj5


FREE

GAS CARD


9I1


Submit Your

Homecoming

Photos

fora

chance

to Win

Great Prizes


Entry With the
Most Votes
WINS a $50
Regal
Cinema
Gift
Certificate
&$50
Applebee's
Gift
Certificate


Submit entries until Nov. 8, view the entries
and vote on your favorite entry Nov. 9-22
www.chronicleonline.com/homecomingphotos
CITRUS COUNTY llneom

V w chronicleonline.com


SEVEN RIVERS
.CHRISTIAN SCHOOL


EE


5!v
LSI/


One lucky winner
for 8 weeks
Grand Prize Winner
$200 Gas Card
* Look for the entry form in
Wednesday's Newspaper
* Enter as often as you would like
* New winner each week
* Grand Prize drawing from all
entries at the end of the contest
Pick up your copy of the


Citrus County Chronicle
Contest Begins
Wednesday, September 11
C C IC I T R U D U N T Y

Must be over 18 year's old and legal resident in our
newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of
the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible.


A 4,m *;


I I


A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


TOGETHER


J




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Husband, wife are car enthusiasts


here are two active
members of the
Wanderers car club
who also belong to several
other clubs and have been
car enthusiasts most of
their lives. Mike and
Peggy DeFrancisco have
owned and operated Tay-
lor Rental Center on State
Rd 44 in Inverness since
2003. They are originally
from Norwich, New York,
but moved to Florida in
2003 as they were tired of
the long, long upstate
New York winters and
shoveling snow Mike was
an automotive teacher
prior to becoming a busi-
ness owner in Inverness.
They have a combined
family of six children and
10 grandchildren.
Mike started out by
pumping gas at a full serv-
ice station when he was
11 years old (gas was
28 cents a gallon), and
that got him interested in
cars at a young age. They
currently own a restored
1964 Ford Econoline
pickup, a 1975 Ford Pinto
Wagon with 27,000 original
miles (all original never
restored), a 1991 Dodge
Shadow convertible, which
has only 55,000 miles and
they have owned since it
was new, a 2012 Dodge
Challenger RT and his
daily driver, a 1988 Dodge
pickup.
Mike does all his own
maintenance and repair
work and has a 36-by-40-ft
garage equipped with a lift
where he keeps his vehi-
cles and does all his work
In the past, Mike and
Peggy had fully restored a
1971 VW Beetle and a 1960
Chevy Impala, which took
about a year for each
restoration. Both cars have
been previously sold. Mike
also owned a nice 1968
Dodge Challenger, which
he sold to a car enthusiast
in Germany They haven't
attended too many car
shows lately and prefer
local cruise-ins and power
tours. You can usually find
them at the Wanderers
Club gathering on Friday
nights by the Inverness
Bealls or at Friday Night


Thunder in dom
verness the third
each month. Or
favorite events
Kelly's Beach E
Cocoa Beach ev
this event, they
weekend with a
friends, lots of 1
good times.
Both Mike ai
enjoy their car
are real enthus
is quite an exp
sic cars and is
ing to help othi
any mechanics
particularly th
rental business
CAR JOKE:/
motorist went 1
garage where 1
chased an expE


iBeter S7Jeakk/


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OOOGSM


I


rough his
S.
An angry
back to the
ie pur-
ensive


Ken McNally is a car
columnist for the Chroni-
cle. Contacthim at ken
mcnally@tampabayrrcom
or 352-341-1165.


October 12 10am-2pm
October 19 10am-2pm
October 25 10am-2pm


jK~J


Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services
NE Crystal Street, Suite B
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-5000 (v)
352-795-7243 (tty)
www.ftri.org/crystal


battery for his car six
months earlier He told
Ken the garage owner: "When
McNally I bought that battery, you
LV1C1 said it would be the last
battery my car would ever
CAR need. Now six months
CORNER later, it's dead!" "Sorry,"
said the garage owner, "I
didn't think your car
would last longer than
vntown In- that."
rd Friday of Upcoming events
ae of their Nov. 2 and 9: Cruise-in
is Mike at 6 p.m. hosted by Citrus
last in County Cruisers at
very May At Wendy's on US 19 in
enjoy a fun Crystal River
a group of mNov 9: Citrus
aughs and MOPARS Club Second an-
nual Beauties & Beasts
nd Peggy Car Show from 8 a.m. to 3
- hobby and p.m. at Crystal Chrysler
siasts. Mike Dodge Jeep on Cortez
ert on clas- Boulevard in Brooksville.
always will- More than 40 awards will
ers with be presented. Contact me
il issues, for registration info.


I ature .Coast I!
"'^IbmerpscMicyMclUil Servikes IuTAi
"Sering irb Ewcellencr and C(ompasion"

Stock Up For Seniors
Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need

Punrha iieins on thi list and help our Citrus County seniors in need!
baby wipes toilet paper powder lotions a paper towels
denture cream Po(ident/Po4iigp tissues o Incontineice pads
deodorant socks towel & wash cloth shampoo or dry shampoo
bars of soap throw blankets Non-perishable snack items i ea^.hodcandy. tcf
Collection Locations & Dates
Natmire Coast EMS
3876 W Country Hit Drre Lanto tbhind Crystal GeI n) REGIONS
Entire month of October Mon-rl Sa-Spm on Hwy 19 in Homiosssa
Citrus County Resounx Center
2804 W. Marc KnIghton Court, Left go,
Entire montl of October Mon4Fri mn-Spn R M
Citmr County CkrontrdH wy44 "Invress
1624 N Meadowcis BO. CrystalB lr by Wal-Mart
tntite month of October Mon4-ri Sam5Spn


WalMart Homoam Saturday
WalMart- Bewrvy llk Saturday
Walmart Inwmes Friday


OrCoCmiW#itySiOrtens F Walmart -

" w =- - 3 "^i PA MJ
Fo oeinfrai oncll32-4-43
oremil kte~ucs~aurcostm. org


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 A19


Virgilio Insurance Services


























OCTOBER 1 DECEMBER 15

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All U.S. citizens under 65 can enroll

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OCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7

Open Enrollment Period (OEP) -

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or change their Medicare Advantage

Plans or Part D Prescription Drug Plans



CALL TODAY!

Phone 352-726-0040

Fax: 352-726-3322

Mobile: 352-212-3571
www.virgilioinsurance.com info@virgilioinsurance.com
0OGGVM




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oct. 28 to Nov. 1 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety
Wednesday: Sausage and egg bis-
cuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety
Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, ce-
real variety and toast, juice and milk va-
riety
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, corn dog minis,
PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet
potato crosstrax, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab N'Go PBJ,
macaroni and cheese, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled
flavored applesauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Half day: chicken
nuggets, with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety


Thursday: Nacho rounds, oven-
baked breaded chicken, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk
variety
Friday: Stuffed-crust cheese pizza,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled strawberry
cup, fruit juice, milk variety
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, milk and juice vari-
ety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg bis-
cuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety
Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk vari-
ety.
Lunch
Monday: Barbecued pork sandwich,
corn dog minis, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, seasoned potato wedges,
chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice,


milk variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange chicken
with rice, macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby
carrots, steamed green beans, flavored
Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety
Wednesday: Half day: stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled strawberry
cup, fruit juice, milk variety
Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken
nuggets with ripstick, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled
strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hamburger, spaghettie with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh garden salad,
sweet corn, chilled peach cup, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and milk vari-
ety
Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese on
loco bread, MVP breakfast, cereal vari-
ety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk vari-
ety
Wednesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round,
cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety


Thursday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety
Friday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders with rice,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, checken sandwich, fajita chicken
super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt par-
fait plate, baby carrots, cucumber coins,
celery, green beans, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with Span-
ish rice, turkey and gravy over noodles
with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad, with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, cold corn salad, Mexicali corn,
baby carrots, sweet potato cross trax,
chilled died peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Half day: Breaded
chicken sandwich, mozzarella maxstix,
steamed broccoli, baby carrots, potato
roasters, chilled peach cup, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken with rice, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, turkey super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, potato roasters, chilled


pineapple, juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken sand-
wich, pizza, chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian
super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt par-
fait plate, baby carrots, cucumber coins,
sweet peas, seasoned potato wedges,
chilled peach cup, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casserole, garlic
spinach, Italian vegetable medley, mixed
fruit, whole-wheat bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Grape juice, Salisbury
steak, mashed potatoes, brown gravy,
garden peas, dinner roll with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef's salad with
turkey, cheese, boiled egg and tomato,
French dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
fresh apple whole-wheat bread, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Chicken parmesan, Calil-
fornia vegetables, Italian flat beans, spe-
cial Halloween dessert, whole-wheat
bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown gravy,
rice pilaf, mixed vegetables, pears,
white bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Support Serv-
ices at 352-527-5975.


Sunday's PUZZLER


GROUPS
Continued from Page A15

Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498.
Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400.
The Korean War Veterans Asso-
ciation, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville
Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call
Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702.


Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23 meets
at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly
at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Her-
nando. Call Nancy Staples at 352-697-
5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Ca-
bane 1219 meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiser-
ian at 352-746-1959. Visit
www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto.
Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League, Samuel
R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.


Marine Corps League Citrus De-
tachment 819 meets at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Pat-
terson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher,
secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets
at Denny's in Crystal River. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Veter-
ans of World War II meets at 11:30
a.m. at Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9
and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida Coasties
meets at the Country Kitchen restau-
rant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd.
(State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call
Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019.


Puzzle is on Page A14.


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A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013









SPORTS


Early deadlines
All of Saturday's national nighttime
sports events and lottery numbers
will appear in Monday's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


" Golf, rec sports/B2
0 High school swimming/B2
" Scoreboard/B3
" TV, lottery/B3
" College football/B4
" NFL/B5, B6
" Baseball/B6


Fans lead cries for Schiano's ouster


Anger levels rise

after Bucs' 0-7

start to season

Associated Press
TAMPA Disgruntled fans
showed up at Raymond James
Stadium, some carrying plac-
ards or wearing brown paper
bags over their heads calling for
the firing of Tampa Bay coach
Greg Schiano.
It didn't happen Friday, a day
after a lopsided nationally tele-
vised loss to the NFC South
rival Carolina Panthers
dropped the winless Bucca-
neers to 0-7 for the sixth time in


franchise history
The Bucs have never gone on
to win more than three games
after losing the first seven to
begin a season.
Schiano said after Thursday
night's 31-13 loss that he's fo-
cused solely on trying to turn
his struggling team around -
not his job.
On Friday, he fended ques-
tions about whether he still has
the respect and support of his
players. The Bucs have lost 12 of
13 games dating to last season
and are 7-16 overall since Schi-
ano left Rutgers in January 2012
to take over a team that dropped
the final 10 games of 2011.
"Have I lost the locker room?
No. Are they listening? Yes. Are
we getting everything we need
out of them? Well, obviously not


because we're 0-7," Schiano said.
"Ultimately we have good
guys in that locker room ... 61
guys that I believe in, and I re-
ally strongly feel they believe in
me. Does belief get tested when
you have an 0-7 record? Ab-
solutely ... But there's a lot of
football left. We've got nine
games remaining. We'll take
each one, one at a time."
Fans chanted "Schiano must
go'!' in the closing minutes of
the latest loss. There has been
little indication of where the
Glazer family, which owns the
team but rarely grants inter-
views, stands on the embattled
coach's future.
It's been a tumultuous season
ranging from the messy
See Page B2


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano still has his job amid
the cries of frustrated fans calling for the organization to fire him.


e down or


32...


Associated Press
Florida State running back Devonta Freeman heads for a 4-yard touchdown as North Carolina State safety Hakim Jones and
linebacker Brandon Pittman give chase in the second quarter Saturday in Tallahassee.

No. 3 Seminoles use huge first quarter to dominate NC State 49-17


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Jameis Winston
threw three touchdown passes and No.
3 Florida State scored 35 points in the
first quarter on the way to a 49-17 vic-
tory against North Carolina State on
Saturday in Bobby Bowden's return to
Doak Campbell Stadium.
Bowden, the NCAA career leader in
major college football victories, planted
the spear at midfield before the game
- a job usually done by Florida State's
Seminole mascot. The school honored
the 83-year-old Bowden with a pregame
ceremony that included nearly 400 for-
mer players.
Then the current Seminoles went out
and put on display that Bowden's best
teams would have been proud of, set-
ting up a huge game with unbeaten
Miami next week in Tallahassee.
Winston completed 16-of-26 passes


for 292 yards with one interception and
left the game after the opening series of
the second half.
Rashad Greene topped 100 yards re-
ceiving for the third consecutive game
with eight receptions for 137 yards and a
touchdown for the Seminoles (7-0, 5-0).
The Wolfpack upset the Seminoles in
Raleigh, N.C., last season, but this year
it was no contest as Florida State put on
a show for its old coach.
N.C. State (3-4, 0-4) had quarterback
Brandon Mitchell back for the first time
since breaking his foot in the season
opener He completed 17-of-33 passes
for 128 yards with two interceptions.
Mitchell threw an interception to Ter-
rence Brooks on the second snap of the
game and the Seminoles scored four plays
later This was the beginning of a long day
for the Wolfpack, who previously won the
last four meetings when the Seminoles
were ranked. The 35 first-quarter points


tied a Florida State record for the most
points in a single quarter
Karlos Williams took a pitch to the
right side, shook a defender and raced
to the end zone for an 18-yard touch-
down to make it 7-0.
The Wolfpack promptly went three-
and-out on the next possession and
Winston threw a 39-yard touchdown to
Kelvin Benjamin on the first play
N.C. State went three-and-out for the
second consecutive possession and
Florida State took its time on the next
scoring drive. The possession needed
seven plays for Devonta Freeman to
score an 11-yard touchdown through
gaping holes. Florida State then led 21-0.
The Seminoles were overwhelming
in the first 15 minutes, but the Wolfpack
didn't do themselves any favors.
Johnathan Alston fumbled on the sec-
ond snap after the Freeman touchdown
and Telvin Smith recovered.


McGee's


exploits set


school record

Lecanto sophomore

quarterback throws

for 416yards Friday
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
Despite having the equivalent of one
full season's worth of starts under his
belt, Lecanto High School's Travis
McGee has already etched his name
into the Panthers' record book.
Friday night, McGee
set a school record by
throwing for 416 yardsI
during Lecanto's 62-52
loss at Williston. The
sophomore quarter- 5 j1
back added six total
touchdowns (four
passing, two rushing)
in a superlative indi- Travis
vidual effort. IMcGee
"In the first quarter, broke Lecanto
I had two touchdowns school record
and I knew it was for passing
going to be a yards in a
shootout," McGee said. game.
"My receivers did a
great job of getting open all night."
McGee did not throw an intercep-
tion and averaged a whopping 27.7
yards per completion. The Panther
connected on 15 of 36 passes for a 41.6
percent completion rate.
"I'm definitely honored for Lecanto,"
McGee said. "It was always a goal of
mine to not only break
the single-game mark
but also passing yards
in a season."
During a record-set- A .
ting performance,
there was only one
thing McGee would
have liked more: a
win. erema
"Besides all individ- Jeremiah
i i .i 2. Lucas
ual goals, the team Lca s
comes first" he said. had 207 yardssoph.
"Above all things, it three TDs.
would be nice to get a
win first"
For the season, the 6-foot, 170-pound
McGee is 66 of 122 passing for 979
yards, six touchdowns and four inter-
ceptions in eight games.
Surprisingly, McGee's output wasn't
even the best passing performance by
a Citrus County quarterback against
Williston. In a 2007 playoff game,
See Page B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kickball heads for playoffs


Special to the Chronicle

The last week of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's kickball
league was played on Tuesday at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River
Kickball Oct. 22
Game 1: Head Shots 11, Convictions 9
Game 2: Average Joes 7, Misfits 6
Game 3: Citrus Whiners 5, Kickin'
Nutz0
Playoff games for Oct. 29
No. 4 Average Joes vs. No. 1 Head
Shots
No. 3 Kickin' Nutz vs. No. 2 Citrus
Whiners
Men's flag football
Oct. 24
Blue 24, Black 19
Tye-Dye 41, Red 12
Green 31, Orange 7
Pink Team had a bye week.
Coed beach volleyball


being moved to Fat Daddy's BBQ
Restaurant, south of Crystal River and
north of Homosassa on U.S 19.
Fat Daddy's provides a large
Olympic-size sand volleyball court with
availability of ordering food and drinks.
Along with great lighting and a stage
next to the court, they're set up for an
awesome league atmosphere.
Registration is open for athletes 17
and older. You have until Oct. 31 to reg-
ister your team at the office of Citrus
County Parks & Recreation. Registra-
tion fee is $100 per team.
The season begins Nov. 13.
Men's softball
The boys of summer are back for the
Fall/Winter softball season out at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River. With Ad-
vanced Fitness taking the summer title,
teams are looking forward to getting
back on the diamond for revenge.
Season begins Nov. 4.
Men's basketball


basketball and will end Nov. 1. A $50
deposit is required at the time of
registration.
Season begins Nov. 13.
If you are an individual adult looking
for a sport to play and do not have a
team, please call Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540 and we will refer you the
managers in each league you are
interested in.
Kickball standings
W L T Pct PF PA
Head Shot 8 2 0 .800 66 37
Citrus Winers 7 3 0 .700 57 35
Kickin' Nutz 7 3 0 .700 71 28
Average Joes 3 6 1 .333 34 58
Convictions 3 7 0 .300 45 69
Misfits 1 8 1 .111 24 70
Football standings


Tie Dye
Green
Blue
Pink
Black
Red


This season, coed beach volleyball is Registration is now open for men's Orange


C1AYS
5AaAYS


0 1 0 .000 19 24
0 1 0 .000 12 41 Associated Press
0 1 0 .000 31 7 Phil Mickelson is 7-under par after the first three rounds
of the CIMB Classic golf tournament at the Kuala Lumpur
Golf and Country Club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The


K c or Tr a final round is today.



Kick or Treat Stroud, Moore

______________ tied in Malaysia


BETH HOOPER/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus United U14 girls competitive soccer team won the 2013 Kick or Treat Cup in Dover, Fla. on Oct. 5 and
6. The team is (in alphabetical order): Emily Akers, Stacey Borgen, Callie Borst, Emily Hooper, Dana Houpt, Kayci
Lindquist, Yesenia Mondragon, Chichi Nkwocha, Cassie Pleus, Katie Valerio, Jessie Walker, Haley Waugh and
Kallie Weidner. The coaches are Richard Valerio and James Waugh.




Lecanto boys win district title


Girls finish second

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
The Lecanto High School boys
swim team won the District 2A-6
title Saturday in the Long Center in
Clearwater. Team scores were not
available at press time.
The Lecanto High girls team fin-
ished as runner-up.
"We were runners-up last year to
Land O'Lakes," said coach Matt
Bouthillier. "This year, they were
runners-up and we won.
"It was an absolute team effort.
Our guys pulled together We racked
up a lot of points from second place,
third on down. Our swimmers con-
sistently scored in the points. We
accumulated a lot of points. Our
guys are very unselfish. They
worked very hard to make this team
something special."
The region will be 4 p.m. Friday
at the Orlando YMCA. Call at 8 p.m.
The first place winner is guaran-
teed a place at state. The other com-
petitors will be determined based
on time qualifications.
Crystal River and Citrus will also
be competing in the same regional.
The coach said there is a new sys-
tem for determining who qualifies
for region. The top eight immedi-
ately qualified. The only ones that


SCHIANO
Continued from Page B1

benching and subsequent
release of starting quarter-
back Josh Freeman to an
outbreak of MRSA infec-
tions in the locker room to a
lack of success on the field.
"I visit with our owners
all the time. There's open
lines of communication,"
Schiano said. "We're all
trying to just get better and
do the things that are going
to make the organization
better"
Safety Dashon Goldson,
one of the team's two big
offseason acquisitions, sat
out Thursday night's game


are guaranteed are the top two.
Then, they go by times.
Gavn Russ was the district diving
champion with 433 points. That was
a school record by 30 points. It was
set by Garrett LeMon in 2007. LeMon
later dove for Florida Atlantic.
"Our divers did fabulous the
other night," Bouthillier said.
Lauren Macaisa, a freshman, won
the 100 backstroke with a time of
1:05.15. She was a quarter second
from setting a school record. She
took fourth place in the 200
freestyle (2:07.95).
"Our ladies did amazing,"
Bouthillier said. "We had Lindsey
Cohee, an outstanding freshman,
who took second in the 200 IM
(2:19.17) and second in 100 fly She set
school record in 100 fly with 59.9."
Senior Steven Swartz was second
in the 100 freestyle (53.83). He also
qualified by taking fifth place in the
boys 50 free (24.17).
"The deal is there are three dis-
tricts in each region," Bouthillier
said. "There are eight swimmers per
event. Some districts eight or nine.
Our district is generally pretty fast"
Other finishers included:
Senior Reine Zizek was sixth in
the 500 free (6:53).
Freshman Maureen Gillespie
was fourth in the 500 free (6:46).
Freshman Brie Reid was sixth in
the 50 free (29.5).
Senior Hayley Bottona was


with a knee injury He said
Schiano has not lost the
locker room.
"There's no complain-
ing, there's no issues. You
come in here, it's a good
work environment," Gold-
son said.
"He's taken a lot of
scrutiny off the field.
These are tough times, and
we understand that," Gold-
son, an All-Pro last season
in San Francisco, said.
"But he has a job to do,
and we do as players, so
we're just doing what we
can to prepare every week
and try to win a football
game and leave the out-
side stuff to the outsiders."
Defensive tackle Gerald
McCoy, a team captain,


eighth in the 200 free (2:25). She was
seventh in the 100 free (1:05).
Junior Abigail Swartz was fifth in
the 500 free (6:49) and eighth in the
100 backstroke (1:16).
Cassandra Swartz was fifth in the
200 IM (2:41) and fifth in the 100
breaststroke (1:23).
Freshman Jordan Gangi was
eighth in the 100 butterfly (1:18).
Senior Anabel Marchildon was
fifth in the 50 free (29.36) and fourth
in the 100 breaststroke (1:21).
Sophomore Jessica Cohee was
sixth in the 100 butterfly (1:14) and
seventh in the 100 breaststroke (1:25).
Junior Aditi Kumar was seventh
in the 50 free (30.23).
Girl diver Kaitlyn O'Rourke was
fourth with 295 points.
For the boys, Lane Ramsey was
third in the 200 free (1:59) and fifth
in the 100 fly (1:00).
Patrick Gillespie was sixth in the
200 free (2:08) and seventh in the
500 free (5:58).
Seth Heinzman, a freshman, was
eighth in the 200 IM (2:30) and sev-
enth in the 100 backstroke (1:08).
His brother, Caleb, a junior, was
eighth in the 100 backstroke (1:09).
Ronnie Crowe was fifth in the 100
breaststroke (1:14).
Diver Kyle Ramsey was third
with 357 points, Nathan Crowe was
fourth with 322 points and Rio
Lumapas was sixth with 236 points.


agreed, to make more. I think we
"As long as he's our have to look at exactly
coach, we're going to have what Mike is capable (of),
respect for him and we're because Mike can do a lot
going to play as hard as of things. (We need to)
can for him," McCoy said. make sure we're playing to
"It's as simple as that." his strengths in every way
Turning it around won't because that's two games
be easy, especially with a in a row now without an in-
rookie at quarterback, perception," Schiano said.
Third-round draft pick "At the end of the game
Mike Glennon threw for 275 we threw the ball on every
yards, one touchdown and down. Take that out and just
no interceptions against the look at the plays before
Panthers, but threw the ball that," the coach added.
51 times and attempting 43, "He's efficient, he's doing
43 and 44 passes in his first what we ask him to do.
three starts. When you know you're
Not a winning formula going to get that, now you're
for a first-year quarterback going to build around that"
"I think we've made Schiano said he "totally"
some right decisions that understands the frustra-
made us better We've got tion of fans upset about the


Pettersen stays

atop LPGA

Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia Chris Stroud
and Ryan Moore overcame
mistakes and bogeys on
the back nine Saturday for
a share of the lead after
the third round of the
CIMB Classic.
Stroud started the day
five strokes back but surged
into contention after five
birdies on the front nine -
including four in a row -
before hitting into the water
on the 12th hole and card-
ing two bogeys for a 4-under
68. Moore (69) opened up a
three-shot lead on the back
nine only to bogey four of
five holes to give it right
back. Both were on 12-
under 204, one stroke ahead
of their nearest rivals.
Gary Woodland (67) and
Kiradech Aphibarnrat (69)
were a stroke back.
The tricky conditions led
to huge momentum swings
throughout the day at the
PGA Tour event, with plenty
of balls in the water and in
the rough beneath the palm
trees lining the course at
the Kuala Lumpur Golf and
Country Club. Second-
round leader Keegan
Bradley had a 76 to fall into
a tie for sixth at 9 under
Phil Mickelson was 7
under after a 68.
The tournament is an of-
ficial PGA Tour event for
the first time. The winner
will receive a two-year
PGA Tour exemption and a
spot in the Masters.
BMW Masters
SHANGHAI Ameri-
can Luke Guthrie stum-
bled at the end of the third
round and wound up tied
for the lead with Spain's
Rafa Cabrera-Bello in the
BMW Masters.
Guthrie has led the Euro-
pean Tour event since his
65 in the opening round,
and he had a three-shot
lead at one point on the
back nine at Lake Malaren.
But his tee shot caught the
bunker on the 16th, leading
to a bogey And he was in
such an awkward spot on
the 18th green that Guthrie
felt his best option was to
chip off the putting surface.
He missed an 8-foot putt to
take another bogey for an
even-par 72.
Cabrera-Bello was far

team's record. He's not
concerned, though, that
calls for his dismissal will
become a distraction for
team moving forward.
"Football players at this
level are very intelligent.
They understand the busi-


more efficient, keeping bo-
geys off his card in a round
of 67. His final birdie on
the par-3 17th turned out
to be good enough for a
share of the lead.
They were at 8-under
208, one shot ahead of
Spain's Gonzalo Fernan-
dez-Castano (67).
LPGA Tour
YANGMEI, Taiwan-
Defending champion
Suzann Pettersen strug-
gled with three early bo-
geys but recovered for a
1-over 73 to maintain a
four-shot lead in the LPGA
Taiwan Championship.
The Norwegian dropped
three shots over the first
five holes but had three
birdies and just one more
bogey the rest of the way to
finish three rounds at 6-
under 210. Azahara Munoz
(69), Sun Young Yoo (72) and
Carlota Ciganda (72) were
tied for second at Sunrise
Golf and Country Club.
The second-ranked Pet-
tersen has three LPGA Tour
victories this year, winning
in Portland, Ore., and
France in consecutive starts
last month. She also won a
Ladies European Tour
event this year in China.
Taiwanese star Yani
Tseng, the 2011 winner,
was 10 over after a 72. Win-
less in 41 LPGATour since
the 2012 Kia Classic, she
has tumbled from first to
25th in the world ranking
in seven months.
Champions Tour
SAN ANTONIO -
Kenny Perry bogeyed the
final hole to drop into a
five-way tie for the lead in
the Champions Tour's
AT&T Championship.
The Charles Schwab
Cup points leader fol-
lowed his opening 65 with
a 71 to match Mike Goodes,
Bernhard Langer, Colin
Montgomerie and Anders
Forsbrand at 8 under
Goodes had the round of
the day, shooting a 63 on
TPC San Antonio's AT&T
Canyons Course to jump
43 spots on the leader-
board. Montgomerie had a
68, and Langer and
Forsbrand shot 69.
The top 30 on the money
list Sunday will advance to
the season-ending Charles
Schwab Cup Champi-
onship next week at TPC
Harding Park in San Fran-
cisco. Perry entered the
regular-season finale 494
points ahead of second-
place Langer in the race
for a $1 million annuity

ness," Schiano said.
"I think we all realize it's
a performance-based busi-
ness," he added. "Players
and coaches, we're paid to
win. That's what it's about.
... We've got to get our
share."


SELF-EMPLOYED FORECLOSURES
BANKRUPTCY FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES
Ji l l];t 4I* I1 im


BUICK GMC


1275 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S. Hwy. 19)
Homosassa
352-795-6800


A = III.i


B2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCOREBOARD


GaDnesvilleEastside20, FO1 7ff r co
Dunnellon 17


EA 0 13 7 0 20
DUN 10 0 0 7 17
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DUN -West 39-yard field goal
DUN -Williams 24-yard run (kick good)
Second Quarter
EA -Simmons 21-yard run (2 point try failed)
EA Simmons 4-yard run (kick good)
Third Quarter
EA Simmons 32-yard run (kick good)
Fourth Quarter
DUN Pollizzi 44-yard pass from Hamm (kick good)
Individual Leaders
Rushing EA: 0. Simmons 27-95-3; DUN: J.
Williams 10-83-1, D. Sims 16-46.
Passing EA: L. Rogers 12-22-1-104; DUN: Z.
McKee 2-5-1-48.
Receiving EA: M. Lofland 3-36, 0. Simmons 4-
31, K. McCray 3-24; DUN: J. Hamm 1-44-1.

Crystal River 43,
Belleview 21
BEL 0 0 14 7 21
CR 15 13 0 15 43
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CR -T Reynolds 38-yard run (R. Breeson run)
CR -A. Franklin 74-yard run (R. Breeson kick)
Second Quarter
CR -A. Franklin 10-yard run (R. Breeson kick)
CR-A. Franklin 16-yard pass from C. Ryan (kickfailed)
Third Quarter
B -N. Colston 37-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick)
B -N. Colston 10-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick)
Fourth Quarter
CR -A. Ellison 1-yard run (Reynolds passto Breeson)
B C. Riche 20-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick)
CR D. Dawsy 101-yard interception return
(Breeson kick)
Individual Leaders
Rushing B: C. Riche 15-46-0; CR: A. Franklin
13-161-2, A. Ellison 26-125-1, T Reynolds 3-42-1.
Passing B: E. Pitts 14-27-2-196; CR: C. Ryan
4-8-0-45.
Receiving B: N. Colston 11-153-2, C. Riche 1-20-
1; CR: Reynolds 3-29-0, Franklin 1-16-1.
Sacks -CR: Hollis 2, LaFleur.
Interceptions CR: Dawsy, Breeson.

Gainesville 38,
Citrus 16
GHS 021 14 3-38
CHS 0 7 9 0-16
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
GHS K. Young 18 pass from C. Christian
(A. Holloway kick), 11:18
GHS -T James 13 run (Holloway kick), 8:08
CHS D. Franklin 55 pass from D. Moore
(J. Marsden kick), 5:28
GHS D. Evans 8 pass from Christian (Holloway
kick), 3:37
Third Quarter
GHS -T Faulkner 2 run (Holloway kick), 7:45
CHS J. Pouncey 2 run (kick blocked), 5:42
GHS Evans 80 kickoff return (Holloway kick), 5:24
CHS Marsden 22-yd field goal, 0:39
Fourth Quarter
GHS Holloway 33-yd field goal, 1:16
Individual Leaders
Rushing GHS: James 22-230-1; Faulkner 10-45-1.
CHS: Pouncey 12-96-1; J. Clark 8-41-0; Moore 8-33-0.
Passing GHS: Christian 3-9-0-44. CHS: Moore
11-33-1-156.
Receiving GHS: Young 2-36-1. CHS: D. Franklin
2-62-1; S. Franklin 3-39-0; J. Juse 3-23-0.
Interceptions-GHS: H. Montgomery




No. 3 FSU 49,
NC State 17
NCState 0 010 7- 17
Florida St. 35 7 0 7- 49
First Quarter
FSU-K.Williams 18 run (Aguayo kick), 13:02.
FSU-Benjamin 39 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 11:12.
FSU-Freeman 11 run (Aguayo kick), 7:02.
FSU-O'Leary 14 passfrom Winston (Aguayo kick),
6:09.
FSU-Greene 42 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
2:02.
Second Quarter
FSU-Freeman 4 run (Aguayo kick), 3:06.
Third Quarter
NCSt-FG Sade 36, 7:51.
NCSt Thornton 72 run (Sade kick), :59.
Fourth Quarter
NCSt Thornton 1 run (Sade kick), 7:16.
FSU-Whitfield 31 run (Aguayo kick), 2:19.
A-80,389.
NCSt FSU
First downs 16 30
Rushes-yards 42-188 34-224
Passing 128 342
Comp-Att-Int 17-33-2 20-34-2
Return Yards 0 46
Punts-Avg. 8-46.8 4-36.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 2-13 3-30
Time of Possession 30:53 29:07
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-NC State, Thornton 23-173, Underwood
3-23, Dayes 4-5, Mitchell 11-(minus 1), Alston 1-
(minus 12). Florida St., Freeman 12-92, K.Williams
13-86, Whitfield 1-31, R.Green 2-19, Coker 5-7, Win-
ston 1-(minus 11).
PASSING-NC State, Mitchell 17-33-2-128. Florida
St., Winston 16-26-1-292, Coker 4-8-1-50.
RECEIVING-NC State, Thornton 5-32, Creecy 3-9,
Underwood 2-25, R.Smith 2-19, Grinnage 1-12,
Purvis 1-10, Watson 1-9, Valdes-Scantling 1-8,
Cheek 1-4. Florida St., Greene 8-137, Benjamin 3-
69, Shaw 3-44, C.Green 2-22, Freeman 1-30, Whit-
field 1-16, O'Leary 1-14, K.Williams 1-10.
No. 7 Miami 24,
Wake Forest 21
Wake Forest 7 7 0 7-21
Miami 0 10 0 14-- 24
First Quarter
Wake-J.Harris 12 run (Hedlund kick), 6:26.
Second Quarter
Mia-FG Goudis 34, 9:28.
Wake-Campanaro 9 pass from Price (Hedlund
kick), 7:09.
Mia Waters 35 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
1:10.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-Du.Johnson 4 run (Goudis kick), 5:36.
Wake-Gibson 44 pass from Price (Hedlund kick),
4:02.
Mia-Du.Johnson 1 run (Goudis kick), :53.


A-66,160.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Wake
21
25-59
302
25-46-1
1
5-40.6
0-0
6-58
32:24


Mia
20
40-200
191
17-28-0
43
4-44.3
0-0
6-46
27:36


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Wake Forest, J.Harris 10-37, Price 13-
12, Gibson 2-10. Miami, Du.Johnson 30-168,
D.Crawford 7-35, Coley 1-7, Team 1-(minus 1), Mor-
ris 1-(minus 9).
PASSING Wake Forest, Price 25-45-1-302, Martin
0-1-0-0. Miami, Morris 17-28-0-191.
RECEIVING Wake Forest, Campanaro 10-88,
Tyr.Harris 6-95, Crump 3-37, Gibson 2-49, Bishop
2-18, James 1-13, J.Williams 1-2. Miami, Waters 4-
47, Walford 4-33, Coley 2-52, Hums 2-25, Cleveland
2-18, M.Lewis 2-9, Hagens 1-7.


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-2-5
6-6-3
o(*-

fi ~PLAY 4 (early)
7-9-1-1
PLAY 4 (late)
.TM 5-7 -0-7

Powerball, Lottery and
Fantasy 5 were
unavailable due to early
deadlines. Please see
Monday's Chronicle for
those results or go to
www.flalottery.com


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 4 -17 -25 -38
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $2,631.50
3-of-4 MB 39 $885.00
3-of-4 1,004 $102.50
2-of-4 MB 1,324 $54.50
1-of-4 MB 11,528 $6.50
2-of-4 29,321 $4.00


Fantasy 5:3 -17 -27 -31 -36
5-of-5 1 winner $217,545.60
4-of-5 330 $106.00
3-of-5 9,304 $10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Indian Grand Prix race
1:30 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Goody's Headache Relief Shot 500 race
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing Reno (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAToyota Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (MLB) 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals.
Game 3 (Taped)
8 p.m. (FOX) 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals.
Game 4
BOATING
1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing Chandler (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at New England Patriots
1 p.m. (FOX) Dallas Cowboys at Detroit Lions
4:25 p.m. (FOX) Washington Redskins at Denver Broncos
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina State at Florida State (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Penn State at Ohio State (Taped)
8 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Florida State (Taped)
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Oregon (Taped)
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: BMW Masters, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: AT&T Championship, Final Round
HOCKEY
5 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Florida Panthers
MOTORCYCLE RACING
3 p.m. (FS1) Moto2: Japan (Taped)
4 p.m. (FS1) World Championship: Japan (Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Skate Canada (Taped)
SOCCER
9:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Sunderland vs.
Newcastle United
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Manchester
City
1:30 p.m. (NBC) MLS: Houston Dynamo at D.C. United
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Alabama at Mississippi
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: Texas A&M at Florida
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders
TENNIS
9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Swiss Indoors Basel final
12 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP: Valencia Open final (Same-day Tape)
5 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA: TEB-BNP Paribas Championships final
(Same-day Tape)
8:30 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Championships doubles final
(Same-day Tape)
10 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Championships final (Same-day Tape)
VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at Connecticut
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Tennessee at Florida

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider


No. 21 UCF 62,
Connecticut 17
UConn 3 7 0 7-17
UCF 21 2410 7- 62
First Quarter
UCF-S.Johnson 10 run (Moffitt kick), 12:37.
Conn-FG Christen 40, 10:27.
UCF-Bortles 10 run (Moffitt kick), 7:39.
UCF-S.Johnson 7 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
:13.
Second Quarter
Conn-McCombs 9 run (Christen kick), 12:03.
UCF-FG Moffitt 50, 7:53.
UCF-Hall 17 run (Moffitt kick), 4:17.
UCF-Godfrey 10 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
1:29.
UCF-Godfrey 9 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
:27.
Third Quarter
UCF-Worton 61 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
12:09.
UCF-FG Moffitt 35, 10:07.
Fourth Quarter
Conn-Lemelle 46 pass from Cochran (Christen
kick), 10:11.
UCF-Godfrey 5 pass from Holman (Moffitt kick),


2:50.
A-37,924.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Conn
15
30-91
142
14-32-2
7
5-45.2
5-2
5-55
23:46


UCF
24
38-176
351
26-35-1
57
2-38.0
1-1
8-72
36:14


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UConn, McCombs 14-88, DeLorenzo
7-13, Lemelle 1-7, Hyppolite 3-7, Cochran 1-(minus
5), Foxx 1-(minus 6), Boyle 3-(minus 13). UCF, Hall
5-45, Holman 3-29, S.Johnson 9-28, Bortles 2-26,
Stanback 5-21, Reed 5-18, D.Wilson 7-9, Godfrey
1-4, Team 1-(minus 4).
PASSING-UConn, Boyle 7-21-2-47, Cochran 7-11-


0-95. UCF, Bortles 20-24-0-286, Holman 6-11-1-65.
RECEIVING-UConn, Phillips 4-21, Lemelle 3-81,
Davis 2-16, Foxx 1-10, Abrams 1-5, Bradley 1-4,
Green 1-4, McCombs 1-1. UCF,Worton6-119, God-
frey 6-54, Hall 4-38, Reese 3-28, S.Johnson 3-16,
Perriman 2-72, Tukes 2-24.

No. 18 Louisville 34,
USF3
Louisville 7 10 3 14- 34
South Florida 3 0 0 0- 3
First Quarter
Lou-Copeland 20 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace
kick), 10:33.
USF-FG Kloss 50, 2:47.
Second Quarter
Lou-FG Wallace 19, 11:33.
Lou-Christian 69 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace
kick), 7:16.
Third Quarter
Lou-FG Wallace 19, 4:55.
Fourth Quarter
Lou-Do.Brown 5 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace
kick), 10:53.
Lou-Gaines 70 interception return (Wallace kick),


7:50.
A-35,782.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Lou
26
40-132
353
26-30-0
70
3-44.3
0-0
9-100
41:43


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Louisville, Do.Brown 18-125, Perry 13-
35, Radcliff 1-7, Team 1-(minus 1), Gardner 2-(minus
9), Bridgewater 5-(minus 25). South Florida, Tice 7-
41, W.Davis 8-14, B.Eveld 4-(minus 7), Bench 1-
(minus 10).
PASSING-Louisville, Bridgewater 25-29-0-344,
Gardner 1-1-0-9. South Florida, Bench 4-12-1-68,
B.Eveld 3-5-0-22, M.White 1-2-0-5.
RECEIVING-Louisville, Do.Brown 6-61, Copeland


5-63, E.Rogers 4-31, Christian 3-83, Perry 1-32,
Quick 1-31, Parker 1-16, Harris 1-14, Radcliff 1-9,
Atkins 1-5, R.Clark 1-5, Hubbell 1-3. South Florida,
McFarland 1-25, Welch 1-18,W.Davis 1-16, Price 1-
10, Gonzalez 1-9, A.Davis 1-7, Bravo-Brown 1-5,
Hopkins 1-5.




Sprint Cup

Goody's Headache
Relief Shot 500 Uneup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway, Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1.(11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99.595.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 99.344.
3.(18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 99.344.
4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 99.183.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 99.162.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.084.
7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 99.007.
8. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.815.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 98.79.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.774.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.748.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 98.712.
13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 98.702.
14. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.656.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 98.553.
16. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.553.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.527.
18. (41)AricAlmirola, Ford, 98.41.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.4.
20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.394.
21. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 98.379.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 98.328.
23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.129.
24. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 98.053.
25. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.048.
26. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 97.972.
27. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 97.855.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 97.83.
29. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 97.78.
30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 97.78.
31. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 97.674.
32. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 97.618.
33. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.568.
34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 97.498.
35. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 97.473.
36. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 97.448.
37. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.




MLB playoffs
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Boston 1, St. Louis 1
Wednesday, Oct. 23: Boston 8, St. Louis 1
Thursday, Oct. 24: St. Louis 4, Boston 2
Saturday, Oct. 26: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at St.
Louis (Kelly 10-5), late
Today, Oct. 27: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at St.
Louis (Lynn 15-10), 8:15 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 28: Boston at St. Louis, 8:07 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 31: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m.


Boston
Toronto
Detroit
Tampa B
Montreal
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsburg
N.Y Islar
Carolina
Columbu
Washing
New Jers
N.Y Ran
Philadelp



Colorado
Chicago
Nashville
Minneso
St. Louis
Winnipeg
Dallas


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
9 7 2 0 14 27 13
11 7 4 0 14 36 29
11 6 4 1 13 25 30
3ay 9 6 3 0 12 32 26
10 6 4 0 12 33 20
10 4 4 2 10 28 27
11 3 7 1 7 23 38
12 2 9 1 5 18 34
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
|h 10 7 3 0 14 34 24
nders 10 4 3 3 11 33 31
11 4 4 3 11 25 33
is 10 5 5 0 10 28 25
ton 10 5 5 0 10 30 30
sey 10 1 5 4 6 20 33
gers 8 2 6 0 4 12 31
)hia 9 2 7 0 4 13 25


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA


0


)ta
3


McGEE
Continued from Page BI


Crystal River defeated the Red
Devils 53-49 behind 585 passing
yards by then- Pirates QB Shay
Newcomer
Another performance that
could be a school record, al-
though it was unconfirmed as of
Saturday evening, was the one
by sophomore receiver Jere-
miah Lucas.
Even if it fell just short of a
record, Lucas can stake claim to
one of the most prolific pass-


San Jose
Vancouver
Anaheim
Phoenix
Los Angeles
Calgary
Edmonton


Pacific Division
GP W L OT
10 8 1 1
13 8 4 1
11 8 3 0
12 7 3 2
11 7 4 0
10 4 4 2
12 3 8 1


catching performances in Pan-
thers history after rolling up 207
yards receiving and reeling in
three touchdowns receptions
from McGee.
Lucas' quarterback gave him
credit for a big evening.
"He's one of our more athletic
guys," McGee said of Lucas.
"He's able to beat man-to-man
coverage."
Jonah Nightengale also
scored two touchdowns, while
Ardante "DeDe" Anderson
added another DeAndre Hor-
ton blocked a punt and recov-
ered a fumble against Williston
as well.


PtsGF GA
17 41 18
17 38 37
16 35 28
16 40 39
14 33 29
10 29 37
7 35 48


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3
Columbus 5, Toronto 2
Anaheim 2, Ottawa 1
Buffalo 3, Florida 1
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Colorado 4, Carolina 2
Saturday's Games
Phoenix 5, Edmonton 4
New Jersey at Boston, late
Pittsburgh at Toronto, late
San Jose at Montreal, late
N.Y Rangers at Detroit, late
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, late
Philadelphia at N.Y Islanders, late
Winnipeg at Dallas, late
Minnesota at Chicago, late
St. Louis at Nashville, late
Washington at Calgary, late
Today's Games
San Jose at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Dallas at Buffalo, 7p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at Vancouver, 10 p.m.




Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 27
Major League Baseball
World Series
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atSt. Louis -110 Boston +100
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
San Fran.-x 14/2 15 (40/2) Jacksonville
at Detroit 3 3 (51) Dallas
at Philadelphia 6/2 5/2 (51) N.Y Giants
at Kansas City 7/2 7/2 (39/2) Cleveland
at New Orleans 12/2 11 (481/2) Buffalo


at N. England
at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
at Denver
at Arizona
Green Bay

Seattle
x-at London


6% 6/2 (45/2) Miami
7 6 (41) N.Y Jets
3 2/2 (401/2) at Oakland
13 12 (58/2) Washington
2/2 2/2 (451/2) Atlanta
7/2 9 (47) at Minnesota
Tomorrow
10 11/2 (42/2) atSt. Louis




BASKETBALL


National Basketball Association
CHICAGO BULLS -Waived C Dexter Pittman
and F D.J. White.
DALLAS MAVERICKS -Waived G Mickey Mc-
Connell.
MIAMI HEAT-Waived F Eric Griffin and C
Justin Hamilton.
PHOENIX SUNS- Exercised their 2014-15 op-
tions on F Markieff Morris, F Marcus Morris and C
Miles Plumlee.
UTAH JAZZ Signed G JamaalTinsley.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELAND BROWNS Signed LB Darius
Eubanks from the practice squad. Waived LB
Brandon Magee.
DALLAS COWBOYS Released G David
Arkin. Signed S Jakar Hamilton from the practice
squad.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Waived DE Justin
Trattou. Signed TE Chase Ford from the practice
squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed OL Jack Cor-
nell. Waived DL Brian Sanford.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS Reassigned G Igor
Bobkov to Norfolk (AHL) from Utah (ECHL).
CALGARY FLAMES Recalled D Derek Smith
from Abbotsford (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled G Keith
Kinkaid from Albany (AHL) with a roster exemp-
tion. Reassigned G Maxime Clermont to Albany
from Elmira (ECHL).
VANCOUVER CANUCKS Reassigned C
Pascal Pelletier to Utica (AHL).
COLLEGE
ECHL Suspended Elmira's Riley Boychuk
pending a review and fined him an undisclosed
amountfor his actions in an Oct. 25 game against
Reading.


Series shifts to St. Louis


Associated Press
St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Joe Kelly throws during the first
inning Saturday of Game 3 of the World Series against the Boston
Red Sox in St. Louis. Because of an early deadline, the result was
unavailable at press time. Please visit www.chronicleonline.com for
the full story.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 B3




B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013






No.


No. 21 UCF rolls

past UConn; USF

can't hang with

No. 18 Louisville

Associated Press

Miami squeaked by Wake For-
est to remain undefeated and set
up another marquee matchup in
the Atlantic Coast Conference
next week.
The seventh-ranked Hurri-
canes needed a late touchdown
to beat Wake Forest 24-21 at
home Saturday, and will head to
Tallahassee next week to face
No. 3 Florida State.
The Hurricanes and Semi-
noles once regularly played
huge games, but since Miami
joined the ACC in 2004, only
once have the rivals played with
both teams ranked in the Top 10.
The Hurricanes came from
behind for the second straight
week to stay unbeaten. Last
week, Miami rallied to beat
North Carolina. This time it was
Wake Forest giving the Hurri-
canes all they could handle.
Florida State is just a week re-
moved from playing a top-five
matchup against ACC rival
Clemson. Keeping the Hurri-
canes undefeated also will help
the Seminoles in the BCS stand-
ings as they jockey with Oregon
for the second spot behind Ala-
bama.
No. 7 Miami 24,
Wake Forest 21
MIAMI GARDENS Duke John-
son ran for two fourth-quarter touch-
downs, the second a 1-yard plunge
with 53 seconds left, as No. 7 Miami
rallied twice to beat Wake Forest.
Johnson finished with 168 yards
on 30 carries for the Hurricanes (7-
0, 3-0 Atlantic Coast Conference),
Tanner Price's 44-yard touchdown
pass to Dominique Gibson with 4:02
remaining put Wake Forest on top,
but the Hurricanes went 73 yards on
their next 10 plays, with Johnson
scoring to keep Miami unbeaten
heading into next week's showdown
at No. 3 Florida State.
Wake Forest (4-4, 2-3) fell to 1-53
against Top 10 teams the lone win
coming exactly 67 years ago Satur-
day. The Demon Deacons trailed for
less than 3 minutes against the Hur-
ricanes, and still dropped their fifth
straight in the series.
No. 18 Louisville 34,
South Florida 3
TAMPA- Teddy Bridgewater
threw for 344 yards and three touch-
downs and Louisville rebounded
from its first loss of the season.
Charles Gaines returned a fourth-
quarter interception 70 yards for a
TD as the Cardinals' defense re-
verted to the form that helped
Louisville (7-1, 3-1 American Athletic
Conference) climb into the top 10
before blowing a 21-point, second-
half lead at home during a 38-35
loss to Central Florida.
Bridgewater completed 25 of 29
passes with no interceptions, hiking
his totals for the season to 23 TDs
with two picks. In three career
games against USF (2-5, 2-1), the
junior from Miami has gone 65 of 82
for 841 yards, eight touchdowns and
no interceptions.
USF failed to score an offensive


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7


iami survives


.~


1~ba~-. ~


Associated Press
Miami's Antonio Crawford celebrates after breaking up a pass for Wake Forest's Michael Campanaro (3) during the second half Saturday
in Miami Gardens. The No. 7 Hurricanes scored twice in the fourth quarter to rally for a 24-21 victory over the Demon Deacons.


touchdown for the third straight
game, all in conference play. The
Bulls used three quarterbacks and
were outgained 485 yards to 133.
No. 21 UCF 62,
Connecticut 17
ORLANDO Blake Bortles threw
for four touchdowns and ran for an-
other as No. 21 UCF routed winless
Connecticut.
Bortles completed his first eight
passes of the game and ended his
day early in the third quarter, con-
necting on 20 of 24 for 286 yards.
The junior ran for a TD as the
Knights (6-1, 3-0 American Athletic
Conference) scored on their first
nine possessions of the game. They
remain the favorite to claim the
league's BCS berth.
UConn's offense was anemic
throughout and helped dig its own
hole early, thanks to two first-half inter-
ceptions by freshman quarterback Tim
Boyle. A Huskies' fumble in the sec-
ond-half set up another UCF score.
The Huskies (0-7, 0-3) have lost
eight straight games dating to last
season.
No. 1 Alabama 45,
Tennessee 10
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. T.J. Yel-
don scored on three 1-yard runs and
AJ McCarron passed for 275 yards
and two touchdowns to help No. 1
Alabama continue to roll along with
a 45-10 victory over Tennessee.
Landon Collins returned an inter-
ception 89 yards for another score
for the Crimson Tide (8-0, 5-0
Southeastern Conference), which
raced to a 35-0 halftime lead. Ala-
bama has outscored its last six op-
ponents 246-26.
The Volunteers (4-4, 1-3)
dropped their seventh straight in the
rivalry game, tying the most consec-
utive wins for either team. Coach
Butch Jones turned to freshman
quarterback Josh Dobbs in the sec-
ond half in his first college action,
replacing Justin Worley.


Worley was 8-of-15 passing for
120 yards and was intercepted twice.
McCarron completed 19 of 27
passes.
Kenyan Drake ran for 89 yards on
14 carries while Yeldon gained 72
yards. Kevin Norwood caught six
passes for 112 yards.
No. 9 Clemson 40,
Maryland 27
COLLEGE PARK, Md.-Tajh
Boyd threw for a touchdown and ran
for a score, Sammy Watkins had a
school-record 14 catches for 163
yards and No. 9 Clemson wore
down injury-riddled Maryland 40-27.
Boyd went 28 for 41 for 304 yards
with an interception and Roderick
McDowell rushed for 161 yards and
two touchdowns to help the Tigers (7-
1,5-1 ACC) rebound from last week's
51-14 defeat against Florida State.
Clemson ran 98 plays compared
to 70 for Maryland (5-3, 1-3) and fin-
ished with a 551-364 advantage in
total yardage. But the Tigers needed
four field goals from Chandler
Catanzaro to take a 19-13 lead into
the fourth quarter.
After that, however, Maryland's
defense finally caved.


tough time in his first start filling in
for the injured Austyn Carta-
Samuels for Vanderbilt (4-4, 1-4). He
threw two interceptions one was
returned for a score and was
sacked five times.
Duke 13,
No. 16 Virginia Tech 10
BLACKSBURG, Va. -Anthony
Boone ran for a touchdown, Ross
Martin kicked two long field goals
and Duke ended a long history of
losing to ranked teams with a 13-10
victory against No. 16 Virginia Tech.
The Blue Devils (6-2, 2-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) beat a ranked
team for the first time since they
stopped No. 13 Virginia in 1994, and
beat one on the road for the first
time since Stanford in 1971. And
they did it without a third-down con-
version all game, and a 2-to-1 time
of possession deficit.
Virginia Tech (6-2, 3-1) had its six-
game winning streak end as Logan
Thomas threw four interceptions, the
last on a deflected pass in the clos-
ing minutes that allowed Duke to fi-
nally run out the clock. The Hokies
held the ball for 39:27 and outgained
Duke 387-198, but still lost.


game late in the first half after an ap-
parent blow to the head.
No. 23 N. Illinois 59,
E. Michigan 20
DE KALB, Ill. -Jordan Lynch
threw four touchdown passes and
caught another as No. 23 Northern
Illinois reached its best start as a
major program with a 59-20 victory
over Eastern Michigan.
The Huskies (8-0, 4-0 Mid-Ameri-
can Conference) never trailed on
the way to a season-high in points
and second-highest total offense
(658 yards).
The Eagles (1-7, 0-4) lost their
seventh straight.
Lynch, the nation's No. 7 rusher
entering Saturday, also ran for a
touchdown while rushing 18 times
for 99 yards. He was 16-of-20 pass-
ing for 223 yards while tying a ca-
reer high with four TD passes in less
than three quarters.
Tommylee Lewis had eight
catches for 107 yards and a touch-
down. Da'Ron Brown caught three
passes for 28 yards and two
scores.
Minnesota 34,
No. 25 Nebraska 23
MINNEAPOLIS Philip Nelson
rushed for two touchdowns and
passed for another, guiding Min-
nesota to its first win against the
Cornhuskers since 1960.
Nelson made all of his seven com-
pletions count, totaling 152 yards,
and carried the ball eight times for 55
yards. He spun across the goal line
from the 1 with 48 seconds left to
seal the victory for the Gophers (6-2,
2-2 Big Ten), who became bowl-
game eligible and stopped a 16-
game losing streak to the Huskers.
Taylor Martinez returned from a
turf-toe injury that kept him of the
last three games for the Huskers
(5-2, 2-1), but he had only 16
yards rushing on eight attempts
and 139 yards on 16-for-30 pass-
ing, plus one touchdown and one
interception.


COLLEGE STATION, Texas-
Johnny Manziel threw for 305 yards
and four touchdowns in less than
three quarters, and Texas A&M
bounced back from a loss last week.
Manziel showed no signs that the
right shoulder he injured last week
was bothering him. He threw three
TDs in the first quarter to help A&M
(6-2, 3-2 Southeastern Conference)
build a 28-point lead. He tacked on
another score before sitting down
with 6 minutes left in the third quar-
ter and the Aggies leading 42-17.
The Aggies rebounded from last
week's upset loss to Auburn despite
playing a messy game where they
had five turnovers.
Freshman Patton Robinette had a


AMES, Iowa Desmond Roland
ran for a career-high 219 yards and
four touchdowns and Oklahoma
State won its third straight.
Quarterback Clint Chelf had 163
total yards in his second start of the
season for the Cowboys (6-1, 3-1
Big 12), who ran for a season-high
342 yards.
Oklahoma State scored 14 points
in a 2 1/2-minute stretch late in the
third quarter to extend its lead to 45-
20. Roland ran 58 yards for his third
touchdown of the day, and Tyler
Johnson took a fumble 54 yards for
a TD with 4:17 left in the third.
Sam Richardson had 95 yards
passing and a touchdown for Iowa
State (1-6, 0-4) before leaving the


College Football SCORES


EAST
Alfred 32, Frostburg St. 7
American International 41, St Anselm 21
Amherst 17, Tufts 7
Assumption 55, Pace 21
Bloomsburg 35, Cheyney 7
Bridgewater (Mass.) 26, Westfield St. 20
Brockport 17, Kean 7
Brown 42, Cornell 35
Bryant 42, Duquesne 14
Bucknell48, Lehigh 10
Buffalo St. 34, Utica 19
CCSU 47, Salve Regina 13
California (Pa.) 35, Gannon 7
Clarion 41, Seton Hill 2
Colby21, Bates 3
Colgate 34, Georgetown 14
Cortland St. 20, College of NJ 7
Dartmouth 56, Columbia 0
Delaware 35, Rhode Island 13
Dickinson 38, McDaniel 31
East Stroudsburg 43, Kutztown 26
Endicott 33, Coast Guard 7
Framingham St. 41, Plymouth St. 9
Gallaudet 16, Husson 13
Hobart 35, RPI 13
Houston 49, Rutgers 14
Howard Payne 47, E. Texas Baptist 36
Indiana (Pa.) 28, Mercyhurst6
Ithaca 25, St. John Fisher 22
Johns Hopkins 34, Gettysburg 16
King's (Pa.) 21, Delaware Valley 14, OT
Lafayette 41, Holy Cross 23
Lebanon Valley 31, Misericordia 14
Lock Haven 26, Millersville 14
Lycoming 20, Albright 17, OT
MIT 17, W. New England 14
Maine 37, Villanova 35
Maine Maritime 63, Nichols 52
Marist 27, Stetson 0
Mass. Maritime 34, Mass.-Dartmouth 21
Merchant Marine 26, WP1I14
Merrimack 40, Bentley 34
Middlebury 27, Trinity (Conn.) 24
Montclair St. 34, Morrisville St. 21
Moravian 52, Franklin & Marshall 42
Mount Ida 36, Becker 25
Muhlenberg 27, Juniata 7


NY Maritime 38, Castleton St. 6
Navy 24, Pittsburgh 21
New Hampshire 31, Stony Brook 13
Norwich 38, Anna Maria 6
Penn 28,Yale 17
Princeton 51, Harvard 48, 30T
Robert Morris 17, Wagner 13
Rochester 21, Union (NY) 7
Rowan 20, William Paterson 9
Salisbury 17, Hartwick 0
Slippery Rock 44, Edinboro 20
Springfield 21, St. Lawrence 20
St. Francis (Pa.) 24, Sacred Heart 10
Stonehill38, LIU Post28
W. Connecticut 55, Worcester St. 35
W. Michigan 31, UMass 30
Washington & Jefferson 42, St. Vincent 7
Waynesburg 31, Geneva 14
Wesleyan (Conn.) 34, Bowdoin 14
West Chester 32, Shippensburg 29
Widener 59, FDU-Florham 14
Wilkes 21, Stevenson 17
Williams 24, Hamilton 0
SOUTH
Alabama 45, Tennessee 10
Albany St. (Ga.) 30, Clark Atlanta 7
Appalachian St. 38, Georgia Southern 14
Ark.-Pine Bluff 38, MVSU 18
Ave Maria 28, Webber 13
Benedict 29, Morehouse 26
Bethune-Cookman 14, SC State 3
Birmingham-Southern 42, Berry 0
Bowie St. 34, Virginia Union 7
Campbellsville 24, Cumberland (Tenn.) 19
Carson-Newman 47, North Greenville 26
Charleston Southern 36, Charlotte 14
Chattanooga 28, The Citadel 24
Clemson 19, Maryland 9
Concord 9, Charleston (WV) 3, 20T
Cumberlands 28, Reinhardt 24
Dayton 42, Morehead St. 14
Duke 13, Virginia Tech 10
Edward Waters 31, Apprentice 21
Elizabeth City St. 37, Chowan 31
Emory & Henry 17, Catholic 15
Fayetteville St. 43, St. Augustine's 19
Florida St. 49, NC State 17
Florida Tech 37, Warner 3


Fort Valley St. 52, Concordia-Selma 19
Georgetown (Ky.) 48, Pikeville 13
Georgia Tech 35, Virginia 25
Grove City 7, Thomas More 4
Guilford 28, Randolph-Macon 21
Hampton 30, Delaware St. 7
Howard 28, Morgan St. 14
Huntingdon 59, NC Wesleyan 35
Jacksonville 56, Davidson 13
Jacksonville St. 34, Tennessee Tech 14
Lenoir-Rhyne 27, Mars Hill 20
Liberty 24, Gardner-Webb 0
Lindsey Wilson 49, Belhaven 15
Louisville 34, South Florida 3
Maryville (Tenn.) 53, Ferrum 14
McNeese St. 55, Nicholls St. 30
Mercer 38, Campbell 31
Methodist 43, LaGrange 41
Miami 24, Wake Forest 21
Millsaps 21, Sewanee 14
NC A&T 20, Florida A&M 13, OT
NC Central 24, Savannah St. 10
North Alabama 57, Valdosta St. 7
North Carolina 34, Boston College 10
Old Dominion 27, Norfolk St. 24
Presbyterian 49, Point (Ga.) 19
Rhodes 35, Centre 14
S. Virginia 44, Bluefield South 18
Samford 34, Wofford 27
Shaw 39, Johnson C. Smith 33
Shenandoah 36, Hampden-Sydney 35
Texas Lutheran 35, Mississippi College 32
Texas Southern 23, Grambling St. 17, OT
Towson 48, Richmond 32
Tulane 14, Tulsa 7
Tuskegee 36, Kentucky St. 7
UCF 62, UConn 17
Union (Ky.) 24, Kentucky Christian 17
Virginia St. 34, Lincoln (Pa.) 14
Virginia-Wise 18, W. Virginia St. 10
W. Carolina 27, Elon 24, OT
WV Wesleyan 38, West Liberty 21
Washington & Lee 42, Bridgewater (Va.)
13
Wesley 20, Menlo 13
Westminster (Pa.) 7, Bethany (WV) 6
William & Mary 17, James Madison 7
Wingate 41, Tusculum 33


Winston-Salem 40, Livingstone 0
MIDWEST
Albion 28, Alma 24
Ashland 27, Malone 14
Aurora 47, Concordia (III.) 33
Baker 13, MissouriValley 10, OT
Baldwin-Wallace 28, Capital 12
Ball St. 42, Akron 24
Benedictine (III.) 34, Wis. Lutheran 28, OT
Benedictine (Kan.) 38, Culver-Stockton 13
Bethel (Minn.) 41, Gustavus 17
Buena Vista 34, Loras 0
Buffalo 41, Kent St. 21
CSU-Pueblo 51, Black Hills St. 17
Carleton 42, St. Olaf 37
Carroll (Wis.) 37, Grinnell 0
Case Reserve 21, Trinity (Texas) 17
Cent. Missouri 51, Northeastern St. 7
Central 22, Luther 12
Chadron St. 31, NM Highlands 24
Concordia (Moor.) 47, Augsburg 20
Concordia (St.P) 28, Wayne (Neb.) 24
Concordia (Wis.) 45, Lakeland 28
Crown (Minn.) 20, Mac Murray 6
DePauw 23, Allegheny 7
Doane 28, Concordia (Neb.) 7
Drake 23, Valparaiso 10
E. Kentucky 31, SE Missouri 7
Earlham 21, Anderson (Ind.) 20
Elmhurst 20, Millikin 7
Evangel 38, Graceland (Iowa) 24
Ferris St. 30, Michigan Tech 27
Findlay 48, Lake Erie 27
Fort Hays St. 45, Lincoln (Mo.) 35
Franklin 64, Rose-Hulman 14
Friends 46, Bethany (Kan.) 20
Glenville St. 20, Notre Dame Coll. 16
Grand Valley St. 23, Northwood (Mich.) 17
Grand View 35, St. Ambrose 21
Greenville 45, Iowa Wesleyan 26
Hanover 25, Defiance 21
Heidelberg 49, Muskingum 21
Illinois College 48, Knox 24
Illinois St. 28, South Dakota 14
Illinois Wesleyan 30, Wheaton (III.) 19
Iowa 17, Northwestern 10, OT


Jamestown 16, Valley City St. 13
John Carroll 47, Ohio Northern 0
Kansas St. 35, West Virginia 12
Kansas Wesleyan 38, Bethel (Kan.) 34
Lake Forest 17, Cornell (Iowa) 10
Marietta 50, Wilmington (Ohio) 22
Martin Luther 35, Minn.-Morris 32
Mayville St. 42, Presentation 33
Michigan St. 42, Illinois 3
Mid-Am Nazarene 44, Avila 30
Minn. Duluth 31, Bemidji St. 21
Minn. St-Mankato 44, Winona St. 10
Minn. St-Moorhead 48, Mary 41
Minnesota 34, Nebraska 23
Minot St. 20, Minn.-Crookston 19
Monmouth (III.) 31, Lawrence 7
Morningside 67, Briar Cliff 0
Mount St. Joseph 41, Manchester 27
Mount Union 48, Otterbein 0
N. Dakota St. 56, Indiana St. 10
N. Illinois 59, E. Michigan 20
N. Michigan 33, Wayne (Mich.) 21
NW Missouri St. 43, Missouri Southern 7
Nebraska-Kearney 28, SW Baptist 14
North Central (III.) 72, Carthage 20
Northwestern (Iowa) 48, Dordt 10
Northwestern (Minn.) 36, Westminster
(Mo.) 21
Ohio 41, Miami (Ohio) 16
Oklahoma St. 58, Iowa St. 27
Olivet Nazarene 20, Lindenwood (III.) 13
Ottawa, Kan. 82, Southwestern (Kan.) 21
Peru St. 51, Cent. Methodist 24
Pittsburg St. 34, Missouri Western 14
Ripon 40, Beloit 14
Robert Morris-Chicago 28, St. Francis
(Ind.) 24
Rockford 34, Maranatha Baptist 13
S. Dakota St. 37, N. Iowa 34, 20T
S. Dakota Tech 69, Dakota St. 25
Simpson (Iowa) 41, Coe 38, 20T
St. Francis (III.) 20, Marian (Ind.) 6
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 31, McKendree 13
St. Scholastica 38, Eureka 25
St.Thomas (Minn.) 43, Hamline 7
St. Xavier 12, William Penn 6


Sterling 40, St. Mary (Kan.) 13
Tabor 19, McPherson 7
Taylor 21, Siena Heights 7
Toledo 28, Bowling Green 25
Trinity (III.) 32, Waldorf 12
Truman St. 27, Missouri S&T 7
Urbana 41, Fairmont St. 5
Wabash 27, Oberlin 10
Walsh 30, Tiffin 29
Wartburg 22, Dubuque 15
Washburn 44, Lindenwood (Mo.) 35
Washington (Mo.) 7, Macalester 0
William Jewell 19, Quincy 17
Wis.-Eau Claire 13, Wis.-River Falls 6
Wis.-LaCrosse 28, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 21
Wis.-Platteville 59, Wis.-Stout 35
Wis.-Whitewater 17, Wis.-Oshkosh 14
Wittenberg 38, Kenyon 7
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Monticello 22, S. Nazarene 19
Austin 45, Hendrix 38
Henderson St. 45, Harding 30
Langston 53, Oklahoma Baptist 7
Mary Hardin-Baylor 63, Hardin-Simmons7
Ouachita 34, Arkansas Tech 24
Rice 45, UTEP 7
SMU 59, Temple 49
SW Assemblies of God 42, Okla. Panhan-
dle St. 35
Sam Houston St. 44, Northwestern St. 10
Texas A&M 56, Vanderbilt 24
W.Texas A&M 90, McMurry 57
FAR WEST
Adams St. 41, W New Mexico 20
Azusa Pacific 24, Cent. Washington 17
Colorado Mines 27, Mesa St. 10
E. Oregon 45, Montana Tech 30
E. Washington 42, Montana 37
Fort Lewis 10, Western St. (Col.) 9
Montana St. 34, UC Davis 17
Pacific 21, Chicago 6
Portland St. 14, North Dakota 10
Rocky Mountain 45, Dickinson St. 7
S. Utah 19, Idaho St. 9
San Diego 42, Butler 14
Southern Cal 19, Utah 3
Whitworth 33, Puget Sound 14


No. 14 Texas A&M 56, No. 19 Oklahoma St. 58,
Vanderbilt 24 Iowa State 27


COLLEGE FOOTBALL




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Cleveland's chore: knock off KC


Detroithosts

Dallas in prime

NFCclash

Associated Press

Now Jason Campbell,
No. 20 in the starting quar-
terbacks parade in Cleve-
land, gets his chance. His
first mission: trying to beat
the undefeated Chiefs. In
Kansas City.
Hardly an enviable task
for the nine-year veteran
and 2005 first-round pick
of the Redskins who has
bounced around the NFL.
The Browns are his fourth
team, and he is their third
starter this season, after
Brandon Weeden and
now-injured Brian Hoyer
"It's an opportunity to go
out there and just get back
to the game and just hav-
ing fun," Campbell said.
"Obviously, we want to go
win games and do the best
we can.
"But at the same time
we understand we're a
growing football team and
our goal and mission every
week is to go out and win
games. The one thing we
can't forget is just to get
back to having fun."
The Chiefs (7-0) haven't
made it fun for any oppo-
nents this season. They're
the only remaining perfect
team because their de-
fense is opportunistic,
sack-crazy and, well, so
darn good.
Cleveland's defense is
pretty staunch as well, and
has sacks from 13 players,
tied for the most in the
league.
But its nine takeaways
are 10 fewer than Kansas
City's, and the Chiefs have
two of the NFL's leading
sackmasters in lineback-
ers Justin Houston (10)
and Tamba Hali (nine).
"You go in every week
respecting every oppo-
nent," linebacker Derrick
Johnson said, "but at the
same time, we don't really
care who plays as long as
we execute our defensive
scheme."
The last time Campbell
started, he was with the
Bears and they lost 32-7 to
the 49ers last season. That
doesn't bode well for
Cleveland (3-4).
Elsewhere today, it's
Washington at Denver,
Dallas at Detroit, the New
York Jets at Cincinnati,
Miami at New England,
Buffalo at New Orleans,
Pittsburgh at Oakland,
Green Bay at Minnesota,
Atlanta at Arizona, the
New York Giants at
Philadelphia and San
Francisco against Jack-
sonville at London in the
second international game
of the season.
Monday night, it's Seat-
tle at St. Louis.
Off this week are Balti-
more (3-4), Chicago (4-3),
Houston (2-5), Indianapo-
lis (5-2), San Diego (4-3)


Associated Press
Kansas City safety Eric Berry and the Chiefs are the lone undefeated team left in the NFL this season. Kansas City
takes on Cleveland looking to improve to 8-0 overall.


and Tennessee (3-4).
Panthers 31,
Buccaneers 13
In Tampa, Cam Newton
threw two touchdown
passes and ran for another
score to lead Carolina over
winless Tampa Bay
The Panthers (4-3) won
for the fourth time in five
games following an 0-2
start. They've won three
straight, with Newton
throwing for 667 yards, six
TDs and no interceptions.
The Bucs (0-7), one of
two NFL teams yet to win,
have dropped the first
seven games in a season
for the seventh time in
franchise history
They've lost 12 of 13 dat-
ing to last season, and
some fans showed up at
Raymond James Stadium
carrying signs and wearing
paper bags over their
heads urging that second-
year coach Greg Schiano
be fired.
Washington (2-4)
at Denver (6-1)
Redskins coach Mike
Shanahan returns to Den-
ver, where he led the Bron-
cos to 146 wins and two
Super Bowl titles in his 14
seasons in charge. The
Broncos are planning a
short video tribute for
Shanahan, who said he ex-
pects a warm reception: "I
don't think I did anything
wrong to get booed. I didn't
leave. They fired me."
Denver comes off its
first defeat in Peyton Man-
ning's emotional return to


Indianapolis, and he
missed some practice time
this week with a sore
ankle.
Neither defense has
done much this season, so
a shootout seems likely
Dallas (4-3) at Detroit (4-3)
Two more pretty good of-
fenses, and the Cowboys
showed plenty of defense
in shutting down Philadel-
phia last week. Whether
that lasts could decide the
winner at Ford Field.
Lions QB Matthew
Stafford is a Dallas guy
and would like nothing
more than a second
straight win over his
hometown team. Stafford
said his family members
have become Lions fans,
but not all of his friends
have done so.
"They want me to have a
really good game and lose
it in the end," he said.
New York Jets (4-3)
at Cincinnati (5-2)
Two teams that have
used special teams for
some special wins. Three
of New York's victories
have come off the foot of
Nick Folk, who's hit all 16
field goal attempts thus far
The last two Bengals wins
were clinched by former
Jets kicker Mike Nugent,
including a 54-yarder to
win at Detroit last Sunday
The Jets have won four
in a row and nine of the
past 10 against Cincinnati.
The last matchup at Paul
Brown Stadium was a Jets
playoff win in 2009.


Miami (3-3)
at New England (5-2)
Miami won its first three
games, but has slumped
badly since, with the
biggest problem an inabil-
ity to protect QB Ryan Tan-
nehill. He's been sacked
an absurd 26 times, and
the Patriots have the Jones
Gang-defensive linemen
Chandler and Chris Jones
- who can get after the
quarterback.
So can Miami's Cameron
Wake, and New England's
inconsistency on offense
has been a season-long
story Still, the Patriots
have won six straight
against the Dolphins.
Buffalo (3-4)
at New Orleans (5-1)
Well rested after a bye,
the Saints look to put be-
hind them their only loss -
a painful, last-second de-
feat at Foxborough and
secure the NFC South they
pretty much are running
away with. And here's
something scary: Three
Saints players had their
first career TDs at New
England, RBs Khiry Robin-
son and Travaris Cadet,
and WR Kenny Stills. So
New Orleans is finding
more offensive threats?
One of Buffalo's main of-
fensive threats, running
back C.J. Spiller, is hobbled.
Pittsburgh (2-4)
at Oakland (2-4)
'Just Win, Baby" vs. "The
Steel Curtain."
Oh, for those days.
As their records show,
neither team has a vintage


Raiders or Steelers squad.
Indeed, Oakland hasn't
been a playoff factor since
it lost in the Super Bowl
after the 2002 season.
But there are signs of
life on both sides. The
Raiders have a decent
running game, play the
run well defensively, and
have a promising if raw
quarterback in Terrelle
Pryor
They have lost the past
10 games coming out of the
bye, however, getting
outscored 271-139.
The Steelers have won
their past two games and
their defense has come
alive, forcing their first
two turnovers. But their of-
fense is next-to-last in red
zone TDs with six in 16
trips.
Green Bay (4-2)
at Minnesota (1-5)
The QB carousel spins
in Minnesota Christian
Ponder, who seemed to
have one foot out the door,
now will have both feet be-
hind center with Josh
Freeman showing concus-
sion symptoms.
No such worries at the
position for the Packers as
Aaron Rodgers makes do
with a shrinking cast of
wideouts, and turns them
into stars. Jarrett Boykin
could be next as he comes
off a career-high eight-
catch, 103-yard, one-TD
game.
Adrian Peterson is
struggling because Min-
nesota's line can't open
holes and there is little


passing attack. But he
tends to dominate the
Packers and had 409 yards
rushing in two meetings in
2012.
Seattle (6-1) at St Louis
(3-4), Monday night
With Sam Bradford gone
for the season with a
wrecked knee, journey-
man Kellen Clemens gets
the call at quarterback for
the Rams. Sounds similar
to Cleveland's situation
this week.
Seattle's rugged defense
is primed, having not
played since Oct 17, and its
19 takeaways are tied for
the league lead with KC.
Marshawn Lynch keys
an aggressive running
game and is second in the
NFL in rushing with 578
yards.
Atlanta (2-4)
at Arizona (3-4)
The Falcons snapped a
three-game slide last
week, but they are banged-
up, especially on offense.
Yet Matt Ryan was the
NFC's top performer in
the win over Tampa Bay,
and WR Harry Douglas
emerged with seven
catches for a career-best
149 yards with Julio Jones
and Roddy White absent.
If Arizona WR Larry
Fitzgerald catches four
passes Sunday, he will be
the youngest player with
800 career receptions at 30
years, 57 days. Fitzgerald
has caught a TD pass
against every NFC team
except Atlanta.
New York Giants (1-6)
at Philadelphia (3-4)
The Giants got off the
schneid on Monday night
against the woeful Vikings,
but don't mistake that for a
turnaround. They remain
injury-depleted, especially
in the backfield, and lost
center David Baas for the
season from an under-
achieving line.
If that line can give Eli
Manning some time, he
can clean up his act he
was not intercepted in the
victory, the first time he
didn't throw a pick all
season.
As Nick Foles recovers
from a concussion, the Ea-
gles were faced with using
either Michael Vick, com-
ing off a hamstring injury
sustained in a win over
New York, or rookie Matt
Barkley at quarterback.
Regardless, look for run-
ning back LeSean McCoy
to get the ball often.
San FYancisco (5-2)
vs. Jacksonville (0-7)
at London
Another game with little
intrigue for the Londoners
to ponder At least there's
a team with a victory on
hand, unlike last month
when Minnesota and Pitts-
burgh played at Wembley
The 49ers won in
Nashville, then flew to
England rather than head
back to California. Staying
on the road has worked
well for them before, and
they weren't facing anyone
as weak as the Jaguars
back then.


NFL Stats CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
and 5 2 0 .714 152
4 3 0 .571 134
3 3 0 .500 135
3 4 0 .429 159
South
W L T Pct PF
is 5 2 0 .714 187
e 3 4 0 .429 145
2 5 0 .286 122
lie 0 7 0 .000 76
North
W L T Pct PF
5 2 0 .714 148
3 4 0 .429 150
3 4 0 .429 131
S 2 4 0 .333 107
West
W L T Pct PF
ity 7 0 0 1.000 169
6 1 0 .857 298
S 4 3 0 .571 168
2 4 0 .333 105
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
4 3 0 .571 200
hia 3 4 0 .429 169
on 2 4 0 .333 152
ts 1 6 0 .143 126
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 5 1 0 .833 161
4 3 0 .571 170
2 4 0 .333 153
ay 0 7 0 .000 100
North
W L T Pct PF
y 4 2 0 .667 168
4 3 0 .571 186
4 3 0 .571 213
S 1 5 0 .167 132
West
W L T Pct PF
6 1 0 .857 191
cisco 5 2 0 .714 176
3 4 0 .429 156
3 4 0 .429 133


Thursday's Game
Carolina 31, Tampa Bay 13
Today's Games
Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Miami at New England, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis, San
Diego, Tennessee
Monday's Game
Seattle at St. Louis, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 31
Cincinnati at Miami, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 3
Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
San Diego atWashington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y
Giants, San Francisco
Monday, Nov. 4
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 8
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds TD Int
P Manning, DEN 289 207 2565 25 3
P Rivers, SND 249 184 2132 15 5
Locker, TEN 152 94 1047 8 1
Dalton, CIN 249 164 1924 11 6
Luck, IND 224 136 1574 10 3
Roethlisberger, PIT 215 143 1655 7 5
Pryor, OAK 138 89 1061 5 5
Tannehill, MIA 219 133 1577 9 7
Manuel, BUF 150 85 985 5 3
Ale. Smith, KAN 250 145 1570 7 4


Rushers
Att Yds Avg
J. Charles, KAN 135 561 4.16
A. Foster, HOU 121 542 4.48
Ry. Mathews, SND 110 446 4.05
Moreno, DEN 95 413 4.35
F Jackson, BUF 86 380 4.42
Chr.Johnson,TEN 115 366 3.18
B. Powell, NYJ 90 366 4.07
Spiller, BUF 90 362 4.02
T. Richardson, IND 106 333 3.14
Ridley, NWE 78 320 4.10
Receivers
No Yds Avg
And. Johnson, HOU 48 584 12.2
An. Brown, PIT 47 548 11.7
Edelman, NWE 46 455 9.9
Cameron, CLE 45 515 11.4
Welker, DEN 44 474 10.8
A.. Green, CIN 43 619 14.4
Decker, DEN 42 627 14.9
A. Gates, SND 42 497 11.8
De. Thomas, DEN 41 610 14.9
Ke.Wright,TEN 40 433 10.8
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Doss, BAL 15 267 17.8
Benjamin, CLE 20 246 12.3
Edelman, NWE 21 243 11.6
Holliday, DEN 19 217 11.4
McCluster, KAN 31 349 11.3
Kerley, NYJ 12 108 9.0
An. Brown, PIT 9 74 8.2
Hilton, IND 14 110 7.9
Reynaud, TEN 18 135 7.5
P Adams, OAK 8 59 7.4
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
Holliday, DEN 10 349 34.9
Q. Demps, KAN 9 299 33.2
Thigpen, MIA 12 321 26.8
K. Martin, HOU 21 548 26.1
F Jones, PIT 10 259 25.9
D. Reed, IND 11 276 25.1
Br.Tate,CIN 13 320 24.6
Reynaud, TEN 15 355 23.7
C. Gates, NYJ 9 209 23.2
Blount, NWE 10 231 23.1
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
J. Charles, KAN 8 6 2
Moreno, DEN 8 8 0
Ju. Thomas, DEN 8 0 8


Welker, DEN
Cameron, CLE
Royal, SND
A.. Green, CIN
F. Jackson, BUF
De. Thomas, DEN
Bernard, CIN

M. Prater, DEN
Gostkowski, NWE
Vinatieri, IND
Folk, NYJ
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
D. Carpenter, BUF
Succop, KAN
Suisham, PIT
Bironas, TEN


M. Ryan, ATL
A. Rodgers, GBY
Brees, NOR
Romo, DAL
C. Newton, CAR
R.Wilson, SEA
M. Stafford, DET
Cutler, CHI
S. Bradford, STL
Vick, PHL

L. McCoy, PHL
Lynch, SEA
Gore, SNF
Forte, CHI
A. Peterson, MIN
De. Williams, CAR
A. Morris, WAS
D. Martin, TAM
D. Murray, DAL
Re. Bush, DET

B. Marshall, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL
V. Jackson, TAM
Ju. Jones, ATL
Cruz, NYG


8 0
6 0
6 0
5 0
5 5S
5 0
4 2 2
Kicking
PAT FG
37-37 11-11
14-14 18-19
18-18 15-17
12-12 16-16
18-18 14-16
15-15 15-17
14-14 15-16
19-19 12-14
9-9 14-14
16-16 11-14


NFC leaders


Week 8
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
244 171
220 143
237 157
265 181
202 131
187 115
290 178
225 146
262 159
132 71
Rushers
Att Yds
141 685
138 578
127 547
116 533
115 511
114 477
91 472
127 456
91 428
98 426
Receivers
No Yds
46 540
42 569
41 623
41 580
40 591


Garcon, WAS 40 466 11.7
De. Jackson, PHL 37 610 16.5
J. Graham, NOR 37 593 16.0
WittenDAL 35 388 11.1
Gonzalez, ATL 35 369 10.5
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Dw. Harris, DAL 13 212 16.3
Sherels, MIN 8 127 15.9
Hester, CHI 9 120 13.3
G.Tate, SEA 19 228 12.0
Hyde, GBY 8 93 11.6
PageTAM 16 147 9.2
Sproles, NOR 15 124 8.3
Dam. Johnson, PHL 10 79 7.9
Spurlock, DET 18 128 7.1
Ginn Jr., CAR 11 76 6.9
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C. Patterson, MIN 13 475 36.5
Dw. Harris, DAL 10 351 35.1
Hester, CHI 21 615 29.3
D. Johnson, PHL 15 385 25.7
B. Cunningham, STL 12 299 24.9
Ginn Jr., CAR 11 272 24.7
D.Wilson, NYG 9 222 24.7
Sproles, NOR 8 161 20.1
C.Thompson, WAS 8 160 20.0


Lynch, SEA
Forte, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL
Ve. Davis, SNF
J. Graham, NOR
Cal. Johnson, DET
A. Peterson, MIN
B. Marshall, CHI
Fauria, DET
Gore, SNF

Hauschka, SEA
Crosby, GBY
Hartley, NOR
Henery, PHL
Gould, CHI
Akers, DET
D. Bailey, DAL
Gano, CAR
P Dawson, SNF
Zuerlein, STL


Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush F
7 6
6 6
6 0
6 0
6 0
6 0
6 5
5 0
5 0
5 5
Kicking
PAT FG
19-19 16-17
18-18 14-16
17-17 14-16
17-17 14-18
21-22 12-13
21-21 11-14
21-21 11-13
20-20 10-10
21-21 9-12
15-15 11-11


New EngIl
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

Kansas C
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
Washingto
N.Y Giant

New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba

Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota

Seattle
San Franc
St. Louis
Arizona


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best-record rarity


Rare for teams with

top marks to meet

in World Series

Associated Press

ST LOUIS The teams with the
best records in each league used to
meet in the World Series every year
Now it's a rarity
Boston and St. Louis are the first
since 1999, when the New York Yan-
kees swept Atlanta.
"You definitely have to be hot and
play good baseball, maybe for a lit-
tle bit longer," Boston pitcher Jake
Peavy said before his Game 3 start
Saturday night.
From 1903 through 1968, the top
teams had to meet in the World Se-
ries. There were no playoffs.
Then the AL voted in May 1968 to
split into divisions the following
year when the Kansas City Royals
and Seattle Pilots joined to create a
12-club league. While the NL was
adding the Montreal Expos and San
Diego Padres, it initially refused to
start a playoff.
"It would be a contradiction of
baseball history and tradition to di-
vide the league and then see a team
that finished fourth or fifth in per-
centage playing in the World Se-
ries," NL President Warren Giles
said at the time.
Two months later, the NL gave in
when owners met again in Houston
after the All-Star game at the As-
trodome. The two division winners
would meet in a league champi-
onship series, initially best-of-five
and then expanded to best-of-seven
starting in 1985. In the 25 years of a
four-team postseason, the World Se-
ries featured the top teams in each
league just nine times.
Then in September 1993, a year
after Bud Selig became acting com-
missioner, owners voted to split
each league into three divisions the
following year and add another
round of playoffs, a best-of-five di-
vision series. The postseason would
double to eight teams.
The vote was 27-1, with Texas
Rangers owner George W Bush the
future president-the lone dissenter
"I made my arguments and went
down in flames," Bush said. "His-
tory will prove me right."
After a one-year delay caused by
the 71/2-month players' strike, the ex-
panded playoffs began in 1995, when
teams played a 144-game schedule
because of the walkout. The top
teams met that October, with Atlanta
defeating Cleveland in six games.
It didn't happen again until 1999.
And after that until this year, the


Associated Press
St. Louis Cardinals relief pitcher Trevor Rosenthal reacts after saving Game
2 of the World Series against the Boston Red Sox on Thursday in Boston.
The Cardinals won 4-2 to tie the series at 1-1.


second after the playoffs expanded
to 10 teams with the addition of a
second wild card in each league.
"That's another manifestation of
how tough it is," Selig said this week
Selig defends his system, pointing
out fewer teams make the MLB
playoffs than in the other major
leagues (12 of 32 in the NFL, 16 of
30 in the NBA and NHL).
Some refer to the postseason as
tournament baseball. Playing well
at the right time is more important
that excellence and consistency
over the long haul.
The 2001 Seattle Mariners were
the biggest casualty They went 116-46
during the regular season for a .716
winning percentage, the best in the
major leagues since the 1954 Indians
went 116-46 (.721). Seattle lost the
ALCS to the Yankees in five games.
"Doesn't matter if you won 85 to
get in the playoffs or 185 to get in
the playoffs. It's how you finish,"
said Aaron Sele, the loser in New
York's clincher


With the advent of the one-game,
winner-take-all wild-card playoff,
winning divisions has taken on
more urgency For more than a
decade, the main difference be-
tween division winner and wild
card was home-field advantage.
But now that the postseason is a
monthlong event, the hurdles to get
a ring are many Just reaching the
World Series is a major accom-
plishment, maybe more so than it
was from 1903-68.
"Getting here and what's it taken
to get here with a great team and a
great group of guys, you see just
how hard it is to win the World Se-
ries," Peavy said. "You really un-
derstand the preparation, the will
of not just a few guys, not just a
handful of guys it has to be an or-
ganizational philosophy that you're
going to win the World Series. It's
got to be a team and a group of guys
that just refuse to quit and all put
their efforts together as a team to be
on top."


NFL's Goodell


cautious about


success in London


Associated Press

LONDON NFL Com-
missioner Roger Goodell
said the NFL's overseas
success doesn't mean the
Super Bowl is crossing the
Atlantic or that the league
is going back to continen-
tal Europe.
Goodell said the expan-
sion from two to three
NFL regular season games
starting next season has
the league exploring how
to continue growing its In-
ternational Series brand.
More games could come to
London, which will need a
franchise before it can
even dream of hosting the
Super Bowl. And that is
some time away
"We don't have a
timetable for (a London
franchise). We want to con-
tinue building interest,
and if it continues to go
well we believe a fran-
chise could be here. The
Super Bowl won't be
played anywhere where
we don't have a franchise,"
Goodell said.
"Right now, our focus is
on the U.K. since the Eu-
ropean fans can get here.
We want to build on our
success here, and whether
it leads to a permanent
franchise or not, then we
can see. What happens
here will dictate that"
The NFL created a Eu-
ropean league in the
1990's that had teams
based in the United King-
dom, Germany, the
Netherlands, and Spain,
before it folded in 2007.


Goodell said demand
from NFL teams to play in
London was more than it
could handle, and that a
game could be held in Sun-
day prime-time hours next
year Monday and Thurs-
day night games in London
have been ruled out, as has
holding preseason games
or the Pro Bowl overseas.
Goodell applauded the
Jacksonville Jaguars for
embracing the Interna-
tional Series, with the
Florida-based team signed
up to play four regular sea-
son "home" games at Wem-
bley Stadium over four
years. The first is today
against the San Francisco
49ers.
"Jacksonville is an inter-
esting experiment. I think
fans there see that it's good
for their community, that
it's putting Jacksonville on
a global stage," Goodell
said while addressing
some Jaguars fans com-
plaints about losing one
home game over these
four seasons. "Whenever
there is going to be change,
there is going to be resist-
ance to change."
Goodell met with a se-
lection of NFL fans along-
side 49ers great Joe
Montana and former
Jaguars offensive lineman
Tony Boselli on Saturday
The enthusiasm of over-
seas NFL fans was palpa-
ble inside the Grand
Ballroom of the Landmark
Hotel, with a scattering of
NFL team jerseys in the
audience.


Associated Press
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell smiles as he is
interviewed on stage during an NFL fan rally Saturday in
Trafalgar Square, London. The San Francisco 49ers will
play the Jacksonville Jaguars today at Wembley Stadium
in London.


B6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Jessica and Ashley: Hopeful, willing and successful


Hopefulness is a long
way from hopeless-
ness.
Hopeful people see the
world through a lens that
sees endless possibilities
and opportunities. They ra-
diate positive energy and
excitement. They're over-
joyed, the world is their oys-
ter, they are giddy! I love
being around people who
are hopeful! Today, I was
with two very hopeful peo-


ple. Jessica and Ashley are
two Citrus County women
who have been participat-
ing in the United Way
"Learn to Earn" program. I
first met them in January at
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute as GED students.
Through a special grant
from the Black Diamond
foundation, United Way was
able to provide Jessica and
Ashley with the resources
they needed to earn their


high school equivalency
diploma. We broke down
barriers for them to be able
to get to school and stay in
school. In May, we joyfully
watched them walk across
the Curtis Peterson Audito-
rium stage to receive their
diplomas, dressed in green
caps and gowns, with smiles
so big they shined like bea-
cons. That night we
awarded them with scholar-
ships to attend a postsec-


ondary program at WTI to
become patient care assis-
tants. Today, we celebrated
with them again as they re-
ceived certificates and pins
that tell the world that they
are qualified and ready to
dutifully care for patients in
our community The hope-
fulness in their eyes was
contagious. Their futures
are bright!
I had the opportunity to
speak with them after the


ceremony Jessica is the
mother of 7-year-old twins
and she was moved to tears
when she spoke about the
future and what it holds for
her sweet family She loves
to tell about their tremen-
dous academic success and
how proud she is of them.
Jessica is considering at-
tending a program at CF to
further her medical career
See PageC3


Associated Press
The storage tank, bottom, is where workers detected water dripping from the top at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant at Okuma
town in Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. A string of mishaps this year at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant,
which was swamped by a tsunami in 2011, is raising doubts about the operator's ability to tackle the crisis and prompting concern
that another disaster could be in the making.





NUCLEAR





INSTABILITY


First floods, then

fires, now humans.

As Tokyo Electric Power

Co. attempts to repair the

damage done to the

disabled Fukushima

power plant, things

only get messier.


MARl YAMAGUCHI
Associated Press


TOKYO


WORKERS OVERFILL A TANK, SPILLING
RADIOACTIVE WATER ON THE GROUND.
Another mistakenly pushes a button, stalling a pump
for a vital cooling system. Six others get soaked with
toxic water when they remove the wrong pipe. All over
the course of one week in October
A string of mishaps this year at the crippled Fukushima nuclear power
plant, which was swamped by a tsunami in 2011, is raising doubts about
the operator's ability to tackle the crisis and prompting concern that
another disaster could be in the making.


PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Dumb

as a box

of rocks?
suddenly, the Citrus
County Commis-
sion has become
the laughingstock of
local governments in the
state of Florida.
While the self-mutila-
tion of the five-member
board might make for
humorous high drama
on the courthouse
square, the damage to
the county's reputation
is real.
This will cost taxpay-
ers money and it will re-
sult in lost opportunities
for the county
For the truth is, no
one wants to do business
with a fool.
Newly elected com-
missioner Scott Adams
has been the instigator
of the turmoil and he ap-
parently has no idea
how to turn it off. His
key goal appears to be to
make his fellow commis-
sioners, and the county
staff, look bad.
Some degree of turmoil
is good for government.
Those in elected positions
should always be forced
to justify their decisions
and answer questions
from the public.
But Commissioner
Adams has taken the
turmoil to a new level of
absurdity Adams is suf-
fering from two recent
thumps to the head by
state investigative agen-
cies that proclaimed his
charges of official cor-
ruption were unfounded.
In one case before the
state ethics commission,
the county is now re-
sponsible for paying the
$8,476 in legal fees that
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays incurred fighting the
charges levied by Adams.
When faced with the
$8,476 waste of the tax-
payers' money at a meet-
ing on Tuesday, Adams
became unglued. He
blamed everyone but
himself and then ac-
cused his fellow board
members of "either being
dumb as a box of rocks"
or being "corrupt"
That's not much of a
choice.
He got into a hateful
personal exchange with
outgoing County Attor-
ney Richard Wesch and
suggested that Lee
County Wesch's new
employer was going to
be sorry it hired him.
The key corruption al-
legation evolves around
the county landfill. When
the independent state
attorney investigated the
corruption allegation, it
found that none existed.
Adams responded by
blasting the state attor-
ney's office and claiming
it was part of the big
conspiracy
See Page C3


Amy Meek
GUEST
COLUMN





OPage C2- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27,2013



PINION


"I never made a decision in my life that
wasn't one hundred per cent selfish."
John Updike, "The Centaur," 1963


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CRUNCH TIME




CMH boards



can't linger at



crossroads


he two boards that
have spent millions of
public dollars waging
governance war over Citrus
Memorial Health System fi-
nally were able to agree: The
"chosen bidder" is Hospital
Corporation of America. The
next step is deciding whether
the hospital should be sold or
leased to HCA.
If you haven't paid atten-
tion to the many
hospital-related T
meetings lately, THE I
we'll sum it up for It's deci.
you: The board in the
members led, Memori
of course, by their
always-present at- OUR OH
torneys now are
locked in a new Boards
tug-of-war One now a
board wants to sell, the corn
one wants to lease. best in
The boards
each contributed two mem-


bers to a joint committee
charged with studying the ad-
vantages and disadvantages
of each option, and make a
recommendation back to
their boards for a decision.
This gang of four has set
meetings for every Monday
through the end of November
Another month of this?
Really?
If the boards had been lis-
tening, they would have got-
ten the message already: This
community wants the hospi-
tal sold ASAP so HCA can
focus quickly on making
badly-needed investments in
facilities and staff, restoring
stability to the CMH family,
and becoming a valued com-
munity member Hospital em-
ployees say it in public
meetings. Physicians and
medical group representa-
tives say it in public meet-
ings. Citizens say it in public
meetings. Audiences applaud
when this option is recom-
mended. In the Chronicle's
recent online poll, 78 percent
of respondents favored a sale.
It's clear: No one wants the
people responsible for this
ongoing turmoil to have any-
thing more to do with Citrus
Memorial
The current fuss presents
no surprise: it's still about
power and money. A lease
would keep the Citrus County


Abusing the system
I live in a rental-assisted
apartment. I heard neighbors
talking about going to Daystar
for food. Sounds sad,
doesn't it? These same Q O
people spent the entire
weekend running
around drinking and
smoking for hours on
end instead of buying
food for their children.
You talk about using
the system. This is sad. CAIL
Toys or tools? 5 iQ-f


This is in response to
the Sound Off "Dawsy
wastes money." As the gap be-
tween the have and the have-nots
increases, you're going to be glad
Dawsy has all these what you call
toys helping to defend the public.


Hospital Board intact as the
hospital system's landlord.
And regardless of the trans-
action type, the looming is-
sues now surround who will
control the proceeds and how
those monies will be handled.
One positive note is that
opinion seems to be coalesc-
ing around the ideas of plac-
ing the proceeds into a trust,
with no spending for at least


ISSUE:
iion time
Citrus
al saga.

PINION:
must act
nd act in
munity's
terests.

tative to


a year, and form-
ing an independ-
ent community
board to oversee
the disposition of
funds.
At the most re-
cent Board of
County Commis-
sioners meeting,
current chair Joe
Meek was desig-
nated as the
BOCC's represen-
the transaction


process. In our view, the
county commission should
be part of this process.
Commissioners are, unlike
members of either hospital-
related board, elected by
and accountable to county
residents.
Commissioners also agreed
to have the county attorney's
office look into the BOCC's
options and possible role in
connection with the hospital
transaction. It just makes
sense to get an independent
opinion rather than relying
for guidance on attorneys for
the combatants. One of those
attorneys sees himself as the
spinmeister and ringmaster;
the other has failed to clearly
or convincingly lay out the
facts for his board members
or the public.
What's the bottom line?
The boards need to make a
decision together, and
soon. The deciding factor
must be what's in the best in-
terest of the entire commu-
nity, not individuals with
special interests. They owe it
to the community to preserve
and protect our health re-
sources. Board members
must promote repair and re-
building from the damage
their feuding has caused, and
do it now, while we have a
willing bidder ready to take
on the job.


Crab logic
Some crab boats can bring in
hundreds of pounds of claws
and a recreational diver can
bring in 2 gallons of
JND claws. Well, that really
ow- sounds fair, doesn't it?
rr Serving utilities
I think we should
Change the name of the
SPSC, Public Service
J 4V Commission, to the
ir# USC, the Utilities Serv-
ice Commission.
)579 The 411 on 411
To the person who
had to pay $1.50 for calling
411: There's a toll-free number
you can use. It's 1-800-
FREE411. Try that and you
won't be charged for it.


Congress: Worse than


after 16 wasted days and
billions of dollars in eco-
nomic damage, the Re-
publicans finally folded their
tattered circus tent and voted to
re-open our government last week
Moderates in the party
lamented that the ending was
predictable, the political
wreckage immeasurable and
absolutely nothing
was gained by the -'
shutdown. National
polls showed ap-
proval ratings for
Congress ranging xI
from only 8 percent
to 10 percent.
From Oct. 4 to 6,
Public Policy
Polling surveyed 502 Carl F
registered voters, OTI
Democrats, Repub-
licans and inde- VOI
pendents. Disgust
and revulsion prevailed across
the board.
Toenail fungus, hemorrhoids,
cockroaches and dog poop all
scored higher in popularity
than Congress. Miley Cyrus,
Honey Boo Boo and Vladimir
Putin scored lower
Undeterred by their dismal
standing with the public, 18
senators and 144 House mem-
bers all Republicans still
voted against ending the shut-
down and raising the debt ceil-
ing to prevent a catastrophic
default.
The losing contingent in-
cluded Sen. Marco Rubio, who
has cemented his status as a
prancing lapdog for the tea
party crazies. He is cleverly po-
sitioning himself to fill the in-
tellectual void left by Michelle
Bachmann, who's retiring from
the House.
GOP strategists would be
wise to dissect the poll results
that gave such a decisive edge
to common toenail-fungus, also
known as onychomycosis.
According to Public Policy's
website, 44 percent of respon-
dents had a more favorable
view of the unsightly infection


I

I



[I
(



than of Congress, 41 percent
said Congress wasn't as awful
and 15 percent were undecided.
Voters older than 65 favored
toenail fungus by a solid margin
of 45 to 39 percent, while voters
18 to 29 were evenly split, so to
speak.
Interestingly, those 30 to 45
years old had a higher opinion
of Congress than of
onychomycosis. Pos-
sibly this is because
they're just reaching
the age when foot
hygiene seems more
important.
The same poll
showed that 53 per-
cent of those sur-
iaasen veyed held
E hemorrhoids in
ER higher esteem than
DES Congress, although
there was a partisan
gap. Democrats and independ-
ents overwhelmingly said Con-
gress was worse than
hemorrhoids, while GOP voters
gave Congress a slight edge.
(It should be noted that re-
spondents weren't asked if
they'd had any personal experi-
ence with either rectal disor-
ders or Ted Cruz.)
On a somewhat positive note,
Congress fared slightly better in
the poll when compared with
cockroaches, although the
hardy insects were still more
popular by a 44-42 percent
spread.
By contrast, generic dog doo
beat out the politicians by a
whopping 47 to 40 percent.
About 13 percent of those polled
were undecided, which proba-
bly means they're cat owners.
Despite such rancid numbers,
a cluster of Toe Fungus Repub-
licans in the Florida delegation
voted to continue the govern-
ment shutdown and initiate a
national default. You'll want to
hang on to this list, in case any
of these geniuses ever decide to
run for statewide office:
Jeff Miller, a real-estate agent
in Chumuckla; Steve Souther-


toe fungus
land from Panama City; Ron
DeSantis from Ponte Vedra
Beach; Dennis Ross, a Lake-
land lawyer; and Ted Yoho, a
Gainesville large-animal veteri-
narian and tea party tool who's
been in Washington 10 whole
months.
Then there's John Mica from
Winter Park; Bill Posey, an anti-
Obama birther from Rockledge;
Tom Rooney, from Tequesta;
Richard Nugent, a former sher-
iff of Hernando County; and
Trey Radel, an ex-TV reporter
and improve comedian from
Fort Myers.
At least Radel admits to being
a comedian. The others have no
excuse.
Here, as is true around the
country, many of the Toe Fun-
gus Republicans hail from con-
servative, skillfully
gerrymandered districts, and
they have little risk of losing
their seats in next year's mid-
term elections.
The biggest casualty of the
shutdown is the national GOP
its hopes for recapturing the
White House poleaxed once
again by the party's radical
right wing. Already a few tea
party action groups have threat-
ened retribution against Re-
publican lawmakers who put
the country first and voted to
stop the madness.
If GOP leaders are looking for
a bright side to the Public Pol-
icy survey here's one: Congress
scored much higher with peo-
ple than Anthony Weiner, the
former Democratic representa-
tive from New York, failed may-
oral candidate and serial sexter
Also, the Ebola virus is still
more unpopular than members
of Congress. So is Lindsey Lohan,
Charlie Manson and heroin.
So they've got that going for
them.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist
for the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132.


LETTER /to the Editor


Inverness fire tax
yes or no?
The seemingly confronta-
tional presentation by Jeff
Dawsy, Joe Meek and Richard
Wesch at the city of Inverness
City Council meeting Tuesday,
Oct. 15, regarding the city's ac-
cepting the proposed fire
MSBU tax was a bit disconcert-
ing. Their insistent demand
the city accept the county's
new MSBU fire protection pro-
gram for the collection of non-
ad valorem fire protection
assessments, they stated, was
on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, or
as they let it be known: If you
don't join, we are taking our
fire trucks and apparatus and
leaving town, which certainly
didn't sit very well with those
in attendance.
Now, let's be realistic. We all
pay the fire service tax al-
ready, and this fire MSBU is on
top of that. You can give it all of
the fancy names that you want,
but it is in reality a major addi-
tional tax on the citizens, and
both the small and large busi-
nesses within the city limits.
Yes, the proposed $54 tax on
homeowners isn't an enormous


amount of money, unless you
are struggling financially,
which a lot of people in the
city are, but the fire tax on the
office or retail building owners
can be staggering, who in one
form or another will have to
pass this extra cost on to their
renters. This will then either
increase their cost of doing
business, or lower whatever
profits they may make, and
may very well put some of
those small businesses out of
business, which you can easily
see we already have in many of
our empty shopping centers.
Let's face it, small businesses
are the lifeblood of this com-
munity, but if you make the
cost of doing business so great
and onerous, the businesses
who are just squeaking by will
go out of business. Does that
benefit anyone?
We want the community to
prosper, otherwise there will be
no real reason to come to this
beautiful downtown area, be-
cause it will have become a ghost
town, and all of the hard work
and money expended by the city
to upgrade, enhance, and re-
vive the city will be for naught.


A disturbing caveat that was
pointed out at the meeting by
the city attorney is if the city
opts into this fire tax program,
the county in concert with the
sheriff, can increase the fire
millage rate that is charged
anytime they want and the city
can't do a thing about it.
So the city of Inverness govern-
ment and city council members
and all of its citizens have a major
decision to make: Do we want
to open up our city's checkbook,
which holds all of our hard-
earned tax dollars, and give the
county a blank check to pay for
our fire protection (which we are
paying for already), or do we want
to go it alone, and do it ourselves?
As a longtime business owner
in downtown Inverness, I for one
would love to see that happen.
Now is the time for the city
manager, the city council mem-
bers and everyone involved to
take a long, hard, realistic look
at what makes sense. It's going
to take a lot of hard work, and
smart thinking and planning,
with maybe even a few fervent
prayers thrown in for good
measure, but it can be done.
Winston C. Perry
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


V




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


909 Mitchell St. and blueberry muffins


he home Cheryl and
I first shared as
newlyweds was at
909 Mitchell St., Dade City,
Fla.
Mitchell Street wasn't
really a street at all: It was
a dead-end, 200-yard-long
lime rock-covered lane on
the outskirts of town that
intersected with State
Road 41. There were
houses on both sides, and
this tiny settlement was
completely surrounded by
orange groves.
Nowadays, we will go
back to Dade City from
time to time, but when we
do, we usually go into
town from north to south


on U.S. 301, not from west
to east on State Road 41. A
family health circum-
stance has caused us to go
there on several occa-
sions during the past cou-
ple of weeks, and, based
on the location of the hos-
pital, we have chosen the
west-to-east route using
State Road 41. In doing so,
we couldn't help noticing
the sign for Mitchell
Street. It brought back
memories, very pleasant
memories.
On one recent after-
noon, we chose to drive
down Mitchell Street and
check it out.
It is still just as it was 47


years ago, a lime rock-cov- the entire neighborhood
ered dead-end lane. seems to be well-main-
There are still houses on tained and that the house
both sides and at No .909 is in
the entire area very good
is still sur- ,shape. I really
rounded by or- couldn't tell for
ange groves. F sure whether
Quaint. athe original
Lovely dwelling had
It was the been refur-
same as it was bished and re-
when Cheryl modeled or
and I were Fred Brannen whether some-
there as little A SLICE one had simply
more than a LIC replaced it in
girl and a boy OF LIFE its entirety We
spreading our stopped to take
wings and beginning to fly a closer look, and ulti-
as a married couple, mately, I concluded that
I was pleased to see that the original structure re-


mains, but it has been
quite handsomely brought
into the 21st century
Our minds can play
tricks on us, and while
looking at the house,
just for a moment, I
thought I could smell
freshly baked blueberry
muffins.
Then I remembered.
Back during our first
year together, each Thurs-
day evening, I attended
banking-related classes.
When I would finally ar-
rive home at 10 o'clock or
so, I'd open the door and
the aroma of freshly baked
blueberry muffins would
waft its way to my nose


while my eyes would find
Cheryl. Our grocery
budget was limited, but
she was consistently able
to find the dime it cost for
a box of muffin mix and
she would have this spe-
cial treat, along with a
glass of milk either
fresh or reconstituted
powdered milk waiting
for me when I came in.
909 Mitchell St. and
blueberry muffins.
Life doesn't get any
better


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


NUCLEAR
Continued from Page C1

Worried Japanese regulators are
taking a more hands-on approach
than usual. They met with Tokyo Elec-
tric Power Co. officials this week to
discuss how to prepare for a typhoon
that could dump heavy rain on
Fukushima. And Nuclear Regulation
Authority Chairman Shinichi Tanaka
has scheduled a Monday meeting with
Tokyo Electric's president to seek so-
lutions to what he says appear to be
fundamental problems.
Human error is mostly to blame, as
workers deal with a seemingly unend-
ing stream of crises. Tanaka said ear-
lier this month the repeated "silly
mistakes" are a sign of declining
morale and sense of responsibility
The operator, known as TEPCO, ac-
knowledged a systemic problem in a
recent report: Workers under tight
deadlines tend to cut corners, making
mistakes more likely; at times, they
don't fully understand their assign-
ment or procedures.
The utility has been losing experi-
enced workers as they reach their ra-
diation exposure limits, and hundreds
of others are quitting jobs seen as un-
derpaid given the difficulty and health
risks. Regulators have urged the plant
to have enough supervisors to oversee
the workers on site; TEPCO says it has
added staff and is ensuring proper
field-management
Some of this year's mishaps:
Oct. 20 to 21: Heavy rains wash
contaminated storm water over pro-
tective barriers around storage tanks
at six locations before workers finish
setting up additional pumps and
hoses to remove the water
Oct. 9: Six workers remove the
wrong pipe, dousing themselves with
highly radioactive water TEPCO says
exposure for the workers, who were
wearing facemasks with filters, haz-
mat suits and raingear, is negligible.
An estimated 7 tons of water almost
overflows the barrier around it.
Oct. 7: A worker mistakenly
presses a stop button during a power
switchboard check, stalling a pump
and cooling-water supply to the Unit 1
reactor for a split second. A monitor-
ing device for Units 1 and 2 and a
building ventilator also fail briefly
until backup power kicks in.
Oct. 2: Workers overfill a storage
tank for radioactive water, spilling
about 110 gallons. The workers were
trying to maximize capacity amid the
plant's water storage crunch. Most of
the spill is believed to have reached
the sea via a nearby ditch.
Oct 1: About five tons of contami-
nated rainwater overflows when
workers pump it into the wrong tank,
most of it seeping into the ground.
Sept. 27: A piece of rubber lining
mistakenly left inside a water treat-
ment unit clogs it up, causing it to fail
hours after it resumed a test-run fol-
lowing repairs. The fragment is removed,
and the unit returned to testing.
Sept. 19: A firefighting water pipe
is damaged during debris removal,
and 80 gallons of non-radioactive
water spurt out The same day TEPCO
provides Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
with a hazmat suit for a plant visit
with the wrong Japanese character for
his family name on the nametag. Spot-
ting the mistake halfway through the
tour, an apparently displeased Abe
peels the sticker off.
Sept. 12: A water treatment ma-
chine overflows, leaking about 18 gal-
lons of contaminated water, when a
worker doing unrelated work nearby
inadvertently shuts a valve.
Aug. 19: A patrolling worker finds
a massive pool of contaminated water
spilling out of a protective barrier
around a storage tank. TEPCO later
concludes an estimated 300 tons es-
caped unnoticed over several weeks.
April 4: A worker pushes the
wrong button on a touch panel, tem-
porarily stopping one of three water
treatment units during a pre-opera-
tion test.
Humans aren't always to blame. A
rat sneaked into an outdoor power
switchboard on March 18, causing a
short circuit and blackout lasting 30
hours in some areas. Four nuclear
fuel storage pools lost cooling, but
power was restored before a melt-
down. A few weeks later, workers
caused another short-circuit while in-
stalling anti-rat nets, leaving one of
the fuel storage pools without cooling
for several hours.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Ways to help clean the water
On Thursday, Oct. 24, the KBAM
(King's Bay Adaptive Management)
group had a great end-of-the-year proj-
ect moving the final crop of hyacinths
and water lettuce from the stormwater
pen on Cutler Spur by the post office to
the KBAM Corral in the lagoon between
Parker Island and the USFWS Refuge
on King's Bay Drive. The weather was
great, and so were the volunteers who
had a great time, albeit was tough work.
All said they would be back next time.
The KBAM project is helping to
slowly prove these floating aquatic
plants will shade the cloudy waters un-
derneath them, clouded with algae, and
at the same time ingest the nutrients in
the waters that the algae feeds on, in-
cluding Lyngbya, enabling the water
column to clear One Rake at a Time is
doing a fab job removing the algae, but
it can't be stopped from coming back
until the nutrient level is lowered, and
these floating plants should do that.
The nutrients come from excess lawn
and plant and farming fertilizers and
improperly maintained septic tanks.
Did you know that hyacinths and water
lettuce are used in some sewer plant
ponds to remove the nutrients from the
waste waters before the water is released?
There is documentation from China
and other countries that these aquatic
plants, when released to ponds and
lakes that are green with algae bloom
pollution can clear the water in weeks.
The plants have to be removed or they
would die, releasing everything they
took up back into the waters to turn
green again.
We have Mother Nature's removal
system here. Either the plants float down
the river to the Gulf where they eventu-
ally die, or they get eaten by the manatees.
To the rumor folks, a manatee's diges-
tive system is extremely long and by the
time they evacuate what's left there are
very few nutrients, so no redepositing.
There are nutrients in the bottom
substrate of our waters too, referred to
by some as muck. But if this substrate is
roughly disturbed releasing a lot of nu-
trients, we could see here what hap-
pened in the Indian River Lagoon, an
algae bloom turning the waters green,


HOPE
Continued from Page Cl

Ashley is a young woman
with endless opportunities in
front of her She eventually
wants to return to school to
become an EMT The two have
obviously become close friends.
They are proud of each other
and proud of themselves.
The hopeful qualities of
today's events are immeasur-
able. But the quantitative ef-
fects are both measurable and
impressive. In January, with-
out a high school education,
these two young women were
on target to earn approxi-
mately $13,000 each, annually
The pay scale for a PCA



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

It can't be lost on taxpayers
that Adams is part owner of
his own private landfill in
Sumter County and just re-
cently wooed away the busi-
ness of the city of Inverness.
That action will cost the tax-
payers of the county
Why is it that so much of
Adams' time is spent com-
plaining about the county
landfill? Can the commis-
sioner not see the obvious
conflict of interest that exists?
Again, in truth, Adams is
probably correct that the
county landfill in Lecanto can
be run more efficiently But
his credibility gets nailed by
independent voters who ques-
tion his long-term intent. Is he
trying to improve the county
landfill's operations, or close
it down so the trash can be
moved to his private business?
It's OK that a private busi-
ness wooed away the business


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily rep-
resent the opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Charlie Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via email. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email
to letters@chronicleonline.com.

killing the fishes and the vegetation and
in Indian River, more than 100 mana-
tees and they still don't know how
So for next year, come and help the
KBAM project and learn about it and
help us do it. And walk gently and play
lightly on the bottoms of the Bay so you
don't release the nutrients from the sub-
strate until we have something floating
around there to eat 'em up.
To me, science is simple: Use the tools
Mother Nature has furnished and we will
have clear waters so the native plants
have the sunshine to grow Keep your
boats slow so you don't prop-dredge the
plants emerging from the bottom. The
seeds and plants are down there. They
just need the sunshine and a little ten-
der concern and care to grow again.
Use native plants in your yard that
take little water, and conserve water
every chance you get. Our spring flows
in King's Bay are down some 30 precent
It's like a firefighter trying to put out a
fire with 30 percent less water At full
flow the springs of King's Bay can flush
a lot of the nutrients out of here.
And send a thanks to the KBAM vol-
unteers, The One Rake at a Time volun-
teers and all the folks who care enough
to conserve water so we will always
have water to drink, and our beautiful,
full-flowing springs.
Helen Spivey
Crystal River


ranges between $10 to $14 per
hour, meaning they could po-
tentially earn $30,000 a year!
Plus more when you consider
shift differential, overtime,
etc. Collectively, these posi-
tive futures could have a
$34,000 annual impact on Cit-
rus County
It's encouraging to know
that by investing donor dollars
into programs that truly ad-
dress the root cause of social
need, we can see real, lasting
change. When we invest in
people who are willing and
committed to improving their
own lives, the results are sim-
ply awesome. Jessica and Ash-
ley were both so appreciative
of the support they received
from United Way, but as I
quickly reminded them, it was


of Inverness, but is it OK for a
county commissioner to be
part of the mix?
If this was Commissioner
Dennis Damato complaining
about construction quality
and trying to win business for
his private company or com-
missioner Rebecca Bays com-
plaining about insurance
costs and claiming her private
business could do a better job,
the regular county critics would
be howling with outrage.
The ethics commission
complaint filed by Adams
against Bays documents how
the commissioner is just try-
ing to make others look bad as
opposed to dealing with the
problem.
Adams actually voted to ap-
point Mike Bays, his fellow
commissioner's husband, to
the country's enterprise
board. Adams asked Wesch if
the appointment was OK and
the lawyer gave him the
thumbs-up.
Two weeks later Adams said
he went to an ethics class for
new commissioners and


Volunteer to help veterans
We need to understand the meaning
of governance. Whether it be at the local
level or the state level or the national
level, it is important to understand the
reason why some issues move slowly At
the local level those ordinances affect
all of us personally, at the state level
they have significant impact when they
affect us on a county level, and when it
is nationally, as with our Congress, they
take small steps to make sure they don't
make catastrophic mistakes that will af-
fect all of us, at least that is what they
have tried to do in the past
It has come to my attention that Con-
gress is afraid to make decisions. Those
members have shut down the govern-
ment to try to make the point that they
are afraid to pay for all the laws they
have passed, and yet, they, the Con-
gressmen, are still being paid.
There is something terribly wrong
with what is happening with our gov-
erning in Washington. I don't need to
tell you about all the public employees
that are getting IOUs to continue to
work, nor do I need to tell you about the
lack of the Veterans benefits to families
that have lost their loved ones to war
and the benefits to help bury them.
I plan to volunteer my services to the
Veterans Clinic here in Hernando to
help veterans receive their benefits. I
did it for my 89-year-old dad in Massa-
chusetts, a DAV veteran, and I plan to
help anyone who needs help here in
Hernando.
As I find this situation intolerable for
our local veterans seeking assistance, I
invite all of you that read this letter to
the editor, to help our fellow veterans,
and volunteer to help them as well. We
here in Citrus County have always told
our representatives in Washington what
is important to us, and our families. We
have the largest percentage of veterans
in any county in the state and it is im-
portant for our representatives' in Con-
gress to represent us and all the other
veterans in the country
Please join the effort I'm sure we can
help our veterans here at home and
maybe elsewhere in the state.
Suzan Franks
Hemrnando


their willingness to improve
and their dedication that re-
ally made it all happen.
Right now, our United Way
is uniting community agen-
cies like the Early Learning
Coalition, We Care Food Pantry
CASA, the Boys & Girls Clubs,
Catholic Charities and several
others to layer up their serv-
ices to radically impact the
lives of those in our commu-
nity who are willing to change
their lives. We know that
adults who commit to going
back to school face financial
barriers. By bringing together
all of our efforts, we can make
a bigger difference. Adult stu-
dents who are confident that
their children are in a safe,
positive learning environment
and are assured that there


learned the appointment was
not OK. Instead of returning to
the commission and Wesch to
inform them of his discovery,
Adams immediately went to
the state ethics commission to
file an official complaint.
He could have resolved the
problem by pointing staff to
the information he learned.
Instead, he played a fun game
of "gotcha" and tried to get
Commissioner Bays in trouble.
The ethics commission re-
jected the charges because Mike
Bays stepped down and never
attended a single meeting.
The charade cost Commis-
sioner Bays $8,400, and by law
the county is liable to pay the
bill.
Taxpayers should not be
fooled by this stuff. While it's
fun to hate politicians at all
levels of government, it's not
fun to see our county turned
inside out.
Staff morale is in the base-
ment. Key leaders (like
Wesch) are seeking jobs in
other locations because they
don't want to deal with the


will be plenty of food at home;
are better able to concentrate
at school. Our collective ef-
forts will strengthen our col-
lective results.
Our community needs to rally
behind people like Jessica and
Ashley, people who have big
dreams and the drive to achieve
them. Your commitment to
United Way is a part of reach-
ing better days in Citrus County
Because of the generosity of
our donors, we are more
hopeful today than yesterday
Hopefulness is a long way
from hopelessness. Hopeful-
ness sounds a lot better, don't
you agree?


Amy Meek is CEO of United
Way of Citrus County


nonsense. And people who
might want to do business
here are not going to be im-
pressed by this level of official
foolishness.
Commissioner Adams is
fond of reminding everyone
that he is very wealthy and a
terrific businessperson, and
that he wouldn't accept such
poor performance from his
employees.
The commissioner needs to
listen to his own words. His
combative behavior and con-
stant criticism of everyone
around him should not be tol-
erated in private business or
any level of government
There is plenty of value to
some of the insights that Scott
Adams could lend to county
government But his tech-
niques are destructive to
process and the people who
try to operate within it.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SoundOFF


Do the hokey pokey
I sincerely wonder if anybody
else has thought about the fact
that when you see these pic-
tures of our county commis-
sioners in the paper, regardless
of what the activity is, they are
all lined up in their favorite ro-
tation, almost like a bunch of
robots. Is there any reason that
they can't move around?
Keep sale proceeds
from commissioners
This call concerns the pro-
posed sale of the hospital in In-
verness. I would normally favor
the sale for cash. However,
there is no way that I trust the
county commissioners with the
proceeds from this sale. They
have shown time and time
again, they are tax-and-spend
Democrats pretending to be Re-
publicans in order to be elected
or stay in office. An exception I
would make would be to put
the funds in an untouchable
trust account with only the in-
terest or dividends available for
county use. I would also ex-
clude the school board use of
any of the funds from the sale.
We're being drained
Interesting article on water use
permits (Oct. 12). In the article,
it lists many things to obtain an
application for water withdrawal.
Well, in the past year, Swiftmud
has approved all of these per-
mits for withdrawal and they
are clearly in violation of A, B,
C, D and probably E. ... Every-
body knows the aquifer is being
drawn down, there's less fresh
water coming out of the springs,
the rivers are becoming salt
and we're going to kill the goose
that laid the golden egg, all in
the name of greed and nobody
has the courage to stand up
and say enough's enough.


Detecting the texting
As of Oct. 1 in the state of
Florida, it's illegal to be texting
and driving. Who's the person
that came up with this great
rule? You have to get stopped
by something else and then the
officer says you were texting
too. I say, "No, I was dialing a
number, it's totally different."
God bless that woman
I would like to thank the
woman who found my purse in
the Walmart shopping cart. My
heart almost stopped when I re-
alized what I had done after I left.
I went back and some woman
had turned it in. I am grateful and
realize there are more honest
people than not and God bless
the woman who turned it in.


The dope on the Dollar
Anybody out there tell me
why the Family Dollar in Beverly
Hills is not open yet?
Stop tailgating
There needs to be something
done about these rude, incon-
siderate people tailgating. I don't
care if it's the people that give
out the driver's licenses, or the
police need to comment about
something, or the car manufac-
turers need to develop something.
I mean this is wrong. Somebody's
going to get hurt real bad. I
mean it's Saturday 11 o'clock
in the morning and they're tail-
gating. You got bikers going the
speed limit and you still got some
car just a couple car lengths
behind him going 60 mph.


Ever the shills
I wonder if the Chronicle has
the audacity to really start re-
porting what's going on. You al-
ways report the stuff that's
coming from Beverly Hills
when, in all actuality, it's less
than a football field from Terra
Vista or Citrus Hills or where
the high influential people with
a better income of the people
who live in Beverly Hills live. But
you always want to put in the
paper it's Beverly Hills. The ac-
tual address, why don't you say
where it's from? It's from Terra
Vista. It's right across the
street. We could put a football
field and you're in Terra Vista
from Gus' Golden Gym instead
of always painting Beverly Hills
the bad place it is.


THE OBMkA TAPES


"
CITRUS U N T Y


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Our Contest www.chronicleon-ine.comlartoutsidethebo
Our Contest www.chronicleonline.com/artoutsidethebox


VOTE TODAY! .

October 21 November 3


S Nigh ll , L., Life"Sarry Nigh", ,, ,
"Night Life" "Starry Night"


L .,.. .. l 1 1 -1 h I.. L '... l _i 11 1 , h ,I
"The Seasons" "Jukebox"


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^^^KVLL Cityi ofyInvenesstnT^fl7~^^

Great American Cooter Fet Block Party^
Cotc hoe 5-2621 x. 130




Naf'jjtureninCoat Community Ban
Ciy f.neres Get.meianCote ritho






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Crystals River Mail


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INov.2 4 1 pm
Rotary Kings Bay 6th Annual StoneCra Ja




Dowton srets fIrtalRvr-Gnra d iso:$

Contact Phone: 3'52-4250093
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Hom. ss. Lios Clu

^^BFesiva f theCArts/ity of nveres



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^^^^^Contact Phone: 614-519-2843

^^^^^^^^^^^^^BNov 2 6 pmi^^^^^^^^^^


County organizational
chart, please
In today's newspaper (Oct.
13), I was reading the editorial
section and Roger Krieger
wrote a wonderful letter on how
the county administrator's con-
stantly reorganizing. I think it
would be very helpful to both
his assistants and the commis-
sioners if the newspaper would
publish an organizational chart
of just how this county runs
under Brad (Thorpe) and I think
it would clear up a bunch of is-
sues and everybody would ei-
ther feel much better about the
county administration or under-
stand that there are serious
problems.
Halloween canceled
Well, happy Halloween, little
kiddies. Just wanted to inform
you there will be no trick-or-
treating on our street in Sug-
armill Woods. With all the
break-ins and all the coyotes,
it's far too dangerous. Maybe
we'll have better luck next year.
Gift card scam
Just want to report this of
what happened to me today
about five minutes ago. I re-
ceived a card through the mail
in my name and my address
and everything, telling me that I
have received $100 in gift sav-
ings which is good at Walmart
or Target. They gave me a num-
ber to call.... I called. They
asked me for my age. I gave
them the wrong age. I said I
was 50 and then they wanted
the date of my birth and that's
when I asked them, "Why do
you need the date?" They didn't
answer me; they just hung up.
So all I know is, this is a fraud. I
just thought I'd let you know.
Maybe you can put it in the
newspaper.


i)E~I~ cWLc~O .W~jzo r~.


Check Out


I I .' 1 S .. I .,I t !11, lri Ii i i ,
"Minion" "Capturing Our
^ Community"


Ci TRUS COUNT NiET

Swww.chronicleonline.com


C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


COMMENTARY


I 4


I :.









BUSINESS
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


. "
'I-


4
4

*'~ %..


4
"t0".


want to support their friends and loved ones who are cancer
victims.

The relays bring teams of volunteers, often associated with
businesses or community organizations, which raise money
through pledges to participate in the 18-hour walk.
I .....X,

















Every yeThousands of dollars aringtime raised for the American Cancer Society.act people who
want to support their friends and loved ones who are cancer
victims.

The relays bring teams of volunteers, often associated with
businesses or community organizations, which raise money
through pledges to participate in the 18-hour walk.

Thousands of dollars are raised for the American Cancer Society.
And where does the money go?

Mike Wright
Staff writer


ome say the money should
provide research to de-
velop preventative meas-
ures and treatments for
cancer
Others say the money should be
used for patients in need who can-
not afford even a drive to the doc-
tor.
"We fall in both categories," said
Robyn Liska, executive director of
the American Cancer Society
chapter in Tampa.
Eighty percent of money raised
through Relays for Life is spent ei-
ther on research or goes back into
the community for programs to aid
cancer patients in need, she said.
Those programs include resource
rooms, which provide supplies,
such as wigs and soft bras and are
staffed by volunteers. The Ameri-
can Cancer Society has a resource
room at Citrus Memorial hospital.


Another program is called
"Road to Recovery," where volun-
teers drive patients to doctor visits
or for treatment.
"One of the biggest concerns is
how do we get patients from point
A to point B?" Liska said. "The
Road to Recovery provides thou-
sands of trips."
The American Cancer Society is
also provides free lodging for pa-
tients and caregivers who qualify
at its Hope Lodges; the two used
by Citrus residents are in
Gainesville and Tampa.
"In 2012 we housed over 40 Cit-
rus County patients and care-
givers in a Hope Lodge," Liska
said. The Hope Lodges have
housed about 29 Citrus County pa-
tients and caregivers so far this
year
See Page D3


* Death rates from breast cancer have
dropped 34 percent since 1990.
* In January 2012, about 2.9 million
women in the U.S. had a history of
breast cancer.


The American Cancer Society funds
$86 million for 220 research projects.
The projects include:
* Establishing new treatments to
counteract triple negative breast can-
cers that do not respond to
chemotherapy
* Evaluating whether genetic factors
are associated with breast cancer risks.
* Exploring new treatments involv-
ing immune system cells.
* In-house, surveillance-based re-
search on populations of breast-can-
cer patients is used to monitor trends
and statistics.
* Studies to determine factors that
lead to a good quality of life after
diagnosis of breast cancer.


2014 Citrus County Relays for Life:
* April 4 for Inverness/Lecanto at
Citrus High School


* April 25 for Dunnellon/Crystal
River at Crystal River High School


Both sides agree: No major budget deal in sight


ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON On this, GOP
budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top
Senate Democrat Harry Reid can
agree: There won't be a "grand bar-
gain" on the budget.
Instead, the Wisconsin Republican
and the Nevada Democrat both say the
best Washington can do in this bitterly
partisan era of divided government is
a small-ball bargain that tries to take
the edge off of automatic budget cuts
known as sequestration.
Official Capitol Hill negotiations
start next week, but Ryan and Reid
both weighed in Thursday to tamp
down any expectations that the talks
might forge a large-scale agreement
where several previous high-level
talks have failed.
Long-standing, entrenched differ-


ences over taxes make a large-scale
budget pact virtually impossible, ac-
cording to lawmakers, their aides and
observers who will be monitoring the
talks.
Republicans say they simply won't
agree to any further taxes atop the 10-
year, $600 billion-plus tax increase on
upper-income earners that President
Barack Obama and Democrats mus-
cled through Congress in January
Without higher taxes, Democrats say
they won't yield to cuts in benefit pro-
grams like Medicare.
"If we focus on some big, grand bar-
gain then we're going to focus on our
differences, and both sides are going
to require that the other side compro-
mises some core principle and then
we'll get nothing done," Ryan, who
chairs the House Budget Committee,


. Page D3


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Federal Re-
serve releases industrial produc-
tion for September, 9:15 a.m.
Eastern; National Association of
Realtors releases pending home
sales index for September, 10 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON -ADP employ-
ment survey for October, 8:15 a.m.;
Labor Department releases Con-
sumer Price Index for September;
and Federal Reserve policymakers
meet to set interest rates.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


too long. Had you filed for bank-
ruptcy while your husband was
still alive, and before there was an
insurance settlement, there is little
question that the bankruptcy


Page D3


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil hovers above $97
after recent losses

NEW YORK-The price of oil
hovered above $97 a barrel Friday,
consolidating mild gains after two
weeks of losses sparked by high sup-
plies and patchy global economic
growth.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for Decem-
ber delivery was up 30 cents at
$97.41 a barrel in electronic trading
on the New York Mercantile Ex-
change. The contract which rose
25 cents to $97.11 on Thursday, is
down nearly 5 percent over the past
two weeks.
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational crude also used by U.S.
refineries, was down 8 cents at
$106.91 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange in London.


Markets OK despite
big slide in Nikkei
LONDON Financial markets
outside of Japan were lackluster
Friday at the end of a week that's
seen the S&P 500 and Germany's
DAX post record highs and the
dollar fall to near two-year lows
against the euro.
In Tokyo, the benchmark Nikkei
index slid 2.8 percent to 14,088.19
as the dollar fell below its 200-day
average of 97.30 yen.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index
of leading British shares was flat
at 6,714, little affected by news
that the British economy grew at a
quarterly rate of 0.8 percent in the
third quarter
Elsewhere in Europe, Ger-
many's DAX was 0.1 percent lower
at 8,975, having earlier risen to an
all-time high of 9,010.65, which
was the first time it has ever
breached the 9,000 mark. The
CAC-40 in France was 0.4 percent
lower at 4,261.

-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY





Credit


card bills


pile up


when sick

EAR BRUCE: I was very ill
in 2010 and got way behind
on credit card bills. I tried
paying the minimum amounts that
were due, but without being able
to work, I got way behind. I
planned to go bankrupt, but it has-
n't been sitting well with me.
My husband passed away a few
months ago, and I got a very small
insurance payment. After the fu-
neral and other expenses, I now
have about $9,000 left. All the
credit card companies want to
make offers of smaller amounts to
settle.
I own my house outright. I really
don't want to go bankrupt. Do you
think there is any way to get a loan
from a bank or a line of credit
using the house, and paying the
settlement amounts of the credit
cards? Will a bank refuse to go for
that with my credit score being in
bad shape?
PR., via email
DEAR PR: I certainly sympa-
thize with your situation. Gener-
ally speaking, that's what
bankruptcy is all about
Unhappily, you waited a little bit








D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Member
news and
events
Oct. 29 Movember
Shave-Off/Kick-Off
Party, Old Citrus
County Courthouse
Square, 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 29- United Way
event: Earn it! Keep it!
Save it! Budget
workshop at 3800
S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Visit Citrus
Unitedway.org for
more information and
registration.
Oct. 30- Tampa Bay
Senior Expo presented
by the Tampa Bay
Times at the Gulfview
Square Mall, 9409
U.S. 19, Port Richey.
Free admission and
parking.
Nov. 1 to 20 Citrus
United Basket/Arbor
Trail Rehab Food Drive.
Please donate can food
and boxed goods to
Arbor Trail Rehab and
Skilled Nursing Center
at 611 Turner Camp
Rd., Inverness or call
352-637-1130 for
more information.
Nov. 2 Annual Blues
and Barbecue Festival
in old Homosassa from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
featuring music from
Franc Roberts, the Eve
Shaw Band, Cool Cor-
porate Cats and the
Pitbulls of Blues Band.
Call 352-628-1081 for
$15 tickets in advance,
profits support local
youth music education
and Susan Mitchell.
Nov. 2 First annual
Casting for the Cure
fishing tournament
presented by Nurses
on Call. Starts at
7:30 a.m. at McRae's
of Homosassa 5300
S. Cherokee Way.
Call 352-777-1302.


EDC

BBQ

abig

success
ne of Citrus County's
best traditions the
EDC Barbecue was a great
success. This event wel-
comed more than 700 folks
to the M&B Diary in
Lecanto. The barbecue
closed out the month of fes-
tivities celebrating
Industry Appreciation
Month. The EDC and Cham-
ber would like to thank the
barbecue's presenting spon-
sor Sibex, volunteers and all
who came out to the event.
Industry
Appreciation
Month Sponsors:
Duke Energy
Workforce Connec-
tion
Health & Wellcare
Services of Florida
Insurance Resources
& Risk Management
Specialty Gems
Sibex
Crystal Automotive
Hometown Values
College of Central
Florida
Citrus 95.3
Job Site Services
Mike Bays State Farm
Insurance
Insight Credit Union
F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.


The Chamber welcomes new


members with ribbon-cuttings


FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS


521 N Lecanto Highway Lecanto, FL 34461
"World-class medicine. Hometown care."


352-746-0707


FLcancercom


Ellen Bishop; Jeffrey Rubin; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Jackie Weeks; Carol Keadle; Andrea Thompson; Eileen Tate;
Ed Murphy. Shelly Glenn; Jarneshah Cunningham; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Marion T. Chirayath, MD; Sunil Gandhi, MD,
FACP; Gustavo A. Fonseca, MD; V. UpenderRao, MD, FACP; Jimmie T. Smith; Marie Chapman; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood;
Diana Seijas; Debbie Jones; Barbara Remener; Crystal Mathis; and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


AMERICAN

TACTICAL

FIREARMS
7908 W. Dunnellon Road
Dunnellon, FL 34443
352-564-1022
https://www.facebook.com/pages/
American-Tactical-Firearms/
1408257082729174?fref=ts
We are a veteran family-owned gun store,
selling guns and ammo.
rRhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast
Bank; Joan Hoffman; Natalie Peters; Dixie and Robyn
Hollins; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George.
Hanna and Phillip Peters with
daughter Natalie; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County.
Jonah and Jesse Hoffman.


In honor and memory
of Tom Corcoran
Citrus County Continuity of Care held a Cele-
bration of Life for Tom Corcoran. The Am-
bassadors presented his wife, Chrissy, with a
Lifetime Ambassador Award at the event.

Tune into
Chamber Chat
Chamber Chat guest the week of Nov. 3 to
hear from presenters from Fire Up Citrus!
And what has happened since sharing their ideas
with the community.

Get Involved in
November
he Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County
wants to see you, your spouse, your
co-workers, your golf or fishing buddies or
anyone you know growing a Mo (short for
moustache) in November. If you, your business
or your friends would like to join the Movember
Citrus County team or if you'd just like to donate,
visit us.movember.com/team/1007301.
To stay in the know about the Mo, go to
Facebook.com/MovemberCitrus. November
Citrus County would like to thank their media
sponsors: Citrus County Chronicle, Citrus
95/Classic Hits The Fox and Hometown Values.


Dragon Boat Festival set for Nov. 16


The inaugural Lake Hernando
Dragon Boat Race is set for Satur-
day, Nov. 16 at the Lake Hernando Park,
3699 E. Orange Drive, and Hernando.
Build your own team
Saturday, Nov. 16
Corporate sponsored teams: $1,000
registration entry fee
Community, nonprofit and club
teams: $5oo00 registration entry fee (spe-
cial inaugural event pricing!)
All necessary equipment included.


Sponsorships available
Calling all food and craft vendors:
Vendor special rate: $50 for business
booth and $25 for nonprofit booth
More information and registration:
http://www.lakehernando
dragonboat.com
813-426-3544
Christine@highfivedragonboats.com


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

would have been approved. The fact
that you have $9,000 left after settling
the funeral and other expenses could
present some problems.
Regardless of the source of the funds,
the strong likelihood is that the courts
would want you to settle at least most of
that money before bankruptcy was al-
lowed.
I understand you are reluctant to go
bankrupt, and since the credit card
companies are willing to make a deal,
see what kind of offer you can get,
maybe 10 percent to 15 percent on the
dollar It may very well be that you
could settle the bills with the $9,000 and
not have to consider bankruptcy
You didn't indicate how much debt
you are in. In the event that the amount
is substantially over the $9,000, you
should really consider consulting a
bankruptcy attorney, but the reality is
you are going to give up most of the
$9,000.
DEAR BRUCE: You have said that
one can get a 6 percent to 8 percent re-
turn on an investment. I would like to
know how to do that since I have read
and been told by a financial adviser that
one can only rely on a 4 percent return
for retirement. What strategy do you
suggest to get your yield?
-M.B., via email
DEAR M.B.: I have said consistently
that I believe it is not unreasonable to
expect a 6 percent to 8 percent annual
income on my investments. I have been
achieving that for many, many years.
Not every year. I had losing years, as
well. But over the long haul, the average
has been 7 percent and in many years
considerably higher
There is no secret, but it's necessary
to take a certain degree of risk. Overall,
the stock market has consistently
given me those types of returns by in-
vesting in conservative, dividend-paying
companies.
There are going to be years when all
of the conservative investments in the
world are not going help. In the years
2008 to 2011, there were a lot of compa-
nies that lost value and others that
failed to increase.
But you will notice that if you kept all
of your investments that went in the toi-
let during the 2008-2009 period,
in most cases you will have recovered
your investment with a substantial
profit.
The question is, are you prepared to
take a certain degree of risk? If your in-
structions to your adviser are that you
are absolutely risk-adverse, then even 4
percent is a difficult number to achieve.
In my view, conservative, strong Ameri-
can companies are here and will re-
main here. Properly invested, the type
of return I suggested is not unreason-
able.
DEAR BRUCE: Our daughter went to
school to be a veterinarian assistant
Her student loan rate was 3 percent.
Three years later, her student loans in-
creased to 6.5 percent and 7 percent.
She now pays $200 per month, interest
only, because it's all she can afford.
She says that she cannot even think
about marriage and starting a family
when she is in debt. She owes about
$35,000. She is very frustrated, and so
are we in watching her struggle.
When the government took over these
loans, the rate doubled. Is this how we
take care of our young people and en-
courage schooling to get ahead? The
only encouraging thing we have heard is
that after 30 years, her unpaid balance
would be forgiven. By that time, she will


have paid $72,000.
-N.B., via email
DEAR N.B.: I can understand and
sympathize with your daughter's situa-
tion. I have no notion as to how much
money she had to borrow, as opposed
how much she wished to borrow rather
than work, when she was in school, but
the fact remains that she now owes
about $35,000.
That she can't even think about mar-
riage is distressing, however I don't nec-
essarily agree. As to the family, that is a
different matter
Were she to get an extra job, over and
above her regular job, at $5,000 a year,
she could unload her debt in five years
or so. With her skills, this shouldn't be a
difficult thing to find. There are many
veterinary practices that work on week-
ends and pay substantial wages to folks
who are willing to put in those weekend
hours.
She also might be able to find a lower
interest rate. I am no expert in that re-
gard, but I can certainly suggest that she
talk to the finance people at her school.
They may be able to help her
Let's face it, she got herself in this situa-
tion because she wanted to better herself
and she has a $35,000 investment in
herself.
You didn't indicate how much she
earns, but as a young person, if she puts
in six or seven days a week, she should
be able to dispose of that loan in a rea-
sonable amount of time. The fact that
many kids are doing it is testimony that
it can be done.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a pipe dream
and would like your opinion on the
idea. We own our own home, worth
about $450,000. We have an IRA with
$50,000, savings of $60,000 and $150,000
in the stock market. Our income is
$55,000 a year
As you are well aware, the stock mar-
ket is not all that stable. I am wondering
if we should sell our stocks and pur-
chase a vacation home near one of our
sons. One lives in Sacramento, Calif,
and one in Sparks, Nev We would prob-
ably use the vacation property on sev-
eral long weekends. Our visits now are
only on weekends, and we stay at their
homes.
I am 87 years old and my wife is 85.
We have no debt other than utilities and
living expenses.
-R.R., via email
DEAR R.R: You say you have a pipe
dream? I don't find it a pipe dream. If
you want to buy a vacation home, I have
no problem with that. But I don't think
it's the wisest thing to do from a finan-
cial point of view
You say stocks are not all that stable. I
consistently point out that if you invest
in conservative, dividend-paying com-
panies, then the stock market can be
one of the best places to have your in-
vestments grow
That being observed, at your respec-
tive ages of 87 and 85, purchasing a va-
cation home doesn't seem to be the best
choice. On the other side of that, there
is no reason in the world why, in either
the Sacramento or Sparks areas, you
couldn't find an attractive and useful va-
cation property to rent.
You wouldn't have the responsibility
of upkeep, and as a practical matter,
how many years are you going to be able
to go out and vacation?
I think you should start the vacation
immediately, but I would consider
leasing a home rather than purchasing
one.

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions ofgeneral in-
terest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be provided.


BUDGET
Continued from Page Dl

said in an interview Thursday "So we
aren't focusing on a grand bargain be-
cause I don't think in this divided gov-
ernment you'll get one."
In an interview Thursday with Ne-
vada public radio station KNPR,
Reid, the Senate majority leader,
agreed that a large-scale grand bar-
gain wasn't in the cards.
"They have their mind set on doing
nothing, nothing more on revenue,
and until they get off that kick, there's
not going to be a grand bargain," Reid
said. "We're just going to have to do
something to work our way through
sequestration."
Ryan, his party's vice presidential
nominee a year ago, and Senate
Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty
Murray, D-Wash., are two of the key
congressional figures in the talks.
They both say they're seeking com-
mon ground between the sharply dif-
ferent Republican and Democratic
budgets.
Common ground, however, is a
much different concept than compro-
mise. It involves finding ideas upon
which they can agree rather than
compromising principles such as Re-
publican opposition to tax increases
or the unwillingness by many Democ-
rats to consider cutting future Social
Security benefits by decreasing the
annual cost-of-living adjustments.
Instead of a broad agreement en-
compassing tax hikes and structural
curbs on the growth of benefit pro-
grams like Medicare and Medicaid,
Ryan says he's seeking a "smaller,
more achievable objective."
The talks, he said, also will focus on
alleviating another upcoming round
of automatic spending cuts and re-
placing them with longer-term cuts.
Sequestration mostly hits so-called
discretionary spending, the money
approved by Congress each year to
run agency operations. Ryan wants to
cut autopilot-like spending on entitle-
ment programs like Medicare to ease
sequestration's effects on both the
Pentagon and domestic programs.
"I think we all agree that there's a
smarter way to cut spending" than se-
questration, Ryan said. "If I can re-


form entitlement programs where the
savings compound annually ... that is
more valuable for reducing the debt
than a one-time spending cut in dis-
cretionary spending."
The White House and Democrats are
pressing to include new revenue from
closing tax loopholes and infrastruc-
ture spending to boost the economy
"Even if we do not have the big
grand bargain, if you were to have a
medium deal or small deal, those
deals could have permanent loophole
closures and permanent mandatory
savings that would help our perma-
nent long-term fiscal situation," sen-
ior White House official Gene
Sperling told a business group Friday
The automatic spending cuts are
required because a 2011 deficit-re-
duction supercommittee failed to
reach an agreement. The cuts would
carve $91 billion from the day-to-day
budgets of the Pentagon and domestic
agencies in 2014 compared with the
spending caps set by a 2011 budget
deal. The Pentagon would absorb al-
most 60 percent of the cuts.
Republicans are looking at a bushel
basket of cuts to Medicare health care
providers contained in Obama's
budget They also have voiced sup-
port for curbing Social Security cost-
of-living adjustments, an idea Obama
has backed, but only in the context of
a broader deal in which Republicans
would allow tax increases. That pro-
posal won't fly in the current talks.
There are also several supercommit-
tee ideas like curbing Postal Service
cost overruns, making federal workers
contribute more to their pensions and
raising premiums on higher-income
Medicare beneficiaries.
Democrats, meanwhile, are wary of
using cuts to Medicare and other enti-
tlement programs to ease cuts in the
defense budget. Negotiators still
might explore curbing generous mili-
tary retirement, health care and pre-
scription drug benefits as a way to
restore cuts to readiness and pro-
curement of weapons systems.
"Congressional Democrats and the
White House, rightly in my view, don't
want to use domestic entitlement cuts
to offset easing or eliminating the de-
fense side of sequestration on top of the
nondefense discretionary side," said
Robert Greenstein, president of the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.


FUNDS
Continued from Page Dl


Traditionally Citrus County has
had three Relays for Life at each of
the county's public high schools.
In 2014, the events are being con-
solidated somewhat. Inverness and
Lecanto will share one relay at Cit-
rus High School, and Dunnellon will
share a relay with Crystal River at
Crystal River High School. Both re-
lays are in April.
In 2011 the Citrus County relays
raised $207,000. While final figures


weren't available, the 2012 relay
raised an estimated $168,000, she
said.
Liska said fund-raising amounts
fluctuate, but she hopes that consoli-
dating three relays into two in 2014
will reduce the cancer society's costs
while increasing donations and inter-
est.
Liska said the cancer society
stands firm in its hope of easing the
impact cancer has on patients and
caregivers.
"That's why we stay focused on
helping the most people with the
most focused services," she said. "We
aim at reaching the most and saving
lives, which is our ultimate goal."


I gdulurl'llane f0itusCont pesnt0


Shave-Off/Kick-Off Party
Tuesday. Obtber 21
5:311p- 7:30p



Whether you have a 'Mo' or 'No Mo'.
you'll wont to go! Everyone is invited.
Bring your buddies, family, friends.
And don't forget your razor or we'll
just shave your moustache for you.


if you con (or even if you can't) grow a
MO. yOu won't want to miss this year's
November events. Start November off
clean-shaven and then grow your
moustache to bring awareness to
men's health issues like prostate and
testicuioar cancer. Be sure to Save the
Date for me Mo Show & Finale Party on
Thursday, November 21 starting at
5:30p at High Octane Saloon. There
you'll proudly strut your Mo. And who
knows, your Mo just might win
Best, Big, Lame or Unique!


oo o to to o ve mb erco m/te am. /1 0 0 70 1


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 D3




D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 BUSINESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Black Diamond Ranch taps group to help with expansion


Special to the Chronicle

LECANTO Black Diamond Ranch Golf Club has
engaged Pipeline Marketing Group to assist with de-
sign and ongoing implementation of its membership
marketing strategy.
Pipeline Marketing Group is a full-service sales and
marketing firm specializing in private clubs and
lifestyle brands. Based in Los Angeles, Calif,
Pipeline has worked with several prestigious brands
including The Riviera Country Club (Pacific Pal-
isades, Calif), Pebble Beach Resorts (Monterey,
Calif), The Crosby National (Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.)
and Ibis Golf and Country Club (West Palm Beach,
Fla).
Pipeline Marketing Group was brought in to ensure
that Black Diamond was taking a professional, edu-
cated approach to communicating the club's overall
image to prospective members. Pipeline has years of
experience working with clubs like Black Diamond
specifically to increase member levels.



Tranzon's Saturley elected
VP of NAA board of directors
Thomas W Saturley, CAI, a principal at Tranzon
Driggers, was elected vice president of the National
Auctioneers Association Board of Directors.
A co-founder of Tranzon, one of the largest real es-
tate auction companies in the country and president
of Tranzon Auction Properties in Portland, Maine, Mr
Saturley was installed at the NAA International Con-
ference & Show in Indianapolis on July 18. He at-
tended the conference with Jon Barber, president, and
Walt Driggers, VP of Tranzon Driggers and also a co-
founder of Tranzon.
Tom is licensed to conduct auctions in Maine, New
Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont and also li-
censed to sell real estate in Maine, New Hampshire
and Colorado. He was a practicing attorney in Maine
and New Hampshire and served as an assistant attor-
ney general for the state of Maine.
Special to the Chronicle


Lecorn obtains state certification
Debra "Dee" M. Lecorn, customer service represen-
tative with Benefit Advisors, Inc. has successfully com-
pleted the state of Florida's 2-15 Resident Life,
Health, and Variable Annuity License exam.
The 2-15 Resident License allows an individual to
represent a health maintenance organization or, as to
health insurance only, an insurer transacting health
insurance, insurance against loss through sickness or
accidental bodily injury
She can also represent an insurer as to life insur-
ance and annuity contracts, including agents ap-
pointed to transact life insurance, fixed-dollar annuity
contracts, or variable contracts by the same insurer
Annuity contracts, including, but not limited to, fixed
or variable annuity contracts; the granting of endow-
ment benefits, additional benefits in event of death or
dismemberment by accident or accidental means, ad-
ditional benefits in the event of the insured's disabil-
ity; and optional modes of settlement of proceeds of
life insurance.
Special to the Chronicle


Bausch completes service training

Marie Rausch, a senior registered service associate
in the Crystal River office of Raymond James & Asso-
ciates Inc. recently completed the Financial Planner
Series for Small Business, according to Patrick Daxon,
vice president of Ramond James' Wealth, Retirement
& Portfolio Solutions group.
The Financial Planner Series is a professional devel-
opment program that focuses on retirement planning, in-
come and estate tax planning, risk management and
investment options for small-business owners and exec-
utives. Rausch has been employed with Raymond James
for 26 years in the Crystal River office.
Special to the Chronicle


Pipeline Marketing Group has recruited former
Black Diamond Director of Membership, Kerry Rosse-
let, to once again spearhead the membership market-
ing efforts on behalf of the club. Ms. Rosselet
previously served as director of membership at Black
Diamond from August 2008 to February 2013, and has
returned as the primary onsite resource for Pipeline.
'As we contemplate our membership marketing
strategy, we must consider how to best leverage not
only the club's physical attributes, but also the incred-
ible sense of pride, community and belonging that our
members have created here at Black Diamond
Ranch," said Doug Egly, general manager of Black Di-
amond Ranch. "In order to generate additional aware-
ness and ultimately recruit new members to the club,
we must be able to clearly define and communicate
our message to prospective members, and Pipeline is
an integral part of this strategy"
Convenient to both Tampa Bay/St. Petersburg and
Orlando, Black Diamond Ranch is quietly situated in
the "Nature Coast" of Florida. An exclusive residen-
tial community when built out will feature approxi-


mately 795 homes with many outstanding select home
sites to choose from. New Homes are being con-
structed daily and a small offering of previously con-
structed homes are available to preview
Black Diamond has been rated the "No. 1 Golf Com-
munity in Florida" by both Golfweek and Florida Golf
Magazine. The 45 holes of private Tom Fazio-designed
golf include the breathtaking Quarry Course which is
consistently ranked among the best courses in the
United States and is registered on many golfers'
bucket lists.
"We are thrilled to be involved with such an amaz-
ing private club community," commented Shannon
Herschbach, principal at Pipeline Marketing Group.
"Black Diamond is extremely dedicated to delivering
a superior member experience and is eager to find
more effective ways to communicate what they are all
about- world class golf in an exclusive, nature coast
community We are very excited to help develop and
implement a marketing strategy that will clearly com-
municate the Black Diamond story to prospective
members."


I* Ouided hoat Rides
through Kings Day
ADMISSION $5 V.I.P. $50
Ticket Outlet at Brannen Banks
For more info.visit
www.stonecrabjam.com


Sponsored by (IMkEpNLEx

DUKE Mimes
)ENERGY. "'IaM glsts



I* S l 1U* ThC Grean*a--qL 1


, chronicleonline.com
your news. anywhere, anytime. -n




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


0 ...* 0* .


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for a few good
players to fill in on Thurs
nights. Single or cou-
ples. If interested please
call 352-527-9632.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



FORD
'98 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054
Gas Fireplace,
no vent. Incl. oak
cabinet with mantel,
raised hearth &
logs, fluted sides, etc.
$300. 352-341-3083
SPA-N-A-BOX
Portable spa w/ cover
& chem. Seats 4; 280
Gal. Like New, Retail
value $1100, asking
$600 (352) 690-2198
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Sugarmill Woods
Sun 11/2 8:30a-2:30p
Lots of collectibles, fur-
niture. For info call
845-505-7333. Also vari-
ous art, some framed
and prints unframed.
For art info call
352-238-5447
18 Blalr Ct, Homosassa
TOYOTA
2000 Avalon, $2000,
leather seats, needs
minor work. Call after
5:00 pm 352-634-2054



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
1352) 771-6191


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 Pitt Mixed Puppies
3 months old
brother & sister
Brindle in color
(352) 464-5983
Come SeePretty
Gunmetal Gray,
Male Cat
needing nice,
loving home
(352) 746-1904
Female Shepherd/
Malamute mix. 7 yrs,
Loves people, needs
to be only pet.
Spayed, updated on
shots. Free to good
home(352) 860-0540
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or mulch. U load and
haul 3526289624
Five KITTENS
Really cute 6 wks old
male & female 3
orange, 1 beige, 1
calico(352) 628-2178


Floral Queen size
Sleep Sofa, needs legs
(352) 400-5174 Iv. msg
Free Firewood
352-794-3368


Brown MiviiniaTure
Horse. white color on
face, feet. Escaped
from pen 10/22 in the
Highlands area off 581
(352) 400-8909
Lost 9/8/13 Tri-Colored
Beagle. Male, Neutered,
Weighs 40 Ibs. Needs
medical
attention.Special needs
pet. Last seen on N.
Lee St. Beverly Hills.
Has been sighted on S.
Harrison. Please call
352-249-3107 or
352476-3140. We miss
him terribly and want
him to come home.
Lost Female Yorkie
on Oct. 20th,
Tanglewood area
on Hartwood Lane
Heartbroken
owner grieving
(352) 634-0307



Found 2 female
Tan Pit Bull
BalckLab Mix,
Found Cardinal St.
Lecanto
727-947-0347
Found Bible
Intersection of
Hwy41 S. &44 E. Near
Burger King.
(352) 208-4236
Found Jack Russell
Male, Saturday 19th
white w/ brown
Turner camp,
Inverness
(352) 464-0200
FOUND KITTEN
Corner of E. Glenn St.
and S. Smith Ave.
Inverness
(352) 726-4111
Found, Friendly
Loving Kitten
off 495 in Crystal River
1 month ago
Call to Identify
(352) 228-2494



Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+ Call Dan
(352) 726-3339

-iTR


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone CrabS$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
MAHI MAHI FILLETS
$8 per Ib, Can Deliver
(352) 613-0930




Animal Services
Clerk Typist
Casual,
on call position
Answer phones,
data entry, performs
adoptions and
owner claims; proc-
ess owner surrenders
and strays; complet-
ing forms, taxing
and ebridging;
process citations
and bite reports;
high customer
interaction in person
and via telephone.
Must be at least
18 years of age.
$8.70 hourly.
Casual labor
applications may
be completed
on line at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and returned to
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department.
3600 W Sovereign
Path Lecanto,
Florida 34461.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




ARNP or PA
RN Full & Part Time
MA w/Phlebotomy
Skills
FLORIDA CANCER
SPECIALIST/Details at
www.flcancer.com

ASSISTANT
DIRECTOR OF
REHAB SERVICES
Llfe Care Center of
Citrus County In
Lecanto
Full-time leadership
position available.
Must be a licensed
physical, occupa-
tional or speech
therapist with a
bachelor's or mas-
ter's degree from an
accredited
program. We offer
competitive salary
and great benefits in
a team-oriented en
vironment. Heather
Langley
888-712-8551
941-554-0537 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne In
Lecanto, FL 34461
HeatherLangley
@LCCA.com Visit us:
LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
43732






CNA'S, HHA'S &
Homemaker
Companion
Level 2 background
check required, CPR
certified & prior
employment
verification.
Apply in Person:
Health Matters
4225 Rachael Blvd
Spring Hill
(352) 597-4084

DENTAL
INSURANCE
COORDINATOR
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson@ rswan-
sondental.com

Dental
Receptionist
or Assistant
Position for motivated
professional with ref.
and exp. Established
cosmetic practice.
Fax resume to
352-795-2235

FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson@rswan-
sondental.com

FRONT DESK
SPECIALIST
Part time for Busy
Office. Only those
w/front desk, health
care exp. considered.
Computer & Insurance
exp. needed.
EMAIL RESUME TO:
billingdept@
nbccdro.com

Fulltime Certified
Dental Assistant
Call 352-746-0330
Ask for Vicki




You mrdlJ first


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CIIkIOIcLEi O


Hiring LPN's &
CNA's, PRN
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person at:
Superior Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

HIRING:
PT, PTA, RN, OT
Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097

LPN
The Dermatology
Center in Inverness
and The Villages
is now hiring an
LPN full time.
Having a home
address between
these 2 locations
is a significant plus.
Mon-Fri 8-5,
Call for details
637-1310, ext. 202
Derm Experience a
plus but not req.
Fax Resume To:
352-637-0788 or Mail
931S. US hwy41
Inverness,FL 34450

Medical Assist-
ants Needed
With Phlebotomy
and Front Office
Skills for offices in
Dunnellon and
Inglis locations.
Fax Resume to:
352-465-7576 or
Email to: srideven@
yahoo.com





The First
Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River, FL
seeks a
Choir Director

The principle
function of the job
is to plan and
develop music for
all worship activities.
Director is required
to have piano/
/organ skills.
Candidates must
have5to 10 years
in church sacred
music. Sendresume
to: Church
Administrator, First
Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River, FL,
1501 SE Hwy 19,
Crystal River, FL
34429. Email is:
fpccr01@gmail.
com.





Cooks & Servers
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced P/T
w- Servers
- Cooks
w- Bartender
- Hostess
w- Dishwasher
CALL 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment

Trades/B
Skills


Aquatic Plant
Technician
Announcement
#13-61
Broad technical
and manual work
spraying or me-
chanically removing
aquatic vegetation
from County
waterways. Ability
to safely operate
airboats, kicker
boats, automotive
and spray equip-
ment. High school
diploma or GED
certificate required.
Must possess or be
able to obtain
within six months of
employment a
Department of Agri-
culture Pesticide
Applicator License
with Aquatic en-
dorsement. Must
possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. $11.09
hourly to start Excel-
lent benefits. Full
time position work-
ing 4-10 hour days,
Monday- Thursday.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, November 1,
2013 EOE/ADA.


Eagle Buick
GMC, Inc
is in need of an
Exp. Automotive
Parts Consultant.
Minimum 2yrs expe-
rience preferred.
Great opportunity
for one to find a
career path, and
earn a great living.
Very productive
repair facility and a
professional environ-
ment with plenty of
growth potential.
Military applicants
welcomed. Benefits.
drug free workplace
Application
Available @ Eagle
Buick GMC Inc
Send Resume:Fax
(352) 564-0400 Email
robbcole @ eagle
buickgmc.com



Your World

I-, , 4 I9,,, h .





CfiipmiE


& Service Tech
Security system &
CCTV Tech with a
minimum of 3 yrs exp.
Fax resume:
352-563-5690

t "ll lii' L
t ill '. %i Id Iii St.
L\^i) Li^t


Classifieds
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973

General
Technician
position available
at automotive
repair shop, full -
time position with
benefits.
To inquire contact
352-447-3174
between 8:30a-5p.


Exp. Metal &
TPO Roofers

must have tools
and transportation
352-726-7006


Now Hiring:
OTR Class A CDL
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Call today
for details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net


POOL I MAINTE-
NANCE TECH
PART / FULL
TIME
Pick up application
Spruce Creek
Preserve SR 200
Dunnellon
Monday Thursday
9:00am 3:00pm.
see Julie


RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply In person
S & S Electric
2692 W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon


Key Training
Center
has positions availa-
ble in group home
setting. Assist adults
with disabilities in
daily living. HS
Diploma/ GED req.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*




CLEANERS
Reliable, Energetic
Individual/Couple
Retirees Welcome
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





Tax Accountant
2 5 yrs. Business Tax
Exp. CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search@
gmail.com


Tax Manager
5-10 yrs. Business Tax
Experience w/ CPA
firm, CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search
@gmail.com


Need JOB
1 #1 Employment source is
m I
I wwMcrornicleonline.comI


a


1i~o~1



'110% -


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


C I T R U S I COUNT y


CHRNO-ICLE
wwwchronicleonline. com
Scarborough 2010


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27,2013 D5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~1iL


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS


Chevy
ULT


ARO f
kage, 20" Wheels
..$31,825
CAS- ..--.-$1,875
$1,500
rJNQUEST:. -$1000
CASH:- -.... -$1,000


New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT


SPARK LS
M SRP: ...................................................... $14,145
DEALER DISCOUNT: ..........- $300
USAA: .. ........ ..... -$750
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:..-......- $2,500


New 2Z
SILVE
DOU


, I


TAHO
M SRP: ................................
DEALERDISCOUNT::-.-
REBATE: -.
LEASE LOYALTYOR COM
USAA--.--
CASH ORTRADEEQUITY


OVER 90
Used & Crtifled
Pre-Loved Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY


2YEARSoc
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE'


Plus, a FKLL
PIT-STOP
PROGRAMM
See dealer for complete details.


$64495


IOVWIETTA 09JEEPGRANDCEROKEE4X
TURlO DIrSEL HLSUNROOF, 12043POWERDRIVESSEAT
TOUA-SC ,P/SET,A OYS SUNROOF, OUCH SCt RAO
$15,498 $16,188


10 GMCTERRAIN AWD
12129, SLTV6 LEATHER,
TOUCHSCREEN RADIO
$21/88


$15,495


D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


CLEANr
AC5


M;A


41:S




CITRUS COUiNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 D7


-I Pi s *- a.***-- - ,-j^ **


. . . . . . . .... .......... ....... .......... .....
flo n........ .................
,"....... ........ .,..-.'


...for a New 2013
CIVIC LXS
Model I
Automatic


"Check anywhere in the world first, but


CHECK WITH


CHAD LASTI"
I \t 14 -



Or
aIR r

:~~ ',a'
.... ..... ....


Honda I-4 a-
EDAN W .,
FG3B5DEW,
Transmission! '////


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...fora New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L 4 EX
A MdeTF3H3DJW- Best Selling Compact
ShYN! America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 iyw
Honda FIT W
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


... for a New 2013 Honda {3
ODYSSEY LX,
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


a
u -a


Model RM3H3CEW-Come SeeWhy The CR-V Is The Best
Selling Compact SUV In America! Save WhileThey last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%AP.
X 60 MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on approved credit.


Sf l'L` 3
Pre-Owned Vehicles!
Pre-Owned Vehicles!


$500 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:
6.10 i it,
Limited Powertrain Warranty"
Limi ted Pcwe rtrai n Wa rran ty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
SP cir' FI i complele dr ik


C.me See What LOVE Can Do For You!


On US-19 2 Miles
South of Crystal River


352.628.4600


LoveHonda.com


*'T.0.4 i OWo Leal Pma provides current owners of a 2003 or newer Honda vehde with $500 towards the Down Payment or Cap Cost Reducion ~'
:.:mlil rs thIeaorpiicl asea 2012 or2013 Civi,. CMc IMA. or Civic NGV through Honda Financial Services (HFS). Dealers can stanadvertising iminedalely
iogb 0 mkayw sales eouts. HP-252012 and 2013 All Ciic Loyalty Incomilve Program offers $500 valid only for current owners of 2003 or newer Honda model
LAig. ,'WI-P.M.' CivIc C mp or Coniwet' program offers $500 valid for current owners of 2003 or newer Chevrolet. Dodge Ford, GC. Hyunda Jeep a,
I M& IIIi t, Satn.lxn Subam. Toyota and Volkswagen model vehices. 136 montai closed end lease with approved credit 12 000 miles per year 15 cents
.: l !!9 iiflsr..$2W5c.ih or ade equity plus taxes, g & fees. First payment, lag and lease and state fees due at sgnifng Any dealer installed eQuipment at additional cosl. Noi lease
.3BaM t lrldos e-pay lease of $9,976 with approved credit 12,000 miles pervyear 15 cents per mile thereafter. S2000 cash ortrade equity Payment is plus tai. tag and lease and state eis due at signing .OptionS at additional ojI tUsed as a down
; rit p st reduce imonltorte puidase of lease of any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan- program [lrough HFS IF ldp ei.ro Di ue at Siing Lease Program) Must
fsTfila eaitcreIa tabllsMWed by HFS, and vehicle must be eligible for new-vehidcle rat s. covers internal luDincant parts See dealer for details All pre-owtned vehicles include S2500 [ash oivnu or t, w equin Ifers vlralin thru idlte of puiblir(Aon


...fora New2013Honda
..CR-VLX2WD i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013200


2013300


2013TOWN
& COUNTRY


$19,695*


695*


2013AVENGER


s17,985


2013 JOURNEY
a MCI


2013 CHARGER


985*


Jeep


2013 PATRIOT


2013WRANGLER


2013 GRAND CHEROKEE


p15,995*


EE RAM


20131500


20133500


2013TRADESMAN


-_A- O,4-A


$8,200


$30,105


465*


I/ ,


Jeep


CRYSTAL
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL 14358 CORTEZ BLVD. BROOKSVILLE, FL 2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. INVERNESS, FL
800-584-8755 ext 10 I CrystalAutos.com ..
'PRICES INCLUDE SI000O CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES, TAX, TAG. TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED ELEBR_ AT_ 10_NEVEIN_
CREDIT+INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


895*


995*


I


I


D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27,2013 D9


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



COO COO CLOCK
Very old clock with deer
antlers and various ani-
mals works 199.00
352-464-1006



1958 CHEVY HUB-
CAPS set of 2 Chevy
Impala Hubcaps, Center
Flags, good condi-
tion,$40. 352-382-0069



SPA-N-A-BOX
Portable spa w/ cover
& chem. Seats 4; 280
Gal. Like New, Retail
value $1100, asking
$600 (352) 690-2198












ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range, GE
Self Cleaning Radiant
white, $100.
Kenmore Electric
Dryer, white, $100.
(352) 586-1848
GE Refrigerator
white, side by side,
18 cu. ft.,
water/ice/crushed,
$350. As is firm
(352) 270-4087
GOOD DRYER $100
Works great with 90
warranty Call or text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
Works great with 90 day
warranty Call or text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore Side by side
24 CF $300
Kenmore 700 Com-
mercial Dryer, elec,
$100 (352) 212-5779







REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, Gently
used 29 w, 60 h, 30 d,
white $175.00
(352) 527-1801
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SOLD
WASHER AND DRYER
Whirlpool commercial
quality super capacity,
white, clean, great
shape. $250.00
WASHER & DRYER and
dishwasher, exc.
cond., $140 each
(352) 344-8971
Washer & Dryer
kenmore, white
$100 ea. Good cond.
can deliver for fee
(678) 617-5560
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
dayGuar.FreeDelivery/
set up. 352 263-7398


COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51H.
$65. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H. $60.
527-1239.
FLAT FILE
Safco, steel, 5 drawers
533/8"W, 161/2"H
41 1/2"D, beige.
Very good cond.
$525. Sits on 30" H
sturdy wood frame.
Frame is free to buyer.
(352) 621-8053



4" DELTA JOINTER
$80.call Dave
352-621-0286
CAR
BUFFER/POLISHER
Random Orbit,10"
Buffer Polisher, Like
new, In Box,
$25 352-382-0069
Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7
Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
65.00 OBO
352 464 0316
PAINT SPRAY GUN
Hi pressure, Chicago
Tools, Brand new,Ext.
mix, siphon feed.
$10.00 (352)257-4076
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
METAL INVERNESS
419-5981


Th"'Stell


27" TV ROMOTE DOES
NOT WORK $25 good
picture 563-1073
SUB WOOFER 10"
powered 200 Watt,BIC
sub Woofer
$100.352-328-0069
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS 1 5" 80
WATTS $90
3352-613-0529




BATH CABINET 36"
WHITE NO TOP OR
FAUCET $60
(32) 527-8993
BATH CABINET 36"
WHITE W/MARBLE
TOP/SINK & FAUCET
$100 (352) 527-8993
DOOR WHITE
MASONITE 2'4" X 6'8"
W/HANDLE/HINGES -
$60 (352) 527-8993
KOHLER TOILET
WHITE ELONGATED -
$75 (352) 527-8993
SINK Sink with Moen
faucet and spray. Great
shape $30.00.
613-4279




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




SOLD
BUNK HAY FEEDER.
Freestanding hay
rack/bunk feeder.
$140.

Outdoorh
^ LFumiture


DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at 3 PERSON
$19.99/month (for 12 SWING-WITH AWNING c
mos.) & High Speed excellent cond. converts
Internet starting at to hammock, sofa, cot
$14.95/month $75 330-618-9761
(where available.) HAMMOCK SWING-
SAVE! Ask About Excellent condition.
SAME DAY Installa- Converts to hammock,
tionl! CALL Now! lounger, sofa bench.
1-800-745-2645 $100 352-503-6111


E
2 LEA
LES
FOOT
less c
tic
36' p,
4C
table
$100

Mah(
ovc
36"
(3

5P
Kitc
W/
$125
B
Calif I
w/B
table
Ivo
(3
B
Fancy
stand
large d
chi
3!
BE
FREN
Dres
stan
Nice

C
w/wl
4 poc

(3
COMIC
USEI
comfo
fu

CORI
DESK
shelf

DININ
6 chai
66"x4
90".
DOU


-LA I
Tan I
clininc





Ci[
3

cl 1


FATHER STRESS- ENTERTAINMENT 8'xl11
S CHAIRS WITH CABINET door front F
T STOOL 2 stress- holds up to 27"TV inside $50. (.
chair Great condi- any size on top $50 VINTI
)n 200.00 each 563-1073 CHAIR
352-464-1006 HUTCH. 36" X 18" X 69" 53". Ver
1ATIO TABLE AND high. Medium color $7C
HAIRS 36' patio wood. Excellent condi- VINTA
ble and 4 chairs tion. $100.... 527-1239 CHAIF
.00 352-601-1718 King Poster Bed Nice c
Armoire, Cherry, w/out 5
agony, 1 drawer, mattress, exc. cond.
Glass in doors, $350.(352) 513-5415
"H,37'W, 19"D,
$100. LIVING RM OR FAM
352) 382-7960 RM SET Green wicker,
Bedroom Set sofa, loveseatchair,
c. full size $150 ottoman, end & cock-
chen Set, Table tail tables. Incls cush-
4 swivel chairs ions. Exc Cond. $750
5.(352) 634-1489 (352) 382-2939
EDROOM SET LOVESEAT LAZYBOY
King 4 poster bed Mauve fabric
Box spring, end w/incliners VERY
dresser & lamp. NICE! Non smoke $60.
ory, $450 obo APPT: 352-621-0175
352) 344-4178 MATTRESS'
EDROOM SET 2 Twin mattress & box
y King bed, 2 night springs. 6 mo. old. Exc
Is & large dresser, cond, like new. $125
dresser with mirror each set
and drawers (352)746-2154
erry wood $500 (3)7-1
352-464-1006 OAK TRIPLE DRESSER
EDROOM SET w/ mirror and 5
4CH PROVINCIAL. drawer chest. Great
ser, chest & night cond. $300/set. or
d. Off white/gold. $175 ea. Will deliver
condition. $150. (352) 249-1031
527-1239 Queen Mattress Set,
:alifornia King frame linens & spread,
'hite headboard spare room set,
)st & box spring, like new $200.
good quality (352) 382-1918
$250
352) 621-1664 RECLINER GREEN
FABRIC Used, very
FORTS OF HOME good condition. $40.00
ED FURNITURE (352)257-4076
fortsofhomeused -(5)5747
urniture.com. Sofa, blue w/white
795-0121 polka dot, matching
NER COMPUTER pillows, $250.
< file drawer,printer 2 matching Maple
f,5'wide. $50 very barstools w/cushions
nice 563-1073 $225.(352) 513-5415
iG ROOM TABLE, SOLD
rs & hutch. Pecan. S
42", with 2 leaves BEDROOM SET. Chest,
$250. 527-1239 dresser & night stand.
Maple. Nice condition.
JBLE RECLINING $200.
HER LOVE SEAT
weather double re- SOLD
g ,very nice 400.00 DINING ROOM TABLE,
352-464-1006 6 chairs & hutch. Pecan.
S 66"x42", with 2 leaves
..i ,,, 90". $250.
I i Ih I St. TVCABINETw/swivel
L^. u^. top, all wood-black,
space for receiver, en-
LI.NIL.LE closed storage. $25
Classified, 352-382-4616


DI;


I I


II


B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352-447-5888



Do You Need Help
with everyday needs?
CALL NANCY
(352) 201-7880



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279*-k*
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Compete Tree Service
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
(352) 344-2696
FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447










Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning









(352) 270-4672



Find Guaranteed,
Local A/C Sales &
Installation Pros!
800-763-7108 Air
Conditioner Sales,
Service and Installa-
tion. All pros are
pre-screened and
relentlessly
reviewed! Call now
for a no obligation
estimate!
800-763-7108
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


E*fp11.11,,,I,
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Trim*Weed*Mulch
Cleaup*Maintenance
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397









A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




40


POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install ABeautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






1Ai"RL1NG
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/lns/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoorfina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024-



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


AAA ROOFING
Call the "/Ae.akh6uste) "
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
: Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./ ns. CCCO57oT537- n- '


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



hit.-.







TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


i


yI *


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
Stump Grinding -
Local, Call Robert
352-302-2220




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
.ii or pool or plan
Something
sI .' ,' ," completely new!
, F .^ "Ofn imitatd,
I nPlv P.ori,,1, \ fii Af


( mteriliGA B m
.r YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
| w i I t, COPES
FS POOL AND PAVER LLC

746-4451 1 7", = 352-400-3188


GENERAL ..
Stand Alone -
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians T
ER0015377

352621124


Exposed .
Aggregate
Shotcrete $451yd..
I *-Decks *Tile,
FREE Pavers
ESTIMATES "-r(
GREG'S COMPLETE
GUEGFO REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
&INSD 352-746-5200

& INSUREDi


11(


KNOCK OUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
SLicensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure

S- Washing Too

352.942.6876
i Call oday tor oa
OOOGD46Clean Tomorrow


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Services from A to Z
Complete Handyman Services
Specializing in
Aluminum Rescreen Work,
Storm Doors, Garage Screen
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch
Dors, Window Screens,
Ceilings, Pressure Washing,
Int/Ext Painting, Regrout
Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing,
SVinyl Tile Installation, Rotten
You Name it I probably do it!



746-2445
S Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START

AFIRE.'

iDr.VentC 2


CASH for

SCRAP
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars OO i
Appliances Wire Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices


4Lmm Afi f ea dc 19 11,0N.29
Motel Rcklbcng www.eliteroofing-inc.com
432 W G ulftoLae 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429

LecantoFL 34461 (352)639-1024
0GGDG 527-9599 LICENSED & INSURED


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
R 352-364-4610
(C)MR.
ELECTRIC
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24 n -ours--nl- - -"a --s a Week---
I24 Hours a DaY. 7 DaYS a Weeki


Lrwil Sprlioikr
Not Workii9?

We'll Fix It

$10 ff wth a


' Ivory Wool
eizy Rug
352) 527-2729
AGE DESK &
R. Maple. 33" x
y nice condition.
'. 527-1239
GE ROCKING
R. Maple. 40".
condition. $45.
527-1239


CHAIN SAWS: Electric
14'$25 & gas 18'$35.
Both run but need atten-
tion. $50 for both OBO.
352-637-2647


Chinese Lanterns
1 large, 2 sm, elec.
Concrete $150
Weed wacker. Electric
good condition $75
(352) 503-6902

RIDING MOWER
Pro line Automatic
48" deck, 24 HP, $600
(352) 746-7357


ROOFING


I


I


ww.aaa roof ingf I.homestead.com
r st I R'ver vj* Inverness
1 '4'11 -, 726-8917


j CLEANING


)I


I


I ROOFEINGB




D1O SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


WEEDEATER Bolens
BL150,31CC gas, 17"
cut, great shape, ($30)
352-212-1596
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362
Gar



INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, Sun, 8a to 3p
clothing, electronics,
household, misc.
1103 Jones Ave.
WHIRLPOOL
Electric range, smooth
ceramic cook top, self
cleaning, exc cond,
bisque, $250
352-201-0093



Inverness
Whole House full of
furniture & accessories
tools, bikes, call
(484) 547-9549
MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945
Sugarmill Woods
Sun 11/2 8:30a-2:30p
Lots of collectibles,
furniture. For info call
845-505-7333. Also var-
ious art, some framed
and prints unframed.
For art info call
352-238-5447
18 Blair Ct, Homosassa



2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $15
EACH 352-613-0529
3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS 36X30 & 2
LARGE CASUAL
SHIRTS $20
352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 $35 352-613-0529
CHILDREN HALLOW-
EEN COSTUMES 1
CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1
LION SIZE 5/6 $6
EACH 352-613-0529
GALLERY JACKET
FOR WOMEN Hardly
used,reversible,cheetah
print, small,good condi-
tion,$20 (352)465-1616
GIRLS WINTER
CLOTHING 4 JEANS 1
PANTS 5 SHIRTS 2 pa-
jama sets & 2 hoodies
$55 352-613-0529
LEATHER JACKETS
Brown Men's, Lg.-R
Women's black- SM.-R
$25. each
352-382-0069



!!! 225/75R -16 !!!
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
60.00 352 464 0316
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLCOVER-
ING $25 PREPASTED
VINYL 165 SQ FT
419-5981
8 x 10 Used
Lark Shed for Sale
Asking $1,550
delivery included
(352)860-0111
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD HEARTS/
TEDDY BEARS/ BUN-
NIES $25 419-5981
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOOTS women's tan
work size 7, black dress
size 7 1/2, good shape,
both for ($5)
352-613-7493
Ceramic Supplies,
Molds & Kiln with
accessories. $500
Call for appointment
(352) 897-4899
CHARCOAL GRILL
KINGSFORD 18.5" ON
WHEELS WITH
COVER $20
352-613-0529
CHRISTMAS TREE
9'Ariifical Blue Spruce
Tree/Lights
$75 352-249-4451


CHRISTMAS TREE
9'Artifical Blue Spruce
Tree/Lights
$75 352-249-4451
CONCERT SHIRT Tay-
lor Swift Red Tour with
matching armband,
large, brand-new, ($10)
352-613-7493
CONCERT TICKETS 2
Justin Moore, sat. 11/9,
St. Augustine amphithe-
ater, both for ($25)
352-212-1596
COSTUME JEWELRY 4
necklaces, 1 pair ear-
ings, 3 watches, all for
($10) 352-613-7493
Craftsman, 27 Ton
hydraulic log splitter
$900. obo
50 Ib thrust 12 V, 36 or
42 shaft, Trolling motor
used once $150.
(352) 560-3019
Cuisinart
Food Processor "little
pro" DLC-10 $25
Fiesta Gas BBQ Grill
$30 (352) 746-7977
DISH SATELLITE Dish
satellite with tripod-new,
never used. $50.00
352-382-4616
DOG CRATE LARGE
Soft Side NEW Heavy
duty for BIG dogs Pd
$300. Ask $100.
352-270-3909
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone CrabL$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
Gas Fireplace,
no vent. Incl. oak
cabinet with mantel,
raised hearth &
logs, fluted sides, etc.
$300. 352-341-3083
HARLEY STOCK EX-
HAUST PIPES NEARLY
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON 100.00 obo.
3524640316
Kirby Upright Self
Propell Vac. Sweeper
W/all attahments Incl.
Rug Shampooer Very
Good Cond. $249.
Phone 341-0302
(If no answer Please
leave message.)
KITCHEN BAR TOP,
Corian, black, angled
one piece 56" x56". Bar
countertop-18" wide.
$40 352-382-4616
LARGE COFFEE TA-
BLE beautiful glass cof-
fee table (42"x30") on
ceramic Florida Cougar
$75. 352-419-6644
LARGE MIRROR Beau-
tiful gold trimmed mirror
(41"x61") 3 Ovals/in one
mirror/w gold trim $75
352-419-6644
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Noritake China
Pattern is Asian
Dream, Service for 12
$200. firm
(352) 489-3264
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE OAK $75 CAN
E-MAIL DIMENSIONS
AND PHOTOS INVER-
NESS 419-5981
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF works great for
fish or jerkey only 60.00
3524640316
TRANSFER SWITCH
AND GENERATOR
Cutler-Hammer
CH10EGEN3060 trans-
fer switch (8 120V ckts
plus 1 240V ckt) and
Generac 4000XL(4000
watts) generator $350
for both. Inverness
726-1083
VINTAGE PROJEC-
TION TABLE $55
ACME PROJEK CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
WOMEN'S BLACK
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS $15 EURO-
PEAN SIZE 43L INVER-
NESS 419-5981


CHROME CLOTHES
RACK, 4 arms for dis-
playing, excellent
condition, $40,
(352) 465-1813


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


CLASSIFIED


-Medical
4 WHEELED WALKER
4 WHEELED WALKER
4 WHEELED WALKER
with seat and brakes.
only 75.00
3524640316
AUTO-GO SCOOTER
FAA approved folding
scooter w/hitch
mounted ramp. Can
be used as power
walker. $300.00
352-527-0942
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
3524640316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 352 464
0316
SAFETY BATH TUB
GRAB BAR it clamps to
the side of the tub 25.00
3524640316



WE BUY US COINS
& CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW & RARE"
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
SOLID TOP, GOLD
GROVERS $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" FLAWLESS 5
STRING RESONATOR
BANJO, SET UP AND
READY HALF PRICE
@ $100 352-601-6625
"NEW" OSCAR
SCHMIDT WHITE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
AQUA MOP TRIM $100
352-601-6625
"NEW"KUSTOM AMP
WITH REVERB, OVER-
DRIVE & 12"
SPEAKER $70
352-601-6625
"OLD SCHOOL"
ELECTRIC GUITAR
ANDAMPW/12"
SPEAKER&REVERB
$100 352-601-6625
FENDER STYLE MINI
BASS POLY STRINGS
PRE AMP W/PIEZO
FULL SIZE SOUND!
$75 352-601-6625
LES PAUL STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR 2
HUMMBUCKINGS
AGED MAHOGANY
$75 352-601-6625



SUMP PUMP 1/6/HP
Flotec FPOS1250X
Brand new, never used.
$40.00 (352)257-4076
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
VACUUM SHARP
1300W Upright,
Exceptional suction,
quite, used. $25.00
(352)257-4076



EXERCISE BIKE good
shape, all electronics.
only 100.00 352 464
0316 352 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
nearly new 75.00 352
464 0316



1 MENS & 1 WOMEN
26" BICYCLES Avalon 7
speed,aluminum frames
, only used a few hours.
$50 each, both $90.
Phone 352 3410736
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ-Go Golf Cart
excellent condition,
has headlights
exc. batteries w/
charger. $1500
(352) 527-3125
Fishing Gear
2 polls and Tackle
$125; Tools-various
prices. 2 Car Ramps
$50 for both.
(352) 503-6902


S^oo^dnsg
Hodeweeln 8
5 sp. Hi/low, new tires,
$450 obo or trade; New
26" Schwin 49 CC, Mo-
torized Bike. $450 obo
or trade(352) 447-6139
Summit Climbing Deer
Stand, good condition
$125.00
352-419-2064
Two Mens Bycycles
Both 26" and like new.
8 speed Monogoose
$175, Break Point
Pro $125
(352) 503-6902
WOMEN'S BICYCLE
SCHWINN collegiate
3 SPEED 26" -
ASKING $99.00
(352) 746-9483



DIAMOND ENGAGE-
MENT RING 1/2 carat,
beautiful color and clar-
ity, high quality, no chips
$1200 obo 201-7305


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369












New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19 Near Mall)
352-563-2110


Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts
Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


LILLY
Lilly, a 6-y.o. female
bulldog mix, white
w/black ears,
beautiful, friendly
girl, weighs 36 Ibs.
Heartworrrm-negaive &
housebrkn. She
loves treats & sits on
command, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Very affec-
tionate, wants to
be by your side.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


Pete
a 1-year-old mostly
white terrier/?hound
mix, Heartworm
negative & house-
broken. Came to
the shelter because
his family could no
longer afford him. A
very gentle,
well-behaved dog,
walks very well on a
leash & gets along
with other dogs.
Weighs 51 Ibs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


SETH
Seth is a 1-y.o.
Retriever mix, very
stunning coloring
soft beautiful coat.
Sits on command,
takes treats gently.
Friendly w/people &
other dogs. Loves
rope toys & belly
rubs. Eager to
please & will make
a great family pet.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


Beauty


#1 Employment source is










wwww.ch ronicleonline.com


U U U


", '' .' "* ., / ": ^ J . ' "f* ' i
.: ,I '..

I l : ,', .. ''-
/, wyL


& Online /// 1







(352) 56359 f ,
(35)53-96 --' <


owl
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $500
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827

Boat

4HP Evinrude,
outboard runs perfect
$300
(352) 628-7818
Auto Pilot,
Raymarine Sportspilot
up to 30 fft, like new,
$600
(352) 601-3656



BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**







14, ALUM BOAT
W/9.9 ENGINE, GALV
TRAIL. XLNT SHAPE.
$900. 352-256-8488
COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945
EVENRUDE 1998
17' Polar Boat, 90 hp
Salt Water Series,
Center Console $4895
352-201-2014,
352- 513-5141
GHEENEE
2003,13' 8hpSuzuki
motor.exc. cond.
$2000.(630) 334-7366
MIRROCRAFT
14FT, Aluminum Boat
35HP, Evinrude, elec.
start, w/ trailer $900
(352) 628-7818
Polar
1995 17'Fiberglass,
75HP yamaha motor,
good condition $4000
(352) 341-2036
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



ALLEGRO BAY
'96, M37 Motor Home
Fully restored in 2011,
New michelin tires,
good cond. $10,500
obo, 352-274-8664
FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 fft, 50k mi. Very
Good cond
MUST SEE $12,000
(352) 628-6643



DUTCHMAN
30 ft classic trailer. W/
tongue, ready for
travel. $1200
(352) 419-5028
KEYSTONE
Springdale 2005
Model 298-BHL
super slide out, awn-
ing, tandem axle,
coupling hitch anti
sway bars, 30 amp
hkup. Asking $9,500
or will consider shal-
low water boat as
trade, (352) 503-9133
before 9pm


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLEETWOOD TERRY
'04, 27 ft, 12ft slide out
new awning & new
hitch, extra clean,
non smoking, extras
$9,000, 352-341-7703
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Rockwood 2011
MiniLite, Travel Trailer
20 ft Power Slide-out,
Like New $9995 firm
(352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




CAR DOLLY
2011 Custom built. Too
many features to list.
$1,000. Phone
734-664-8692
Running Boards, Ford
Equipment. For 250 S.D
Ext Cab. Type 2 tubu-
lar. Like New $250
(352) 628-1783



-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Liquidation Sale
'Outf For Business
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
Wanted to buy:
HATCHBACK
2011 or newer, Power
everything plus XM
radio(352) 513-5291




CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT
4door, power win-
dows, locks, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2004 Sebring Lxi
convertible, dark
green/tan top all the
toys new brakes, good
shape $3200.00
352-364-2375
DODGE
98 Caravan mini
van, 7 psg. runs
great, looks qood.
asking $1675.
(352) 637-2588
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595

Misc. Notice


'98 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
Liquidation Sale
ifOut For Business
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MERCURY
2001, Grand Marquis,
great cond. cold air,
leather int., 93k miles
$4,500. (352) 422-5622
MERCURY
98 Grand Marquis
56,200 mi. senior own-
ed, garaged, great
cond. $4700. See at
9472 S. US 19 across
from Sugarmill Publix
OLDSMOBILE
1998 Achieva
runs & looks good,
cold air. $1200 firm
Lye msg 352-364-3009
SATURN
1994, 4 Dr, good cond
very low miles, great
MPG, $2100 obo
(352) 287-5993
SATURN
1999, S11,4 door,
low miles, extra clean,
1 owner, $3,250.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2000 Avalon, $2000,
leather seats, needs
minor work. Call after
5:00 pm 352-634-2054



CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
CORVETTE
1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
Dodson 280 ZX
1979 Antique
2 Door Coupe $5000
(352) 257-3261





1111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




'06, DODGE
2500, crew cab, hemi
eng. 88k mi. 5th whl.
hitch $14,900.
'04 FORD F250
Super cab, 86k mi.
$12,900. Like New
'01 FORD
Crew cab, Lariat,
112k mi., $8,900
'04 DAKOTA
Crew cab, 119k mi.
sharp $6,900.
'03 DAKOTA
Reg. cab., 89Kmi
$5,900. (352) 726-2494
DODGE
2002 Dakota 2002
Dodge Dakota quad
cab sport 164,000 mi-
les clean title! $4000
firm. (352)-795-9878
FORD
2004 F350, S uper Cab
dually diesel, low miles
new tires, full warranty
til 4/1/14, clean truck,
over 2k in extras, nice
cond! $15,900
(352) 564-2756




371-1027 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Nicole Cupak
2440 W Jonquil Dr
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 27, 2013.

376-1027 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 14TH day of November. 2013 at the
Citrus County Transit Center, 1300 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34460
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, October 27, 2013.


373-1027 SUCRN
11-6 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, October 27, 2013.


376-1027 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of:
D & B Enterprise located
at 3879 N. Tamarisk Ave,
Beverly Hills, Florida
34465, in the County of
CITRUS, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations
of the Florida Dept. of
State, Tallahassee,


Florida.
Dated at Inverness, FL.,
this 18th day of October,
2013./S/Donald
Christian
Schaefer and Bonnie
Larsen. Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle,
October 27 2013.


h


Liquidation Sale
*'Out For Business
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 1 owner $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2007, Escape, XLS,
$7,950.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2003, Wrangler,
4 cyc., 5 speed,
soft top, $9,950
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan,
Fully loaded, dual slid-
ing drs. 35mpg, V6,
Perf. cond., garaged
New tires, Crystal Riv.
$3,700. (727) 207-1619



HONDA
02, Silverwing, 600cc,
auto trans, new front
tire, 23,159 miles,
great shape, $3,200.
obo 352-897-4108
HONDA 1988
GOLDWING TRIKE
Clean, well kept
$11,995 352-201-2014
352-513 -5141



372-1027 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has
intent to sell the vehicles)
below under FloridaStatutes
713.78.The undersigned will
sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding on the
premises where said
vehicles) have been stored
and are located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
4212W Hwy 44,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
DOS: 11-07-13@8AM
1999 MERC VIN#
2MEFM74W3XX736155
2005 VOLK VIN#
3VWRK69M65M020359
DOS:11-09-13@8AM
1999 FORD VIN#
1FAFP6538XK178772
Purchases must be paid for
at the time of sale, cash
only. All vehicles are sold
as is and must be removed
at the time of sale. All sales
are subject to cancellation
in the event of settlement
between owner and the
obligated party.
October 27, 2013
375-1027 SUCRN
11/8 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SUPERIOR TOWING/ C&M
TOWING gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and in-
tent to sell these vehicles)
on 11/8/2013, 9:00am at
2157 NE Jacksonville Rd,
Ocala, FL 34470 pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. Superior
Towing /C&M Towing re-
serves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
1FMZU67KX5UB77902
2005 FORD
1FUYSSEBXYPA16806
2000 FREIGHTLINER
1GRAA9629TB164649
1996 GREAT DANE
4V4NC9TH9CN544639
2012 VOLVO
October 27, 2013


^^^^^^'911


Meeting
I NT^TTeS


Metn


fowio

You





YOUR; Daysr


I


Meeting
I Notices^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'C>]

NN~


NEW 2013 ESCAPE SE NEW 2013 F150 XL
M SRP...........................................................................$28,055 M SRP............................................................................ $25,340
Nick Nicholas Discount..................................................-1,056 Nick Nicholas Discount.....................................................-900
Retail Customer Cash....................................................-1,000 Retail Customer Cash....................................................-1,750
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash**......................-500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash**...................-1,000


$25,499


$21,690


1 FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED *r 1,
1 9 / Relax, It's Covered.~. t chnicians -
1 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 44, m
^ *7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage** ,., r
APR for 60 months* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage**

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
:Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualifications and complete details.
*See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership.
L. __ ___ __ ___ ___I_ _I__ __ ___ __ __
~L~1#441


2012 FORD
FOCUS SE
30,000 Miles. GP1632
$16,950


2010 FORD
MUSTANG GT
10,000 miles, leather, 1 owner. G4CO08A
$23,950


2010 FORD
FUSION HYBRID
33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GPR1244
$20,950


2009 LINCOLN
MKS
Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1681
$24,950


2010 FORD
TAURUS LTD
Leather, moon roof, 1 owner. GP1684
$22,950


2013 FORD
FLEX
With Eco Boost. GP3059A
$26,450


2010 LINCOLN
MKZ
One owner. G3T235A
$22,950


2010 LINCOLN
MKX
Leather, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1653
$26,950


2013 FORD
ESCAPE SE
20,000 miles, sunroof. GT1691
$23,450


2013 FORD
F 15O CREW XLT
305 V8. G3T205A
$27,950


2007 FORD FOCUS 2004 JEEP LIBERTY
40,000 miles One owner, monroof, leather.
$7.950 7.950


2005 FORD F150 I
V8, Auto, Flareside. I
tIo art I


2011 FORD FOCUS
Economy Car.
$12,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE
5 speed, std trans, 1 owner.
$14.950


2012 CHEVY MLIBU
Sunroof, leather.
$16.950


LT 2012 HONDA ACCORD EX.L 2010 FORD MUSTANGE CONV.
Leather, sunroof, one owner. Leather, Auto
'$16,950 $17,950 |


2011 FORD RANGER XCAB
One owner.
$18,950


12006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED
Ato, low miles.
$19,950


2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2011 BMW-128 CONV.
Warranty. Leather.
$24,950 $25,950


I I


Nick Nicholas


Crysta


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


Anna Cruz
Salesperson of the Month


Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all
buyers will qualify. See dealerfor details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13.


12011 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB1 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT
5.8L V8, leather. Leather, 3rd row seating.
$26,950 $31,950 1


River


Nicholas -
Ford E
Lincoln

oast Ford


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 D11




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7.-.
/


iNA WA TN FONR ALL


DRIVE FOR

169 PERMONTH"


One or more at this price.
$2999 cash or trade equity.
Vin 033383
Model #22113
DRIVE FOR
PAPER
MONTH"
LLI


;N.IS S AN CRYSTAL
2 L A NI SSAN


800-584-8755 EXT 10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 SOUTH SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL
^PRICE INCLUDES $2,999 CASH FOR TRADE EQUITY AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT EXCLUDES TAX, TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +INCLUDES
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY DUE AT SIGNING AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE.WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR
...... ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.


D12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013




Section E -SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27,2013


OME RONT
CITFRTS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GulI


II
B Sikorski's
tiAc PAtticGEE4
--- -'<,! PAGE IE4


I' N l
I *S ^/,i S i


?!I


-~-~ I


I,4


I.-'


-"W in '. .
-,'tcR r 4ae, -=-. .


I1oM00


r I A v/




E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


8180 H. HILLVIEW CIR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BD/2BNA2CG Built in 2005 Great Location/Lot
* Many Upgrades, All Appliances Neutral Tile
* Living RM + Family RM Ready For New Owners
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [li
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


^PE OUSjf TODAYI





5384 N. ELKCAM BLVD.
TODAY 12 4 PM
Stunning 2007 Builder's showcase
award-winning home!
Priced 45% below replacement VALUE!!
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828 r
Ad Code #1043
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS
,4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
* New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
, Beautifully Maintained ,Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL inrl
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


Great Custom Built 2/2 Stilt Home With Direct Gulf Access.
Many Upgraded Features Include Cathedral Ceiling Living
Areas Overlooking The Water & Nature, Mexican Tile Thru,
Solid Oak Kitchen Cabinets, Tile Counters, Stainless
Appliances, French Doors, Plantation Blinds, Riprap Seawall,
Irrigation, 140 R. Boardwalk To Feloating Dock. Old Florida
Ambiance! A Perfect Retreat!
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net I .


OAKWOOD VILLAGE AFFORDABLE HOME
*2 BR, 1 BATH *1-Car Garage
* Open Floor Plan Cathedral Ceiling
* Screened Porch Living & Family Rooms
* All Appliances New CARPET

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 fl
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com i





WM*
IT

W



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
N 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
S637-2828

2Buyer enters house
j 2B 4 number when
prompted


3 uyer listens to
property
E presentation in
English or Spanish


I IV h* WfWl Wl, IlhlIlIIIVWIVI 5VlnlhW
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/3CG on 1 ACRE
* Great Rm./Dining Rm./Office
* Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area
* Enclosed Florida Rm.
* Wood/Tile/Carpet Flooring
* Deck/Gazebo/Fire Pit
* Citrus Hills Social Membership
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 2
Email: lenpalmeir@remax.net S

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11-3PM


Jte


~J1Ip


LOVE THE KITCHEN!
*3 Bedroom/2Bath/2-Car Garage Energy Efficient
*New Floors New Appliances
*New LennoxAC New Water Treatment
All for the low, low price of $94,500!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [ 1
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com fl 1
Welsile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com .


oInyle nUme iseup lUr Z separa[de iviny areas. EaWu
side with full kitchen. One side has 2BR's, 2 baths,
fireplace and loft. Other side has 1BR, 1 Bath,
morning room, large living room and it's own entrance.
Large corner lot with big wrap around deck.
JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferStollz@remax.net
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


,o^ mrw7 L1 hiriiii
15 MIMOSA CT. E.
Sugarmill Woods! Looking for more space? Family
growing? This 4/3/2 with 2,368 of living space and
built in 2008 could be your next home. Steal of a deal!
Directions: OR 480/Oak Park Blvd. to Cactus St.,
Right on Iberis Ct., to right on Mimosa Ct. E.
ROH MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Experl


242 N.1 Ie l Hw. eel Hls5774 w wRtAI o I 10 U..Hy.4 Invres6760


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12-3PM 24U CO VINE60
..11637- 28

Enter NouS 2


4/2/2 w/Office Open Split Floor Plan
* Formal Dining Rm. Great Rm. & Master Open to Lanai
* Eat-In Kitchen Lg./Rooms & Lots of Storage Space
* Huge Great Room Surrounded by Nice Homes
GEILA'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 .F ]
Email: g.english@remax.net I
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com L


S LCIL,,_ .L 'i K 1111
7696 N. LAZY TRAIL, CRYSTAL RIVER
*4.87 PRIVATE ACRES
SEnergy Efficient 3BR/2BA/2CG
SOpen Kitchen w/Silestone Counters
Enclosed Lanai
Fenced & Cross-Fenced for Animals
12 x 28 Workshop
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpaliner@remax.net


CITRUS HILLS
CUSTOM BUILT 3BR/2BA HOME. LOTS OF
EXTRAS IN THIS ONE. FORMAL DINING ROOM
PLUS A NOOK. FAMILY WITH PERGO
FLOORING, MASTER SUITE WITH GARDEN TUB,
DUAL SINKS AND A WALK-IN CLOSET. A TOTAL
OF 2,790 SO. FT. UNDER ROOF.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Emil:. barbaramims@earthlink.net


BGOLD CRESTBUILT- M. M..... M ,,-

. ,,.......i.ii,ii, i,ii~, iu:i ^.
R. ,, VENTICINQUE 352-422-2180 = 1 I
,,,-,i I I I m ., 144 11] i. ,I IFI s I ,,1 I -i i m -


Email: richardv@remax.net l
www.citruscounty-florida-realestate.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront
BRIEF

Plant workshops
to be offered
SA free gardening work-
shop will be offered from 2
to 3:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and 19
at the Citrus County Exten-
sion Building, 3650 W. Sov-
ereign Path in Lecanto.
Material hardiness zones
are a critical factor in the
proper selection of sustain-
able plants. This workshop
introduces participants to
criteria to consider when
selecting materials, their
placement in the landscape
and potential frost protec-
tion encouraged to reduce
material loss.
SA free gardening work-
shop will be offered from 2
to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10 atthe
Citrus County Extension
Building, 3650 W. Sover-
eign Path in Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to
plan and prepare garden
projects for the upcoming
milder season. Garden
planning, estimating cost
and garden clean-outs are
important topics to consider
when outdoor work is
delayed.
These topics will be dis-
cussed during this
presentation.
From staff reports


Real Estate DIGEST


Donna
Earling
ERA American
Realty.


Jeanne
Gaskill
ERA American
Realty.


ERA agents soar
to new heights


ERA Amer-
ican Realty
and Invest-
ments is
pleased to an-
nounce that
Donna L.
Earling has
recently
joined ERA
American Re-
alty and In-


"7-v


Coleen
Fatone-
Anderson
ERA American
Realty.


vestments. Donna will work in
the company's Inverness of-
fice specializing in residential
sales.
Donna has resided in Cit-
rus County full-time since
January. In her spare time
she enjoys music, art, danc-
ing, and gardening. She loves
to travel and enjoys playing
with her two dogs.
Contact Donna at the Inver-
ness office at 352-726-5855.
ERA is also proud to an-
nounce the latest production


levels [ n
achieved by I
its associates.
Coleen
Fatone-
Anderson
has surpassed
the $1 million Rod
mark in closed Kenner
sales volume ERA Suncoast
in 2013. Realty.
She can be
reached at the Inverness of-
fice at 352-726-5855.
Jeanne Gaskill has sur-
passed the $2 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
She can be reached at the
Beverly Hills office at 352-
746-3600.
ERA Suncoast Realty is
proud to announce that Rod
Kenner has surpassed the $4
million mark in closed sales
volume in 2013.
He can be reached at the
Crystal River office by calling
352-795-6811.
ERA is proud to recognize
the achievements of these
fine real estate professionals.
RE/MAX agents
continue to excel
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to congratulate three
of their agents for passing the
$3 million mark in sales vol-
ume this year.
Linda Meahl, Dianne


Linda
Meahl
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Geila
English
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Dianne
MacDonald
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Tony
Viggiano
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Ellie Wayne
Sutton Hemmerich
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
MacDonald and Geila English
have all surpassed this signifi-
cant milestone in sales.
Linda is a Realtor in the In-
verness RE/MAX office.
Dianne works out of the Crystal
River office and Geila is in the
Central Ridge office located


on Lecanto.
RE/MAX International also
has a special award for
agents who excel in sales
production each year. It's
called the 100 percent club.
Three local RE/MAX Realty
One agents qualified for the
award this year.


Ellie Sutton, Tony Vig-
giano and Wayne Hem-
merich have each posted
high enough commission in-
come to qualify.
The brokers and staff of
RE/MAX would like recognize
and congratulate these
agents for their achievements.


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents and associates
submitted for the Real Estate Digest are kept on file
in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is the re-
sponsibility of the individuals submitting news
notes to ensure headshots have been sent to the
newsroom, and to advise staff of any name
changes.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi-
mum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.



-Jackie Caffney Jason Caffney -
Realtor- HOUSE Realtor I
A HOUSE
^^ 302-3179 SOLDName! 287-9022 '
wL^^ 746-6700
The Golden 0irl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
.T~ 'A ~ i .T.J in~i~ '4TLT1EUi r


102 W. HONEY PALM LP.
3/2/2 Huntington featuring double-door entry, new
interior paint, new tile, new carpet. New stainless
steel appliances. Eat-in kitchen, gas fireplace,
formal LR/DR, 25 x 35 expanded screened lanai.
Workshop area in garage with built-in cabinets.
Roof in 09'. Gorgeous view of park.


726 W. COLBERT CT.
Brittney is my name and I am beautiful.
3/2/2, remodeled kitchen with island, 10 x 13
master bath, walk-in closet, new sink faucets,
new appliances, roof May 12', H A/C 5 years.
Beautiful tiled designer entry.
Call for Drivate viewing. Come see for yourself.


En rl. z ed Sal es Pro esin l Wa te


Positive Attitude...

High Energy...

Professional Demeanor!


The premiere active-adult master-planned community
in West Central Florida wants you!
Unlimited earning potential.
New home sales experience preferred, not required.


Florida RE License is preferred.

C VILLAE,., oF M.. Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
itrus ( /tlls s nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707
1Q G A________________________________________________________________________________


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E3




E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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Ci i iNwlcE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plant flowering trees


at correct time of year


hen buying any plant, it is impor-
tant to know the correct botani-
cal name, both genus and
species. Only then can garden-
ers research the chosen plant's
range, characteristics, cultural
needs and tolerance to
drought, cold, heat, local dis-
eases and pests.
Both common and botanical
names are usually marked on
the plant tag. All kinds of folk-
lore, old wives' tales, misinfor-
mation and personal opinion is
available online and in old Jane
books. Plant sellers often are JAN
more concerned with making a
dollar than your personal plant GARI
wants and needs.
More accurate and reliable informa-
tion comes from university and govern-
ment sites like forestry and natural
resources department websites and plant
atlases. Check the date of publication and
when it was updated.
A recently published (after the prolif-
eration of DNA testing) gardening book is
my personal favorite source. I can relax


in the electric recliner or rocking chair
and browse books and their color pic-
tures to my heart's content. If I fall asleep
and/or forget what I read, then
the information is readily
available just by flipping the
pages.
Flowering trees add sea-
sonal color to Florida gardens.
Most trees bloom for a short
month or so, then set seeds.
They are often deciduous or
leafless in winter when their
bark, form and structure add
Weber interest to winter gardens.
IE'S Deciduous trees that shade
a home in summer but let the
DEN sun warm the house in winter
can reduce the high cost of
heating and cooling. Flowering trees are
best transplanted from nursery contain-
ers while dormant in the fall and winter
Digging from the wild is rarely successful,
not recommended, could be illegal and is
not worth the effort involved.
Leafless trees need much less watering
See JANE/Page ElI


Inside...


Getting a lift
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Could 'Kenmore' guitar be related to town in Washington?


ear John: I am trying the case. Another online in-
to find out informa- terest years ago had an idea
tion about a guitar I but was not sure.


inherited from my
mother It was left
to her by my
grandmother It
was used in the
early 1940s, so I
know it is old. The
name on the han-
dle is Kenmore.
I have tried to
get it appraised,
but nobody can fig-
ure out what it is,
and I get various
replies. I was
given an idea that


John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
AT'IC


maybe it was made for an old
guitar shop in Kenmore. I
never got a reply from that
message.
I had an appraiser near me
who was more interested in


I cannot find
any other infor-
mation on it. Some
think it is a Silver-
tone, but that dif-
ferent brands
were used de-
pending who was
selling them.
Searching Ken-
more only gets me
appliances. Would
you know any-
thing about that?
-N.R., Internet
DearN.R: I was


not able to find any collector
interest relative to the name
Kenmore. It could have been
as suggested, retailed
through a store in Kenmore,
Wash.; it appears there are


quite a few guitar shops in
that city
For research, you might
contact the library in Ken-
more. The Mandolin Broth-
ers in Yonkers, N.Y,
specialize in stringed instru-
ments. Perhaps they can help
with the type of guitar you
have. The website is
www.mandoweb.com.
Good luck, and let us know
what you discover
DearJohn: I have enclosed
pictures of a vase that be-
longed to my mother I be-
lieve it is quite old, as I am 71
and she had it long before I
was born.
It is in very good condition
with no chips. The gold is
slightly worn on the handles.
The markings on the bottom
are faint, but it has the num-
ber 52 written in gold. Under


that it says Germany Under
Germany is what looks like a
blue crown attached to a dia-
mond shape. At the bottom I
think it says Audolstadt.
I always thought the vase
was very beautiful, but my
mother thought it had no
value. I read your column in
the Sunday paper and I am
curious about this piece.
The other pictures are of a
pottery dish from China. It
too is in very good condition.
This looks like it was hand-
made, and the work is a little
rough, with ridges showing
on the inside and slight im-
perfections showing along
See ATTIC/Page E5
This old guitar bears the
obscure brand name
"Kenmore."
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

the bottom. The outside
designs are done nicely
and it looks like the out-
lines of the flowers were
carved into the clay before
it was painted and glazed.
I believe that this piece is
also quite old.
I would appreciate any
information you could give
me on these. PL.,
Internet
Dear EL.: The word at
the bottom of your pretty
vase is actually Rudol-
stadt. The Rudolstadt
Porcelain Factory was es-
tablished in Thuringia,
Germany, in the 18th cen-
tury and continues into


current times. They have
been producing beautiful
decorative porcelains and
tableware and are widely
recognized by collectors.
The mark on your vase
indicates it was made
about 100 years ago. Rela-
tive to collector interest, it
is low on the totem pole.
Potential dollar value is
below $50.
The other dish was made
in China and appears to be
porcelain. I think it was
made between World War I
and II. Potential dollar
value is below $50.
Dear John: The 19 1/2-
by-25 1/2-inch untitled por-
trait is number Ed 64/125
and is signed Cathelin, the
artist being, I hope, the
French painter Bernard
Cathelin, 1919-2004. How


should I proceed to deter-
mine its authenticity? Is it
an authentic Bernard
Cathelin, and what is its
current value?
I have wandered all over
the Internet looking for and
at Bernard Cathelin por-
traits and nudes. Of the
works I have come across,
my print appears very like
portraits that have the name
"Claudine" in the title. I
have enclosed a photo to ac-
company myverbal descrip-
tion. -J.F, Inverness
DearJ.E: Works of art by
Bernard Cathelin are ea-
gerly sought after in the
art market. He produced
oil-on-canvas paintings
and a large quantity of
original prints.
Your print is likely a lith-
ograph. I think it is gen-


uine and not a reproduc-
tion. To be sure, take a
hand magnifier and look
closely at the details. If you
see a tiny, uniform dot pat-
tern, it is a commercial-
grade print.
Potential dollar value, if
I am correct and it is origi-
nal, is up to $500 at this
time. I suggest you keep it
for now


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


This vase comes
from the Rudol-
stadt Porcelain
Factory in
Thuringia, Ger-
many, a well-
known name
among collec-
tors. It is likely
at least 100
years old.
Special to the Chronicle


Specilzngi errista
Brnwo Resales


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


BILL DfECKER 3.52-464-0647 SIAN MIlLL FN 352.-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKIN 352.-427-3777


Professionally decorated Lantana maintenance free home 2 bedroom, 2 baths, plus den/
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Come take a look at this beautiful home that IS situated on an oversized home
'Pace w o tmsps a aa 2 00 a Lt aa
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aam ao So L a L ors am 00 aa Lae celn a ay mor uprdsEcoe
apart bedroom Some of the features this home has to offer are extended lanai, Minka laded celng fan & many more upgrades Enclosed
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I I II 1 1


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I gets One-of-a-kind immaculate 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 2-car garage
, the
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S many i
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DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 1-CAR, BRENTWOOD" ..:
BRENT WOOD VILLAS WOODVIEW VILLAS.Spaclu 2/2 townhom wt grat 00om moer kche wt eat 00no,"
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Terac CluB Membership 0our par I R
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E5




EI SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dispelling some


common tree myths


rees everyone has one in
his or her yard. And everyone
has an opinion about them.
Many homeowners rely on their
neighbors for "advice" regarding
their trees. Often, this ad-
vice is incorrect or inac-
curate and is simply
passed on from person to
person.
As I have said many
times, there are three
things that will get you in
trouble with your neigh-
bor- kids, dogs and
trees. I can only help you
with the latter; the other
two issues will have to be Eric ]
resolved among your- ARE
selves. C
That being said, I will CULl
impart some of my tree
knowledge to dispel common myths
concerning trees. The items below
are only a few of the common myths;
space does not permit me to address
all of them at this time.
U My tree is green, so it must be
healthy. Nothing could be further
from the truth. A tree's vascular sys-
tem provides a system to transport
nutrients and water from the soil
and food (sugars) from the leaves.
This vascular system is known as the
cambium layer, which is an ex-
tremely thin layer found just inside
the bark.
As long as most of this layer is in-
tact, the tree will continue to live
and grow If the tree is getting suffi-
cient nutrients, water, and food, it
will appear green.
Inside this cambium layer is the
sapwood and heartwood of the


F
r


trunk. Much or most of the wood
within the trunk can be decayed
without affecting the tree's ability to
transport food and water However,
a considerable amount of decayed
wood can compromise a
tree's ability to support it-
self or its heavier
branches. Thus, people
Share often surprised when
a green tree fails; upon
Subsequent examination,
f one can see the extensive
decay within the trunk.
Outward signs of decay
can include oozing, bark
splitting, bulges in the
foyer trunk, vertical cracks, and
lOR carpenter ants. A certi-
Sfied arborist can examine
U RE your tree in greater detail
to determine the health of
the tree and its likelihood of failure.
U Mulching around a tree is al-
ways good. Recent research has
proven that any amount of mulch
over the root ball of a newly planted
tree is detrimental. The mulch can
prevent adequate rainfall from
reaching the roots and can hold in
moisture, which promotes fungal
activity
While it is OK to place mulch
around the root zone of an estab-
lished tree, it should always be kept
away from the trunk. Mulch directly
against the trunk leads to excessive
moisture on the trunk, which pro-
motes fungi and can lead to decay
In addition, if mulch is used on a
larger tree, it should be kept to a 3-
to 4-inch depth. Under no

See TREES/Page E7



Waterfront Res Acreage
on Crystal River, FL
ONLINE AUCTION Nov. 14 Nov. 20
2 lots will be sold to highest bidder above $99,000
Property #DG694F
S4 parcels 20+ to 27 ac
Minutes to Gulf of Mexico I.A. I1


See website for full details!
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
Uic. Real Estate Broker, FL
Lic# AU707 &AB3145110% BP


LOTS OF LOTS PRICED TO SELL
River Oaks East Dunnellon 1 +/- AC. #353179 $38,500
Lecanto4.8+/-AC. #704535 $44,900
Waterfront Gospel Island Inverness 1 +/-AC. #705346 $47,500
Waterfront Homosassa 2.77+/- AC. #705954 $130,000
Debbie Tannery tel: 352-613-3983


0 0 8


jScan for our home of the week:
2587 E Marcia St.
Inverness, FL 34453
BC RtnlcR nK, tor


Ni &%m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TREES
Continued from Page E6

circumstances should a
"mulch volcano" be cre-
ated at the base of the tree.
Spanish moss is killing
my tree. Spanish moss is
neither Spanish nor moss.
It is actually a bromeliad
and is in the pineapple
family
Spanish moss is native
to South America and the
southeastern United
States. It is an epiphyte,
which means it uses the
tree only for support and
gets water and nutrients
from the air or rainfall. It
does not have roots which
penetrate the tree and
Spanish moss does not


harm the tree per se.
If Spanish moss be-
comes more prevalent in a
tree, it is due to a thinning
canopy, which allows more
sunlight, creating a more
suitable environment for
growth. Thus, the thinning
canopy is a symptom of
some other problem, such
as a compromised root sys-
tem, soil compaction, etc.
Generally, it is not rec-
ommended that Spanish
moss be removed from the
canopy of a tree due to the
expense and temporary
nature of the removal.
However, in the event that
Spanish moss has accumu-
lated at the end of a long
limb which has most of the
foliage concentrated at the
end, the moss should be
removed to lessen the


OOOGGYH y afd '

REAL ESTATE, INC.
lr) -5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oc.: (352) 795-6633
W' WAT w V'RC'(OMv F-iv n ATI'(-a)ATI 'XRV 'COM


"-BESTI

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^ ^, _ __r^ O N DUSE EAS A W K
___ ____


DUNNELLON 1998 beautiful 4 bedroom, MEADOWCREST comervillaw/1 bedroom,
2 bath, D/W mobile, 5 + acres Dual faced 1 bath, 1 car garage, vinyl windowed screen
fireplace between family & living rm dbl room Ne I, .1 ,, walk m closet,
glazed windows w/air space, fenced, breakfast i 1 i. .. & dmmg area
excellent water #701494 $88,000 Central water& sewer #706010 $58,500


I-
HERNANDO waterfront 2 bedroom,
1 5 bath S/W M/H, needs some work
Canal leads to Tsala Apopka out fall
canal to Withlacoochee River, boat ramp
on property Owner financing with 20%
down #702276 $32,900





IERNANDO bank owned, D/W M/H on 10
acres, fenced 3 bedrooms, 2 5 baths
Cathedral & vaulted ceilings, skylights,
secluded & pnvate Handyman/woman
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DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
M/H '-t-r-- f-r cars/workshop on 2
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kitchen, i ..... dry rm Large
family rm Cath 1, ,1 ;1;,. urmet
kitchenw/island !


carport singlewide M/H on 5 beautiful
fully fenced acres Cent A/C, excellent well
water; near by to new Wal-mart; paved
road #700665 $75,000





CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath D/W
M/H by Skyline on 4 5 acres of land, country
kitchen, dinmg mn, family rm, wood burnimg
.I,, i ,, I, -' n n" nn





IIERNANDO 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
garage ranch home w/country kitchen,
family room w/wood burning fireplace sits
on 3 62 acres of land Bedrooms are larger
Close to shopping and schools #703542
$129,900


weight on the limb to pre-
vent limb failure.
Topping my crape
myrtle makes it bloom
more heavily. Topping a
tree is never recom-
mended. Topping destroys
the natural architecture of
a tree and promotes nu-
merous sprouts to grow
from the cut point. These
sprouts are weakly at-
tached and break more
easily in the wind and
rain.
In addition, flowering is
not increased. This prac-
tice is often referred to as


"crepe murder" because of
the detrimental effects to
the tree. If necessary, taller
stems can be cut back to a
point of attachment to re-
duce height. Leggy stems,
stems growing inward,
sprouts at the base of the
tree, or stems interfering
with one another should be
cut Flower production can
be increased by cutting
back stems to a point of at-
tachment after the first
flowers start to fade. Also,
cutting off the seed clus-
ters will promote another
crop of flowers.


I qb.U







PINE_ RIDG I--
Anianda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal
BROKER/ASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BR(


Other tree myths
abound and will be fodder
for a future article. Should
any of the above be of con-
cern to you, a certified ar-
borist can assist you in
answering your questions.


Eric Hoyeris a certified
arborist, a certified
forester, a registered con-
sulting arborist, and a
qualified tree risk asses-
sor with Natural Resource
Planning Services Inc. He
can be contacted at
erich@nrpsforesters.corn.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E7


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle wel-
comes tips from read-
ers about breaking
news. Call the news-
room at 352-563-
5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of
the news event.
* To submit story ideas
for feature sections,
call 352-563-5660
and ask for Logan
Mosby.


R1 U1 h


Rr 746-9000
REALTOR


1820 W. BEGONIA DR.
3/2/2 Pine Ridge pool home 705806 $147,500


Liia 'go
9459 S. KING BIRD
1 2/1/1 705876 $47,500 |


I 137 N. FRESNO
3/2/2 701884 $119,900


S 87 S. LUCILLE 213 S. TYLER 45 S. DESOTO 19 N. ADAMS
21212 703454 $74,900 2/1.5/1 702531 $67,500 2/1/1 704027 $42,500 2/1.5 704683 $48,500

Sr- ,

)- J,- -L U2. OWNE I-11"--la p..._
9 N. WADSWORTH 38 S COLUMBUS 52 S. FILLMORE 6898 W SEDALIA CT.
3/1.5 704088 $52,500 2/2/ 77067 F 4$5,59 20//70589-715009
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


0 141 1 (1:




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A home in the process
of being raised is seen
in the Broad Channel
section of Queens.
N.Y.


Some homeowners k


raise the roof /1

(and everything else) -i.

to lower flood risk/

Associated Press -
ileen Benner says elevat-
ing her home in Atlantic
City, N.J., was a "no-
brainer" after it suffered
extensive flood damage
during superstorm Sandy
"I would tell anybody who has the
money available to go ahead and do
it," she says.
John Paynter's Long Beach Island,
N.J., vacation home now stands 13
feet higher than it did before the
storm a year ago. He, too, says he's
glad he did it, though the process it-
self was nerve-wracking: "You heard
a lot of cracks and creaks."
Nationwide, insurance c lii., tor
flooding damage totaled on i\ ex-,L'e


_________ I


ROTO
HOUSE MOVING
& HOUSE RAISING
973. 917.9549
973.917.9549


.-,. -
4
V.
B- -


- *^^-1z


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


'- ~A... ._ .. v .







LIFT
Continued from Page E8

more than $3 billion annu-
ally from 2003 to 2012, ac-
cording to the National


Flood Insurance Program
(NFIP). And rising sea levels
and more severe storms
mean that in some areas,
more homeowners are find-
ing themselves in flood zones
for the first time or in higher-
risk ones.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- SE V40 L 9*4 C7-M 9O MT


PINE RIDGE ( Prudential
1481 W Pine Ridge Blvd. F",l r a S c
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Flda Showcase
(352) 527-1820 A Week! Properties
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


,f isftA 1048 W. Lake Valley Ct.
MLS 705655 $349,000
REDUCED & readyto sell! 3/2/2 enhanced with upgrades.
Directions. Rte. 486 to Terra Vista entry R at Fenway(Cirle), L on Lake
Marie R on Skyiew Landing, L on Wisper, L on lake Valley.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058
NEW LISTING


K1-o.,,o 1980 W. Tall Oaks Dr.
X00 MLS 706190 $224,900
istom built 3/2.5/2 pool home on 1+ acres.
New roof in 2012.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


242 N. Braddock Pt.
-,jl MLS 703493 $369,000
Exquisite 3/2.5/3 in gated community
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


L..Wa Iuz L Gilchrist ut. Zb
,ASI MLS 355589 $63,
S Furnished 2bd/2ba
ground floor unit.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


S172W. Doerr Path k .1 Iuu W Pearson S.
QW" MLS 701971 $239,000 +I. [ILo uu59o$128,500
2/2 Villa overlooking the 5th Green of Skyview Golf Course. Meticulously maintained 2!22/with fabulous upgraded features.
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entry, thru the gates to first Directions 486 W to L on Essex to R on Keller to L on Fresno to
left, left again to 172 on the right. R on Pearson.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Helen Forte 352-220-4764
NEW LISTING &..- .


Las l321 E. Keller Cl.
1-i's'$ MLS 706196 $199,900
Citrus Hills Oaks Golf Course
3/2/2 pool home with spa.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


^it



?,l ~ 5278W. Yuma Ln.
P d MLS 703898 $259,000
Absolutely exquisite 3/2/2 with expanded lanai
on private one acre
Joy Holland 352-464-4952
RENTAL
U'-" -. VI


Afgef F/L/SD $750
SFurnished, upper unit, no membership
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


479W. Mickey Mantel Path
479 MLS 703997 $385,000
Value, savings, elegance AND the golf view
you've always dreamed of.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


8 854 N. Kensington Ave,
MLS 701772 $179,000
3/2/2 split plan with a huge family room and
large bedrooms.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
BRENTWOOD RENTALS




Choose from one of two unfurnished, completely
maintained properties in The Brentwood gated
neighborhood. All for less than $1,000 per month.
Both units have a family social membership to the
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club included in
their more than reasonable rent.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


nume Duywr// 511111r 1 LUuyU yl -
SiiI Jll .Ihh,I, III ...... II I I I II ,I II I I II III I Ih I ,I I ,, ,I ,
[E, 1 ,, ,, 11. . .I ..h ,I I ,h i I.. .. ,, . .I0, I h ,, I .Ih I ,111,,,O I1 ,, ,, ,S[, H .. i i h ,,


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E9
The most common way to
reduce the risk: elevating the
home, the NFIP says.
The process can cost a lot
- more than $100,000 in
many cases, depending on

See Page EO10


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories in J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


WHO SAID THREE's A CROWD')




EIO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013



LIFT
Continued from Pags E9

the home's size, location and
foundation. But homeowners
may be eligible to get some
help from flood insurance
policies and grants.
Flood elevation maps de-
termine whether a property
needs to be raised and by how
much. Homeowners in high
risk zones who choose not to
raise their homes could see
their flood insurance premi-
ums skyrocket.
Roderick Scott of L&R Re-
sources, a Mandeville, La.,
company that does home ele-
vations, recommends lifting a
house 1 or 2 feet above the
minimum needed to get a
flood elevation certificate.
"You don't want to elevate
structures more than once in
their lifetime," he says.
Homes with an open foun-
dation with a basement or
crawl space are the easiest
and least expensive to raise.
"It's easy to get underneath
and get the structure of the
house from underneath and
lift it up," he says.
Raising those built on a slab


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


foundation takes more time
and money "You have to open
up walls and remove lower
cabinets," Scott says.
Any air conditioning and
heating systems in the base-
ment must be relocated, as
well as power and other utili-
ties. "They have to go on or
above the main level of the
structure so they won't be
damaged," Scott says.
And then there's the ques-
tion of how you'll get up to the
higher house. Where will you
put the stairs, for example?
'A lot of seniors live at the
beach. They may need to inte-
grate a lift," says Scott.
He uses a hydraulic ma-
chine to jack up a house, and
says the process is so smooth
that he once put a glass of red
wine on a tabletop. "Not a
drop was spilled," he says.
Still, he advises people to take
pictures off the walls and
pack up any valuable crystal.
A house may be set down on
pilings or cinderblocks, de-
pending on the height.
It's likely that millions of
homes will have to be raised
based on redrawn flood maps
nationwide, Scott says. How-
ever, Dan Watson, a
spokesman for the Federal


Emergency Management
Agency, says it's difficult to say
how many and where: "In
some cases the risk has gone
down and in some cases it has
gone up."
In 2012, Louisiana had the
most flood damage claims, fol-
lowed by New Jersey and
New York.
In Brick Township, N.J.,
Mayor Stephen C. Acropolis
says about 8,500 homes suf-
fered water damage during
Sandy, and that more than
half of those will have to be
raised because of redrawn
maps. He says many people
got temporary certificates of
occupancy that give them four
years to elevate.
His own home, he says, is "a
51 percenter that means
your house was damaged to
more than 50 percent of the
value of your home. And so is
my son's and a lot of people in
my neighborhood."
He's not rushing into ele-
vating his home, though.
"We're going to get prices,
we're going to deal with engi-
neers," he says. "I don't see a
ton of people elevating their
homes right away unless they
had the money"
Benner felt she didn't have


a choice. The water in her du-
plex after Sandy was a foot
deep. It cost $21,000 to lift the
house, she says, and she ex-
pects the total bill to be
$130,000 to $140,000. Part of
that was offset by a clause in
her flood insurance policy
that gave her $30,000 to meet
the new height requirements.
"By the time I'm done, my
base floor is going to be about 12
feet' higher than it used to be,
she says. "I feel comfortable."
After Paynter's house was
lifted, "I had to build stairs. I
had to build a front porch. I
had to reattach the utilities,"
he says. He also built a new
chimney and redid the house's
flood-damaged interior
Total cost? He estimates
$140,000.
He moved back in in August
"I'm very happy" he says.


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


CRYSTA
A taste of unspoiled nature: secluded
oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious
This Shangri
Get a taste of it & visit http://ww


WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen medical profession-
als contribute their expertise to
columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
Read up on all things school-related
in the Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the week from the
tempting recipes in the Flair for
Food section./Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend entertain-
ment with the stories in Scene./
Friday
See what local houses of worship
plan to do for the week in the Reli-
gion section./Saturdays
Read about area businesses in the
Business section./Sundays



GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com







L RIVER SOLITUDE
80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ponds, mature
Cottages are carefully positioned in a beautiful setting!
i-La can be yours for $800,000
w.mycrystalriverfarnm.com/ for an interactive tour.


COUNTRY ESTATE -
OUTSTANDING PLEASANT GROVE
.OUT.TAND. I I 1 .....,n built ROOM TO ROAM!
Waterfront residence: tastefully ,, ,, , , , quality Spectacular i ii.... i.. lanai
remodeled 3/25/2 home, high & dry throughout vaulted tongue & groove on 214 aci i ,, ,ached
(never flooded), ample space (042 ac) celmgs fireplace granite counters & garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for
for boats i ,i i custom cabinetry; family room, den/office, your RV Nicely landscaped with pretty
240f, sea .11 .1 i i 1 1 2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor oaks and well maintained, too New roof
roof, A/C i ,, i i ..,.. entertaining' Jenn-Air summer kitchen, (2013), 14 Seer HVAC (2009), generator
meticulous maintained coee ai /vr orn elns & perimeter alarm
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$m49,900 $249,895





SECONDS TO KINGS BAY
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Golf cart path to Inverness G&CC Everything just waiting for you ....e s , n
$249,000 $488,000 $179,000 OOOGFZJ


MIA


0BOSH


**Mi.iiiMr




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thrill of the hunt drives


antiques shoppers


ith this new col-
umn, we hope to
inform, perhaps
entertain with thoughts,
ideas and opinions on an-
tiques and collectibles.
There are many enjoyable
aspects of this business,
from finding that rare ob-
ject, learning something
new every day and best of
all, the stories. I hope to
convey some of these in
future articles. Our shop
dog, Gypsy, is always will-
ing to put in her two cents.
Gypsy's two cents
I hear "let's go to work"
and my day begins. I help
open the shop, make my
rounds, and determine all
is secure. It's amazing to
me that when my favorite
people come in my tail
stays attached. While to-
tally focused on my bone,
the door opens and even
though I know better, I
sometimes just can't help


being vocal. My parents they sell for less than a
are equally excited, but hundred, a direct result of
I'm not sure if a large supply
it's because of Another vari-
me or the cus- able is locale. As
tomer. I'll fig- Citrus County
ure it out. I r has been a re-
Now and tirement com-
munity for
then decades, resi-
Popular TV dents have
shows and the brought their
Internet have treasures with
had a profound Steve Barnes them to enjoy
effect on the TIME WILL but eventually
antiques and TELL they must find
collectible another home
business. The for them.
TV shows generate inter- Where do you start
est and drama, but then when establishing value?
Internet pricing injects The Internet as a re-
reality The shows have search tool is a wonderful
increased awareness of thing; there are many
potential value and have website and auction
people searching and houses with extensive
wondering "Where did I databases to be used for
leave that thing?" Only a research. It is rare that we
few years ago, a Hummel can't find information on
figurine would sell for
hundreds of dollars; now, See TIME/Page E13


JANE
Continued from Page E4

to become established.
They will grow spreading
roots from the football,
which should not be tam-
pered with or stomped on.
Planting several native
flowering trees with differ-
ent flowering times can
enhance the spring
season.
Red maple, Acer
rubrum, flowers burgundy
in January Flatwood
plum, Prunus umbellate,
and Chickasaw plum,
Prunus angustifolia,
flower white from Febru-
ary into March. Redbud,
Cersis canadensis, starts
its pretty pink flower sea-
son in February continu-
ing into March. Flowering
dogwood, Comrnus Florida,
is covered in white bracts
in March. (The pink-flow-
ering Dogwood cultivars
are not heat-tolerant in
Central Florida.) Red
buckeye, Aesculus pavia,
flowers red in March
when migratory hum-
mingbirds are returning
from the flower-filled
tropical south. Shortly


"AMERICAN
__ MieleR "'
ontuRl DAVID KURTZ| LouRATY R INVSTME NTS
J Morton Cell: 954-383-8786 ALWAYS THEREFOR YOU@ 4511Nea oHy
Real Estate, Inc. Office: 352-726-6668 Cell: (352) 697.1685 c352-146-3M0


FATUE LISING


INVERNESS 7 LAKES AREA. 2911 S. SKYLINE DR.
Custom built oversized house 2 bed, 2 bath,
2 car gar., pool house on lake front .53 acres.
All rooms and garage extra large
2014 Liv Area. New paint and carpet.
Pool patio screened (28x40).
$159,000 MLS #700947


after the white fringetree,
Chionanthus virginica,
takes the spotlight. In
April, the stately tuliptree
or yellow poplar, liroden-
dron, flowers. It a host
plant for Eastern tiger
swallowtail butterfly
caterpillars. By mid-May,
the evergreen cultivar
"Little Gem" magnolia,
magnolia grandiflora,
blooms steadily for about
three months and sporad-
ically until fall.
The original huge
Southern magnolia only
flowers for about 30 days
after it matures at 15 to 20
years of age. The cultivar
called "D. D. Blanchard"
flowers for 45 to 60 days
starting in May, but is a
fast-growing, very tall tree
with very large, leathery
leaves. Knowing the cor-
rect botanical name and
the exact cultivar will en-


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 Ell

sure you are buying the
plant you really want.
Local growers and
smaller, private nurseries
are apt to be more knowl-
edgeable, conscientious
and honorable than inter-
national big-box outlets
with trucking fleets. I have
specimens of all the above
spring flowering trees
planted around my garden
home. Visitors are wel-
come to examine them be-
fore making their final
decision to adopt.

Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


***Foreclosure List***

4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre,
705705- $174,900 Clearview Estates
705705 $174,900 705702- $189,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129

2/1 Stilt Home Deep Water
in Ozello Canal Front Home
705061- $74,900 705665
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
Move-in ready! Charming 3/2/2
4/2 mobile on over two acres! in Citrus Springs.
705223 $84,900 705093 $89,900
Becky Paradiso 352-634-4581 Tony Moudis 352-777-2927

3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 3/2/2 on over an acre.
704264 $114,900 705142 $119,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129

Gorgeous upgraded Desirable Brentwood Estates
3/2/2 on an acre. 3/2/2 det. villa.
705087 -$129,900 704862 $119,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
REDUCED! Beverly Hills
Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home, 3/1 Handyman's Delight.
dbl. lot. 704938 $329,900 705153 $41,550
Becky Paradiso 352-634-4581 Tony Moudis 352-777-2927


I OPEN HOUSE 12-3 PM 1


TO SEE VISUAL TOURS AND VIEW ALL
CITRUS COUNTY LISTINGS, VISIT ... LOUMIELECOM




E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Step on it! Plants for walkways


Durable greenery a good

choice for high-traffic locations


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Plants you can walk on
are attractive additions to
pathways. These low-lying
perennials can withstand
heavy foot traffic, release
pleasant odors when
crushed, smother weeds,
and cushion your step in
the narrow spaces be-
tween bricks or flagstones.
"You can use 'step-
pables' for all kinds of ap-
plications," said Kathy
Gurnee, owner of Green
Thumb Landscaping in
Clinton, Wash.
"You can use them as
groundcover in lieu of
bark," she said. "On patios,
pathways, rock walls and
crevices. I like them
around the bottoms of
trees. They're also good for
living roofs and living
walls. They deliver a beau-
tiful resilience."
Walkables generally are
defined as creeping plants
that don't exceed 12 inches
in height, said John
Schroeder, president of


Valleybrook International
Ventures Inc., a family-
owned horticultural oper-
ation in Abbotsford,
British Columbia. The
company's line of'Jeepers
Creepers" includes
around 100 varieties of
low-to-the-ground herbs,
mints, evergreens, ivy,
moss and more.
"I like them for lawn re-
pair or replacement," he
said, adding that he
stripped 900 square feet of
turf grass from his own front
yard and replaced it with
creeping mazus, a dense,
ground-hugging plant
"It's just a gorgeous lawn
application," Schroeder
said. "I set out some 1-inch
plugs at 12-inch spacings
in September, and by July,
they were one solid mass.
"They give me an inch-
thick, lawn-like cover with
purple flowers for a few
weeks out of the year and
no more mowing. Just
some trimming and weed-
ing around the edges."


See STEP/Page E13


I -..______- _______ K S^
Associated Press
Durable, low-lying perennials are attractive additions to pathways. They also can be used on patios, crevices, over
bulb gardens, in containers and on living roofs and living walls. Many of the resilient plants on this property will give
off a fragrant odor when crushed.


iiii"Nuncy Knows Sugarmill WoodS"

NANCY Direct:

PONTICOS 5352 6344225
S Multi-Million $$$ Produer ,lix KEYEALTY INC.
a 8015S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy @Nancyknows. com
1 w IIt.


ONE STORY END UNIT CONDO!
SBeautiful hardwood flooring
SStainless steel appliances
SUpdated tile kitchen
SViews of #3 green on Cypress
SExtra parking places for guests
SHome warranty for the buyers
#354159 $66,000


UNIQUE BEAMED VAULTED CEILINGS!
S2/2/2 detached villa
SEat-in kitchen opens to atrium
SExterior recently repainted
SAC/heat less than 2 years old
SScreened entry for ventilation
SStorage closet in garage
#706042 $75,000


16 toIiNMKWUUU
* Sweetwter Windjammer On Golf Course
* Fantastic Pool & Spa New 3-zone Heat Pump
* Neutral Decor Summer Kitchen
* 3 Car Garage Open Island Kitchen
;$279,400 MLS#703050

Tke my vituall touS T


UAMUU .N .lI IN
38' Florida Room- Garden View
3 BR/2 BA Open Floor Plan
Tray Ceilings 3 Car Garage
Wrap Around Shower & Garden Tub
$199,700 MLS#701124
1,149 1 I --i


52 OAK VILLAGE BLVD. S 1 NEMESIA COURT E
(S. OAK VILLAGE) (N. OAK VILLAGE)
S3/2/3 + library Lg lanai + pool 4/3/2 Over 3,000 sq ft
SFam. rm w/built-ins 10'ceilings Upgraded appliances Built 2006
HUGE BONUS ROOM HUGE ISLAND KITCHEN
#700772 $255,000 #704031 $219,000


See .JirItu .I Tours .@ ..I J IIJ.I.I..!mIs J.I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STEP
Continued from Page E12

Many walkable plants are drought-resis-
tant, while others perform well in shade, on
hard-to-maintain slopes, covering bulb gar-
dens, spilling from containers or protecting
high-use areas.
A sampling:
For areas with moderate to heavy foot
traffic: Corsican sandwort has moss-like fo-
liage with white flowers in spring. Does well
in damp, dry or shaded settings. Celestial
spice pratia has tiny green leaves covered by
deep blue flowers all summer
For fragrance: Corsican mint the small-
est of the mint family It delivers a pleasant
creme-de-menthe fragrance when crushed. It
also does well in shade. Creeping thyme is a
fast-growing groundcover that gives off a
spicy scent Most thyme varieties are drought-
tolerant and can survive moderate traffic.
Their flowers are attractive to butterflies.
As a lawn substitute: Alpine moss ear
grows into a dense carpet with white flowers
in summer It thrives in dry climates. Blue
star creeper is a dark green perennial pro-
ducing soft blue flowers through summer
Turkey tangle fogfruit has gray leaves with
white to lavender blooms from spring to fall,
and is deer-resistant. Creeping mazus, with
its low mat of green leaves studded by small
lavender flowers, tolerates hot, humid
summers.
Getting walkables established is half the
fun. The other half can be had with pruning.
"Corsican mint if you let it go, will grow out
and cover the flagstones as well as the
weeds," Gurnee said. "I like to be a little cre-
ative. I use a pair of scissors and trim it back
in some sort of design so the stones aren't cov-
ered. That way you can see the tones and tex-
tures of the stones up against the plant
colors."


Associated Press
Several flats of potted, walk-on plants are laid out alongside the flagstones of
a pathway in Langley, Wash. The plants are divided into several pieces
before being placed in the ground, where they grow quickly into a single,
weed-choking mat that adds color and contrast to the stones.


TIME
Continued from Page Ell

an item, and as a dealer we subscribe for
access to this data. It's most satisfying when
a match is found and one realizes how rare
or special a piece is.
Very often though, the opposite is true.
"It's worth what someone is willing to pay
for it" is said often, but it's true.
Before the Internet, small antique shops
relied on personal experience from the
shop, shows, other dealers or books to es-
tablish value. Publications, while a won-
derful resource, are typically high in their
pricing. Shops or shows allowed for the per-
sonal interaction and exchange of knowl-
edge- and of course, dollars for fair and
consistent pricing. This "hands-on" experi-
ence and knowledge is hard to beat
People buy to add to a collection, or they
could be buying a memory You may not always
find your treasure in a local antiques shop, but
the thrill of the hunt is what drives us.
What are the chances?
A customer shared the story of his fa-
vorite toy truck as a child. After returning
home from Vietnam, he discovered that his
Mom had sold all his toys. As an adult, he
searched for a truck like the one he grew
up with. As he neared retirement, he found
not only the same model, but the one with
his initials on the bottom in an antiques
mall near Wildwood. Most would say "what
are the chances?" but who knows what you
may find in your local antiques shop?
Next month we'll talk about myths and
truths. Until then, happy trails.


Steve Barnes owns and, along with his
shop dog Gypsy, operates Olde Inverness
Antiques.


Listen to the birds sing as you enjoy nature on your
screened porch! Snowbirds or small family ready!
Two BR, 1 B, remodeled home on 1/2 ac w/partially
fenced yd and Ig shed. Steps from the lakes and in a
quiet comfortable neighborhood. See this now and
call it home. MLS 704140. Only $ 65,000.
Directions: Hwy 41 to E on Parson's Point, rt on
Bucknell to home on left.


OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 1 3 PM


5127 W Mustang Blvd, Pine Ridge
One of a kind custom built pool home featuring 3,338 sq. ft. of
upgraded living. All situated on 2.75 acres abutting community trails!
Directions: Hwy 491 to Mustang Blvd
to home on Right


Tony
Pauelsen


Ir "!-
1942 N. Prospect Ave. n--. (352) 303-0619
Lecanto, FL 34461 www.letstalkflrealestate.com


I/^ JOANN MARTIN 2
JP referredc
rokRsEAL -T ATE fmIe

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net

Hbg^' ^^aH


3826 N Parkside Village
Terrace
Spacious 1 bedroom 1 bath villa with
Florida room. New carpeting, new tile in
kitchen. Interior recently painted, new
washer & dryer, inside laundry, large
bedroom. Offered at $41,500.


177 Seymeria
Beverly Hills
Adorable 2 bedroom 1.5 bath 1 car garage
home. New roof 2007, new heat & air
2005, recently painted inside & out.
Florida room and sun room. Don't miss out
call today! Priced at $59,900.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E13


upETRtNC





E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
FLORAL CITY
Rent to Own 3/2
Lg. DW, On Canal to
Lake & River,
$3,500 dwn $400 mo
(352) 726-9369
HOMOSASSA
3/2 on 490 near 19, Irg
lot, Sale or Rent, Zone
MDR, $475. mo + Ref.
No Pets, 352-628-3019
LECANTO
2/1 $510/mo. LG yard
352-464-3159
LECANTO
2/2, Doublewide $550.
(352) 212-9682
LECANTO
Leisure Acres
3/2 SW, water & gar-
bage inc. application
& bckgrnd req. $600.
mo. (352) 628-5990




3 BR, 2BA, Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500.
(352) 212-4265
HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2 1,/4 acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192

NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182


NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181


RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807


USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183





INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, 1BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances ind. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565

A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/ work-
shop. /4 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 228-4282

Castle Lake Park
INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt
scnd lanai, steel roof,
caged inground pool,
1 acre, no HOA fees,
$69k (352) 238-4521


Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899
INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013



Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Inverness 55+ 2Br/lBa
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BRI1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incd
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!

Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500, furn. lot rent
$245. ind. trash &
water (219) 929-8909
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


Real,.1 Estate=f'lml'















Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
7735 W. Tropical Ln.
Agent (352) 382-1000


-AfflON
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHonieRenitals.comn
HOMOSASSA
59 inaberry r .................... $150
SMW i // onoa 2 cours 1 lawn
2217 S. Sandbuirg Pt ........... $500
2/ dupl vll l soonil
INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY
1304 Claymore St. ONV) .......$1,100
3/2/2 pool home I block from Rills to Trmils
1530 S. Duval Island (FC) ......$1,100
3/2 lakefront home with a beau iful vim
CRYSTAL RIVER
9200 N. Perseus Ter. .............. $650
3/2 nice DW split plan on 1 acre
9469 W. Wisconsin Ct..............$650
2/2 nice 2-story condo coming sooni
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
817 S. Adams (BH) ................. $615
2/1 5/1 newly remodeled with Florida room
1699 N. Maltese Dr. ()CS $800
3/2/2 nice newer home 1,254 sq ft

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?



3/2/2 $700
2/2/1 Duplex $600
2/1 Duplex $525
2/1.5 Tonhouse $550
ff 0T ,RTIW~r7

2/2/1 $700
2/1/1 $550
2/2/1 $700


3/2 Doublewde $1,000
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
,Property Manager/
oRealtor-Associates
g 352-726-9010I




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-877

1





CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS

2 Bedrm., 1 Bath
Rental Assistance
Available

CALL 352-344-1010
MON. WED. THURS
8A-12P& 1P-5P
307 Washington
Ave. Inverness Fl.
E -




OPPORTUNITT/


Get
Results in
the
homeFront
classified!


RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Fall Into Savings
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE
*Select Units
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Monthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."



an----- It o
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."



SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD








Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442 (352) 637-6349

Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available

Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Pro-
vider & Employer."


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterjlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
LECANTO
1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. incl
Non Sink, $550/mo.
352-628-3501




Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-877

1









CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equip ped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic./cottage, all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Remodeled, C/H/A
$515.mo 352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2 poss 3/1/1 + carport
$600. 352-464-2514
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
FOR SALE OR RENT
TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

HERNANDO
Rent to Own 12 Of-
fice, % AC, Hwy. 200
352-344-3084


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-877

1






Crystal River
modern 2/2, 1500 sq.ft
on 10 acres grass
pasture w/horse barn.
5 miles from down-
town Crystal River off
of Citrus Ave. (Hwy
495 and 488) Lease
for 10 yrs & it will be
yours! Rent $1000 per
month, call Larry
Hough, Manager
352-795-2240

HERNANDO
Rent to Own 4/2,
/2 ac, hwy 200, $875.
mo. 352-344-3084

INVERNESS
3/2 Carport, $625. mo
Call (561) 248-8391
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Avail 11/22,
sunroom, fenced yard,
app'd pets w/ add'l
fees, $775/mo + sec &
1 st. 352-697-2195
Inverness
3/2/2 $800. mo + sec.
no sink/pets 726-1875
Inverness
3/2/2, caged heated
pool/spa, privacy
fence. Includes pool
Serv. $900/mo.F/L/S
(352) 726-1069

INVERNESS

Country Living
on large 12 acre lot.
3 bd. 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964

INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/2
Near Anna Jo Rd.
By appt 786- 423-0478
or (352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1, Avail 11/1
fenced yardapp'd
pets w/ add'l fees
$725/mo + sec, 1st.
352-697-2195




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


INVERNESS
Waterfront home
for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1,100 per month;
first/last/security;
annual term. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.





HERNANDO
Rent to Own 1/2 Of-
ice, AC, Hwy. 200
352-344-3084


HERNANDO
Rent to Own 4/2,
/2 ac, hwy 200, $875.
mo. 352-344-3084





CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms in house, Full
Kichen, Near Publix,
furn, one price pays all,
+ WIFI, $115wk/420.
mo.sm. $130wk/470
mo. Ig 352-563-6428

INVERNESS
Furn rm in DW mobile,
share home wth 3
men, All Util incl'g
cable & laundry. Priv
TV.,$300 mo. $100
Dep, avail 11/1
352-726-0652




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$750. 352-419-4421




4 Beautiful Acres next
to lake. Well, paved
streets. Horses OK
9157 E Orange Ave
FLORAL CITY. 941-358
-6422, 941-320-0433

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RWF/M
REALTY ONE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 E15


Hunting/Fishing Camp
6/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room &AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kt.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268


Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





HERNANDO
Rent to Own 1/2 Of-
fice, %/ AC, Hwy. 200
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
Rent to Own 4/2,
'2 ac, hwy 200, $875.
mo. 352-344-3084





Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina









Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me




Lecanto 3 bedroom.
2 bath with fireplace,
sauna, and garage.
2 acres w/fruit trees,
garden ready.
352422-7136

-Il


HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW,own lot, new carport
& screened front & back
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858


Hoe



117S Lunar Terrace 2
bedroom 2 bath Florida
RM Garage & Carport
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE
Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down
352-344-9290
FOR SALE OR RENT
TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

LQok
Inverness highlands 2
bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$62,000 2 car garage.
Fenced yard.
352-476-0581
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



2005 MEADOWCREST
(Fox Hollow) BEAUTY.
3/2/2/2 Lg Split BR,
Cul-d-sac.See pics @
www.forsalebvowner.co
m. #23967875
Call 724-813-8624.
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFAIRC
REALTY ONE
Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenced
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195k 352-422-7077




4BR/112 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

For Sale By Owner
2BR, 1 BA, Corner Lot
Located in Old
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated
kitchen, SS appl's.,
pine Hardwood firs./
tiles, roof 3 yrs. old.
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy-
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000.
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092


IAMI SL;UI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!




For Sale %,i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

For WSle -,,i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell




Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

WANT IT SOLD
House not selling?
Behind in
payments?
Upside down in
mortgage?
CALL ME I can helo
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

For Salle %t,
Forest Lake, Hernando
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5
Acres, Fenced. Many
extras including 24x36
Shop/garage. Sun
Room with Wood Burn-
ing Stove. Fruit trees. 2
8x10 Storage Sheds.
Security System. See
ad on 4SaleByOwner
for pictures. 352
726-7755








#I Employment

source is...




Clsiftd


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
ee nwtury 21P
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855



Your World







CH~pNiCLE


Hme


Cir sCo n y


Citrus County7
Homes


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com







3 BR, 31/2 BA, Condo
2100 sq. ft., Furnished,
Carport,
Citrus Hills on Hartford
$119,000.
Call 352-419-5268



Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993







Bank's Loss is
YOUR GAIN.
50-300+ acres
adjoining Cumber-
land Trail Park.
Big Timber, Creeks,
Hunting, Perfect for
Cabins! Starting at
$1,500/acre
Call 877-282-4409.


Foreclosed Cabin
On 4 Acres! Just
$89,900. Bring your
hammer & nails.
Great fixer upper on
beautiful wooded
rolling land. Enjoy
wildlife, creeks,
ponds, lake access.
Must see! Call
877-888-0267, x 436


Time Share

Six day vacation in
Orlando, Florida!
Regularly $1,175.00.
Yours today for only
$389.00! You SAVE
67 percent. PLUS
One-week car
rental included.
Call for details.
1-800-985-1463





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Vacation waterfront
property. $5k down,
$1200 month 1/1/2,
Sawgrass Landing.
$ 10Ok down
$1900/mo, 2/2
condo. Casa Rio.
Lease options avail.
Call Lisa Vandeboe
352-634-0129
Owner/Broker


Ho e

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor











ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty








SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaureCoast
Properties.corn
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




NORTH GEORGIA -
Long Flowing Creek
Property, Secluded
on culdesac.
Perfect retreat near
Oktoberfest in
Helen, GA. Utilities in
place ready to build
for $29,900.
1-877-717-8992
ext591



mand
Streamfront Land
Bargain! 1.7 acre
wooded corner
parcel in Blue Ridge
Mtns. 390' on crystal
clear stream, Natu-
ral year-round
spring. Paved road,
municipal water,
utilities, mild
restrictions RV
friendly. Was $69,900
now, $27,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
866-952-5303, x 63





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEEP IN THE FOREST PRIMEVAL
6 Iu l I ,:i l|..i .'J i" Iii H I...i .I 1h ,i..i I..



Mir_'.- =';. NEWLY PRICED AT S44,900
Ask In, Maill n Booth 637-4904


FYOU HOME-
IvER37 FA.I r'.2 p I ENC
YEAR5 W. Main SUNDA InensF450 Cl oa o


* -Cif. ['ill I'-.1 -
* I- I,,i i,., I ,,,],"1hi!ii l i l~

* MI lI.ivl.-.il l
MI.'1,=11:i1lU1l $49,000
Jeanne oi Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'i:'it'. CiltusCountolSold. coim


* I lH FH .1 ''l. i I... I. 1.

Mi_ /3= il_' ASKING $85,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


1in, n,,n hi ul. ,,,,l, I ... h ~ ,,l,



6.1 ... h I ,, I ,,, ,,, I,
r 1i.: = ,, J ASKING S158.900
Iwo hsttigs n It ,\.:i


CELINA HILLS
I',''I [' i, l ' a'i.'.a'. h. i. Ii. I.. a,



NMl. =;i;i. $160,000
Call Jim Mi ion 422 2173
to see this lovely' home


SNOW BIRD SPECIAL:

laIii 111 Hll i.i *' l 'i.h.1 ,d iii f,iii] i.i 11 1iii -
III, il I I I !_in l l. .^IM .I 'll i..i li'i. l hN i '. h i ll


$67,500
Call mie Ruth Fiedetck 13525636866


OPEN HOUSE 12-3 PM


INVERNESS 1 LAKES AREA
2911 S SKYLINE DRIVE INVERNESS


,...)I '.' i i-'hi i. l..:i. -- dI.. | i ; i .i|
rii =-iii4- $159.000
1.i iwir.' "ill 95.1 ,.33 S'1 5 0l 1r,? "?76 6s


KENSINGTON 4 BED, 3 BATH!
l vi : l I ,:io Il \ :l i.j ,I ll. i i j l h1

ONLY $162,000
Call Ouade Feese/ 352-302 7699


nu I I BI I noN NHIW!
NOT TOO BIG and
NOT TOO SMALL JUST RIGHT'
[I.~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~. ... h,, .,.,h 11h"1"''I1

hl.i s JUST REDUCED TO S99,000
C.ll Dons llinei 352 422 4621


* L.,I I .ii..i..:.lll I _" I l..:.ii
* I- .-i,,, ,i '-"I,,,,i l, 1, i :
* I l.: h .l l~niU ll li hl II..] / I(.h

Mi_ -1/I'"/IlIJ REDUCED $98,000
Jeanne i Willaid Pickiel 201-9871
i'i'it',. CiltusCounti'Sold. con


OPEN WATERFRONT
,I ,,,.,I., I ,,,,j,.,,,,,,, I .,,I t ,t ... .
.........,, II I. ,..,, I- ,,,,..t,,, ,,t, 1.1...... I ,.t, I,, t .....
,,t, ,, t,,, ,, ,,tI ........ ...I I. 'I,.,,, I *.... I.. ,- I ,,
........ .,.. ,. ,.,t .. ... ..,,,, t, t. ,
i,,, ,.-- I tt,I ,,,,,- t.I 1.1 I,, i,,.,1, II. ,,,,t 1 ,,.1 ,,t ..
rl =-, ASKING S188.900
Ii'llh llt7J On iiii. ll, l e l$ ,8
p__ ii iigil on's i i) lrinP is ,..>


WATERFRONT HOME
-i|..i..i'"J' 4l'J.| ; --.iilh I:,.. ..j .i,:ji ,.l.i:i
'-: '--.1 "i II h. dlil ". /1"1" "i I fI h ii.i
H .ilJ .l. ,:.il ,:l^.i l i.....I ,.Jfl. l.i.,il hlll i.i l.l.hlJ..
i:.hhAT ei-i', $459,000 ANI
Ii_ ij ,,iN l. hF ijh t- 0 f M i = -/ Ill I 111
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


SUPER LOCATION -
MAINTENANCE FREE LIFESTYLE
. .:............ .. H .. .. .i rl..i

rii:ii::]i ASKING $55.900
Pit Di,4 352212 7280
Ir..i h.iin i hiip 1 ,11 /2ft.di. P. m










FULLY EQUIPPED RESTAURANT FOR SALE!
I iii IF-_ Hi.I .. I I".i .1 -


0..l 't .- "" ....
* i.: -..... .... 1, 1..}. }

.d. If: ..I 11I
r iih = i-i.. OFFERED AT S325.000
C it 352 400O 2635Ii ml i,}
___i__ 352 400 2835 ____


hill ii .~ i I .a~. ... ....

.. ....i. h.-.... I h l .. ,ai..,l I.

rih = "i. ASKING $149.800
Pi Di,' ,352 212 7280
['oi .iatin .11, I;2tagiid ija .jani


SUBJECT TO BANK APPROVAL




Cal 'l'.I 1J IP I 35i 2-6l 4lii 3 i
Call Mait\ Paisons 352.634 1273


PRICED RIGHT!


i ,:,, ,- l),., I,1 I, N|',.,I N .i ll L. ,lh


M1'- hi.'.nii. ASKING $74,000
Contact Nancj Jenks 352-400-8072
01 352 726 6668


COUNTRY COTTAGE

I..... I I~o. i.l.[.:i.:i. ..I l ll .[ ..

I ',, d'''" i 'i' 'ii,, a
ri. = -ii I I ASKING $149.900
Cii Ruih Ft.ndl,, h I 352 563 6866 ,] ioo


A GREAT LOCATION i. .IJ. ...

St.,i'i i iin ,ll\i-vi ni i 'lll i rii, i' i i ii ii 'l J ,l ,~i .
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E16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013









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F2 Discover Citrus County 2013-2014


Stay up to date on what's happening at Munroe, get access to important health news
and find links to stay in touch with us. Visit www.MunroeRegional.com, scroll down to r 1 W
the bottom of our homepage, and click on the e-Newsletter link B
Munroe L
To learn more about the services we provide or to find a physician close to home, Regional
call Munroe Regional's Health Resource Line at 352-867-8181 or 800-575-3975. Medical Center


B "* www.MunroeRegional.com 1500 SW 1St Ave, Ocala, FL 34471


OG2Q3




Discover Citrus County 2013-2014 F3


UkE
| FIRST
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QUALITY
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EDUCATION.
WCOMMUNITYJI


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F4 Discover Citrus County 2013-2014


OCALA PLASTIC SURGERY


GET TO KNOW OUR

C6fa/i prroviAdin w$yucetin
plsi rgr an ackvn euiu^a a-oocn eutfrorpiii


James Rogers DMD, MD
Dr. Rogers is a native Floridian. He is a graduate of Emory University, and completed his dental
and medical degrees from the University of Florida. He trained in surgery at Shands Hospital
at the University of Florida, and completed his plastic surgical training at Tulane University and
Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans. Dr. Rogers is a member of the American Society of Aesthetic
Plastic Surgery, and has performed Cosmetic and Reconstructive Procedures in Ocala for over
twenty years. He is one of the most experienced surgeons in Central Florida.

Navinderdeep Nijher MD
Dr. Nilher is a native New Yorker who now resides in Ocala with his wife who is a pediatrician. He
completed his plastic surgery training at the prestigious New York Hospital of Cornell and Columbia
Universities and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He provides the latest cutting edge
techniques in minimal scar surgery of the breast, face, forehead, and eyes. He also specializes in all
facets of body sculpting including but not limited to liposuction, abdominoplasty, and post bariatric
body contouring. Dr.Nijher lectures extensively trying to educate patients on plastic surgery and has
subsequently become one of the most sought out plastic surgeons in Central Florida.
Leonik Ahumada MD
Dr. Ahumada specializes in cosmetic and plastic surgery. He is trained in the latest plastic surgical
techniques of the face, eyelids, breast and body with emphasis on minimal scarring. This includes
non surgical (fillers,botox,fat grafts,sclerotherapy) and surgical procedures (facelift,eyelids,nose,
breast,tummy tucks,liposuction). He graduated from Harvard with a degree in biochemistry and
completed medical school at the University of Miami. He was awarded many honors while
completing Plastic Surgery training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and has authored
and co-authored papers in plastic surgery. He prefers a personal approach to his patients and will
listen to your concerns when suggesting procedures. Dr Ahumada's family is from South America; in
addition to English he is also fluent in Spanish and has an international clientele. He is married and
father to three girls; when not seeing patients he enjoys time with his family.


U^





Discover Citrus County 2013-2014 F5


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F6 Discover Citrus County 2013-2014

1 9,.i'E


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1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com
G erry M u lliga n ................................................................................................................................P ub lis her
Ken M elton............................................................................................................ Com m unity Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly ...................................................................................... Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah G atling .................................................................................................................... C om m unity Editor
Trista Stokes ...................................................................................................... A advertising Sales M manager


r'~- *>....~. -,-,, 2 i F7




Welcome


to the


2013-2014


Discover


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About the cover:
This year's Discover cover photograph was
submitted by Linda Breslin-Dourm as part of
the Discover photo contest, where winners
SI h I 11 I. -. .|1 i .l J i | ill | 1 11 ,- \ I !111, -.1'1. 1) i i ,1 1, '' *







had their photos pub.\l!l listed in the magazine..il\ ll-






Dourm's photo is of Jared Nash and
S(' lIl l \' ( l tll -l il l 'lr I '\ '-'







S1'Brett I e, l).lc .enjoying a day tubing on thel l






Crystal River.
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About the cover:
This year's Discover cover photograph was
submitted by Linda Breslin-Dourm as part of
the Discover photo contest, where winners
had their photos published in the magazine.
Dourm's photo is of Jared Nash and
Brett Iwaniec enjoying a day tubing on the
Crystal River.





F8 Discover Citrus County 2013-2014


Luis R. Annoni, MD Darshan V. Patel, MO
Medical Director


H %" ..,,,U.Raul Jimenez, MD Rajiva Goyal, MD Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD


B Regional Medical Center Bypet Point
Medical Ctler of Trinity
C Oak HI Hospital


727-869-5565 toll-free 855-534-4325
14000 Fivay Road, Hudson, FL 34667
YourHeartBeat.com


n Arrhythmia.
Ria ecCENTER OF FLORIDA
Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point


Huang-Ta Lin, MD





Discover Citrus County 2013-2014 F9


Discover what's inside


Discover Citrus County by Air
H it the H eights........................................................ P age 12
Points of Interest
B irding trails .......................................................... P age 13
Whooping Cranes .................................................. Page 22
E agle S nag ............................................................ P age 24
Remote-Controlled Airplanes ................................ Page 28
Crystal River Airport .............................................. Page 29
Inverness A airport .................................................... Page 30


Discover Citrus County by Water
W et 'n' W ild ............................................................ P age 38
Activities
B oating .................................................................. P a ge 3 7
D iving/Snorkeling .................................................. Page 37
K ayaking ................................................................ P age 38
F ish ing .................................................................... P a ge 4 0
S calloping .............................................................. P age 4 2
Swimming with the manatees ................................ Page 44
Bicentennial Pool .................................................. Page 45
Central Ridge Pool ................................................ Page 45
Whispering Pines Park Pool .................................. Page 45
Puddle in the Pines ................................................ Page 46
Three Sisters Springs ............................................ Page 48
H unters S pring ...................................................... Page 48
Fort Island Gulf Beach .......................................... Page 49
Tsala Apopka Chain of Lakes ................................ Page 52
C ooter Pond .......................................................... Page 53
Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge.............. Page 54


Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge .................. Page 56
M onkey Island ........................................................ Page 56
Withlacoochee River .............................................. Page 57
W ater Fun .............................................................. P age 58
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.................................................. Page 63
Boat R am ps .......................................................... Page 65

A c tiv itie s .................................................................. P age 69

K id s P la y .................................................................. P age 76

V ie w s .......................................................................... P age 78


Discover Citrus County by Land
Towns and Nature .................................................. Page 85
Places
Old Courthouse Heritage Museum ........................ Page 88
Coastal Heritage Museum...................................... Page 90
Floral City Heritage Museum
and "Country Store"............................................... Page 90
Olde Mill Gallery and Printing Museum .................. Page 90
Fallen Heroes War Memorial.................................. Page 91
Yulee S ugar M ill .................................................... Page 91
Floral City Labyrinth .............................................. Page 91
R ails to Trails.......................................................... P age 92
R oller B arn ............................................................ P age 92
H heritage V village ...................................................... Page 92
Homosassa Butterfly.............................................. Page 94
Citrus County Speedway........................................ Page 94
Avenue of the Oaks................................................ Page 97





F10 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


Discover what's inside


Parks
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.................................................. Page 98
B every H ills ........................................................ P age 100
C itrus S springs ...................................................... Page 100
C rystal R iver ........................................................ Page 100
D unnellon ............................................................ P age 104
F loral C ity ............................................................ P age 104
H ernando ............................................................ P age 105
H om osassa .......................................................... Page 105
Inverness .............................................................. P age 106
Leca nto ................................................................ P age 106
S tate Parks .......................................................... Page 107
O n S ta g e .................................................................. Page 109
Art Center of Citrus County .................................. Page 110
CF Performing Arts .............................................. Page 110
Citrus Community Concert Choir.......................... Page 110
Music at the Museum .......................................... Page 112
M usic in the Park.................................................. Page 112
Nature Coast Community Band............................ Page 112
Nature Coast Friends of Blues ............................ Page 114
"The Nutcracker" ................................................. Page 114
Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle.................... Page 114
Woodview Coffee House...................................... Page 118
S ugarm ill C horale ................................................ Page 118
Suncoast Harmony
Chapter of Sweet Adelines .................................. Page 119
Great Outdoors...................................................... Page 120
Withlacoochee State Forest ................................ Page 121
Equestrian Trails .................................................. Page 122


Hiking and Biking Trails........................................ Page 124
Camping in Citrus County .................................... Page 131


Sports
B baseball .............................................................. P age 132
B basketball ............................................................ P age 132
F ootba ll ................................................................ P a ge 13 2
H orseshoes .......................................................... Page 132
PLAY Programs.................................................... Page 132
S huffleboard ........................................................ Page 132
S occe r .................................................................. P age 132
Sw im m ing ............................................................ Page 132
YMCA Programs .................................................. Page 133
Outdoor Groups .................................................. Page 133
People and Pets .................................................... Page 134
Festivals and Events
M monthly Events .................................................... Page 140
November 2013 Events........................................ Page 140
December 2013 Events........................................ Page 144
January 2014 Events .......................................... Page 146
February 2014 Events.......................................... Page 146
March 2014 Events .............................................. Page 148
April 2014 Events ................................................ Page 150
May 2014 Events ................................................ Page 151
June 2014 Events ................................................ Page 152
July 2014 Events.................................................. Page 152
September 2014 Events ...................................... Page 152
October 2014 Events .......................................... Page 152
Advertising Index by Category...................... Page 157
Advertising Index -Alphabetically ................ Page 158




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 Fll

C Accidents Happen...

... .. .. We'll Fix You Up!

* 24 Hr. Towing ..........
* 3 Paint Booths
* 2 Chief Frame Machines ..
* Auto Refinishing With Spies "
Hecker Products
* Computerized Paint Mixing
* Free Estimates -,
* Full Line Of Truck
Accessories
* Rhino Spray On Bedliners
* Complete Auto Detailing
* Full Time Mechanic On Duty ]






B^ Thank You Citrus County For
= Voting Us The Best Body Shop
For 18 Years In A Row!

4870 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL (352) 628-4878
i After Hours Towing (352) 942-3284 www.davesbodyshop.net





F12 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY









photo by Loretta McDermid photo by Holly Richards





Hit the ieghs


M any visitors to Citrus County
T,,,,il\ ,i..l,, .red arrive in
Citrus County by air. They soar
in to take advantage of sunny
skies, clean air and pleasant weather.
Those factors make it a favorite with
those arriving to live here or thosejust
passing through. And birds and the people
who watch them are one of the fastest
growing segments of Florida tourism.
Citrus County is right in the middle of it
all with its widevariety o Inlg, trails
and the winter home to a flock of
migrating whooping cranes.


photo ~y Mary 1-underburkphoto by MJ Leandro photo by Monnie Bettuo photo by Sljerri Wnce


21 4


pnoto by Debbie


iters


photo by Monnie Bettuo


photo by Mary 1-unlerburK


photo by MJ Leandro


photo by Sherri Vince





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F13


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Betty Rieman


photo by Christa Collins


photo ay Diane Atterson


)nisoO






n eres


photo by Holly Richards


T he Citrus C ,i i\ !ki il
ing Trail is part of the
west section of the
Great Fl.11i 0. 1, !'; i,Ii i
Trail. The 18 birding trails cre
ated for the Great Florida Bird
ing Trail program take
advantage of Citrus County's
diversified features and its
habitat for birds.
The county trail system is
divided into the three natural
ecological characterizations
that make up the geography
of the county
* Coastal Region from the
Gulf of Mexico to U.S. 19.
* The Brooksville Ridge
Region from U.S. 19 to U.S. 41.
* The TsalaApopka Lake
Region bounded on the east by
the Withlacoochee River. The
Withlacoochee River serves as
the eastern and northern
boundary of the county.
Some of the most sought
after bird species that can be
seen in Citrus County include
the red cockaded woodpecker,
Bachman's sparrow American
white pelican, scrubjay and
many more.
see TRAILS Page 14


photo by Judith Peterson


photo byAlfonzo Noffa


pnoro Dy KeDeKan h-uner


photo Dy Lue uraKe


photo oy Judith Peterson






F14 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


from Page 13

Bluebird Springs One mile
west of U.S. 19 at Yulee Drive
and West Bradshaw Street in
Homosassa

Chassahowitzka River Trail -
Begins at the boat landing at
the Chassahowitzka River
Campground and follows the river
to the National Wildlife Refuge at
the end of Miss Maggie Drive

Citrus Tract Part of the
Withlacoochee State Forest
bounded on the north by
Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State


Road 44) and on the south by
County Road 480

Crystal Cove Trail, Crystal River
Preserve State Park Starts at
the Mullet Hole parking lot on the
north side of Sailboat Avenue

Crystal River Archeological
State Park 3400 N. Museum
Road, Crystal River

Eagle Snag Trail Citrus County
Landfill off State Road 44

Eco-Walk Trail, Crystal River
Preserve State Park The
trailhead is off U.S. 19, one mile
south of Duke Energy on
Curtis Tool Road
see TRAILS Page 18


I -.. -... I


photo by Susan Falcone photo by Lue Drake


piU-iu uy iVdfluy IudU


photo by Holly Richards


photo by Robin Thomas


photo by Lisa Kennedy


photo by Robert Strickland




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F15


HOME OF


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& FURNITURE INDUSTRIES. INC.


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PJiulu Uy DMiiy f larfini


photo by Wayne Faulkner


photo by Lue Drake photo by Lue Drake


F16 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Nora Moore


photo by Lue Drake photo by Virginia Bennett


pnoto Dy umane irrerson





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F17


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352-795-2526






F18 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Betty Rieman


photo by Mary Funderburk


from Page 14

Fort Cooper State Park 3100 S. Old
Floral City Road, Inverness

Fort Island Trail 12073 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River

Loop Road Trail-Flying Eagle Preserve -
Take U.S. 41 to Eden Drive, which turns
into Moccasin Slough Road, Inverness


Johnson Pond Trail Two Mile Prairie is
located on County Road 39 between State
Road 200 and U.S. 41

King's Bay Trail, Crystal River Wildlife
Refuge Winds through King's Bay
around refuge islands north to Hunters
Spring to the mouth of the Crystal River;
only accessible by boat

Inglis Island Trail -A walking trail at the
Inglis Dam on Lake Rousseau off
Riverwood Road, one and a half miles
east of U.S. 19
see TRAILS Page 20


photo by Rebekah Fuller


photo by Rose Brechka


photo by Robert Strickland.
photo by Robert Strickland


photo by Diane Atterson




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F19


AUTOMATIC
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Sales, parts and service.

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F20 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Robert Strickland


from Page 18

Mason Creek Trail Only
accessible by boat at the end
of Mason Creek Road in Old
Homosassa

Nature Coast Canoe Trail A
20-mile coastal marsh trail through
the coastal planes of the St. Martins
Aquatic Preserve and the
Chassahowitzka National Wildlife
Refuge, it runs from Fort Island Trail
park off U.S. 19 to Chassahowitzka
Trail on Miss Maggie Drive

Oystercatcher Trail,
Withlacoochee Bay Spoil Islands -
An open-water trail around the
islands created by the building of
the barge canal

Pepper Creek Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, 4150 S. Suncoast Blvd.

Potts Preserve Trail Five miles
north of Inverness at the end of
Turner Camp Road

Rook's Trail The Homosassa Tract
of the Withlacoochee State Forest
begins two miles west of U.S. 19 on
Burnt Bridge Road

Withlacoochee Bay Trail and
Felburn Park Follows the
southside of the Florida Barge
Canal to Withlacoochee Bay on
the Gulf of Mexico





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F21


"TOTAL CARE" LAWN
* Fertilizing & Nutrients
* Insect Elimination & Prevention
* Fungus Elimination & Prevention
* Weed Elimination & Prevention


ltinn Homes & Busi


SHRUB & TREE CARE
* Shrub Specific Fertilizers
* Mites Elimination & Prevention
* Fungus Elimination & Prevention
* Insects Elimination & Prevention
* Palm & Tropical Care Program


S -1 0LT






F22 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Loretta McDermid


C hassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge
is famous as the
southern wintering site
for the re introduced eastern
population of whooping cranes.
In 2001, the Whooping Crane
Eastern Partnership (WCEP)
raised whooping crane (Grus
americana) chicks in
Wisconsin's Necedah National
Wildlife Refuge then guided
them using ultralight aircraft
to the Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge for the winter.
That pattern continued until
2012, when weather and a
complaint to the Federal
Aviation Authority concerning
thr.hi.ih,'il ,!r i, .. that
all the birds were taken to the
St. Marks Federal Wildlife
Refuge in the Florida
Panhandle.

see CRANES Page 23


Chronicle file photo photo by Patti Ray


photo by Brian Imparato


Chronicle tile photo






Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F23


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY






from Page 22
The 2013 migration will again end at St. Marks.
Officials blame a shortage of funds because of -
sequestration by the federal government.
But a sizable population of the birds continue to
return to Chassahowitzka for the winter. Hopefully,
those birds will be accompanied this year by some
of the chicks that are being released in the fall in
the (, i '. .,i\ I 1-i, adults at Necedah to learn the
migration route. Those chicks are in addition to
those being escorted by the ultralights. ______
These birds represent a portion of the
endangered whooping cranes to take part in a
project conducted by WCEP, a coalition of public
and private organization that is re introducing a
1,,.1. I (, I1. I.- of cranes into eastern North
America, part of this historic range.


Chronicle file photo


photo by Ted True





F24 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Sandy Ramsell


photo by Christa Collins


EUiL Schikdn
HOMOSRSSR




WILLIFE FRiF.
Visitor Center on US 19.
Homosassa Springs
352-628-5343
www.floridastateparks.org/homosassa

Mark Your Calendars for
These Upcoming Park Events:
SOct25 & 26: 6pm-11pm
HAUNTED TRAM RIDES
* Nightly Dec. 19-24 & Dec 26
CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS
* April 19, 2014 starting at 9am
EASTER EGG HUNT


t might not officially be a part of the
Great F1, i ]. i I i i g, Trail, but the Eagle
Snag Trail is still a favorite with bird
watchers in Citrus County It is part of
the county's system c(, I hi I1 ; trails.
It's a driving trail at a quirky location -
the Citrus County Landfill. But birders
know that facilities like water treatment
plants and landfills are great places to view
and study rare birds up close.
see EAGLE Page 25


See our New

Shore Bird Aviary!

* Walk UnderWater in the Spring of 10,000 Fish
* See the Endangered Red Wolves, Whooping
Cranes, Key Deer and West Indian Manatees
* Daily Manatee and Alligator Programs and
Wildlife Encounters


CsOUPO


--mm-


20% OFF Regular Admission
to Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
With this ad for up to 6 in party.
I Not to be used with other offers.
I Expires 3/31/14 CCC-Disc
- - - - -





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F25


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY

















from Page 24
photo by Robert Strickland
The trail provides op
species of birds, but it is
the best place in Citrus
County to observe bald
eagles in large quantities.
Visitors may also see
vultures and gulls in huge
numbers as well. Other
birds likely to be spotted
are red tailed and red
photo by Loretta McDermid shouldered hawks,
pileated woodpeckers,
spring warblers, owls,
1i"irii1 '1'1\ iii, swallows,
sparrows, bobolinks and
meadowlarks.
It's best to visit this trail
during the winter, when
birds come by the
thousands to scavenge
Jat the landfill.
The trail starts at the
landfill office off of State
Road 44 in Lecanto.
Visitors should sign in at
the office. Hours are
V, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
weekdays and from 8 a.m.
photo by Richard Schoentube to 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays.


We Have ...
* Propane Full Line Of Small Engine V-belts
* Ammo Fishing Tackle Knives Electrical "
Craftsman Tools (Inverness & Hernando Only) Rope ..
* Organization For Home & Garage Plumbing Chain l
* Paint And Supplies Gardening Tools Lawn & Garden Seeds 1
* Fertilizer & Insecticides Irrigation Parts, Timers And More ".
* Flags & Decorative Items For Garden & Home
We . .
* Re-key Locks Cut Keys Chip Keys I
* Cut Glass Rescreen Your Screens -f


"Aced:-H ait 72-8811
4hkefst Kbn\
"': : ,wr~e ^35|f6-' !yW
,,: .. w7!.4





F26 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014

DISCOVER CITRUS

COUNTY BY


ADVANCED
Urology Specialists


Paresh G. Desai, MD, FACS
Udaya Kumar, MD, FRCS Urol, Dip Urol (Lon)
Practicing at:
Homosassa Office
3475 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 628-7671

Michael G. Desautel, MD
Manuel A. Seneriz, MD Fran Pulice, PA-C
Practicing at:
Inverness Office
609 West Highland Blvd. Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 726-9707


AdvancedUrologists.com




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F27


-7- a-4



-ES.1.*'-BES
OFTEOfil
0BS 0BS
ii S10H
IAIL OW4N ED&PRAE
6ik & *.en 6*ns Onr
Turn~~~II IO~ IakYr iesd&Isrd*P072

In( You OwU LIo
.. Pol/p Cosruto Sonhy aitnac






F28 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


u ,j :.; ,J.
." --' '' "''. .

-, s?"* ''." ^ iP '" : -,-. "' '*


Chronicle file photo


he Pine Ridge RC Electric Airplane Club was formed in
November of 2005. The three founding members of the club,
Phil Sciarroni, Bill Cronin and John Casdia live in Pine Ridge
Estates. They wanted to find a place close to home where they
could fly their electric radio controlled airplanes. Phil Sciarroni located
an area in Pine Ridge that would be suitable for use as a flying field.
They formed the Pine Ridge RC Electric Airplane Club, became the
first club officers and, with the assistance of the Pine Ridge Board
and Maintenance Deptartment, had a portion of the area mowed
and a section leveled for a model airplane landing strip. Recycled
tennis screening, provided by the Pine Ridge Board, became the
8 feet by 50 feet landing strip. A notice in the Pine Ridge Civic
Association Newsletter advised the community of the newly formed
club seeking residents interested in joining.
The Club now has a 24 feet by 100 feet runway pilot stations and
many more members.
www.pineridgerce.com


/ I r ..

7,


* ell





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F29


DISCOVER CITRUS


photo by Matthew Beck


of Citrus County relies on
feathers.
Many residents and visitors
use the two county airports for takeoffs
and landings and aerial maneuvers.
The Crystal River Airport is situated
on 196 acres along U.S. 19 at Venable
Road and is home to a pair of non
intersecting runways. One asphalt
runway is 4,555 feet long and 75 feet
wide with a full parallel taxiway The
other runway is turf and 2,665 feet long
and 100 feet wide.
The fixed base operator at the airport
is Crystal Aero Group Inc., owned by Tom
Davis.
There's a large terminal't 1l, 111 ,ig with


parking for 20 vehicles.
The aircraft ramp can handle 53
aircraft.
The facility serves a wide range of
general aviation needs.
Business f Ihil -. i, 't 1,, i, r about
30 percent of the operations.
Flight training is a significant part of
the activity, with roughly 40 percent of
the airports operation being connected
to flight training.
Transient users, which account for
about 25 percent of the business,
frequent the airport for business,
tourism, golf and dining in the
community
352-795 6868
www.crystalaerogroup.com


What's your EXIT Strategy?
Discover the Best of Real Estate
on the Nature Coast, voted by
Citrus County Residents for three years in a row!









EXIT REALTY LEADERS
Helping buyers and sellers make their move!
THREE LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
352-794-0888 730 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
352-527-1112 5018 Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
S 352-447-2595 5 63rd St., Yankeetown
Swww.exitrealtyleaders.com





HEARING AID \


REPAIR & SERVICE@


ST-,fiti j-,


ALL MAKES FROM ANYPLACE
t ~GardnerAudiology.com ..

|r Gardner Audiology

Crystal River Inverness
2 352-795-5700 352-419-6565





F30 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS


"We Cater to Cowards!"

Experience The Difference


HONEST


* PROFESSIONAL


* COMPASSIONATE


photo by Matthew Beck


he Inverness Airport, located
along U.S. 41just south of
Inverness, is a favorite for
recreation fliers.
It is served by one 5,000 feet long and
75- feet wide runway. It also features two
14,000-square -yard paved aircraft
parking aprons. The fixed base operator
is William Bachschmidt and
A1'li,1.\ h .N i\., Air Inc.


While the airport serves the basic
needs of general aviation, approximately
75 percent of the activity at the facility
can be classified as sport aviation or
reci,.. iii. .i i \ in'i I hli-,l training is a
small part of the operation, as is
transient, or visiting aircraft.
352 341 0322


1 Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Ledgerdentistry.com
3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 628-3443
SInsurance Accepted License #DN 17606




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F31


CRYSTAL RIVER
MALL
0M A L 1_
f^L
thecrystalrivermall.com
1801 NW U.S. HWY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER FL
PH (352) 795-2585
MALL HOURS
MON-SAT 10a-9p\
SUN 12p-5:30p 7


Ve 're building
relationships
with you to
provide the
ultimate
shopping
experience
for our
community
today
& and


morrow.


"Crystal River's
Most Unique
Nature Themed,
P ..


- Nature Themed Gifts
* Manatee Gifts & Souvenirs
* T-shiJewelryts
* T-shirts


* m


REAL CAJUN SEAFOOD W
SERVING FRESH CATCH
MARKET & DININ


kitR
.']lq (
[,iJIS,


CAFE


RESTAURANT (352) 2


-=W 6L


0 46ff


'rep, I V





F32 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


I1T


'1 ~%\] ~ =1 7'~ ~


v B I STR0
_. S -_ S1




20 .AopaAe Tue.- Sa am to9i

Situated in beautiful downtown Inverness sits the quaint and elegant McLeod House. This
historic home turned restaurant is so named for the family that resided there for many years.
The Bistro opened in February 2010 under classically trained Chef/owner Michael Kulow.
The outdoor deck is the perfect place to relax for lunch or dinner under the 100 year old
oaks, or you can enjoy your dining experience inside one of the four intimate rooms.
Sip on a refreshing Sangria or glass of wine while enjoying a palate pleasing appetizer,
which includes soup made fresh daily, or the award winning Baked Stuffed Artichokes.
The lunch menu consists of fresh salads, sandwiches and paninis. Dinner selections include
Breast of Duck with mixed berries & port wine, Scallops Au Gratin, and Filet Mignon with an
exquisite sauce de vin.
Complete your dining experience with Creme Brulee, Pina Colada Bread Pudding or the
Flourless Chocolate Torte with grand marnier and chocolate lace.
For more information, visit www.mcleodhousebistro.com, and visit Tripadvisor to see what
our guests have to say!


Mon.-Thurs.
7am-6pm
Friday 7am-9pm
Saturday 8am-9pm
Full Breakfast
Fresh Lunches, Fine Dining,
Wine Tasting and Other Events
I 109 Courthouse Sq., Inverness, FL
(352) 341-5400
Find Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/thedecocafe
For Daily Specials & Weekend Surprise


There is a place,
a place to be...
Deco Caf6 is a place of hospitality,
ambiance, fresh food, specialty coffees,
teas, smoothies and decadent desserts.
The menu includes breakfast, lunch,
fine dining, wine tasting and special
events.
Menu highlights include fresh fruit
scones, homemade soups, irresistible
quiches, wraps, salads, sandwiches,
paninis and gourmet dinners.
Deco Caf6 is located at 109 Courthouse
Square in Historic Downtown Inverness
across from the Olde Courthouse Heritage
Museum. Hours are Monday through
Thursday 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., Friday
7:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m., and Saturday
8:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.
Call 352-341-5400 for more information.
You can also find information, daily spe-
cials and weekend surprises on facebook
at www.facebook.com/thedecocafe.


aTE RS SHRIMP INTOW
e Ir 'I I


K7 .......-

5590 South Blvd. Dr., Old Homosassa, FL
..... (352) 628-2452


Homosassa's best kept secret is just around the bend and right on
the river offering great food, good views, and a great atmosphere.
Specialty favorites include blue crabs, shrimp, wings, smoked mullet and
ice cold beer, just to mention a few. If you're fishing' for the right place
to chill out, The Freezer's rustic, fishing town atmosphere is never
disappointing.
Next door you can sit back and watch a real working fish house in
action. The Cedar Key Fish & Crab House seafood retail and
wholesale store operates seven days a week with the reputation of
some of the best shrimp, stone crabs, oysters, scallops, mullet and
other fish caught fresh in the local waters by local fishermen and
crabbers who come and go buying and selling their daily catches.
Locals and out-of-towners can't resist the friendly atmosphere and
Old Homosassa hospitality of both The Freezer and Cedar Key
Fish and Crab House, located at/ l l f y
5590 South Boulevard Drive,
Homosassa.
Call 352-628-2452.


ENEEK





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F33


There's so
much to
b *J choosefrom!





Aiid
^ohiso good! f aj^ f

Your Chicago Connection!
Hot Dogs Hamliurglers
Fresh CuIt Fries
3'5'24' 37i33l.^ ,- Flii,.lli', ..^l~jmr.,
352-344-3733 ^ fj
I JIl '.. HI.I.IE
I [ih ,-,Hi .11 ",lf;u ", ~ll S
[Iil ...4 ll:W)II


You'll keep

coming back

for more
In case you haven't heard come see
why Citrus County's number one hot dog
shop has been around for 13 years now!
We have five brands of hot dogs,
three different Coney sauces, fresh
burgers and fresh cut fries, and we are
picky for the hole in the wall that we are.
We also have a great line of Chicago
food on the menu.
When you leave Pudgee's, you will be
happy, I guarantee it!
You can find Pudgee's All American
Hot Dogs at 7220 South Florida Avenue in
Floral City. Phone 352-344-3733.


Old World Restaurant has been a major landmark in Floral
City since it was established in 1981. Best known for their
Prime Rib and Schnitzel dinners, they also serve a large
selection of steaks, seafood, chicken and roast duck. On the
weekends also feature Salmon and Ossobuco (Pork Shank).
Dinners are served with homemade soup and salad.
Danny and Olympia have owned Old World Restaurant for
over 30 years and invite you to come by and give them a try!
Old World Restaurant is located at 8370 S. Florida Ave.
(US Hwy. 41) in Floral City. Call 352-344-4443.


It's a trip through Italy's cuisine that you'll never forget
lii .i '.lli i II illlll .i i r'14 r111 i. IiI , j l, I i i, i j I,i i .,u --Ii i iI ,I l ,,- I
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II1 j I ,,, I I 1 l~ 111 1jI : I Ii ITI I I I 1 III,- 1.h,,ll l,-In,
IJ, ,, -I j r ,, I ,, I ,,-,l.jI ,,-I : 1.11 I,. r , i l ,: 1 1,,-, 1 r,, [ I, :,i,- 4 1') :.'.4 11,-I ,1 1
I J.!l., ,h I : I ,,. l,: .!.. l 1 --., 1, I I...,.l.' ., 4 ........ h., ,,,, ..:. F .,,, J.. .


r ANGUS 1
WHOLESALE MEATS ..
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC "
*Angus Beef Meats Poultry Pork
SLamb Seafood Sausages Dell Items
Ice Cream *Vegetables *Produce
FRESH BREADS BAKED DAILY
STOP IN AND HAVE A FRESH SANDWICH FOR LUNCH!
Angus Wholesale Meats Inc. is proud to provide Central Florida with the highest quality Angus
Beef, meats, poultry, pork, lamb, seafood, sausages, deli items, ice creams, vegetables and produce.
Our Angus beef is shipped fresh and direct from Iowa. We have hind quarters, four quarters, sides
and whole cattle. All meats are custom cut and vacuum sealed to your specs making special orders
quick and easy. We can even special order hard to find meat products. Just ask the butcher.
Hours are Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Call today to place an order or stop in,
and remember, Angus Wholesale Meats Inc. is your One Stop Meat Store.
Prices Up To 50% OFF Grocery Store Pricing
All Chicken Products Are All Natural Farm Raised
All Our Ground Meat Products Are 100% Natural No Fillers
New England Hot Dogs and Rolls Call Ahead For Our Family Packs
German Groceries & Lunch Meat Try Our Homemade Sausage
Visit us on Facebook/Angus Meats (More Than 8RFavors To Choose F'.'''i~
I I 3 I M I A Ai





F34 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


) ]0 I1 N]L A*y1


BrjBreakfast e Lunch Dinner
Ties. Sun. Barn 8pm Closed Mondags
3887 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Si~ 'i H ilP verl H;ills, FL 34465

Smoke se (352) 527-7250
& Grill follow us on 1 www.skeetlsbbq.com

Skeet's Smokehouse & Grill offers southern-style barbeque favorites such as pulled pork,
beef brisket, turkey, chicken and ribs. Other menu items and specialty dishes include
seafood, liver and onions, and smoked meatloaf. Freshly made soups and salads are popular,
as are the wings and burgers. Try our Pulled Pork Eggrolls or Pork and Slaw Wrap for a
delightful twist on a traditional favorite.
Fresh baked muffins and desserts are now available. Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie and Key
Lime Pie are popular dessert choices. Skeet's offers a selection of craft beers on draft, as
well as draft root beer.
Breakfast offers all of your traditional favorites: eggs, omelettes, biscuits and gravy,
pancakes and Belgian waffles. If you're really hungry, try the Three Lil' Pigs Breakfast, a
pork lovers paradise that includes bacon, sausage, pulled pork, cheddar cheese, potatoes and
gravy all topped with an egg and served on Texas toast!
00FWQL

Good home cooking and a friendly, family atmosphere are what makes Mama's
Kuntry Kafe a unique mom and pop style restaurant situated in Inverness.
Mama's Kuntry Kafe is family owned and operated and has been open in the
Inverness area for six years serving great home-cooked meals seven days a week.
Mama starts the day off with her specialty breakfasts while Papa closes it down in
the evening with dinner and karaoke on Friday and Sunday nights. In 2013,
Mama's Kuntry Kafe took third place in the Battle of the Burgers.
Located at 1787 W. Main Street in Inverness, Mama's Kuntry Kafe is open
Monday through Thursday 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Friday 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.,
Saturday 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Entertainment
is provided Friday and Sunday nights. Call 352-341-6262 for more information.

fl4ri~~lNTKBITMB~ IrAiN
g |,," ""Good Home Cooking"
1787W. Main St.
A rk Iiiveriiess, FIL 34453
41Ounaei Lisa &DVle IV1Iuite


LakeSide Bar & Grill offers exceptional modern American cuisine with European fusion providing an upscale dining
experience with a lively bar scene. This notable styled restaurant is known for its creative cuisine and has become a
local favorite, serving contemporary bistro fare that blends American and European favorites in a Florida cool setting.
Lunch and dinner are served daily As such, it is the perfect place for any occasion. It has a large outside screened I ,
in patio area, large bar, intimate dining room and a large private dining room. LakeSide can accommodate large events
such as weddings, rehearsal dinners and any event that is to be desired in a private setting.
However you see fit, we invite you to join us for some of your favorite entrees in our dining room or outside on our
patio with great views of the golf course. Chef changes the menus seasonally while offering daily specials including a
fresh catch daily Chef uses fresh local ingredients from local market and fisheries to ensure a pleasurable dining experience. Don't forget to
join us for our Sunday Brunch!
LakeSide has a full liquor bar with specialty drinks, Martinis, Wines and a large beer selection including local craft beers on tap. Join us
for happy hour daily The restaurant has eight large TV's and broadcasts all large sporting events including all NFL games during season.
With all of these options, its easy to see why LakeSide Bar & Grill is perfect for your next dining experience. Walk-ins welcome.
Reservations are not required but recommended. We look forward to seeing you soon. Friend us on facebook. Visit our website at www.
restaurantLakeSide.com for specials or call us at 352-419-6511.

jLLakeSide
Bar & Grill
_s 4543E. The Best in Casual Fine Dining
4543 E. WINDMILL DRIVE, INVERNESS, FL 34453
HWY. 41 BETWEEN INVERNESS AND HERNANDO
419-6511 K
www.restaurantLakeSide.com
Tues.-Sat. 10am-10pm
Sun.10am-9pm *Mon.10am-.5pm


,,,,,,,




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F35


1' 11 ] A = 1


Rain
or Shine
We've Got
You
Covered


P Y4.- N. L itru Nprt jl;i- I
i.Located in the heart of Citrus Springs is a place locals like to call home.
Sparrows Tavern is truly the place you want to visit when you need to
improve your day and is the coolest neighborhood bar in Citrus Springs.
If you're looking to watch a game, play cards, darts or pool, look no further.
Wjyhor tid lae Oh... And did we mention the excellent bar food? Burgers, pizza, wings, and
awesome nachos.
[*IjIC.ors ~ Sparrows Tavern offers a full liquor bar, daily drink specials, and live music
and karaoke. Smoking is permitted at the bar. Check out our specials at
www.facebook.com/pages/Sparrows-Tavern.
Sparrows Tavern is located across from the Fire Station at 9542 North
Citrus Springs Blvd, Citrus Springs. Phone (352) 465-0053.


lHeward's

Flea Market
mrBS ,6373 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
800-832-3477
-'- Market Open Friday Sunday www.Howardsflea.com
HERE'S WHY WE'RE BEST OF THE BEST
ipFOR 18 YEARS IN ROW!
Best Dealers *Best Produce
f RBest Concessions *Best Bakery
*b Best Merchandise *Best Prices


/ ..,-


rG-RILL71





F36 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


pnoto Dy ierry ,-ieman


priOt oy ueeuee rfierce VVIicox


ptiULU uy -Mi-d vlyd -Ld idi


From the west side of
Citrus County where
spring fed rivers make
their way through salt
marshes to the Gulf of Mexico,
to the east side of the county
dominated by the enchanting
chain of lakes and the
Withlacoochee River, it's easy to
understand why this is a water
lover's paradise.
It's the place where folks from
all over the globe come to see
the manatees.
It's the place where canoe and
kayak trips reveal a serene
world.
It's the place where anglers
come to test their skills against
some of the best game fish
.1\ .1il.i1,1L.. I I where.
It's the place where during
the season normallyJulyto
September seafood lovers


inwi



come to grab their limit of
scallops.
It's the place where boaters
,.I'lij..\ *> i ,I 'i *I I I. If 'I n| .i.I l I .i )O)Id^ H 'E
assortment of places to cruise-
from l ht, .i,., ,. 1 ,i .. it ,i (\vofthe
lakes and rivers, to the open
waters of the Gulf of Mexico. '
And anglers seeking
freshwater adventure have a
very good chance o l .iinlga a I.. --
bass that will look like a whale
in the photograph if you hold
it in front of your body at arm's
length. The TsalaApopka chain
of lakes near Inverness is a great
place to begin.
With seven Outstanding
Florida Waterways, some of the
most productive estuaries in
the state and numerous dive
sites, Citrus County is a favorite
for water sports, aquatic
adventures or just getting wet.


photo by Jill Lyles photo by June Hunte


photo by Jill Lyles


photo by June Hunte





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F37


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Judy Lane


photo by Sherri Vince


pnoto Dy Linda isresimn-ujorum


Boating

From dinghies and
yachts to kayaks and
pontoons, there's a body
of water in Citrus
County to float everyone's boat.
Boaters with every imaginable
vessel can find a spot to meet
their needs, making their own
discoveries while they fish,
snorkel, dive, ski or, the most
popular reason of all, to relax
and enjoy the beauty of the
Nature Coast at its finest.




DivinglSnorkeling

A armed with little more
than a swim mask and
a snorkel, yotfu're ready
to explore the close in
world where the rivers of
Citrus (, ,t11 i\ 11'. 1, ,i'Ithe
Gulf of Mexico. Just about
anyone can enjoy snorkeling,
and for the more adventurous,
scuba excursions probe deeper
waters. Springs and sinkholes
can challenge even the most
expert scuba diver. Any of the
commercial establishments
specializing in scuba gear can
recommend training, locate
a suitable guide and
double check equipment.
www.visitcitrus.com


photo by Diana Moore photo by Philip Wilchynski


~- -


photo by Shellie Cornell


photo by Jill Lyles






F38 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Holly Richards photo by MJ Leandro


photo by Holly Richards


photo by DeeDee Pierce Wilcox


photo by Holly Richards


photo by Philip Wilchynski


photo by Pat Colletti





Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F39


Florida


HEALTH


Citrus County


Crystal River
117 N. W. Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-6233
Environmental Health
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 194
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-5295
Inverness
120 N. Montgomery Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1731
Lecanto Main/Administration
3700 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0068


Lecanto North
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-249-9258
Vital Statistics
3650 Sovereign Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-5743


Services
* Adult Health Care
* Birth and Death Certificates
* Children's Care
* Dental Care
* Disaster Preparedness
* Disease Prevention
* Environmental Health
* Family Planning/Women's Health
* Health Education
* Healthy Start/Mom Care
* Illness Investigation
* Tobacco Prevention
SWalk in Clinics
* WIC/Nutrition


To make a medical appointment 352-527-0247 for Dental 352-249-9258
www.citruscountyhealth.org


1W






F40 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY


photo by Sabrina Thomas


photo by Linda Breslin-Dorum


photo by Sabrina Thomas


photo by Sherri Vince


photo by Christa Collins




Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014 F41


PENS 5 11660


I'm going to

see Jewel on

Thursday!


Sound familiar?
In the United States alone, 36 million adults have some
degree of hearing loss. In recent years, more and more
people have opted for a modern hearing system. Thanks to
enormous advances in hearing aid technology, it's now
easier than ever to hear what you've been missing!


er#IHANSATON
I hd ,r,,,s *"/'"9^^ V'IB
Let the experts at NuTech Hearing help you
discover the best hearing devises at the lowest
prices! We're here for you!
Visit us in person or at www.nutechhearing.com


Yes, I'd like

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INVERNESS
352-419-7911
3161-C, E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
12 mile east of Walmart


CRYSTAL RIVER
352-794-6155
1122 N. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19)
A block and a half south of Ft. Island Trail


OCALA WEST
352-671-2999
11250 SW 93rd Ct. Rd., Ocala
Next to Chili's


OCALA- EAST
352-861-2775
3405 SW College Rd., Suite 207
Colours Plaza, Next to Red Lobster


' U 1, i.,, .I ll ,i; r l,1i i, ,i ,,jiir,






F42 Discover Citrus County, 2013-2014


DISCOVER CITRUS COUNTY BY













photo by Jeanne Obedzinski photo by Jeanne Obedzinski



Scalloping

They fill up the hotels,
motels and
campgrounds.
Theyjam boat ramps
and waterways.
They keep all the local fishing
guides busy during July August
and September
They boost traffic at gas
stations, retail stores and
restaurants.
"They" are all those visitors
drawn to Citrus County each
year seeking scallops.
Scalloping is big business in
Citrus County from July 1 until
Sept. 11 scallop season.
Although, for the past several
years, the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) has extended
the season. This past season
started on June 29 and was
extended through Sept. 24.
The 2013 season was a good
one. The water clarity was good
and the scallops were good sized
and plentiful. Catching the limit
during the 2013 season was easy.
mhi nl\iwc.com


photo by Linda Breslin-Dorum


photo by Jeanne Obedzinski




Full Text

PAGE 1

OCTOBER 27, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 81 $1 CITRUS COUNTYDiscover Discover: Give new life to your lifestyle /Inside www.chronicleonline.com Annies Mailbox......A14 Classifieds................D5 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B3 Lottery Payouts........B3 Menus.....................A20 Movies....................A14 Obituaries..............A18 Together..................A15 Veterans..................A17 INDEX HIGH79LOW50Sunny.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SUNDAY Due to early deadlines, late sports news and lottery results were not available for todays edition. The Chronicle apologizes for the inconvenience. MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerThe choice for Citrus Countys first executive director of tourism exaggerated credentials on his rsum to appear he spent a longer time at two similar jobs than he actually had, according to reports and interviews. Robert Bob Marx, who is set to be confirmed by county commissioners Nov. 5 to the $75,000-a-year position, said on his rsum and job application that he was president and chief executive officer of the Peoria, Ill., Area Convention and Visitors Bureau from January 2010 to January 2013. In actuality, he resigned in January 2012. Marx also listed on his rsum an identical position in Bakersfield, Calif., from December 2006 to September 2008. He actually only spent six months on that job, though he stayed in Bakersfield until 2008 as a marketing consultant, according to interviews and published reports. Marx, in an interview Friday, acknowledged the discrepancies, but said they were simple errors because he continued work in both communities as a tourism consultant after resigning from the convention bureaus. In actuality, I was working with them still, he said, referring to the Peoria job. I was an ally and supported what they were doing. Perhaps I didnt sit in the chair, per se. They realized my importance and felt I was a player. Citrus County officials, who offered Marx the job earlier this month, were unaware of the rsum errors until a reporter told them Friday afternoon. Later Friday, Human Resources Director Sherry Anderson said she confirmed with Marxs former employers that Marx ended his Peoria job in January 2012 and began his next job with GF Hotels that same month. Marxs rsum said he was with GF from January 2013 to July 2013. I think it was a typographical error, a lapse in memory, Anderson said. Choice for Citrus tourism director admits incorrect dates in job history Special to the ChronicleRobert Bob Marx is in the running for the position of executive director of tourism, a job which starts at $75,000 annually. See RSUM/ Page A2 Associated PressMONTPELIER, Vt. As states open insurance marketplaces amid uncertainty about whether theyre a solution for health care, Vermont is eyeing a bigger goal, one that more fully embraces a government-funded model. The state has a planned 2017 launch of the nations first universal health care system, a sort of modified Medicare-for-all that has long been a dream for many liberals. The plan is especially ambitious in the current atmosphere surrounding health care in the United States. Republicans in Congress balk at the federal health overhaul years after it was signed into law. States are still negotiating their terms for implementing it. And some major employers have begun to drastically limit their offerings of employee health insurance, raising questions about the future of the industry altogether. In such a setting, Vermonts plan looks more and more like an anomaly. It combines universal coverage with new cost controls in an effort to move away from a system in which the more procedures doctors and hospitals perform, the more they get paid, to one in which providers have a set budget to care for a set number of patients. The result will be health care thats a right and not a privilege, Gov. Peter Shumlin said. Where some governors have backed off the politically charged topic of health care, Shumlin recently surprised many by digging more deeply into it. In an interview with a newspapers editorial board, he reversed himself somewhat on earlier comments that As feds wrangle overhaul, Vt. eyes single-payer See HEALTH CARE/ Page A8 PATFAHERTY Staff writerThe long-term care component of Floridas Medicaid reform will soon be hitting Citrus County. The change is part of the shift to the Statewide Medicaid Managed Care Program. Eventually, all of Floridas 3.2 million Medicaid enrollees will be moved to private health insurance companies. The long-term care rollout started in August, with the entire state expected to be covered March 1, 2014. It a huge undertaking, and there have been some problems, said Allen Curtis, administrator of Citrus Health and Rehab Center. But those issues should be resolved by the time it gets to our area. Citrus County currently has approximately 23,000 residents eligible for some type of Medicaid services, with 3,209 of them age 65 and older. Eligibility for Medicaid is determined by Department of Children and Families or the Social Security Administration (for SSI recipients). According to the Florida Agency for Health Medicaid changes coming to Citrus While the la w pushes patients toward private insurers, some services must be covered. /Page A10. Enrollees being moved to private plans See MEDICAID/ Page A10 ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESSonny Cooter enjoyed the cooler temperatures Saturday as he welcomed guests to his annual party.He had to shine his shell first, though, for the 10th annual Great American Cooter Fest at Liberty Park after a late night of dancing at the Rock the Block concert Friday. Sonny was a little lost for words as he was overwhelmed by the number of friends present at the festival. However, Inverness special events director Sharon Skeele-Hogan said Cooter Fest represents building family relationships. The beauty pageant always chokes me up and last night the rock the block had 3,000 people there, she said. This is all for hometown awesomeness. The people here are enjoying Todays activities:6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.: Cooter triathlon Noon: Cooterween registration 1 p.m.: Cooterween costume contest 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.: Cooter Cup turtle races 2:45 p.m.: Duck, Duck, Cooter race 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.: Greg Solomon magic show 4 p.m.: Trick-or-treat/ cupcake wars PARTY ON, SONNY STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleEighteen-month-old Bentley Robertson and mother Elexis of Crystal River meet with Sonny Cooter on Saturday at the 10th annual G reat American Cooter Festival in Inverness. SONNY CELEBRATES A DECADE AS COOTER FEST KICKS OFF See COOTER/ Page A11

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However, that contradicts Marxs recollection that he spent nearly a year in the Peoria area, providing tourism consultation to smaller communities that partner with the convention bureau. Anderson also said she spoke with someone with the Greater Bakersfield Area Convention and Visitors Bureau who confirmed Marxs employment from December 2006 to September 2008. That contradicts both published reports of Marxs resignation in May 2007 and Marxs recollection that he spent more than a year consulting in the Bakersfield area after leaving the convention bureau. A reporter called the number in Bakersfield that Anderson provided. The number was for Rick Davis, a former member of the Bakersfield convention board who retired three years ago. He said he was relying on memory when he gave Anderson the employment dates. Davis, who also was the Kern County, Calif., tourism director, confirmed he hired Marx as a consultant after he left the Bakersfield job to continue marketing work in the area. We were close friends. Hes a very likeable man, Davis said.Marx sought moving expenses, accommodationsMarx was a last-minute entry in the application stack for Citrus County director of tourism, a job recently created by the Tourism Development Council and approved by the county commission. Funding for the Citrus County Visitors and Convention Bureau comes solely from the bed tax on overnight accommodations. Marx said he had recently moved to Kissimmee from Philadelphia, where he was director of sales and marketing for GF Hotels, a company that provides help at hotels in transition between management teams. He said he left GF because he wanted to return to Florida. From 1998 to 2006, Marx was president and owner of Reed Roberts Marketing Communications in West Palm Beach. Marx said he was serving as an adjunct professor at the University of Central Floridas Rosen College of Hospitality Management when he learned of the Citrus County job. One of three finalists, Marx met with members of the TDC, Commissioner Rebecca Bays and Assistant County Administrator Cathy Pearson. The only other time he had visited Citrus County, Marx said, was participating in a golf tournament in Inverness as part of his West Palm Beach consulting company. Impressed with his credentials and background, the TDC made Marx its unanimous choice on Oct. 9. Pearson made the offer to Marx for the new directors job at a starting salary of $75,000, plus an increase of up to $5,000 after six months at the TDCs discretion. The next day, Marx sent an email to Pearson in which he made several financial requests, including:The pay would increase to $80,000 in three months instead of six.The county would pay moving expenses from Chicago, where his furniture is stored. Marx said moving the furniture from Chicago to Kissimmee would be about $4,900, but he could get a better estimate for a move to Citrus County and let Pearson know.Forty-five days of free hotel accommodations to give him time to find permanent residency. Since it is the slow season I would bet that one of the hotels would offer a very favorable rate to the county, plus this would provide me an opportunity to learn the hospitality product and customer base in the area, he wrote to Pearson. In another email three days later, Marx asked about an expense account and mileage reimbursement. Pearson said she flatly told him the county would not provide moving or living expenses. The only perk, offered to all hires at a department director level, is three weeks of annual vacation. And, because the position is a department director, Marx can be fired without cause and receive two months severance pay. Should commissioners confirm him on Nov. 5, his scheduled starting date is Nov. 18.Marx: No intention to hide anythingPolitics, Marx said, forced him from both jobs in Peoria and Bakersfield. In Peoria, the city government wanted to significantly reduce the convention bureaus funding. I thought I couldnt be successful where there was that strong a headwind of people trying to cut our budget for no significant reason, he said. Two years into a threeyear contract, Marx resigned. He said he spent the next eight months working as a paid consultant for smaller towns in Peoria County to better coordinate their marketing strategies with the convention bureau. He declined a reporters request to name the towns he worked with. The Bakersfield job came to an end six months after it began. Marx said the city wanted to take control of the convention bureau and he knew his employment days were numbered when the city manager eliminated the tourism board. Id be lying if I said it didnt cross my mind, Marx said, explaining his reasons for resigning. Marxs friend, Rick Davis, hired Marx as a paid marketing consultant for the Kern County tourism bureau. He was very knowledgeable, Davis said. Hes a team-builder with authority. Hes very positive. Marx left Bakersfield in December 2008 for a job as general manager of a new Fairfield Inn & Suites in Gadsden, Ala. During his TDC interviews in Citrus County, Marx said he never mentioned to anyone the discrepancies on his rsum because no one asked about the employment dates. It wasnt done in any deviant, sly behavior, he said of the rsum errors. There was no intention to hide anything. Bays and Pearson both said they were relying on Andersons background check of Marx. Bays, however, said rsum details are important. I like people to be honest with me, she said. Somebody put something on their rsum, Id like for that to be accurate and verified.Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty contributed to this report. Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. A2SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, exa mination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discou nted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICAN MADE! We do not ship to China! $ 59 00 Cleaning Special New Patients Only FREE Exam & X-Rays w/Cleaning D0210 D0150 D1110 Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/31/13 $ 579 00 Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns (For first one) Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/31/13 D2751 $ 690 00 Dentures starting at Upper & Lower Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/31/13 D5510 D5120 FREE Second Opinion X-ray & Exam (New Patients Only) D0210 D0150 If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/31/13 6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy. Crystal River 352-794-6139 Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD We Welcome You To Value Dental Care NEW LOCATION! 000GFKA Meet Dr. Santa Cruz, DMD Dr. Santa-Cruz offers high quality dentistry. Dr. Santa-Cruz was awarded several scholastic awards, he is certified in the administration of Botox/ Dysport/Cosmetic fillers. Originally from Miami, Dr. Cruz is a veteran of Naval Aviation, serving overseas in Japan and the Arabian Gulf. He currently serves in the reserves. 000G8WL Let the Energy Savings Pay for your New Unit! Buy a new 16 SEER 3-Ton 2-Speed Variable Heat Pump for only $135/mo. MINUS Energy Savings of $60/mo. NET COST $ 75.00 Call Bay Area Air Conditioning Today 795-0526 ACT NOW! LIMITED TIME OFFER!! UNDER NORMAL USAGE These 2-speed variable heat pumps not only control the temperature, but also the humidity in your home. The use of multiple sensors allows this system to use the least amount of electricity possible... every second of every day!! FIRST TIME EVER!! 60 Month 0% Financing $1,000 Rebate Federal Tax Credits RSUMContinued from Page A1 During his TDC interviews in Citrus County, Marx said he never mentioned to anyone the discrepancies on his rsum because no one asked about the employment dates.

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Around theCOUNTY Health care changes topic of meetingA panel of local experts will present their perspectives on health care expansion at a League of Women Voters of Citrus County meeting at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills. For information, call 352601-6857 or email lwvcc2013@gmail.com, or visit the Facebook page, League of Women Voters of Citrus County. Nature Coast Republicans to meetThe Nature Coast Republican Club will meet at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, with a coffee social at 8:30 a.m. The guest speaker will be state Sen. Charlie Dean. The meeting will be at American Legion Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. For more information, call 352-344-8786Delegation to meet TuesdayCitrus County Legislative Delegation will meet from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in the Citrus County Commission chamber, in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. For more information, call Dawn Faherty at state Rep. Jimmie T. Smiths office at 352-560-6020. Fall festival planned at Baptist churchFirst Baptist Church of Inverness will host its Fall Festival from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at 550 Pleasant Grove Road. This is a free event with hay rides, games and food. For more information, call 352-726-1252, or go to www.fbcinverness.com. From staff reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Correction According to incorrect information provided to the Chronicle the site of the Red Ribbon Week mustache on Page A7 in Saturdays edition was incorrect. Students at Central Ridge Elementary School lined up to make the pictogram. The Chronicle regrets the error. Readers can alert the Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. Crist plots political comeback Former governor now running as a Democrat Associated PressORLANDO Charlie Crist had barely entered the room before a throng of teachers swarmed him. The union delegates and stalwart Democrats wanted autographs, pictures, hugs and even kisses from the former Republican governor. We love you, Charlie! a woman shouted, locking arms with Crist as someone snapped a picture. I love you all, he told those gathered at the Florida Education Associations annual convention this month. Nearly three years after losing a U.S. Senate campaign to Republican Marco Rubio and leaving the governors mansion, Crist is plotting a political comeback that seems fantastical even by Floridas stranger-than-fiction standards. The man who once identified himself as a Ronald Reagan Republican is preparing for another gubernatorial bid, this time as a Barack Obama Democrat. As he travels the nations largest swingvoting state, Crist is emphasizing the bipartisanship and consensus-building that marked his sole term as governor. Most early polls show him leading the unpopular incumbent, Republican Gov. Rick Scott, a former hospital company executive elected with tea party support in 2010. Democratic officials, looking for a candidate to lead them back to power in Florida after 15 years, have embraced the convert. In an era of political polarization, Democratic leaders see his pragmatic governing record as a national model for a party trying to claim the political center and solidify gains among the countrys fast-growing bloc of independent voters. A statewide victory also would give Florida Democrats an organizational edge in the 2016 presidential election. The shutdown and the fiasco in Washington have made that style of bringeverybody-together government much more popular, said Ed Rendell, the former Democratic governor of Pennsylvania and ex-chairman of the National Governors Association. Charlies going to ride a wave. According to a Gallup poll this month, nearly half of Americans now identify themselves as independent, an all-time high. A separate survey found that a record 60 percent of Americans are so dissatisfied with the way Democrats and Republicans are governing the country that they favor the creation of a third major party. Crist, who calls himself the peoples governor, might be able to capitalize on that disenchantment if voters are willing to overlook his history of conflicting positions in key areas. His reputation as a moderate governor stemmed in part from his willingness to break with the GOP on major issues. He vetoed legislation that would have required ultrasounds before abortions, killed a bill that would have instituted merit pay for teachers and supported the restoration of voting rights for ex-felons. Scott has since signed ultrasound and merit-pay bills and reversed Crists voting rights effort. Crist calls bringing a new tone to Tallahassee of bipartisanship his proudest achievement. People are so fed up with the partisan rancor that we are experiencing on a national level, Crist recently told The Associated Press. I would compare it to children in a schoolyard, but that would be insulting to the children in the schoolyard. Associated PressNearly three years after losing a blistering U.S. Senate campaign to Republican Marco Rubio and leaving the governors mansion, former Gov. Charlie Crist is plotting a political comeback that seems fantastical even by Floridas stranger-than-fiction standards. City council meets on MondayA.B. SIDIBE Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER The city council on Monday will take up the issue of allowing public input during meetings. City officials would like to set a public comment policy that is in compliance with state law. The city currently allows for public comment during two designated periods at each council meeting. In addition, public comment is allowed prior to any action being taken on a public-hearing item. The Citrus County Commission recently began disallowing public comment during public-hearing items amid public outcry. This year, the Florida Legislature adopted a law that mandates that members of the public be given a reasonable opportunity to be heard on a proposition before a public board or commission. The statute provides that the publics right to be heard is to be subject to rules or policies adopted by the board or commission, with such rules or policies to be limited to those that: Provide guidelines regarding the amount of time an individual has to address the board or commission. Prescribe procedures for allowing representatives of groups to address the board or commission, rather than all members of such groups. Prescribe procedures for an individual to use in order to inform the board or commission of a desire to be heard. Designate a specified period of time for public comment. City officials said while the city has previously allowed public comment, it wants the council to adopt a formal policy on public comment in accordance with state statute. The council also will: Discuss the issue of the idled harvester used by Save Crystal River Inc. to clean up Kings Bay. Recently there has been a spate of letters, with the first one coming from Steve Lamb and asking the city council to write to the board of Save the Manatee Club, requesting that the organization not present a legal challenge to a permit being sought by Save Crystal River to run the harvester. Helen Spivey, cochair of Save the Manatee Club, replied to the citys letter saying while her organization is committed to the cleanup of the bay and applauds every effort to do so, it would not stand idly by and watch harm done to the bay, even if the intent was noble. Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, has joined the fray by writing a letter to Jimmy Buffett, the co-founder of Save the Manatee Club, asking that a legal challenge to the new permit not happen. Introduce Leslie Bollin as the citys special events coordinator. Get the latest crime statistics from Capt. Danny Linhart, the Citrus County Sheriffs Offices westside commander. Hear information regarding legal requirements related to extending the term of the Community Redevelopment Agency. Discuss the status of major projects for fiscal year 2014. At the CRA meeting at 6:30 p.m., the council in its capacity as the board will consider approval of a resolution appropriating $17,500 as matching funding for a Southwest Florida Water Management District grant that will provide a design for a stormwater system for the commercial waterfront district and portions of the northeast section of the city.Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@chronicleonline.com. Public comment on CR agenda Special to the ChroniclePhilip Rhinesmith, a senior environmental scientist for the Southwest Florida Water Management District will be the featured speaker for the Coffee and Conversation at the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum at 7 p.m. Nov. 7. He will describe the archaeological finds discovered by divers during the restoration of the Chassahowitzka Springs, a popular recreation site in southwestern Citrus County, which has had human occupation for more than 9,000 years. Chassahowitzka is a Seminole word meaning place of the pumpkins. As engineers and workers from the water district and Underwater Engineering Services Inc. (UESI) cleaned the springs, clearing organic sediment that was 12 feet thick in some places, they realized they were uncovering significant evidence of human occupation and use of the springs. Rhinesmith will tell the story of researching the area of Chassahowitzka Springs through the Florida Master Site File at the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, which is the states official inventory of historical cultural resources. We knew the area was inhabited during several periods of human occupation, he said. To protect and conserve these cultural resources, the district worked with Southeast Archaeological Research Inc. to develop a plan to conserve and recover the cultural resources exposed during the sediment removal process. That discoveries of these artifacts and the opening of this window to the past will allow a whole new story to be told on the history of the Chassahowitzka Springs and the community of the same name, going back over time some 9,000 years, said Kathy Turner Thompson, Citrus County historical resources manager stated. The program is free and open to the public. For seat reservations, call 352-3416427 or 352-341-6436, or email katherine.turner @bocc.citrus.fl.us. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Scientist to discuss springs research Volunteers make a difference STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleVolunteers Paul Calbacher and Wilfred Provencher pack a truck Saturday with boxes of food donated by Citrus County residents during the 2013 countywide food drive. Food was donated by individuals leaving bags and boxes at their mailbox to be picked up by mail carriers who, in turn, dropped the items at the post office. From there, the food is taken to the Daystar Life Center in Crystal River for distribution to various agencies and local food banks. The Community Food Bank of Citrus County along with Citrus County Harvest, the United States Postal Service, Nature Coast Volunteer Center and local food pantries teamed up to make the food drive work. Oct.26 was chosen because it is national Make a Difference Day a Day of Caring, which is the biggest national day of community service. Since 1999 the food drive has collected more than 549,000 pounds of food donated by county residents to help families in need.

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Birthday Do what works best for you in the months ahead. Look over the highs and lows you have experienced recently and choose a path that suits your current situation. Being a little different will draw interest and spark ideas that could turn a little venture into something exciting. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Keep your emotions in check, or you may ruin an opportunity to enrich your life. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Offer something if you want something in return. Your charm and carefree attitude will attract an audience willing to follow your lead and support your venture. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You may be tempted to get involved in an impractical project. Dont be fooled by someones improbable claims. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont follow someone else. You have to make your choice based on your own judgment. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You will instinctively know what will and wont work. Journey in a direction that caters to your skills and expertise, and it will lead to money and success. Aries (March 21-April 19) You will learn something valuable from experiences with people who grab your attention and capture your heart. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Keep your emotions in check when reacting to others. Keep busy with challenging physical activities to avoid emotionally draining conversation. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do your best to right a wrong or to fix a problem that has sprung from a misunderstanding. Share your thoughts and suggestions with the people who count. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Do your own thing and follow your dream. You will meet new friends if you participate in an event that deals with something you know little about. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen to others, but be careful how you respond. Now is not the time to start a war. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Put more into your important friendships. The bonds you have with others will make a difference in the quality of your life. Caring, sharing and teamwork will bring you the greatest joy. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Use your imagination to find a viable solution to your financial problems. A service or skill you have can be turned into a second income with a little ingenuity.TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Oct. 27, the 300th day of 2013. There are 65 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Oct. 27, 1858, the 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, was born in New York City. On this date: In 1904, the first rapid-transit subway, the IRT, was inaugurated in New York City. In 1938, Du Pont announced a name for its new synthetic yarn: nylon. In 1962, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, a U-2 reconnaissance aircraft was shot down while flying over Cuba, killing the pilot, U.S. Air Force Maj. Rudolf Anderson Jr. In 1971, the Democratic Republic of Congo was renamed the Republic of Zaire (but it went back to its previous name in 1997). Ten years ago: Suicide bombers in Baghdad struck Red Cross headquarters and three police stations, killing dozens of people. Five years ago: The body of singer-actress Jennifer Hudsons 7-year-old nephew, Julian King, was found in an SUV three days after Hudsons mother and brother were found shot to death in the Chicago home theyd shared. (The estranged husband of Hudsons sister, William Balfour, is charged in the killings.) One year ago: Sixty million people in the eastern United States braced for high winds, torrential rains, power outages and even snow from Hurricane Sandy, which was headed toward a merger with two wintry weather systems. Todays Birthdays: Actress Nanette Fabray is 93. Actor-comedian John Cleese is 74. Author Fran Lebowitz is 63. Singer Simon Le Bon is 55. Thought for Today: In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. Theodore Roosevelt, American president (1858-1919).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Todays active pollen: Ragweed, grasses, elm Todays count: 5.5/12 Mondays count: 5.5 Tuesdays count: 6.2 ENTERTAINMENT Quincy Jones sues Jackson estateLOS ANGELES Quincy Jones sued Michael Jacksons estate claiming he is owed millions in royalties and production fees on some of the superstars greatest hits. Jones lawsuit Friday seeks at least $10 million from the singers estate and Sony Music Entertainment, claiming the entities improperly re-edited songs to deprive him of royalties and production fees. The music has been used in the film This Is It and a pair of Cirque du Soleil shows based on the King of Pops songs, the lawsuit states. Jones also claims that he should have received a producers credit on the music in This Is It. His lawsuit seeks an accounting of the estates profits from the works so that Jones can determine how much he is owed. The producer worked with Jackson on three of his most popular solo albums, Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad. Jacksons estate wrote in a statement that it was saddened by Jones lawsuit. To the best of its knowledge, Mr. Jones has been appropriately compensated over approximately 35 years for his work with Michael, the statement said. An after-hours message left at Sony Musics New York offices was not immediately returned. Jacksons hits Billie Jean, Thriller and Dont Stop Til You Get Enough are among the songs Jones claims were reedited to deprive him of royalties and his producers fee. Jones lawsuit states the producers contracts called for him to have the first opportunity to re-edit or alter the songs, in part to protect his reputation.Malaysia bans Ke$ha concertKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Authorities in Muslim-majority Malaysia have banned a planned concert by U.S. pop singer Ke$ha after deciding it would hurt cultural and religious sensitivities. Concert organizer Livescape said it received a letter about the decision on the eve of the show that was to be held Saturday at a Kuala Lumpur stadium. The Ministry of Communications and Multimedia said separately that it was rejecting the application for Ke$ha to perform for reasons of religion and culture. The ministrys statement did not elaborate. Ke$ha, whose hits include Tik Tok and Die Young, has songs that make explicit references to sex and liquor. Last month, Malaysian officials also barred a performance by American metal band Lamb of God, accusing the Grammynominated groups work of being blasphemous. Ke$ha and her team had previously agreed to modify their planned show in Malaysia, including making changes to her song lyrics and wardrobe, to comply with the governments general guidelines for performers, Livescape said in its statement.Clevelands rock hall honors StonesCLEVELAND It was a big day in Cleveland for fans of the Rolling Stones. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum wrapped up a weeklong schedule of events honoring the Rolling Stones as part of its annual Music Masters series. The final days events Saturday included a conference focused on the career of the Rolling Stones and their impact on rock music. And Saturday night it was an all-star tribute concert with musicians who have performed with the Rolling Stones over the past half-century. From wire reports Associated PressQuincy Jones sued Michael Jacksons estate on Friday claiming that he was owed millions in royalties and fees on music thats been used in post-death Jackson projects. A4SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Fictitious Name Notices . . . . . D10 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . D10 Lien Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D10 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . D10 77 51 78 82 73 46 78 47 47 51

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Associated PressSILVER SPRINGS State officials will no longer allow a trapper to snare wild monkeys from a central Florida state park and sell them to research laboratories. A Department of Environmental Protection spokesman told the Tampa Bay Times the agency is looking for other ways to deal with the invasive species. Trapper Scott Cheslak has captured about 700 of the rhesus macaques monkeys with state permission over the past decade. The monkeys are a popular sight for tourists at the Silver River State Park. They have been in the area since the 1930s, though no one is certain exactly how they arrived. Some say they got loose during the filming of a Tarzan movie. A more plausible theory is that they were placed on a small island in the Silver River as an attempt to spice up the Silver Springs Jungle Cruise ride for tourists. The operator of the cruise, however, didnt realize the monkeys could swim. The rhesus macaques have thrived in the central Florida woods. Their colony grew to about 100, but with suburban development conflicts developed. In the 1980s, there were reports that the monkeys had attacked a 3-year-old boy and threatened a game warden, but those faded over time. Cheslak originally worked for a company that supplied monkeys to research laboratories, but the companys CEO later decided to discontinue the practice, believing it was wrong to cage monkeys that had been in the wild for so long. Cheslak, however, continued the work as an independent contractor. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, he was selling some of the monkeysto a research facility. Many of the monkeys Cheslak caught were juveniles or yearlings. His license expired last year, and he hasnt trapped any since. He did not respond to a request for comment. State officials worry the monkeys could pose a health threat to humans because most of the ones Cheslak has captured tested positive for herpesB, which can be fatal. However, there have not been any cases of people infected by the Silver Springs rhesus macaques. The only cases have taken place in laboratories. The manager of the Silver River State Park told the Timeslast year state officials have been torn about the species, considered both a tourist attraction and a health hazard. We know people like to see the monkeys, but we know they dont belong here, manager Sally Leib said. The Animal Rights Foundation of Florida had petitioned the state to stop the trapping. We are very happy that (the park) will once again be known for its natural beauty and outdoor activities, not as a supplier of animals for cruel laboratory experimentation, the groups spokesman, Don Anthony, said a news release Friday.STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A5 000GE3H Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way 000G7M5 Same Day Appointments Available! Dr. Shirley A. Ice is going on sabbatical beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care continuity, she recommends her patients see her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from Suncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our other locations for your convenience. Inverness 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N. Florida Ave. 489-2486 000GAJW 000GAJW 000GE3W State: Trapper can no longer sell monkeys to labs An alpha male called King Phillip, or snaggle tooth because of his right fang hanging over his lower lip, displays a threat call on Sept. 17 along the shoreline of the Silver River in Floridas Silver Springs State Park. Citizen biologist Bob Gottschalk of Lady Lake, Fla., has studied on the rhesus macaques along the Silver River for about six years. Associated Press

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Sarah Chadwick, 65HERNANDOSarah Jane Chadwick, of Hernando, Fla., passed away Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. She was the daughter of James M. Busby and Drucella Reeves, born Oct. 25, 1948, in Salem, Ore. Sarah was united in marriage to Phillip G. Chadwick July 17, 1966, celebrating 47 years of blissful marriage. Sarah graduated from Burlington High School and attended vocational school to become a licensed cosmetologist in Colorado. Her true calling was working with children, operating an inhome daycare center and as an ESE teachers aide for the Citrus County School District. Sarah made lifelong impressions on her students and her colleagues. She was Support Person of the Year for 2008-09 at Citrus High School. Sarah was also a member of the Inverness Order of Eastern Star, Inverness Women of the Moose and past president of the Citrus Shrine Clubs Noble Ladies. She was preceded in death by her father, James Busby; and two brothers, Danny Lee Busby and Tommy Dean Busby. Left to cherish her memories are her husband Phillip; her mother, Drucella Clausen, Beverly Hills; daughter, Sandra (George) Goff of Hernando; sons, Phillip Chadwick (Corey) of Greeley, Colo., and Paul Chadwick (Mary) of Cedar Ridge, Colo.; several loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren; two sisters, Lynda Allen (Larry) of Fort Collins, Colo., and Joyce Merriman (Jim) of Kearney, Neb.; and one brother, Doug Busby (Tammy) of Calgary, Canada. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to a scholarship fund. Contact Phil at 352302-2770 for more information. A memorial service will be at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, at the Unity Church in Lecanto. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Frank Esposito, 79INVERNESSFrank J. Esposito, age 79, Inverness, died Oct. 25, 2013, surrounded by his loving family and under the care of Hospice of Citrus County. Frank was born on Nov. 11, 1933, in Bronx, N.Y., to the late Frank D. and Helen (Reiser) Esposito. Frank served our country in the United States Air Force. He was employed by Western Electric for 32 years as a supervisor. He enjoyed gardening, bowling, music and loved to play the organ. He was a true Frank Sinatra fan. Frank served as a volunteer for the Highlands Civic Crime Watch for more than 15 years. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 32 years, Angelina Angie Angel Esposito; sons, Frank D. (Velarie) Esposito, Aurora, Colo., John (Debra) Esposito, Pawling, N.Y.; daughters, Debra (Bill) Desimone, Joann Esposito, both of Ocala, Fla.,; Mary Esposito (Chris Williams), Fort Montgomery, N.Y., and Robin (Alan) Bisignano, Anaheim, Calif.; his brother, Robert Esposito, Dalton, Mass.; and sister, Helen Esposito, Gainesville, Va.; 13 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and his beloved dog Lexi. A Mass of christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. The family will receive friends in visitation from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, with a wake service at 5 p.m., at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Inurnment will take place at a later date at Florida National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in Franks memory to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Ronnie Rogers, 65FLORAL CITYRonnie L. Rogers, 65, of Floral City, Fla., passed away at his residence on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Floral City. He was born in Savanna, Ill., on March 28, 1948, to the late Bernard and Marjorie (Edie) Rogers. Ronnie was a U.S. Army veteran, and a carpenter in the home-building business. He arrived in this area in 1989, coming from Pinellas Park, Fla., was a Christian and loved playing cards, pitching horseshoes, grilling and spending fun times with his family and friends. Ronnie is survived by his loving wife of 38 years, Ella Rogers. Other survivors include his children, Leeanna Ford and her fiance, Robert, of Floral City, Melissa Rogers of Pinellas Park, Tabitha Lane and her fiance, Lee, of Crestview, Fla., and Renae Herndon and her husband Ricky, of Inverness, Fla.; three brothers, Ric, Kurt and Mark Rogers; 14 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. A celebration of life memorial service is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the VF. Post No. 7122, Floral City, Fla. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Lorraine Makin, 69Lorraine Evelyn Pyers Makin, 69, died Oct. 24, 2013. Arrangements trusted to ICS Cremation & Funeral Home, Lake City, Fla. 386752-3436.A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Kelly Prus 564-2917 kprus@chronicleonline.com 000G7P3 000GE3R 355 NE 10th Avenue Crystal River, FL 34429 352-228-4967 www.cremationcenterofthenaturecoast.com 7449 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Suite 8, Crystal River Visit our RETAIL Showroom (352) 564-2378 SHOWROOM CELL (352) 287-3170 Mon.-Fri. 8:00-4:30 Sat. By Appt. www.MosaicTileAndRemodel.com Tile & Wood Flooring Bathrooms & Kitchens Pavers Pool Decks Driveways Water Features & Caves Fire Pits Retaining Walls Summer Kitchens MOSAIC TILE and REMODEL LIC. #2837 000G7L1 000G85B 000G7C9 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000G81U Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000GGVQ Serving all of Citrus County (352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com Serving all your cremation needs. 000GGAH Hwy. 44 W. Inverness (352) 726-1231 nicknicholasford.com SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 MANAGERS SPECIALS 2011 FORD FIESTA SES SALE PRICED! NP5861 $15,996 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID SALE PRICED! N3C191D $19,626 2010 FORD RANGER XLT EXT CAB SALE PRICED! N3C136A $19,633 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE SALE PRICED! NP5856 $19,988 2010 FORD EDGE AWD SEL SALE PRICED! NP5915 $26,442 2012 FORD EXPEDITION XLT SALE PRICED! N3C205A $34,367 2013 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED SALE PRICED! NP5917 $35,927 2013 FORD FLEX SEL SALE PRICED! Only 1k miles. N3T257A $36,832 32 nd Anniversary Sale 32 nd Anniversary Sale Stop In During Our 32nd Stop In During Our 32nd Anniversary Sale & Check Out Anniversary Sale & Check Out Our Newly Remodeled Showroom. Our Newly Remodeled Showroom. When Simplicity, Affordability and Compassion Matter 4272 E. Louisiana Lane, Hernando ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL McGan Cremation Service LLC 000GDUQ Affordable Cremation Veteran Discounts 24 Hour Service Pre-Arrangements Available 352-419-7917 Sean McGan, OWNER Serving Citrus and Surrounding Counties Family Owned and Operated For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX Obituaries OBITUARIES Phone 352-563-5660 for details.

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Associated PressSALAMANCA, N.Y. Tucked in the foothills of western New Y orks Allegany Mountains, Salamanca doesnt appear to have changed much in the last 100 years let alone the last 10 since the Seneca Indian Nation opened a major casino on the edge of town. With New York about to vote Nov. 5 on a casino proposal thats being promoted as a driver of economic growth in small upstate communities like theirs and the state as a whole, residents here say that while the casino has delivered jobs, the bustle and din of 2,000 slot machines and an average of 8,000 daily visitors, its effect is barely evident outside the gleaming gambling palace walls. When the casino came, I thought, Great, the towns going to perk up, Barbara John said as she worked in a consignment shop near the casino, which towers from the landscape off Interstate 86. I expected more. There have been no spinoff restaurants or attractions to keep casino patrons in town, and existing business owners say that except for two hotels, the fast-food chains in the casinos shadow seem to be the biggest winners of any spillover business. Nevertheless, with more than 900 workers, it has become a go-to employer, several residents said, and with its on-site restaurants and concert hall, another option for a night out in a place that lacks even a movie theater. In Salamanca, you cant even go buy socks and underwear. Theres no place to buy it. Theres no stores, said Mayor Carmen Vecchiarella, who described economic development in the community of 6,000 as stagnant since the casino. He hopes that will change with the citys $3.2 million purchase of a 200-acre plot near the casino. Salamanca will use casino proceeds to build roads to the site with the goal of accommodating tax-paying developers. There has been talk of locating a water park or shopping plaza there. The tribe turns over 25 percent of slot machine revenues to New York, which shares a quarter of that with the host communities. Salamanca, after expenses are paid, is left with an average of $2 million a year for economic development, said Vecchiarella, who only recently received the last four years of casino payments following resolution of a dispute between the state and Senecas.NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A7 000GGWO RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Spring Hill Holiday Inn Express 3528 Commercial Way Attend a FREE Seminar: HIP PAIN? 000G9BZ Hickory Island Lighthouse Lounge Come Sit With Friends At The H.I.L.L.000G72Y48 Hwy. 19 S, Inglis, FL Located on Hwy. 19 South of Hwy. 40www.HickoryIslandFL.com (352) 447-2520 FULL LIQUOR / 14 DRAFTSIce Cold A/C Buzz Time Trivia Darts Pool Tables Table Shuffleboard Huge Screen TVs Biker Friendly $100 BEST COSTUME CARVED PUMPKIN CONTEST $100 Live Band & Prizes October 30, 2013 6-10 PM See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers AND trade-in allowances from $50 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only sold from September 16 November 15, 2013. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where p rohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special t erms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special t erms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: M onthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with t he market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/1/2013. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card f or cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly paymen t if shown based on $xx purchase. 352-746-0098 H.E. Smith Co. Inc 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 www.trane.com LICENSE # RA0035171 Dont let this offer pass you by. Unstoppable savings now thru November 15th. Its tough to find a fall value more unstoppable. Trade-up to Trane, the number one name in reliability. September 16 through November 15, 2013, get renowned Trane efficiency at the best value ever. Pay 0% interest for 36 months, plus a trade-in cash allowance up to $1000. Call today and enjoy the colors of fall. And save green. Energy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage. Tranes XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-thats the Trane difference. Dont get left behind in the cold. Offer only lasts thru November 15th. 000G77M We take customer satisfaction to the highest degree. West Coast Flooring Family Owned & Operated OPEN: M-F 9 am 5 pm SAT 10 am 2 pm Hwy 44, Crystal River 564-2772 Flooring For Every Budget Cash n Carry In Stock Only Not Installed Exp. 10/31/13 VINYL 99 Installed (Trim Extra) LAMINATE FLOORING SALE $ 3 25 Sq. Ft. New Shipment Exp. 10/31/13 CERAMIC TILE $ 3 59 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Ft. Sq. Ft. 000G7KO MOHAWK SOLO CARPET $ 14 99 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Yd. Lifetime Soil & Stain Warranties Does Not Include Tear Out Does Not Include Tear Out 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G8X4 Associated PressDowntown Salamanca,N.Y., pictured on Oct. 17, hasnt changed much since the Seneca Allegany Casino & Hotel opened on the western edge of the city in 2004. With New York about to vote on whether to allow more casinos in small communities like theirs, Salamanca residents say that the casino has delivered promised jobs. Not much has changed, say residents of NY casino town

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Vermont would wait to figure out how to pay for the new system. He said he expects a payroll tax to be a main source of funding, giving for the first time a look at how he expects the plan to be paid for. The reasons tiny Vermont may be ripe for one of the costliest and most closely watched social experiments of its time? Its the most liberal state in the country, according to Election Day exit polls. Democrats hold the governors office and big majorities in both houses of the Legislature. It has a tradition of activism. Several times in recent years, hundreds of people have rallied in Montpelier for a campaign advocating that health care is a human right. Its small. With a population of about 626,000 and just 15 hospitals, all nonprofits, Vermont is seen by policy experts as a manageable place to launch a universal health care project. Within a state like Vermont, it should be much more possible to actually get all of the stakeholders at the table, said Shana Lavarreda, director of health insurance studies at the University of California at Los Angeles Center for Health Policy Research. Vermonts small size also is often credited with helping preserve its communitarian spirit. People in its towns know one another and are willing to help in times of need. The key is demography, said University of Vermont political scientist Garrison Nelson. Discussions about health policy can be handled on a relative face-toface basis, he said. Vermont also has little income diversity, Nelson said. In general, people with lower incomes who dont pay into a health care system make it costlier for other people. Then theres the fact that Vermont is close to universal health care already. Lavarreda noted that the state became a leader in insuring children in the 1990s. Now 96 percent of Vermont children have coverage, and 91 percent of the overall population does, second only to Massachusetts. At this stage, no one knows whether state-level universal health care will succeed, and its an open question as to whether Vermont can work as a model for other states. Developing a singlepayer system for Vermont is a lot easier than in California or Texas or New York state, said U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, using an industry term to describe a system in which health care is paid for by a single entity. Sanders, frequently described as the only socialist in the Senate, has been pushing for some form of socialized medicine since he was mayor of Burlington 30 years ago. The nation is focused on the rollout of the statebased health insurance marketplaces and the disastrous unveiling of healthcare.gov. In the meantime, Vermonts efforts have largely gone unnoticed, said Chapin White, a researcher with the Washington-based Center for Studying Health System Change. Vermonts thinking about 2017, and the rest of the country is just struggling with 2014 right now, White said. Even with years to go before Vermonts singlepayer plan will be in place, several obstacles remain.A8SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE NATION 000GFUQ GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM 000GAL6 HEARING AID REPAIR 2013 2013 2013 2013 Inverness 586-7599 Homosassa 621-8000 Dunnellon 789-1559 All Makes and Models 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY BLINDS BLINDS 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO www.72-hourblinds.com 2012 2012 2012 2012 WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G9JT The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! Faux Wood Blinds Top Treatments Drapery Shades Shutters Verticals 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000G7LU Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs 000GFPJ HEALTH CAREContinued from Page A1 Associated PressWorkers take calls for Vermonts health care exchange Oct. 1 in Burlington, Vt. While much of the nation works to implement the health insurance exchanges under the federal health overhaul law, Vermont does that and also keeps its eye on a bigger goal, one that more fully embraces government-funded health care: The state has a planned 2017 launch of the nations first universal health care system. See HEALTH CARE/ Page A9

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The largest national health insurance industry lobbying group, Americas Health Insurance Plans, has warned that the law could limit options for consumers and might not be sustainable. The plan could disrupt coverage consumers and employers like and rely on today, limit patients access to the vital support and assistance health plans provide, and put Vermont taxpayers on the hook for the costs of an unsustainable health care system, said AHIP spokesman Robert Zirkelbach. And questions have also arisen about the expected cost savings of eliminating multiple insurance companies and their different coverage levels and billing styles. Much of a hospitals billing process is coding to ensure that the right patient is billed the right amount for the right procedure, said Jill Olson, vice president of the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. That would continue in a single-payer system. Vermont also has yet to answer how it will cover everyone. The post-2017 system is not envisioned to include federal employees or those with self-insured employers that assume the risk of their own coverage and are governed by federal law, including IBM, one of the states largest private employers. It also may not include residents who work for and get insurance through companies headquartered out of state, Olson said. At least one resident, 73year-old Gerry Kilcourse, has little patience for the naysayers. Kilcourse said that when he and wife Kathy bought a hardware store in Plainfield in the early 1980s, they struggled for years to find good, affordable health insurance coverage. In retirement, Kilcourse has schooled himself on health policy and advocates for universal coverage. He sees health care as a public good and likens the current campaign to the 19th-century push in the United States for public schools. It should be similar to education, which is publicly funded, Kilcourse said of health care. If we did the same thing for education (as in health care), youd have a number of people being excluded from public schools. Shumlin has made it clear the status quo cant hold. As a part owner himself of a small business a student travel service based in Putney he has spoken often of the burden that employee health coverage is to such business owners. At a Chamber of Commerce forum in September, he called the federal health overhaul a great improvement over the past but added it is not the silver bullet that will ... provide universal access and quality health care for all Vermonters. That, he appears to hope, will come in 2017.NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A9 Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness . . . . 637-2079 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness No two women are created the same. We will take the time to provide services for each individuals needs. Brashears www.BrashearsPharmacy.com PHARMACY POST MASTECTOMY PRODUCTS Mastectomy Bras Breast Forms Prostheses Swimwear & Much More 000G59W 000GE4X DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent 1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Years Licensed, Bonded, Insured $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000G8ZY WINDOW CLEANING Dirty Windows? Window Cleaning Window Tinting BONDED & INSURED Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates! 352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com New customer special Min. order $100 LICENSED & INSURED 000G2JI www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net FLOORING WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER 685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowes on Hwy. 44) Lecanto 341-0813 MON-FRI 8:30-5 SAT 9-4 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Visit Us 000GEXD Tub & Tile RefinishingServing Citrus Since 1989ALL ABOUT BATHSWarranty Porcelain Fiberglass Tile Custom Colors Acrylic Bath Systems Chip Repairs & Morewww.AllAboutBaths.com352 637-2299 Check us out!BATHTUB REFINISHING000FYKY 000FNUL 352-794-0270 www.smcflorida.com CARPET CLEANING Our Services: Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Spot Removal 24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE CR-C057844 Expires 11/30/13 Have a couch and loveseat cleaned, get a chair or recliner cleaned FREE ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13 $ 79 95 3 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE STARTING AT $ 60 00 Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! www.CitrusPest.com 000G91F (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS PEST CONTROL Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River 2013 2013 2013 2013 000G8YN APPLIANCE REPAIR Top Notch Appliance Repair Over 30 Years Experience 352-586-9109 Accepting Credit Cards Licensed & Insured Robert Roik Member of Chamber of Commerce WE BEAT THE COMPETITION!! With Same or BETTER Windows! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED LICENSE #CCL002604 WINDOWS UNLIMITED 352-795-8772 1-800-600-HEAT (4328) www.windowsfla.com WINDOWS 000G7RB ROOFING 000G91L Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices LIC#CC1327656 www.eliteroofing-inc.com 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 639-1024 LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED 000G9GX HEALTH CAREContinued from Page A1 WHATS IN PLACE Beginning in 2017, the state will offer a set package of coverage benefits to every Vermont resident under the program, called Green Mountain Care. A five-member board created under the law has already launched four pilot projects designed to bring down health care costs. For example, one bundles the price of services that often come together, as in a single, set price for the anesthesia, surgery and follow-up physical therapy connected with a knee replacement. The overall goal of the law is to ensure universal access to and coverage for high-quality, medically necessary health services for all Vermonters. It aims to prevent costs and other barriers from keepingpeople from accessing health care.WHATS NEXT Launching Green Mountain Care will require a waiver from the U.S. government to use federal health care funds to run it. A division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will decide whether to grant the waiver, likely late in the Obama administrations final term, said Robin Lunge, Gov. Peter Shumlins director of health reform. She said Vermont had been successful in winning earlier waivers allowing it to make changes to its Medicaid system. Vermont lawmakers must also approve a state financing plan, which has yet to be developed. The Legislature signaled its support for some form of state financing when it passed the law in 2011.Associated Press

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Care Administration (AHCA), current Medicaid recipients receiving nursing facility care and certain similar services will be required to participate. It also affects those on Medicaid due to a disability requiring nursing facilitylevel care. In the future, they will receive long-term care services through a plan managed by one of several selected insurance companies. Those companies will be paid a per-member rate by the state for treatment. Notification for Citrus and the other counties in Region 3 is scheduled to begin Nov. 1 with a prewelcome letter. That will be followed up with a welcome letter Dec. 20 and a reminder letter in January. Feb. 13 will be their last day to choose a managed care plan before initial enrollment, which starts March 1, 2014. Participants will then have a 90-day window to change plans. After that plans can only be changed for good cause reasons or during the annual open enrollment period. Participants in the LTC program will be identified based on current Medicaid enrollment data, said AHCA spokesperson Shelisha Coleman. She added that if a family member feels that they should have been notified and have not been, they can submit a complaint through our online complaint form at http://apps.ahca.myflorida. com/smmc_cirts/. But theres no reason to get stressed out, Curtis said. There is not a lot for patients and their families to worry about. He said there will be counselors available, it will not affect the levels of care and most of the detail work will fall on the providers. Under AHCA guidelines, the new plans will be required to continue existing services for 60 days or until the patient receives a comprehensive assessment and a new plan of care is developed. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com.A10SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE LOCAL 000GG4I Buying Hours 10am-5pm No appointment necessary Crystal River Mall Accessories next to Cosmetics October 29 through 31 000GCPC Office Locations: Crystal River & Inverness 352-795-5700 MANDATED SERVICE PROVISIONSWhile the new Medicaid long-term care plans may limit eligible health care providers, there are some services that must be covered: Adult companion care. Adult day health care. Assisted living. Assistive care services. Attendant care. Behavioral management. Care coordination/ case management. Care-giving training. Home accessory adaption. Home-delivered meals. Homemaker. Hospice. Intermittent and skilled nursing. Medical equipment and supplies. Medication administration. Medication management. Non-emergency transportation. Nursing facility. Nutritional assessment/risk reduction. Personal care. Personal emergency response system. Respite care. Therapies occupational, physical, respiratory and speech. MEDICAIDContinued from Page A1 GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.

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LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A11 RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The Villages Comfort Suites 1202 Avenida Central Attend a FREE Seminar: KNEE PAIN? 000G9BV 000GGYF 000G85D with their hearts and are happy to be here. Its all about family fun. I cant think of anything more important than doing that. It helped that there was some aromas leading noses to the parks food vendors everything from barbecue and chicken pitas to Greek kebabs and authentic gyros, kettle corn, boiled peanuts and funnel cakes. Plus, Sonny indicated that local agencies and organizations had lots of information and there was ample opportunity to get a jump start on holiday gift shopping. We have over 90 vendors here today, SkeeleHogan said. We have everything from crafts, food court, kids play area and more. From live turtle races, bounce houses, Little Miss Cooter Princess, children and turtles of all ages had something to do. And the fun continues today, beginning at noon and closing at 5 p.m.Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington can be contacted at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington @chronicleonline.com. COOTERContinued from Page A1 Darryl Harris with Jakes BBQ prepares for the lunch crowd, checking turkey legs in the smoker at Liberty Park. Cyclists Amy Rahn, left, and Debbie Perez of Tampa were riding along the Withlacoochee Trail and just happened upon the festival. Photos by STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleNine-year-old Sabrina Riley of Dunnellon waits patiently for her pretzel. To see more scenes from the 10th annual Cooter Fest, visit www.chronicleonline.com.

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NATION& WORLD Page A12SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Saudi women drive in protest with little problem Associated PressRIYADH, Saudi Arabia More than 60 women across Saudi Arabia claimed they drove cars Saturday in defiance of a ban keeping them from getting behind the wheel, facing little protest by police in their push for easing restrictions on women in the kingdom. The campaigns message is that driving should be a womans choice. The struggle is rooted in the kingdoms hard-line interpretation of Islam known as Wahabbism, with critics warning that women driving could unravel the very fabric of Saudi society. Though no laws ban women from driving in Saudi Arabia, authorities do not issue them licenses. Women who drove on Saturday had drivers licenses from abroad, activists said. Activist Aziza Youssef, a professor at King Saudi University, and another activist said protest organizers received 13 videos and about 50 phone messages from women showing or claiming they had driven. She said they have no way to verify the messages. May Al Sawyan, a 32-year-old mother of two and an economic researcher, told The Associated Press that she drove from her home in Riyadh to the grocery store and back. Activists uploaded a four-minute video of her driving to the campaigns YouTube account. Al Sawyan said she was prepared to be jailed if caught by authorities. She said she was far enough from a police car that she was not spotted. I just took a small loop, she said. I didnt drive for a long way, but it was fine. Al Sawyans husband and family waited at home and called her nervously when she arrived at the store to check on her, she said. She drove with a local female television reporter in the car. They were both without male relatives in the vehicle, which in itself defies the countrys strict norms requiring women to have a male relative in public. Associated PressDemonstrators protest during a rally Saturday outside of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, demanding Congress investigate the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs. Associated PressA Saudi woman said she got behind the wheel Saturday and drove to the grocery store without being stopped or harassed by police, kicking off a campaign protesting the ban on women driving in the ultraconservative kingdom. Students mom grieves son, teacher in killing Associated PressDANVERS, Mass. The mother of the Massachusetts teenager accused of killing his teacher inside a school bathroom is brokenhearted over the educators death and seeks prayers for her son, according to a statement released Saturday by her sons defense attorney. Diana Chism also asked for prayers for the family of slain Danvers High School teacher Colleen Ritzer, saying her heart is broken for the Ritzer family and the loss of their daughter and sister. Fourteen-year-old Philip Chism is being held without bail on charges he killed Ritzer after school Tuesday, then dumped her body in the woods behind the school. He was arrested early Wednesday. Ms. Chism would like you to know that her son was born in love and is dear to her, very dear, said the statement released by defense attorney Denise Regan. She asks that you know that she cares for the worlds hurt over this and greatly hopes for your prayers for the Ritzer family, the Danvers community, for her son, and all those affected by this tragedy. Authorities have offered no clues on Chisms alleged motive. They also would not say how Ritzer, a 24-year-old math teacher, was killed. Court to test surveillance law Justice Department intends to use information from spy program against accused terrorist Associated PressWASHINGTON The Justice Department said for the first time that it intends to use information gained from one of the National Security Agencys warrantless surveillance programs against an accused terrorist, setting the stage for a likely Supreme Court test of the Obama administrations approach to national security. The high court so far has turned aside challenges to the law on government surveillance on the grounds that people who bring such lawsuits have no evidence they are being targeted. Jamshid Muhtorov was accused in 2012 of providing material support to the Islamic Jihad Union, an Uzbek terrorist organization that, authorities say, was engaging NATO coalition and U.S. forces in Afghanistan. According to court papers in the case, the FBI investigated Muhtorov after his communications with an overseas website administrator for the IJU. In a court filing Friday, the government said it intends to offer into evidence in Muhtorovs case information obtained or derived from acquisition of foreign intelligence information conducted pursuant to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978. Last February, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 vote that a group of American lawyers, journalists and organizations could not sue to challenge the 2008 expansion of the law. The court those who sued could not show that the government would monitor their communications along with those of potential foreign terrorist and intelligence targets. Last month, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who had ruled with the majority in the earlier 5-4 decision, said the courts ultimately would have to determine the legality of the NSA surveillance program. In the majority opinion last February, Justice Samuel Alito suggested a way for a challenge to be heard. He said if the government intends to use information from such surveillance in court, it must provide advance notice. In his argument before the courts decision, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli had made similar comments to the justices on behalf of the administration. NY state creating gas reserve to prevent shortagesNEW YORK Gov. Andrew Cuomo saidNew York is creating the nations first state gasoline reserve to prevent shortages during emergencies. Cuomo said Saturday that a pilot program on Long Island will hold 3 million gallons of fuel for motorists and first responders. The project is a response to the gas shortages that created hourslong lines in the days after superstorm Sandy. Cuomo says New Yorkers need to be able to get around after bad weather. The reserve will use capacity owned by Northville Industries on Long Island. Cuomo says gasoline from the reserve will be released as needed to meet fuel needs while the industry recovers from an operations disruption, like Sandy.Detroit bets on uncertainty of rail, new arenaDETROIT Detroit may be too broke to pay its bills, but its still thinking big. As the debt-ridden city moves through bankruptcy proceedings, local and state leaders are backing plans to build a new hockey arena and streetcar line. The developments would cost $800 million and bet at least $300 million in future tax revenues to attract people to a city that residents have been fleeing for 60 years. Skeptics said the plans are risky for a city with so much debt that it cant fund services as simple as streetlights. Supporters predict the downtown improvements will expand the tax base and lay the path to a brighter financial future. Jimmy Saviles chauffeur charged with rapeLONDON The former driver for disgraced late BBC entertainer Jimmy Savile has appeared in court to face charges including multiple counts of raping girls younger than 16. Saviles reputation as a popular if eccentric personality collapsed after his death in 2011 at age 84, when hundreds of witnesses and victims came forward accusing him of sexual abuse. Police have since described him as a serial sexual predator. British police charged the driver, 72-yearold Ray Teret, with 32 offenses that allegedly took place between 1962 and 1996, including multiple counts of rape and indecent assault. The 15 accusers were all under the age of 16 at the time.Syrian Kurds capture border crossing with IraqBEIRUT Syrian Kurdish gunmen on Saturday seized a major border crossing with Iraq from al-Qaida-linked groups following intense infighting between rebel groups that raised concerns of a spillover, activists and an Iraqi official said. The latest violence coincided with a visit by the U.N.-Arab League envoy to Iran, a staunch ally of President Bashar Assads government, to press efforts for international peace talks aimed at ending the civil war, now in its third year. The Kurdish militiamen captured the Yaaroubiyeh post in northeast Syria after three days of clashes with several jihadist groups there, including Jabhat al-Nusra and the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. World BRIEFS From wire reports Nation BRIEFS From wire reports Colleen Ritzermurdered on Tuesday.

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EXCURSIONSPage A13SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 Travel & Leisure Special to the ChronicleCatherine Stegemann and Paul Foss enjoyed a trip to Alaska. It was the couples first trip to the state. During their trip, they visited Ketchikan, the salmon capital of the world.The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.DREAMVACATIONSPhoto Contest SARASOTA ut the line for homestyle Amish food at Yoders Restaurant is out the door, with a 45minute wait for a table. Salivating customers snake past a sign listing varieties of pie as waitresses walk by carrying trays heaped with fried chicken. Yoders is located in Pinecraft, an Amish-Mennonite neighborhood that swells in the cold months as buses bring visitors from Amish and Mennonite communities in Ohio and Indiana. Its comfort-food menu reflects traditional Amish home-cooking with yummy staples like noodles, pot roast, meatloaf and mashed potatoes. But the food is prepared with a light touch, avoiding the oversalted goo and blandness that gives this type of cooking a bad name. The menu is also sprinkled with surprises you dont expect to find at an Amish restaurant: Asian chicken salad, Amish quesadillas (chicken, cheese and mushrooms), and a salad of mixed greens, crumbled gorgonzola cheese and dried cranberries. Breakfast includes a veggie Benedict spinach, tomato, and avocado with hollandaise sauce and fresh fruit on the side. No meal here is complete without trying Yoders famous pie, which comes in two dozen varieties. The most popular flavor is peanut butter, with layers of crunchy peanut butter topping and vanilla pudding. Also popular are coconut, banana cream, strawberry and chocolate peanut butter. Some varieties are offered seasonally, like mincemeat. In some parts of the country where the Amish spurn modern ways, youll find horses-and-buggies plying the roads, but here the only horse and buggy is a model in Yoders parking lot. Local adherents of the faith instead get around on three-wheel bikes, which form a virtual parade in some parts of town in winter. Pinecraft is also famous for its post office, which the Amish community bought from the U.S. Postal Service after the branch was scheduled to close, and for its simple church, called the Tourist Church. Both are just a block or two from Yoders. The TLC network has even filmed some of its Breaking Amish episodes in Pinecraft. The reality show looks at young people who were raised Amish and Mennonite as they experience life outside those communities and decide whether to go back to them. Yoders, which opened in 1975, has a gift shop and produce market onsite as well. The restaurant seats 130 people but on a busy day in peak season routinely serves 1,500. Customers are a mix of locals and tourists, and only a few are Amish. Its not unusual to hear all kinds of languages spoken on the line to get in; some vacationers will drive an hour from Tampa-St. Petersburg or even two hours from Orlando to eat here. And after putting away all that fried chicken, noodles and pie or, if you must, a salad theres no better way to enjoy the rest of your day in Sarasota than at Siesta Key beach, just a short drive or three-wheeled bike ride away. Its 2:30 p.m. on a Saturday in October well past lunch, and the slowest time of year in Sarasota, where the beautiful Gulf Coast beaches are most crowded in winter and spring. Beth J. Harpaz Associated Press

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A14SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Dear Annie: My son is a secondgrader. Over the summer, while he was staying with my ex-husband, a boy touched my sons private area over his clothes. This was no slight, accidental touch. It was deliberate. My sons stepmother called child protective services regarding the incident, because the family of the other child runs an inhome day care. As I have sole custody, the child services caseworker contacted me about the incident. I spoke with my ex and his wife, and we were all in agreement that our son would not be in contact with the other child again. It is now four months later, and my son tells me that his father allowed him to play at the home of this same boy who grabbed his genitals. I called my ex, and he doesnt seem to think the initial incident was serious. He feels his wife blew it out of proportion, and theyve had fights about it. I have spoken with child protective services about Dad continuing to allow our son to interact with the neighbor boy who obviously has boundary issues. While my son has not reported a second incident, I am left feeling that I cannot trust his father to parent effectively. Dad seems more interested in proving his wife wrong than he is in protecting our son at this vulnerable age. I cannot in good conscience allow visitation under the current circumstances. I refuse to permit my son to be in a potentially questionable environment, and I cant trust Dad to make the right call. How can I effectively protect my son when hes on Dads watch? I dont want to refuse visitation altogether. Mom in Nebraska Dear Mom: First, please dont demonize this neighbor boy. You were right that the situation needed to be reported, not only because the family runs a day care program, but also because children who molest others are often being abused themselves. We hope CPS checked it out. Still, if you cannot trust your ex to honor the joint decisions you make, your best recourse is to request supervised visitation. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Flavorful 6Icy rain 11Electrical problem 16Nuisance 20Ridge in mountains 21Heartbeat 22The Netherlands 23Nebraska city 25An alloy 26Baker or Loos 27Come into being 28Sensational 29 Palmas 30A martial art 32Mockery 34Tip 35Looked at 37Of and Men 38Slip 39Concurs 41Great pain 43Cod and Canaveral 44Spasm 46Kind of card 49Lustrous fabric 50Banknote 54Sickly 55Gets along 56Make indistinct 57Ladd or Alda 58CIA cousin 59Romes river 60Magnificent 61Gaze 62Gifts for the needy 64Like some floors 65Kent or Gable 66Veer 67Make secrets known 68Golden69Throttle 70Letter after phi 71Ott or Brooks 72Cruiser 74Serious 75Scale 77From Z 80Intelligence 81Low-down guy 82Burn 83Forearm bone 87Gullet 89Analyze grammatically 90Fail 91Error 92Hard to lift 93Flatboat 94Hold fast 95Bed in a sickroom 96Bone (prefix) 97Toward shelter 98Not taut 99Wrinkle 102Female prophets 105Paddle 106Fried cake 107Old-fashioned 108Reek 109Kilmer poem 110Straight man 113Horses 114Ooze 115Vaulted church area 119Time 120Hugged 123Contribute 125State near Ind. 126Private teacher 128British measure 129Prove false 130Legitimate 132Odor 133Musical group 134River in France 135Eat at 136Victim 137Lawn problem 138Stuck in mud 139Saltpeter DOWN 1Costly fur 2Dress richly 3 porridge hot... 4A possessive 5Escritoire 6Frugal 7Madness 8The upper crust 9Punta del 10Light meal 11Hone 12Badger 13Pointed arch 14Trick 15Golf items 16Plane figure 17Earthbound bird 18Garment for a ranee 19Old pronoun 24Appends 31With 32On the (to be considered) 33Vetch seed 36Spanish painter 38By and by 40Refund 42Liquor 43Was concerned 44Torso 45Animal group 46Waterway 47Way between seats 48Andes animal 49Sword 50Fierce look 51Make fearful 52Cut 53Genuflect 55 mignon 56Stopping mechanism 59Snug 60Catchers mitt 61Do the crawl 63Firmament 64Implied but unsaid 65Pursue 66Avoid 69Oil-filled bottle 70Loud sound 73Far and 74Stuff 75Big piece 76Annoy 77A Musketeer 78The ones here 79Speechify 81 and penates 82Hit it off 84Not widespread 85Loop in a rope 86Subsequently 88Go to extremes 89Blanched 90Cut of beef 93Ignoble 94Septs 98Caught sight of 99Crawled 100Regret 101Designer Schiaparelli 103Anxiously 104Check 105Paved ways 106Made 108Holy 109Time in office 110Hardens 111Get the better of 112Horse opera 113Dull surface 114Serious 116Cockpit VIP 117Playground attraction 118 statesman 121Gust 122Paddy plant 123Mr. Arnaz 124Regular 127Grand Opry 129Edge 131Exodus hero SundayPUZZLER Mom worries about playmate (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug h t on C amera C aug h t on C amera Thieves and Thugs C aug h t on C amera Rage (N) S ex Sl aves: Addi ct i on S ex Sl aves B ran d e d (N) S ex Sl aves i n t h e Suburbs (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Let Her Rip Doomsday Preppers Top Survivors American Blackout (N) VAmerican Blackout V (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.See DadInstant Jurassic Park (1993) Sam Neill. 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(In Stereo) R Its a Disaster (2012, Comedy) Julia Stiles. (In Stereo) R Belly (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 300 (2007, Action) Gerard Butler, Lena Headey. R (DVS) The Dark Knight (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. PG-13 (DVS) Resident Evil: Extinction (2007) R (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Planet 51 (2009, Comedy) PG DragonsTeenAmericanClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. GuyChina, IL (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Most TerrifyingTerrifying PlacesMaking MonstersMaking Monsters (N)Halloween Att.Halloween Craziest (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Worlds Dumbest...Top 20 Funniest PGTop 20 Funniest Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsThe Golden GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS Witch Hunt (In Stereo) PG NCIS Code of Conduct NCIS Murder 2.0 (In Stereo) Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Backfire CSI: Miami Meltdown CSI: Miami Mommie Deadest CSI: Miami Time Bomb CSI: Miami All Fall Down CSI: Miami Dishonor (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplayFunny Home Videos SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 27, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Extraordinary Women G Secrets of the Tower of London (N) PG, V Masterpiece Classic The Paradise PG Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) PG As Time Goes By As Time Goes By % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGSecrets of the TowerMasterpiece ClassicMasterpiece ClassicAustin City Limits ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time Good Form PG Revenge Control (N) PG Betrayal ... Nice Photos (N) NewsSpo Night on 9 (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10Evening News 10 News (N) 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) (In Stereo) The Good Wife Hitting the Fan (N) The Mentalist The Red Tattoo (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NFL Football Washington Redskins at Denver Broncos. (N) The OT (N) PG 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. Game 4. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis.(Time tentative). (N) FOX13 11:00 News (N) (In Stereo) 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosOnce Upon a TimeRevenge (N) PGBetrayal (N) NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileWatchmanPeter Youngren Great AwakeningGary Hoffman UnspokenPastor Dayna Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time Good Form PG Revenge Control (N) PG Betrayal ... Nice Photos (N) NewsCastle PG @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Glee Wheels (In Stereo) PG Glee Ballad (In Stereo) PG The Office The Office We There Yet? We There Yet? F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Crash (2004) Sandra Bullock.SeinfeldSeinfeldRepublic of DoyleOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyPaidMinistries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends PG Friends Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami Prey (In Stereo) CSI: Miami Under Suspicion Criminal Minds A Real Rain Criminal Minds (In Stereo) PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy GEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7NFL Football The OT2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. (N) FOX 35 News at 10 (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Mira Quin Baila (N) PG (SS) Sal y Pimienta PGComed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage: NY Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty GovernorsGovernorsGovernorsGovernors (AMC) 55 64 55 I Am Legend (2007, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Alice Braga. PG-13 The Walking Dead Infected MA The Walking Dead Isolation (N) MA Talking Dead (N) The Walking Dead Isolation MA (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be Announced Lone Star Legend Lone Star Legend CallWildman CallWildman Mountain Monsters (In Stereo) CallWildman CallWildman (BET) 96 19 96 David E. Talberts What My Husband Doesnt Know Precious (2009) Gabourey Sidibe. Pregnant and abused, a Harlem teen looks for a way to change her life. R T.D. 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(DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Teen BeachWanderYonder Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Liv & Maddie Jessie G Dog With a Blog G Austin & Ally G Jessie G GoodCharlie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCSMLS Soccer: Galaxy at Sounders SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49WTA Tennis Baseball Tonight (N)NHRA Drag Racing Toyota Nationals. From Las Vegas. NASCAR Now (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over Live PGSunday Night PrimeChesterRosaryDogmatic TheologyGodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 The Addams Family (1991) Addams Family Values (1993, Comedy) Anjelica Huston. PG-13 Hocus Pocus (1993, Comedy) Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker. PG Ravenswood Pilot (In Stereo) (FLIX) 118 170 Nola The Ref (1994, Comedy) Denis Leary. (In Stereo) R Intolerable Cruelty (2003) George Clooney. PG-13 Mr. Wrong (1996, Comedy) Ellen DeGeneres. (In Stereo) PG-13 English Patient (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 Iron Chef AmericaHalloween Wars GGuys GamesHalloween Wars GCutthroat Kitchen GRestaurant: Im. (FS1) 732 112 732 Jones MoseleyNASCARUFCUFC UnleashedBeingBeingThe Ultimate FighterFOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 NHL Hockey PanthersPanthersPanthersThe Best of Pride (N)Bull Riding World Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 30 Days of Night (2007, Horror) Josh Hartnett, Melissa George. R Paranormal Activity (2007, Suspense) Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. R Paranormal Activity 2 (2010, Horror) Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. R (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralGolf CIMB Classic, Final Round. CentralPGA Tour Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 See Jane Date (2003) First Daughter (2004, RomanceComedy) Katie Holmes. PG The Good Witchs Destiny (2013, Drama) Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Cloud Atlas (2012, Drama) Tom Hanks, Jim Broadbent. Actions in one time ripple across the centuries. (In Stereo) R Boardwalk Empire (N) MA EastboundHello Ladies MABoardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Prometheus (2012) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012) Ian McKellen. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. The Day After Tomorrow (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlCousins UndercoverLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Hillbilly: The Real Story Stories. PG American Pickers PG American Pickers PG RestorationPawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG The Real Story of Halloween PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Witches of East End Pilot Witches of East End Witches of East End Ingrid struggles. Drop Dead Diva (N) PG Witches of East End (N) Witches of East End (LMN) 50 119 Charles Ng and Leonard Lake The Pig Farmer Killer Robert Pickton Killer Profile (In Stereo) Killer Profile Timothy Krajcir (N) PG Family Secrets PG, L,V Mother of Murder (In Stereo) V (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Ted War of the Worlds (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Bourne Legacy (2012, Action) Jeremy Renner, Rachel Weisz. (In Stereo) PG-13 Strike Back: Origins MA Puzzle answer is on Page A20. TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Bad Grandpa (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Captain Phillips (PG-13) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7p.m. Carrie (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:35 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)4:50p.m., 7:20p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)In3D. 1:50p.m. No passes. The Counselor (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Escape Plan (R) 1:30p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1: 40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40p.m. No passes. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:20p.m., 4:30p.m., 7:50p.m. Machete Kills (R) 7:10p.m. Prisoners (R) 1:10p.m., 3:55p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Bad Grandpa (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Captain Phillips (PG-13) 12:45p.m., 3:45p.m., 6:50p.m. Carrie (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m. The Counselor (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Escape Plan (R) 12:50p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:25p.m. No passes. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.

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This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@ chronicleonline.com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352795-6526, email blantonthompsonPost155@ gmail.com, or visit www.fl Post155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan at 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post 237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-2134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352476-7001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352-8602090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.VETERANSOFFOREIGNWARS H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-7460440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-726-3339, email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com or Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352-4473495.OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352447-1816; email Amvet447@comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS MOC/MOCA to serve pastaThe Military Order of the Cootie/Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will serve a pasta and meatball or sausage dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr. Post No. 4252, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando (where the helicopter is). Advance tickets, for $7, may be purchased at the post. Donation at the door will be $7.50. Music will be provided after dinner. For more information, call Paul Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-795-4142 or the post at 352-726-3339.Vets sought for classroom programThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21stannual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform around the world. The model Veterans in the Classroom program was recognized in 2008 with a Florida Education Foundation award. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed as participants. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc @tampabay.rr.com. Case manager aids veteransThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department has a case manager who is available to assist veterans to apply for benefits and provide information about benefits. The monthly schedule is:First Wednesday Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.Second Wednesday Homosassa Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.Third Wednesday Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an appointment to meet with the case manager, call 352-527-5915. DAV helps vets get to clinicsThe DAV transportation network has received great response for volunteer drivers for the two vans assigned to the Lecanto clinic one going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from Lecanto to The Villages. The Gainesville van goes each weekday and The Villages run is made when there is a need. Veterans who need to go to appointments in Gainesville or The Villages are asked to call the Veterans Service Office in Lecanto at 352527-5915 to be placed on the van list. All appointments must be made before 1 p.m.Office has help for vets with PTSDThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department offers help for veterans who have had their post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied. Veterans who have been denied within the past two years are asked to contact the office to review the case and discuss compensation/pension examination. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been denied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County Veterans Office. To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will need to have your denial letter and a copy of your compensation examination by Gainesville. You can get a copy of your exam either by requesting it through the VA medical records or from the primary care window in Lecanto. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets. Transitioning veterans can get help The Citrus County Veterans Services Department is looking for veterans who have recently transitioned from the military (or returning reservist from tours of active duty) to Citrus County within the past two years. Veterans Services requests that veterans and their spouses call to be placed on a list for an upcoming seminar, which will discuss what benefits or services they need to help ease transition. The office will schedule a seminar to discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets. Reserve for Trip to Hawaii Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired, will lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for veterans and their families and friends from Feb. 25 to March 14. Signups are being taken for the annual trek, which includes visits to several islands, some golfing and a special visit to the USS Arizona Memorial and The National Cemetery of the Pacific. For more information, call McLean at 352-637-5131 or email dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com. Memorial honors vets in HomosassaPurple Heart recipients are sought to be honored with centerpieces with their names on them at The Old Homosassa Veterans Memorial. Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.Assist Coast Guard AuxiliaryEx-military and retired military personnel are needed to assist the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the Coast Guard with non-military and non-law enforcement programs such as public education, vessel safety checks, safety patrols search and rescue, maritime security and environmental protection. Wear the Auxiliary uniform with pride and your military ribbons. Criminal background check and membership are required. Email Vince Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.Hospice assists veteransHPH Hospice, as a partnering agency with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), provides tailored care for veterans and their families. The program is provided in private homes, assisted living facilities and nursing homes, and staff is trained to provide Hospice care specific to illnesses and conditions unique to each military era or war. It also provides caregiver education and a recognition program to honor veterans services and sacrifices. HPH Hospice care and programs do not affect veterans benefits. Call theCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A15 (352) 527-88553557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.com 000GGUC ST 35415 EUROPE FOR THE H LIDAYS 8 Day Budapest, Vienna & Prague Escorted $849.00 pp. 12/22/13 departure8 Day Italy Venice Florence & Rome Escorted $1399.00 pp. 12/24/13 departure10 Day Spain Madrid, Granada, Seville, Barcelona $1349.00 pp. 12/26/13 departureGet onboard Royal Caribbean Explorer of the Seas9nts from Port Canaveral Dec 4, 2014 Balcony D2 $1381.00 Includes cruise, port & govt taxes and motorcoach to the pier 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000GFZD Outside cabins and Early Saver rates also available. Please inquire. Based on double occupancy. Spac e is limited. Rates include Port/Government taxes and fuel surcharges. In the event the fuel cost rises abive $60. 00 per barrel Carnival has the right to add the fuel supplement back on to the cost of the cruise. CARNIVAL LIBERTY Oct. 25-Nov. 2, 2014 8 Night Southern Caribbean Cruise Aruba, Curacao and Grand Turk GREAT ITINERARY. CARNIVAL LIBERTY Oct. 25-Nov. 2, 2014 8 Night Southern Caribbean Cruise Aruba, Curacao and Grand Turk GREAT ITINERARY. Dont miss the boat! SPACE IS VERY LIMITED Deposit $300.00 per person due at time of booking. Final payment due Aug. 1, 2014 HURRY! Inside Cabin $742.48 /pp Inside Cabin $742.48 /pp Balcony $1132.48 /pp Balcony $1132.48 /pp Blackshears II Aluminum 795-9722 Free Estimates www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer 000G8WK HWY. 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 2013 2013 2013 2013 Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions 000GGSB Nature Coast, INC. of the 5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa (352) 628-0668 http://travelauthorityofthenaturecoast.vacationport.net/ Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com 000GF98 CELEBRATE 15 YEARS OF BUSINESS WITH US! Join Buzz & Gwen On One Of These Wonderful Journeys! 7 Night all inclusive trip to the Dominican Republic 8 Day Viking River Cruise 14 Day Alaskan Experience 17 Day African Safari CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION FL Seller of Travel: 10131 TALLY-HO 352-860-2805 000GFZE www.tallyhovacations.com dmuir@tallyhovacations.com 1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 S TOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS No Hidden Fees PACIFIC DELIGHT TOURS February 13-24, 2014 $ 3789 dbl pp Fully escorted touring Beijing, Xian and Shanghai CALL FOR FULL ITINERARY! China including air & Harbin Ice Festival from TRAFALGAR IRISH HIGHLIGHTS May 10-17, 2014 $ 1599 dbl pp Dublin, Waterford, Youghal, Blarney, Killarney, Limerick, Bunratty, Galway ASK ABOUT AIR SPECIALS Fully Escorted from GREAT GETAWAY The Friends of Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Inc. Present An Evening of Elegance with the Friends Autumn Fantasy *Online ticket and raffle purchase is available at www.friendsofchazz.org For more information and to purchase tickets, contact: Tom (352) 586-7140 or Shirley (352) 382-0525 000GA6A All travel arrangements by: Beckys Travel Store, 352-528-8855, beckystravelstore.com 1st Prize 4-Day / 3-Night Cruise on Royal Caribbean for 2 2nd Prize $500 Gift Card on Southwest Airlines November 3, 2013 5:00 8:00 PM Skyview at Terra Vista County Club $75 per person* A portion of the funds will support the education center at Three Sisters Springs. Red Carpet and Champagne Welcome! Chef-Served Food Stations! Complimentary Valet Service! Music & Entertainment! Your Next Vacation Could Cost Just $10 Purchase a raffle ticket to win one of two great prizes! Black Tie Option al See GROUPS/ Page A20

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A16SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPOTLIGHTONCITRUS Photos by Logan Mosby Downtown Crystal River Saturday, October 10, 2013 Zoe Longo, Jaidyn Storey, Justine Storey and Jerry Storey Brailey Stokes, Graysen Stokes and Sybil Stokes Sierra Brewer, Ciara Sullivan and Brooke Elsworth Jenna Schubert and Heath Ritchie Thomasine Kennedy, Clarine Kennedy, Karilynn Willoughby and Aryn Willoughby Jan DeWitt, Rosalie White and Barbara Lee Heather Flynn, Saundra Mercuri and Ann Pollard Dwight Ferrell, Janice Ferrell and Justin David Richardson Janet King, Christina Barfield and Owen Barfield Lannie Hough, Wanda Lee and Lanna Wentworth Jessica Buntine and Autumn Lasher Andrea Bilby, Rachel Bilby and Andrew Bilby Rylee Murphree and Mandy Murphree Amanda Couprider and Phillip Kofmehel Susie Owens and Genia Pateracki

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Page A17SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE VETERANS Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed. Dinner theater to honor vetsA Sentimental Journey, a Veterans Appreciation Week World War II dinner theater presentation, will honor veterans at the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W. Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3. The dinner and show, preceded by social hour, are $15. For reservations, call 352-212-1014.Auxiliary to serve hamThe Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W. Pennon Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites everyone to a ham dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864.40&8 to serve breakfastCitrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. the first Sunday each month at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). Donation is $6 for adults; special on kids (8 and younger) meals. Specialty drinks available for $1. Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.Primary school to honor vetsInverness Primary School will have its Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the school cafeteria. Citrus County veterans are invited to participate. Students will be performing songs in honor of veterans. Three students in kindergarten through second grade will be honored with the Randy Allers Picture Contest Awards for first, second, and third places. Three thirdthrough fifth-grade students will earn the Randy Allers Essay Contest Awards for first, second and third places. The students will share their essays with the veterans in attendance. After the program, the veterans will be the celebrities of IPS as they walk down the hallway full of children cheering, to the Veterans Garden to enjoy cake and drinks. For more information, email Mary Tyler at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or call 352-726-2632. CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.VFW post plans celebrationVFW Edward W. Pennon Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites everyone to a Veterans Celebration at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov. 11, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. A picnic will follow at noon. For more information, call 352-465-4864.Elks Ladies sale to help vetsThe West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the lodge, 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. Everyone is welcome to participate. Those with items to sell may call Bonnie Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at 352-382-7614. Rental spaces are $15 each or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 17. Food will be available. Proceeds from the food booth go to help the Elks veterans committee provide for our veterans in nursing homes.New veterans pin availableDisabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces the design and availability of this years Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Commemorative Pin. In keeping with this years theme, Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans, the pin is an outline of Citrus County superimposed with the Iraq Campaign and the Afghanistan Campaign service medals. Pins are available for a donation of $3 each and may be obtained by calling the chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the Citrus County Veterans Service Office in Lecanto. During Veterans Appreciation Week activities, Oct. 26 through Nov. 17, the pins will also be available at various functions.VETERANS NOTES JEFFBRYAN Riverland NewsSoldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhowers message to Allied Forces prior to the D-Day Invasion.The 70th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion is more than six months away; however, that certainly didnt stop more than three dozen men and women who are likely to participate in re-enactment ceremonies, getting a jump start on preparations for ceremonies planned for next June.And perhaps there was no better way to fully understand the historical significance of the allied invasion the largest joint military operation to this day than to step inside an aircraft used in the original invasion of Europe. From her participation in D-Day, when the Tico Belle was one of 52 C-47s that carried troops and Waco gliders containing elements of the 82nd airborne infantry, shes held a special place in the minds of many. She also dropped much-needed supplies to troops during the Battle of the Bulge, participated in Operation Varsity, an Allied assault to cross the Rhine River, and the post-World War II Berlin Airlift. That history certainly wasnt lost on those who came to prepare for re-enactments, just jump or those who are part of an active military group in their home countries. All told, of the more than 60 jumpers who participated in the two-day event Friday and Saturday at the Dunnellon-Marion County Airport, 11 countries were represented. Its unbelievable, said James Dalueg, a member of the Canadian Royal Air Force. Its an honor to follow in the footsteps of the men who stepped onto that plane so many years ago. Sharon Kitzmiller, who served in the U.S. Army for five years and began skydiving in February, said theres no way to put into words what its like to jump from a plane used in such an historical event. Its unreal, she said, fighting back tears. Its hard to quantify what its like to step in there and jump out, using the same parachutes they used. Of course, were doing it under different circumstances, much different than they were. They were doing it under fire, unsure if they were going to live or die. That is why they are our greatest generation. The National Parachute Test Center (NPTC) hosted the event again this year; however, unlike in years past, opened the event to the public, giving citizens the chance to see the Tico Bell up close. The Tico Bell is a great draw, not only for the jumpers, but the crowd, said Major Robert A. Mathews, U.S. Marines, retired, and president of NPTC, about opening the event to the public. Shes got a lot of great history that everyone appreciates, they understand it. While spectators are given the opportunity to watch almost five dozen men and women make the jump from 1,500 feet, its the behind-the-scenes training they dont see leading up to the two days. Its a great opportunity to provide training to those who need it, Major Mathews said. And its also a great opportunity for the strap jumpers (those who only make a few jumps a year) to keep current. Parachutists take leap of faith from historic plane JEFF BRYAN/Riverland NewsABOVE: A parachutist heads toward the landing zone at the Dunnellon-Marion County Airport using a World War II-era round parachute. BELOW: The Tico Belle received its nose art after the Valiant Air Command acquired it.

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Oct. 7-13, 2013 Divorces Tabetha Lynn Bryan, Inverness vs. Richard Jeffrey Bryan, Beverly Hills Ellen M. Dixon, Citrus Springs vs. James S. Dixon, Citrus Springs Virginia C Higginbotham, Inverness vs. Johnny A. Higginbotham, Lebanon, Va. Richard C. Iverson, Hernando vs. Cassandra J. Iverson, Hernando Olive A. Radeker, Crystal River vs. Lee A. Radeker Jr., Crystal River Carol A. Roy, Crystal River vs. Albert J. Roy, Chilhowie, Va. Marriages Joshua Aaron Davis, Citrus Springs/Suni Chantal Eldridge, Citrus Springs Frederick Leo Downey, Inverness/Danielle Ann Flury, Inverness Wayne Allen Perry, Inverness/Valerie Dee Smart, Wildwood Harley Eugene Webb, Dunnellon/Lisa Ann Childs, Dunnellon Rickey Lynn Willard III, Citrus Springs/Krystina Kimberly Velez, Citrus Springs Michael Paul Williams, Citrus Springs/Priscilla Ann Padilla, Citrus Springs Steven William Wilson, Crystal River/Kelly Brooke Prus, Crystal River For theRECORDA18SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETOGETHER 000GELK PHOTO CONTEST PHOTO CONTEST PHOTO CONTEST Entry With the Most Votes WINS a $50 Regal Cinema Gift Certificate & $50 Applebees Gift Certificate Submit Your Homecoming Photos for a chance to Win Great Prizes Submit entries until Nov. 8, view the entries and vote on your favorite entry Nov. 9-22 www.chronicleonline.com/homecomingphotos Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Spring Hill Holiday Inn Express 3528 Commercial Way Attend a FREE Spine Seminar: call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. Learn about the Florida Spine & Neuro Center and the innovative treatment options available. 000GAXA SPINE CARE YOU CAN TRUST FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. FOR THE RECORD Divorces and marria ges filed in the state of Florida are available from the Clerk of the Courts Office. Call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit www.clerk.citrus .fl.us. FirstBIRTHDAY Takoda Dale Thompson Takoda Dale Thompson of Fort White celebrated his first birthday Oct. 19, 2013. His parents are Jamie Edwards and Justin Thompson of Fort White, and his brother is Travis. Maternal grandparents are Ralph and Rhonda Smithwick of Floral City. Paternal grandparents are Larry Durey and Jodie Hoogewind of Fort White. 100th BIRTHDAY Ernie Glover Longtime Citrus County resident and businessman Ernie Glover celebrated his 100th birthday Oct. 24, 2013. Glover was owner of the Jolly Fisherman restaurant and the Fort Cooper Station restaurant. His family, mostly from New Jersey, celebrated with him for four days. On Friday night, his daughter hosted a special dinner for him, his relatives and his local honorary family the Dr. Trifon Dalkalitsis family at the Citrus Hills Club House. On Saturday, both families spent the day at the Dalkalitsis home for a barbecue and today both families will accompany the Glovers to the Greek Orthodox Church service. The church is sponsoring a luncheon in his honor following the service. He and his wife, Gloria, live in Terra Vista. 50th ANNIVERSARY The Klovaches Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Klovach of Inverness celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Sept. 8, 2013. They are both from Long Island, N.Y, moving to Florida in 1973. Both are retired from the Pinellas County School System, RuthAnne from teaching and Fred from maintenance. A reunion of friends and family was held at the Grand Plaza Hotel, St. Pete Beach. Renewal of vows and reception dinner was held nearby at Silas Dents Banquet Hall. A surprise highlight of the celebration was that Mrs. Klovach wore her original wedding gown. It was slightly altered by Accents by Grace of Inverness. Four members of the 1963 wedding were there for the ceremony. The maid of honor attended by live stream via the Internet from Plum, Pa. Son Roy Klovach of Oldsmar and son Raymond Klovach and granddaughter Lilly came from Columbus, N.C. Also attending were Mr. Klovachs sister, Marylou, her daughter, Stacy, and her daughter, Samantha. Aunt Martha, New Bern, N.C., and many friends joined in the festivities. WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS Photos need to be in sharp focus. Include your name, address and phone number on all photos. When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to right. Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format. Photos cannot be returned without a selfaddressed, stamped envelope.

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There are two active members of the Wanderers car club who also belong to several other clubs and have been car enthusiasts most of their lives. Mike and Peggy DeFrancisco have owned and operated Taylor Rental Center on State Rd 44 in Inverness since 2003. They are originally from Norwich, New York, but moved to Florida in 2003 as they were tired of the long, long upstate New York winters and shoveling snow. Mike was an automotive teacher prior to becoming a business owner in Inverness. They have a com bined family of six children and 10 grandchildren. Mike started out by pumping gas at a full service station when he was 11 years old (gas was 28 cents a gallon), and that got him interested in cars at a young age. They currently own a restored 1964 Ford Econoline pickup, a 1975 Ford Pinto Wagon with 27,000 original miles (all original never restored), a 1991 Dodge Shadow convertible, which has only 55,000 miles and they have owned since it was new, a 2012 Dodge Challenger R/T and his daily driver, a 1988 Dodge pickup. Mike does all his own maintenance and repair work and has a 36-by-40-ft. garage equipped with a lift where he keeps his vehicles and does all his work. In the past, Mike and Peggy had fully restored a 1971 VW Beetle and a 1960 Chevy Impala, which took about a year for each restoration. Both cars have been previously sold. Mike also owned a nice 1968 Dodge Challenger, which he sold to a car enthusiast in Germany. They havent attended too many car shows lately and prefer local cruise-ins and power tours. You can usually find them at the Wanderers Club gathering on Friday nights by the Inverness Bealls or at Friday Night Thunder in downtown Inverness the third Friday of each month. One of their favorite events is Mike Kellys Beach Blast in Cocoa Beach every May. At this event, they enjoy a fun weekend with a group of friends, lots of laughs and good times. Both Mike and Peggy enjoy their car hobby and are real enthusiasts. Mike is quite an expert on classic cars and is always willing to help others with any mechanical issues, particularly through his rental business. CAR JOKE: An angry motorist went back to the garage where he purchased an expensive battery for his car six months earlier. He told the garage owner: When I bought that battery, you said it would be the last battery my car would ever need. Now six months later, its dead! Sorry, said the garage owner, I didnt think your car would last longer than that. Upcoming eventsNov. 2 and 9: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. hosted by Citrus County Cruisers at Wendys on US 19 in Crystal River.Nov. 9: Citrus MOPARS Club Second annual Beauties & Beasts Car Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep on Cortez Boulevard in Brooksville. More than 40 awards will be presented. Contact me for registration info.Ken McNally is a car columnist for the Chronicle. Contact him at ken mcnally@tampabay.rr.com or 352-341-1165.EXCURSIONSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 A19 CALL TODAY!Phone 352-726-0040 Fax: 352-726-3322 Mobile: 352-212-3571www.virgilioinsurance.com info@virgilioinsurance.com000GGVMVirgilio Insurance ServicesOCTOBER 1 DECEMBER 15 Affordable Care Act (ACA) All U.S. citizens under 65 can enroll in the Health Insurance Exchange OCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7 Open Enrollment Period (OEP) All Medicare beneficiaries can enroll or change their Medicare Advantage Plans or Part D Prescription Drug Plans 000G8TT CHIROPRACTIC Better Health 795-8911 Hours: Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9am 12pm & 2pm 6pm Tues. & Thurs. 10am 4pm 6166 W. Hwy. 44, Crystal River, FL visit us online at: www.betterhealthchiropractic.us New Technology, Natural Healing nonsurgical spinal decompression Triton computerized spinal traction for neck and back pain, sciatica, herniated or bulging discs, pre/post surgery. Russell Chiropractic has united with Better Health Chiropractic Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant Dr. Russell Lewandowski We offer: Gentle Adjusting Techniques: A.K., S.O.T., Palmer, Drop Table and Diversified Massage Therapy/Myofascial Release Laser/Microcurrent Acupuncture Cold Laser Therapy Natural Weight Loss Mediwrap Cellulite Reduction Buy 5, Get 1 FREE For more information call 352-249-4730 or email: katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org 000FSRQ Stock Up For Seniors Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need Husband, wife are car enthusiasts Ken McNallyCAR CORNER 000GGB8

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Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352-8602400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at 352-6975565. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727. Landing Ship Dock(LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. Oct. 28 to Nov. 1 MENUS CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Hamburger, corn dog minis, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet potato crosstrax, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Goldies Grab NGo PBJ, macaroni and cheese, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Half day: chicken nuggets, with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, ovenbaked breaded chicken, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Stuffed-crust cheese pizza, turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Middle school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Barbecued pork sandwich, corn dog minis, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Oriental orange chicken with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, steamed green beans, flavored Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Half day: stuffed-crust cheese pizza, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken nuggets with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Hamburger, spaghettie with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled peach cup, fruit juice, milk variety. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese on loco bread, MVP breakfast, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Chicken tenders with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, checken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cucumber coins, celery, green beans, seasoned potato wedges, chilled applesauce, juice, milk. Tuesday: Nacho rounds with Spanish rice, turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad, with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, cold corn salad, Mexicali corn, baby carrots, sweet potato cross trax, chilled died peaches, juice, milk. Wednesday: Half day: Breaded chicken sandwich, mozzarella maxstix, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, potato roasters, chilled peach cup, juice, milk. Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, potato roasters, chilled pineapple, juice, milk. Friday: Barbecued chicken sandwich, pizza, chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cucumber coins, sweet peas, seasoned potato wedges, chilled peach cup, juice, milk. SENIOR DINING Monday: Lasagna casserole, garlic spinach, Italian vegetable medley, mixed fruit, whole-wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Grape juice, Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, garden peas, dinner roll with margarine, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Chefs salad with turkey, cheese, boiled egg and tomato, French dressing, carrot-raisin salad, fresh apple whole-wheat bread, low-fat milk. Thursday: Chicken parmesan, Calilfornia vegetables, Italian flat beans, special Halloween dessert, whole-wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Friday: Meatballs with brown gravy, rice pilaf, mixed vegetables, pears, white bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. A20SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE IN TODAYS PAPER SundaysPUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A14. GROUPSContinued from Page A15

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Golf, rec sports/ B2 High school swimming/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV, lottery/B3 College football/B4 NFL/B5, B6 Baseball/ B6 SPORTSSection BSUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Early deadlines All of Saturdays national nighttime spor ts events and lottery numbers will appear in Mondays Chronicle. 000G9Y9 Fans lead cries for Schianos ouster Anger levels rise after Bucs 0-7 start to season Associated PressTAMPA Disgruntled fans showed up at Raymond James Stadium, some carrying placards or wearing brown paper bags over their heads calling for the firing of Tampa Bay coach Greg Schiano. It didnt happen Friday, a day after a lopsided nationally televised loss to the NFC South rival Carolina Panthers dropped the winless Buccaneers to 0-7 for the sixth time in franchise history. The Bucs have never gone on to win more than three games after losing the first seven to begin a season. Schiano said after Thursday nights 31-13 loss that hes focused solely on trying to turn his struggling team around not his job. On Friday, he fended questions about whether he still has the respect and support of his players. The Bucs have lost 12 of 13 games dating to last season and are 7-16 overall since Schiano left Rutgers in January 2012 to take over a team that dropped the final 10 games of 2011. Have I lost the locker room? No. Are they listening? Yes. Are we getting everything we need out of them? Well, obviously not because were 0-7, Schiano said. Ultimately we have good guys in that locker room ... 61 guys that I believe in, and I really strongly feel they believe in me. Does belief get tested when you have an 0-7 record? Absolutely. ... But theres a lot of football left. Weve got nine games remaining. Well take each one, one at a time. Fans chanted Schiano must go! in the closing minutes of the latest loss. There has been little indication of where the Glazer family, which owns the team but rarely grants interviews, stands on the embattled coachs future. Its been a tumultuous season ranging from the messy Associated PressTampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano still has his job amid the cries of frustrated fans calling for the organization to fire him. See SCHIANO/ Page B2 McGees exploits set school record Lecanto sophomore quarterback throws for 416 yards FridayJON-MICHAELSORACCHI Staff writerDespite having the equivalent of one full seasons worth of starts under his belt, Lecanto High Schools Travis McGee has already etched his name into the Panthers record book. Friday night, McGee set a school record by throwing for 416 yards during Lecantos 62-52 loss at Williston. The sophomore quarterback added six total touchdowns (four passing, two rushing) in a superlative individual effort. In the first quarter, I had two touchdowns and I knew it was going to be a shootout, McGee said. My receivers did a great job of getting open all night. McGee did not throw an interception and averaged a whopping 27.7 yards per completion. The Panther connected on 15 of 36 passes for a 41.6 percent completion rate. Im definitely honored for Lecanto, McGee said. It was always a goal of mine to not only break the single-game mark but also passing yards in a season. During a record-setting performance, there was only one thing McGee would have liked more: a win. Besides all individual goals, the team comes first, he said. Above all things, it would be nice to get a win first. For the season, the 6-foot, 170-pound McGee is 66 of 122 passing for 979 yards, six touchdowns and four interceptions in eight games. Surprisingly, McGees output wasnt even the best passing performance by a Citrus County quarterback against Williston. In a 2007 playoff game, Travis McGeebroke Lecanto school record for passing yards in a game. Jeremiah LucasLecanto soph. had 207 yards, three TDs. See McGEE/ Page B3 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Jameis Winston threw three touchdown passes and No. 3 Florida State scored 35 points in the first quarter on the way to a 49-17 victory against North Carolina State on Saturday in Bobby Bowdens return to Doak Campbell Stadium. Bowden, the NCAA career leader in major college football victories, planted the spear at midfield before the game a job usually done by Florida States Seminole mascot. The school honored the 83-year-old Bowden with a pregame ceremony that included nearly 400 former players. Then the current Seminoles went out and put on display that Bowdens best teams would have been proud of, setting up a huge game with unbeaten Miami next week in Tallahassee. Winston completed 16-of-26 passes for 292 yards with one interception and left the game after the opening series of the second half. Rashad Greene topped 100 yards receiving for the third consecutive game with eight receptions for 137 yards and a touchdown for the Seminoles (7-0, 5-0). The Wolfpack upset the Seminoles in Raleigh, N.C., last season, but this year it was no contest as Florida State put on a show for its old coach. N.C. State (3-4, 0-4) had quarterback Brandon Mitchell back for the first time since breaking his foot in the season opener. He completed 17-of-33 passes for 128 yards with two interceptions. Mitchell threw an interception to Terrence Brooks on the second snap of the game and the Seminoles scored four plays later. This was the beginning of a long day for the Wolfpack, who previously won the last four meetings when the Seminoles were ranked. The 35 first-quarter points tied a Florida State record for the most points in a single quarter. Karlos Williams took a pitch to the right side, shook a defender and raced to the end zone for an 18-yard touchdown to make it 7-0. The Wolfpack promptly went threeand-out on the next possession and Winston threw a 39-yard touchdown to Kelvin Benjamin on the first play. N.C. State went three-and-out for the second consecutive possession and Florida State took its time on the next scoring drive. The possession needed seven plays for Devonta Freeman to score an 11-yard touchdown through gaping holes. Florida State then led 21-0. The Seminoles were overwhelming in the first 15 minutes, but the Wolfpack didnt do themselves any favors. Johnathan Alston fumbled on the second snap after the Freeman touchdown and Telvin Smith recovered. Associated PressFlorida State running back Devonta Freeman heads for a 4-yard touchdown as North Carolina State safety Hakim Jones and linebacker Brandon Pittman give chase in the second quarter Saturday in Tallahassee. No. 3 Seminoles use huge first quarter to dominate NC State 49-17

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benching and subsequent release of starting quarterback Josh Freeman to an outbreak of MRSA infections in the locker room to a lack of success on the field. I visit with our owners all the time. Theres open lines of communication, Schiano said. Were all trying to just get better and do the things that are going to make the organization better. Safety Dashon Goldson, one of the teams two big offseason acquisitions, sat out Thursday nights game with a knee injury. He said Schiano has not lost the locker room. Theres no complaining, theres no issues. You come in here, its a good work environment, Goldson said. Hes taken a lot of scrutiny off the field. These are tough times, and we understand that, Goldson, an All-Pro last season in San Francisco, said. But he has a job to do, and we do as players, so were just doing what we can to prepare every week and try to win a football game and leave the outside stuff to the outsiders. Defensive tackle Gerald McCoy, a team captain, agreed. As long as hes our coach, were going to have respect for him and were going to play as hard as can for him, McCoy said. Its as simple as that. Turning it around wont be easy, especially with a rookie at quarterback. Third-round draft pick Mike Glennon threw for 275 yards, one touchdown and no interceptions against the Panthers, but threw the ball 51 times and attempting 43, 43 and 44 passes in his first three starts. Not a winning formula for a first-year quarterback. I think weve made some right decisions that made us better. Weve got to make more. I think we have to look at exactly what Mike is capable (of), because Mike can do a lot of things. (We need to) make sure were playing to his strengths in every way because thats two games in a row now without an interception, Schiano said. At the end of the game we threw the ball on every down. Take that out and just look at the plays before that, the coach added. Hes efficient, hes doing what we ask him to do. When you know youre going to get that, now youre going to build around that. Schiano said he totally understands the frustration of fans upset about the teams record. Hes not concerned, though, that calls for his dismissal will become a distraction for team moving forward. Football players at this level are very intelligent. They understand the business, Schiano said. I think we all realize its a performance-based business, he added. Players and coaches, were paid to win. Thats what its about. ... Weve got to get our share.B2SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS 000G8V1 SCHIANOContinued from Page B1 Associated PressPhil Mickelson is 7-under par after the first three rounds of the CIMB Classic golf tournament at the Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The final round is today. Pettersen stays atop LPGA Associated PressKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Chris Stroud and Ryan Moore overcame mistakes and bogeys on the back nine Saturday for a share of the lead after the third round of the CIMB Classic. Stroud started the day five strokes back but surged into contention after five birdies on the front nine including four in a row before hitting into the water on the 12th hole and carding two bogeys for a 4-under 68. Moore (69) opened up a three-shot lead on the back nine only to bogey four of five holes to give it right back. Both were on 12under 204, one stroke ahead of their nearest rivals. Gary Woodland (67) and Kiradech Aphibarnrat (69) were a stroke back. The tricky conditions led to huge momentum swings throughout the day at the PGA Tour event, with plenty of balls in the water and in the rough beneath the palm trees lining the course at the Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club. Secondround leader Keegan Bradley had a 76 to fall into a tie for sixth at 9 under. Phil Mickelson was 7 under after a 68. The tournament is an official PGA Tour event for the first time. The winner will receive a two-year PGA Tour exemption and a spot in the Masters.BMW MastersSHANGHAI American Luke Guthrie stumbled at the end of the third round and wound up tied for the lead with Spains Rafa Cabrera-Bello in the BMW Masters. Guthrie has led the European Tour event since his 65 in the opening round, and he had a three-shot lead at one point on the back nine at Lake Malaren. But his tee shot caught the bunker on the 16th, leading to a bogey. And he was in such an awkward spot on the 18th green that Guthrie felt his best option was to chip off the putting surface. He missed an 8-foot putt to take another bogey for an even-par 72. Cabrera-Bello was far more efficient, keeping bogeys off his card in a round of 67. His final birdie on the par-3 17th turned out to be good enough for a share of the lead. They were at 8-under 208, one shot ahead of Spains Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (67).LPGA TourYANGMEI, Taiwan Defending champion Suzann Pettersen struggled with three early bogeys but recovered for a 1-over 73 to maintain a four-shot lead in the LPGA Taiwan Championship. The Norwegian dropped three shots over the first five holes but had three birdies and just one more bogey the rest of the way to finish three rounds at 6under 210. Azahara Munoz (69), Sun Young Yoo (72) and Carlota Ciganda (72) were tied for second at Sunrise Golf and Country Club. The second-ranked Pettersen has three LPGA Tour victories this year, winning in Portland, Ore., and France in consecutive starts last month. She also won a Ladies European Tour event this year in China. Taiwanese star Yani Tseng, the 2011 winner, was 10 over after a 72. Winless in 41 LPGA Tour since the 2012 Kia Classic, she has tumbled from first to 25th in the world ranking in seven months.Champions TourSAN ANTONIO Kenny Perry bogeyed the final hole to drop into a five-way tie for the lead in the Champions Tours AT&T Championship. The Charles Schwab Cup points leader followed his opening 65 with a 71 to match Mike Goodes, Bernhard Langer, Colin Montgomerie and Anders Forsbrand at 8 under. Goodes had the round of the day, shooting a 63 on TPC San Antonios AT&T Canyons Course to jump 43 spots on the leaderboard. Montgomerie had a 68, and Langer and Forsbrand shot 69. The top 30 on the money list Sunday will advance to the season-ending Charles Schwab Cup Championship next week at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco. Perry entered the regular-season finale 494 points ahead of secondplace Langer in the race for a $1 million annuity. Stroud, Moore tied in Malaysia BETH HOOPER/Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus United U14 girls competitive soccer team won the 2013 Kick or Treat Cup in Dover, Fla. on Oct. 5 and 6. The team is (in alphabetical order): Emily Akers, Stacey Borgen, Callie Borst, Emily Hooper, Dana Houpt, Kayci Lindquist, Yesenia Mondragon, Chichi Nkwocha, Cassie Pleus, Katie Valerio, Jessie Walker, Haley Waugh and Kallie Weidner. The coaches are Richard Valerio and James Waugh. Kickball heads for playoffs Special to the ChronicleThe last week of Citrus County Parks & Recreations kickball league was played on Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.Kickball Oct. 22Game 1: Head Shots 11, Convictions 9 Game 2: Average Joes 7, Misfits 6 Game 3: Citrus Whiners 5, Kickin Nutz 0Playoff games for Oct. 29No. 4 Average Joes vs. No. 1 Head Shots No. 3 Kickin Nutz vs. No. 2 Citrus WhinersMens flag football Oct. 24Blue 24, Black 19 Tye-Dye 41, Red 12 Green 31, Orange 7 Pink Team had a bye week.Coed beach volleyballThis season, coed beach volleyball is being moved to Fat Daddys BBQ Restaurant, south of Crystal River and north of Homosassa on U.S 19. Fat Daddys provides a large Olympic-size sand volleyball court with availability of ordering food and drinks. Along with great lighting and a stage next to the court, theyre set up for an awesome league atmosphere. Registration is open for athletes 17 and older. You have until Oct. 31 to register your team at the office of Citrus County Parks & Recreation. Registration fee is $100 per team. The season begins Nov. 13.Mens softballThe boys of summer are back for the Fall/Winter softball season out at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. With Advanced Fitness taking the summer title, teams are looking forward to getting back on the diamond for revenge. Season begins Nov. 4.Mens basketballRegistration is now open for mens basketball and will end Nov. 1. A $50 deposit is required at the time of registration. Season begins Nov. 13. If you are an individual adult looking for a sport to play and do not have a team, please call Parks & Recreation at 352-527-7540 and we will refer you the managers in each league you are interested in.Kickball standingsWLTPctPFPA Head Shot820.800 6637 Citrus Winers730.700 5735 Kickin Nutz730.700 7128 Average Joes361.333 3458 Convictions370.300 4569 Misfits 181.111 2470Football standingsWLTPctPFPA Tie Dye 1001.0004112 Green 1001.000317 Blue 1001.0002419 Pink 000.00000 Black 010.0001924 Red 010.0001241 Orange 010.000317 Kick or Treat Girls finish secondLARRYBUGG CorrespondentThe Lecanto High School boys swim team won the District 2A-6 title Saturday in the Long Center in Clearwater. Team scores were not available at press time. The Lecanto High girls team finished as runner-up. We were runners-up last year to Land OLakes, said coach Matt Bouthillier. This year, they were runners-up and we won. It was an absolute team effort. Our guys pulled together. We racked up a lot of points from second place, third on down. Our swimmers consistently scored in the points. We accumulated a lot of points. Our guys are very unselfish. They worked very hard to make this team something special. The region will be 4 p.m. Friday at the Orlando YMCA. Call at 8 p.m. The first place winner is guaranteed a place at state. The other competitors will be determined based on time qualifications. Crystal River and Citrus will also be competing in the same regional. The coach said there is a new system for determining who qualifies for region. The top eight immediately qualified. The only ones that are guaranteed are the top two. Then, they go by times. Gavn Russ was the district diving champion with 433 points. That was a school record by 30 points. It was set by Garrett LeMon in 2007. LeMon later dove for Florida Atlantic. Our divers did fabulous the other night, Bouthillier said. Lauren Macaisa, a freshman, won the 100 backstroke with a time of 1:05.15. She was a quarter second from setting a school record. She took fourth place in the 200 freestyle (2:07.95). Our ladies did amazing, Bouthillier said. We had Lindsey Cohee, an outstanding freshman, who took second in the 200 IM (2:19.17) and second in 100 fly. She set school record in 100 fly with 59.9. Senior Steven Swartz was second in the 100 freestyle (53.83). He also qualified by taking fifth place in the boys 50 free (24.17). The deal is there are three districts in each region, Bouthillier said. There are eight swimmers per event. Some districts eight or nine. Our district is generally pretty fast. Other finishers included: Senior Reine Zizek was sixth in the 500 free (6:53). Freshman Maureen Gillespie was fourth in the 500 free (6:46). Freshman Brie Reid was sixth in the 50 free (29.5). Senior Hayley Bottona was eighth in the 200 free (2:25). She was seventh in the 100 free (1:05). Junior Abigail Swartz was fifth in the 500 free (6:49) and eighth in the 100 backstroke (1:16). Cassandra Swartz was fifth in the 200 IM (2:41) and fifth in the 100 breaststroke (1:23). Freshman Jordan Gangi was eighth in the 100 butterfly (1:18). Senior Anabel Marchildon was fifth in the 50 free (29.36) and fourth in the 100 breaststroke (1:21). Sophomore Jessica Cohee was sixth in the 100 butterfly (1:14) and seventh in the 100 breaststroke (1:25). Junior Aditi Kumar was seventh in the 50 free (30.23). Girl diver Kaitlyn ORourke was fourth with 295 points. For the boys, Lane Ramsey was third in the 200 free (1:59) and fifth in the 100 fly (1:00). Patrick Gillespie was sixth in the 200 free (2:08) and seventh in the 500 free (5:58). Seth Heinzman, a freshman, was eighth in the 200 IM (2:30) and seventh in the 100 backstroke (1:08). His brother, Caleb, a junior, was eighth in the 100 backstroke (1:09). Ronnie Crowe was fifth in the 100 breaststroke (1:14). Diver Kyle Ramsey was third with 357 points, Nathan Crowe was fourth with 322 points and Rio Lumapas was sixth with 236 points. Lecanto boys win district title

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 B3 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 5:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Indian Grand Prix race 1:30 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Goodys Headache Relief Shot 500 race 2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing Reno (Taped) 8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Toyota Nationals (Same-day Tape) BASEBALL 1 p.m. (MLB) 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. Game 3 (Taped) 8 p.m. (FOX) 2013 World Series Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. Game 4 BOATING 1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing Chandler (Taped) NFL 1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at New England Patriots 1 p.m. (FOX) Dallas Cowboys at Detroit Lions 4:25 p.m. (FOX) Washington Redskins at Denver Broncos 8:20 p.m. (NBC) Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings COLLEGE FOOTBALL 5 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina State at Florida State (Taped) 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Penn State at Ohio State (Taped) 8 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Florida State (Taped) 9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Oregon (Taped) GOLF 6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: BMW Masters, Final Round (Same-day Tape) 12 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship, Final Round (Same-day Tape) 3:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: AT&T Championship, Final Round HOCKEY 5 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Florida Panthers MOTORCYCLE RACING 3 p.m. (FS1) Moto2: Japan (Taped) 4 p.m. (FS1) World Championship: Japan (Taped) FIGURE SKATING 4 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Skate Canada (Taped) SOCCER 9:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Sunderland vs. Newcastle United 12 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Manchester City 1:30 p.m. (NBC) MLS: Houston Dynamo at D.C. United 2 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Alabama at Mississippi 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Womens College: Texas A&M at Florida 9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders TENNIS 9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Swiss Indoors Basel final 12 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP: Valencia Open final (Same-day Tape) 5 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA: TEB-BNP Paribas Championships final (Same-day Tape) 8:30 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Championships doubles final (Same-day Tape) 10 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Championships final (Same-day Tape) VOLLEYBALL 1 p.m. (ESPNU) Louisville at Connecticut 1:30 p.m. (SUN) Tennessee at Florida Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 4 17 25 38 Mega Ball: 19 4-of-4 MBNo winner 4-of-46$2,631.50 3-of-4 MB39$885.00 3-of-41,004$102.50 2-of-4 MB1,324$54.50 1-of-4 MB11,528$6.50 2-of-429,321$4.00 Fantasy 5: 3 17 27 31 36 5-of-51 winner$217,545.60 4-of-5330$106.00 3-of-59,304$10.50Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 1 2 5 CASH 3 (late) 6 6 3 PLAY 4 (early) 7 9 1 1 PLAY 4 (late) 5 7 0 7 Powerball, Lotter y and Fantasy 5 were unavailable due to early deadlines. Please see Mondays Chronicle for those results or go to www.flalottery.com Gainesville Eastside 20, Dunnellon 17EA 0 13 7 0 20 DUN 10 0 0 7 17 Scoring Summary First Quarter DUN West 39-yard field goal DUN Williams 24-yard run (kick good) Second Quarter EA Simmons 21-yard run (2 point try failed) EA Simmons 4-yard run (kick good) Third Quarter EA Simmons 32-yard run (kick good) Fourth Quarter DUN Pollizzi 44-yard pass from Hamm (kick good) Individual Leaders Rushing EA: O. Simmons 27-95-3; DUN: J. Williams 10-83-1, D. Sims 16-46. Passing EA: L. Rogers 12-22-1-104; DUN: Z. McKee 2-5-1-48. Receiving EA: M. Lofland 3-36, O. Simmons 431, K. McCray 3-24; DUN: J. Hamm 1-44-1.Crystal River 43, Belleview 21BEL 0 0 14 7 21 CR 15 13 0 15 43 Scoring Summary First Quarter CR T. Reynolds 38-yard run (R. Breeson run) CR A. Franklin 74-yard run (R. Breeson kick) Second Quarter CR A. Franklin 10-yard run (R. Breeson kick) CR A. Franklin 16-yard pass from C. Ryan (kick failed) Third Quarter B N. Colston 37-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick) B N. Colston 10-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick) Fourth Quarter CR A. Ellison 1-yard run (Reynolds pass to Breeson) B C. Riche 20-yard pass from E. Pitts (C. Irwin kick) CR D. Dawsy 101-yard interception return (Breeson kick) Individual Leaders Rushing B: C. Riche 15-46-0; CR: A. Franklin 13-161-2, A. Ellison 26-125-1, T. Reynolds 3-42-1. Passing B: E. Pitts 14-27-2-196; CR: C. Ryan 4-8-0-45. Receiving B: N. Colston 11-153-2, C. Riche 1-201; CR: Reynolds 3-29-0, Franklin 1-16-1. Sacks CR: Hollis 2, LaFleur. Interceptions CR: Dawsy, Breeson.Gainesville 38, Citrus 16GHS 0 21 14 3 38 CHS 0 7 9 0 16 Scoring Summary Second Quarter GHS K. Young 18 pass from C. Christian (A. Holloway kick), 11:18 GHS T. James 13 run (Holloway kick), 8:08 CHS D. Franklin 55 pass from D. Moore (J. Marsden kick), 5:28 GHS D. Evans 8 pass from Christian (Holloway kick), 3:37 Third Quarter GHS T. Faulkner 2 run (Holloway kick), 7:45 CHS J. Pouncey 2 run (kick blocked), 5:42 GHS Evans 80 kickoff return (Holloway kick), 5:24 CHS Marsden 22-yd field goal, 0:39 Fourth Quarter GHS Holloway 33-yd field goal, 1:16 Individual Leaders Rushing GHS: James 22-230-1; Faulkner 10-45-1. CHS: Pouncey 12-96-1; J. Clark 8-41-0; Moore 8-33-0. Passing GHS: Christian 3-9-0-44. CHS: Moore 11-33-1-156. Receiving GHS: Young 2-36-1. CHS: D. Franklin 2-62-1; S. Franklin 3-39-0; J. Juse 3-23-0. InterceptionsGHS: H. Montgomery.No. 3 FSU 49, NC State 17NC State 0010717 Florida St. 3570749 First Quarter FSUK.Williams 18 run (Aguayo kick), 13:02. FSUBenjamin 39 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 11:12. FSUFreeman 11 run (Aguayo kick), 7:02. FSUOLeary 14 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 6:09. FSUGreene 42 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 2:02. Second Quarter FSUFreeman 4 run (Aguayo kick), 3:06. Third Quarter NCStFG Sade 36, 7:51. NCStThornton 72 run (Sade kick), :59. Fourth Quarter NCStThornton 1 run (Sade kick), 7:16. FSUWhitfield 31 run (Aguayo kick), 2:19. A,389. NCStFSU First downs1630 Rushes-yards42-18834-224 Passing 128342 Comp-Att-Int17-33-220-34-2 Return Yards0 46 Punts-Avg.8-46.84-36.8 Fumbles-Lost1-10-0 Penalties-Yards2-133-30 Time of Possession30:5329:07 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNC State, Thornton 23-173, Underwood 3-23, Dayes 4-5, Mitchell 11-(minus 1), Alston 1(minus 12). Florida St., Freeman 12-92, K.Williams 13-86, Whitfield 1-31, R.Green 2-19, Coker 5-7, Winston 1-(minus 11). PASSINGNC State, Mitchell 17-33-2-128. Florida St., Winston 16-26-1-292, Coker 4-8-1-50. RECEIVINGNC State, Thornton 5-32, Creecy 3-9, Underwood 2-25, R.Smith 2-19, Grinnage 1-12, Purvis 1-10, Watson 1-9, Valdes-Scantling 1-8, Cheek 1-4. Florida St., Greene 8-137, Benjamin 369, Shaw 3-44, C.Green 2-22, Freeman 1-30, Whitfield 1-16, OLeary 1-14, K.Williams 1-10.No. 7 Miami 24, Wake Forest 21Wake Forest 770721 Miami 01001424 First Quarter WakeJ.Harris 12 run (Hedlund kick), 6:26. Second Quarter MiaFG Goudis 34, 9:28. WakeCampanaro 9 pass from Price (Hedlund kick), 7:09. MiaWaters 35 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 1:10. Fourth Quarter MiaDu.Johnson 4 run (Goudis kick), 5:36. WakeGibson 44 pass from Price (Hedlund kick), 4:02. MiaDu.Johnson 1 run (Goudis kick), :53. A,160. WakeMia First downs2120 Rushes-yards25-5940-200 Passing 302191 Comp-Att-Int25-46-117-28-0 Return Yards1 43 Punts-Avg.5-40.64-44.3 Fumbles-Lost0-00-0 Penalties-Yards6-586-46 Time of Possession32:2427:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGWake Forest, J.Harris 10-37, Price 1312, Gibson 2-10. Miami, Du.Johnson 30-168, D.Crawford 7-35, Coley 1-7, Team 1-(minus 1), Morris 1-(minus 9). PASSINGWake Forest, Price 25-45-1-302, Martin 0-1-0-0. Miami, Morris 17-28-0-191. RECEIVINGWake Forest, Campanaro 10-88, Tyr.Harris 6-95, Crump 3-37, Gibson 2-49, Bishop 2-18, James 1-13, J.Williams 1-2. Miami, Waters 447, Walford 4-33, Coley 2-52, Hurns 2-25, Cleveland 2-18, M.Lewis 2-9, Hagens 1-7. No. 21 UCF 62, Connecticut 17UConn 370717 UCF 212410762 First Quarter UCFS.Johnson 10 run (Moffitt kick), 12:37. ConnFG Christen 40, 10:27. UCFBortles 10 run (Moffitt kick), 7:39. UCFS.Johnson 7 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick), :13. Second Quarter ConnMcCombs 9 run (Christen kick), 12:03. UCFFG Moffitt 50, 7:53. UCFHall 17 run (Moffitt kick), 4:17. UCFGodfrey 10 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick), 1:29. UCFGodfrey 9 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick), :27. Third Quarter UCFWorton 61 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick), 12:09. UCFFG Moffitt 35, 10:07. Fourth Quarter ConnLemelle 46 pass from Cochran (Christen kick), 10:11. UCFGodfrey 5 pass from Holman (Moffitt kick), 2:50. A,924. ConnUCF First downs1524 Rushes-yards30-9138-176 Passing 142351 Comp-Att-Int14-32-226-35-1 Return Yards7 57 Punts-Avg.5-45.22-38.0 Fumbles-Lost5-21-1 Penalties-Yards5-558-72 Time of Possession23:4636:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGUConn, McCombs 14-88, DeLorenzo 7-13, Lemelle 1-7, Hyppolite 3-7, Cochran 1-(minus 5), Foxx 1-(minus 6), Boyle 3-(minus 13). UCF, Hall 5-45, Holman 3-29, S.Johnson 9-28, Bortles 2-26, Stanback 5-21, Reed 5-18, D.Wilson 7-9, Godfrey 1-4, Team 1-(minus 4). PASSINGUConn, Boyle 7-21-2-47, Cochran 7-110-95. UCF, Bortles 20-24-0-286, Holman 6-11-1-65. RECEIVINGUConn, Phillips 4-21, Lemelle 3-81, Davis 2-16, Foxx 1-10, Abrams 1-5, Bradley 1-4, Green 1-4, McCombs 1-1. UCF, Worton 6-119, Godfrey 6-54, Hall 4-38, Reese 3-28, S.Johnson 3-16, Perriman 2-72, Tukes 2-24.No. 18 Louisville 34, USF 3Louisville 71031434 South Florida 30003 First Quarter LouCopeland 20 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace kick), 10:33. USFFG Kloss 50, 2:47. Second Quarter LouFG Wallace 19, 11:33. LouChristian 69 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace kick), 7:16. Third Quarter LouFG Wallace 19, 4:55. Fourth Quarter LouDo.Brown 5 pass from Bridgewater (Wallace kick), 10:53. LouGaines 70 interception return (Wallace kick), 7:50. A,782. LouUSF First downs268 Rushes-yards40-13220-38 Passing 35395 Comp-Att-Int26-30-08-19-1 Return Yards700 Punts-Avg.3-44.36-47.2 Fumbles-Lost0-02-1 Penalties-Yards9-1002-25 Time of Possession41:4318:17 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGLouisville, Do.Brown 18-125, Perry 1335, Radcliff 1-7, Team 1-(minus 1), Gardner 2-(minus 9), Bridgewater 5-(minus 25). South Florida, Tice 741, W.Davis 8-14, B.Eveld 4-(minus 7), Bench 1(minus 10). PASSINGLouisville, Bridgewater 25-29-0-344, Gardner 1-1-0-9. South Florida, Bench 4-12-1-68, B.Eveld 3-5-0-22, M.White 1-2-0-5. RECEIVINGLouisville, Do.Brown 6-61, Copeland 5-63, E.Rogers 4-31, Christian 3-83, Perry 1-32, Quick 1-31, Parker 1-16, Harris 1-14, Radcliff 1-9, Atkins 1-5, R.Clark 1-5, Hubbell 1-3. South Florida, McFarland 1-25, Welch 1-18, W.Davis 1-16, Price 110, Gonzalez 1-9, A.Davis 1-7, Bravo-Brown 1-5, Hopkins 1-5.Sprint Cup Goodys Headache Relief Shot 500 LineupAfter Friday qualifying; race today At Martinsville Speedway Ridgeway, Va. Lap length: .526 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99.595. 2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 99.344. 3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 99.344. 4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 99.183. 5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 99.162. 6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 99.084. 7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 99.007. 8. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 98.815. 9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 98.79. 10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 98.774. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.748. 12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 98.712. 13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 98.702. 14. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 98.656. 15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 98.553. 16. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.553. 17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 98.527. 18. (41) Aric Almirola, Ford, 98.41. 19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 98.4. 20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 98.394. 21. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 98.379. 22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 98.328. 23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 98.129. 24. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 98.053. 25. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.048. 26. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 97.972. 27. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 97.855. 28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 97.83. 29. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 97.78. 30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 97.78. 31. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 97.674. 32. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 97.618. 33. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.568. 34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 97.498. 35. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 97.473. 36. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 97.448. 37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points. 39. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 42. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.MLB playoffsWORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox Boston 1, St. Louis 1 Wednesday, Oct. 23: Boston 8, St. Louis 1 Thursday, Oct. 24: St. Louis 4, Boston 2 Saturday, Oct. 26: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at St. Louis (Kelly 10-5), late Today, Oct. 27: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 15-10), 8:15 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28: Boston at St. Louis, 8:07 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 31: St. Louis at Boston, 8:07 p.m.NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston9720142713 Toronto11740143629 Detroit11641132530 Tampa Bay9630123226 Montreal10640123320 Ottawa10442102827 Florida1137172338 Buffalo1229151834 Metropolitan Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh10730143424 N.Y. Islanders10433113331 Carolina11443112533 Columbus10550102825 Washington10550103030 New Jersey1015462033 N.Y. Rangers826041231 Philadelphia927041325 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Colorado10910183214 Chicago10613153127 Nashville11641132226 Minnesota11533132423 St. Louis8512122922 Winnipeg11452102833 Dallas945082529 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA San Jose10811174118 Vancouver13841173837 Anaheim11830163528 Phoenix12732164039 Los Angeles11740143329 Calgary 10442102937 Edmonton1238173548 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3 Columbus 5, Toronto 2 Anaheim 2, Ottawa 1 Buffalo 3, Florida 1 Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2, OT Colorado 4, Carolina 2 Saturdays Games Phoenix 5, Edmonton 4 New Jersey at Boston, late Pittsburgh at Toronto, late San Jose at Montreal, late N.Y. Rangers at Detroit, late Buffalo at Tampa Bay, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, late Winnipeg at Dallas, late Minnesota at Chicago, late St. Louis at Nashville, late Washington at Calgary, late Todays Games San Jose at Ottawa, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Columbus, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Colorado, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Mondays Games Dallas at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m. Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Washington at Vancouver, 10 p.m.Glantz-Culver LineFor Oct. 27 Major League Baseball World Series FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at St. Louis-110 Boston+100 NFL Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG San Fran.-x1415(40) Jacksonville at Detroit33(51) Dallas at Philadelphia65(51) N.Y. Giants at Kansas City77(39) Cleveland at New Orleans1211(48) Buffalo at N. England66(45) Miami at Cincinnati76(41) N.Y. Jets Pittsburgh32(40) at Oakland at Denver1312(58) Washington at Arizona22(45) Atlanta Green Bay79(47) at Minnesota Tomorrow Seattle1011(42) at St. Louis x-at London BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS Waived C Dexter Pittman and F D.J. White. DALLAS MAVERICKS Waived G Mickey McConnell. MIAMI HEATWaived F Eric Griffin and C Justin Hamilton. PHOENIX SUNS Exercised their 2014-15 options on F Markieff Morris, F Marcus Morris and C Miles Plumlee. UTAH JAZZ Signed G Jamaal Tinsley. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS Signed LB Darius Eubanks from the practice squad. Waived LB Brandon Magee. DALLAS COWBOYS Released G David Arkin. Signed S Jakar Hamilton from the practice squad. MINNESOTA VIKINGS Waived DE Justin Trattou. Signed TE Chase Ford from the practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed OL Jack Cornell. Waived DL Brian Sanford. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS Reassigned G Igor Bobkov to Norfolk (AHL) from Utah (ECHL). CALGARY FLAMES Recalled D Derek Smith from Abbotsford (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled G Keith Kinkaid from Albany (AHL) with a roster exemption. Reassigned G Maxime Clermont to Albany from Elmira (ECHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS Reassigned C Pascal Pelletier to Utica (AHL). COLLEGE ECHL Suspended Elmiras Riley Boychuk pending a review and fined him an undisclosed amount for his actions in an Oct. 25 game against Reading. Crystal River defeated the Red Devils 53-49 behind 585 passing yards by thenPirates QB Shay Newcomer. Another performance that could be a school record, although it was unconfirmed as of Saturday evening, was the one by sophomore receiver Jeremiah Lucas. Even if it fell just short of a record, Lucas can stake claim to one of the most prolific passcatching performances in Panthers history after rolling up 207 yards receiving and reeling in three touchdowns receptions from McGee. Lucas quarterback gave him credit for a big evening. Hes one of our more athletic guys, McGee said of Lucas. Hes able to beat man-to-man coverage. Jonah Nightengale also scored two touchdowns, while Ardante DeDe Anderson added another. DeAndre Horton blocked a punt and recovered a fumble against Williston as well. McGEEContinued from Page B1 Associated PressSt. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Joe Kelly throws during the first inning Saturday of Game 3 of the World Series against the Boston Red Sox in St. Louis. Because of an early deadline, the result was unavailable at press time. Please visit www.chronicleonline.com for the full story. Series shifts to St. Louis

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B4SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOLLEGEFOOTBALL No. 7 Miami survives No. 21 UCF rolls past UConn; USF cant hang with No. 18 Louisville Associated PressMiami squeaked by Wake Forest to remain undefeated and set up another marquee matchup in the Atlantic Coast Conference next week. The seventh-ranked Hurricanes needed a late touchdown to beat Wake Forest 24-21 at home Saturday, and will head to Tallahassee next week to face No. 3 Florida State. The Hurricanes and Seminoles once regularly played huge games, but since Miami joined the ACC in 2004, only once have the rivals played with both teams ranked in the Top 10. The Hurricanes came from behind for the second straight week to stay unbeaten. Last week, Miami rallied to beat North Carolina. This time it was Wake Forest giving the Hurricanes all they could handle. Florida State is just a week removed from playing a top-five matchup against ACC rival Clemson. Keeping the Hurricanes undefeated also will help the Seminoles in the BCS standings as they jockey with Oregon for the second spot behind Alabama.No. 7 Miami 24, Wake Forest 21MIAMI GARDENS Duke Johnson ran for two fourth-quarter touchdowns, the second a 1-yard plunge with 53 seconds left, as No. 7 Miami rallied twice to beat Wake Forest. Johnson finished with 168 yards on 30 carries for the Hurricanes (70, 3-0 Atlantic Coast Conference), Tanner Prices 44-yard touchdown pass to Dominique Gibson with 4:02 remaining put Wake Forest on top, but the Hurricanes went 73 yards on their next 10 plays, with Johnson scoring to keep Miami unbeaten heading into next weeks showdown at No. 3 Florida State. Wake Forest (4-4, 2-3) fell to 1-53 against Top 10 teams the lone win coming exactly 67 years ago Saturday. The Demon Deacons trailed for less than 3 minutes against the Hurricanes, and still dropped their fifth straight in the series.No. 18 Louisville 34, South Florida 3TAMPA Teddy Bridgewater threw for 344 yards and three touchdowns and Louisville rebounded from its first loss of the season. Charles Gaines returned a fourthquarter interception 70 yards for a TD as the Cardinals defense reverted to the form that helped Louisville (7-1, 3-1 American Athletic Conference) climb into the top 10 before blowing a 21-point, secondhalf lead at home during a 38-35 loss to Central Florida. Bridgewater completed 25 of 29 passes with no interceptions, hiking his totals for the season to 23 TDs with two picks. In three career games against USF (2-5, 2-1), the junior from Miami has gone 65 of 82 for 841 yards, eight touchdowns and no interceptions. USF failed to score an offensive touchdown for the third straight game, all in conference play. The Bulls used three quarterbacks and were outgained 485 yards to 133.No. 21 UCF 62, Connecticut 17ORLANDO Blake Bortles threw for four touchdowns and ran for another as No. 21 UCF routed winless Connecticut. Bortles completed his first eight passes of the game and ended his day early in the third quarter, connecting on 20 of 24 for 286 yards. The junior ran for a TD as the Knights (6-1, 3-0 American Athletic Conference) scored on their first nine possessions of the game. They remain the favorite to claim the leagues BCS berth. UConns offense was anemic throughout and helped dig its own hole early, thanks to two first-half interceptions by freshman quarterback Tim Boyle. A Huskies fumble in the second-half set up another UCF score. The Huskies (0-7, 0-3) have lost eight straight games dating to last season.No. 1 Alabama 45, Tennessee 10TUSCALOOSA, Ala. T.J. Yeldon scored on three 1-yard runs and AJ McCarron passed for 275 yards and two touchdowns to help No. 1 Alabama continue to roll along with a 45-10 victory over Tennessee. Landon Collins returned an interception 89 yards for another score for the Crimson Tide (8-0, 5-0 Southeastern Conference), which raced to a 35-0 halftime lead. Alabama has outscored its last six opponents 246-26. The Volunteers (4-4, 1-3) dropped their seventh straight in the rivalry game, tying the most consecutive wins for either team. Coach Butch Jones turned to freshman quarterback Josh Dobbs in the second half in his first college action, replacing Justin Worley. Worley was 8-of-15 passing for 120 yards and was intercepted twice. McCarron completed 19 of 27 passes. Kenyan Drake ran for 89 yards on 14 carries while Yeldon gained 72 yards. Kevin Norwood caught six passes for 112 yards.No. 9 Clemson 40, Maryland 27COLLEGE PARK, Md. Tajh Boyd threw for a touchdown and ran for a score, Sammy Watkins had a school-record 14 catches for 163 yards and No. 9 Clemson wore down injury-riddled Maryland 40-27. Boyd went 28 for 41 for 304 yards with an interception and Roderick McDowell rushed for 161 yards and two touchdowns to help the Tigers (71, 5-1 ACC) rebound from last weeks 51-14 defeat against Florida State. Clemson ran 98 plays compared to 70 for Maryland (5-3, 1-3) and finished with a 551-364 advantage in total yardage. But the Tigers needed four field goals from Chandler Catanzaro to take a 19-13 lead into the fourth quarter. After that, however, Marylands defense finally caved.No. 14 Texas A&M 56, Vanderbilt 24COLLEGE STATION, Texas Johnny Manziel threw for 305 yards and four touchdowns in less than three quarters, and Texas A&M bounced back from a loss last week. Manziel showed no signs that the right shoulder he injured last week was bothering him. He threw three TDs in the first quarter to help A&M (6-2, 3-2 Southeastern Conference) build a 28-point lead. He tacked on another score before sitting down with 6 minutes left in the third quarter and the Aggies leading 42-17. The Aggies rebounded from last weeks upset loss to Auburn despite playing a messy game where they had five turnovers. Freshman Patton Robinette had a tough time in his first start filling in for the injured Austyn CartaSamuels for Vanderbilt (4-4, 1-4). He threw two interceptions one was returned for a score and was sacked five times.Duke 13, No. 16 Virginia Tech 10BLACKSBURG, Va. Anthony Boone ran for a touchdown, Ross Martin kicked two long field goals and Duke ended a long history of losing to ranked teams with a 13-10 victory against No. 16 Virginia Tech. The Blue Devils (6-2, 2-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) beat a ranked team for the first time since they stopped No. 13 Virginia in 1994, and beat one on the road for the first time since Stanford in 1971. And they did it without a third-down conversion all game, and a 2-to-1 time of possession deficit. Virginia Tech (6-2, 3-1) had its sixgame winning streak end as Logan Thomas threw four interceptions, the last on a deflected pass in the closing minutes that allowed Duke to finally run out the clock. The Hokies held the ball for 39:27 and outgained Duke 387-198, but still lost.No. 19 Oklahoma St. 58, Iowa State 27AMES, Iowa Desmond Roland ran for a career-high 219 yards and four touchdowns and Oklahoma State won its third straight. Quarterback Clint Chelf had 163 total yards in his second start of the season for the Cowboys (6-1, 3-1 Big 12), who ran for a season-high 342 yards. Oklahoma State scored 14 points in a 2 1/2-minute stretch late in the third quarter to extend its lead to 4520. Roland ran 58 yards for his third touchdown of the day, and Tyler Johnson took a fumble 54 yards for a TD with 4:17 left in the third. Sam Richardson had 95 yards passing and a touchdown for Iowa State (1-6, 0-4) before leaving the game late in the first half after an apparent blow to the head.No. 23 N. Illinois 59, E. Michigan 20DE KALB, Ill. Jordan Lynch threw four touchdown passes and caught another as No. 23 Northern Illinois reached its best start as a major program with a 59-20 victory over Eastern Michigan. The Huskies (8-0, 4-0 Mid-American Conference) never trailed on the way to a season-high in points and second-highest total offense (658 yards). The Eagles (1-7, 0-4) lost their seventh straight. Lynch, the nations No. 7 rusher entering Saturday, also ran for a touchdown while rushing 18 times for 99 yards. He was 16-of-20 passing for 223 yards while tying a career high with four TD passes in less than three quarters. Tommylee Lewis had eight catches for 107 yards and a touchdown. DaRon Brown caught three passes for 28 yards and two scores.Minnesota 34, No. 25 Nebraska 23MINNEAPOLIS Philip Nelson rushed for two touchdowns and passed for another, guiding Minnesota to its first win against the Cornhuskers since 1960. Nelson made all of his seven completions count, totaling 152 yards, and carried the ball eight times for 55 yards. He spun across the goal line from the 1 with 48 seconds left to seal the victory for the Gophers (6-2, 2-2 Big Ten), who became bowlgame eligible and stopped a 16game losing streak to the Huskers. Taylor Martinez returned from a turf-toe injury that kept him of the last three games for the Huskers (5-2, 2-1), but he had only 16 yards rushing on eight attempts and 139 yards on 16-for-30 passing, plus one touchdown and one interception. Associated PressMiamis Antonio Crawford celebrates after breaking up a pass for Wake Forests Michael Campanaro (3) during the second half Saturday in Miami Gardens. The No. 7 Hurricanes scored twice in the fourth quarter to rally for a 24-21 victory over the Demon Deacons. EAST Alfred 32, Frostburg St. 7 American International 41, St. Anselm 21 Amherst 17, Tufts 7 Assumption 55, Pace 21 Bloomsburg 35, Cheyney 7 Bridgewater (Mass.) 26, Westfield St. 20 Brockport 17, Kean 7 Brown 42, Cornell 35 Bryant 42, Duquesne 14 Bucknell 48, Lehigh 10 Buffalo St. 34, Utica 19 CCSU 47, Salve Regina 13 California (Pa.) 35, Gannon 7 Clarion 41, Seton Hill 2 Colby 21, Bates 3 Colgate 34, Georgetown 14 Cortland St. 20, College of NJ 7 Dartmouth 56, Columbia 0 Delaware 35, Rhode Island 13 Dickinson 38, McDaniel 31 East Stroudsburg 43, Kutztown 26 Endicott 33, Coast Guard 7 Framingham St. 41, Plymouth St. 9 Gallaudet 16, Husson 13 Hobart 35, RPI 13 Houston 49, Rutgers 14 Howard Payne 47, E. Texas Baptist 36 Indiana (Pa.) 28, Mercyhurst 6 Ithaca 25, St. John Fisher 22 Johns Hopkins 34, Gettysburg 16 Kings (Pa.) 21, Delaware Valley 14, OT Lafayette 41, Holy Cross 23 Lebanon Valley 31, Misericordia 14 Lock Haven 26, Millersville 14 Lycoming 20, Albright 17, OT MIT 17, W. New England 14 Maine 37, Villanova 35 Maine Maritime 63, Nichols 52 Marist 27, Stetson 0 Mass. Maritime 34, Mass.-Dartmouth 21 Merchant Marine 26, WPI 14 Merrimack 40, Bentley 34 Middlebury 27, Trinity (Conn.) 24 Montclair St. 34, Morrisville St. 21 Moravian 52, Franklin & Marshall 42 Mount Ida 36, Becker 25 Muhlenberg 27, Juniata 7 NY Maritime 38, Castleton St. 6 Navy 24, Pittsburgh 21 New Hampshire 31, Stony Brook 13 Norwich 38, Anna Maria 6 Penn 28, Yale 17 Princeton 51, Harvard 48, 3OT Robert Morris 17, Wagner 13 Rochester 21, Union (NY) 7 Rowan 20, William Paterson 9 Salisbury 17, Hartwick 0 Slippery Rock 44, Edinboro 20 Springfield 21, St. Lawrence 20 St. Francis (Pa.) 24, Sacred Heart 10 Stonehill 38, LIU Post 28 W. Connecticut 55, Worcester St. 35 W. Michigan 31, UMass 30 Washington & Jefferson 42, St. Vincent 7 Waynesburg 31, Geneva 14 Wesleyan (Conn.) 34, Bowdoin 14 West Chester 32, Shippensburg 29 Widener 59, FDU-Florham 14 Wilkes 21, Stevenson 17 Williams 24, Hamilton 0 SOUTH Alabama 45, Tennessee 10 Albany St. (Ga.) 30, Clark Atlanta 7 Appalachian St. 38, Georgia Southern 14 Ark.-Pine Bluff 38, MVSU 18 Ave Maria 28, Webber 13 Benedict 29, Morehouse 26 Bethune-Cookman 14, SC State 3 Birmingham-Southern 42, Berry 0 Bowie St. 34, Virginia Union 7 Campbellsville 24, Cumberland (Tenn.) 19 Carson-Newman 47, North Greenville 26 Charleston Southern 36, Charlotte 14 Chattanooga 28, The Citadel 24 Clemson 19, Maryland 9 Concord 9, Charleston (WV) 3, 2OT Cumberlands 28, Reinhardt 24 Dayton 42, Morehead St. 14 Duke 13, Virginia Tech 10 Edward Waters 31, Apprentice 21 Elizabeth City St. 37, Chowan 31 Emory & Henry 17, Catholic 15 Fayetteville St. 43, St. Augustines 19 Florida St. 49, NC State 17 Florida Tech 37, Warner 3 Fort Valley St. 52, Concordia-Selma 19 Georgetown (Ky.) 48, Pikeville 13 Georgia Tech 35, Virginia 25 Grove City 7, Thomas More 4 Guilford 28, Randolph-Macon 21 Hampton 30, Delaware St. 7 Howard 28, Morgan St. 14 Huntingdon 59, NC Wesleyan 35 Jacksonville 56, Davidson 13 Jacksonville St. 34, Tennessee Tech 14 Lenoir-Rhyne 27, Mars Hill 20 Liberty 24, Gardner-Webb 0 Lindsey Wilson 49, Belhaven 15 Louisville 34, South Florida 3 Maryville (Tenn.) 53, Ferrum 14 McNeese St. 55, Nicholls St. 30 Mercer 38, Campbell 31 Methodist 43, LaGrange 41 Miami 24, Wake Forest 21 Millsaps 21, Sewanee 14 NC A&T 20, Florida A&M 13, OT NC Central 24, Savannah St. 10 North Alabama 57, Valdosta St. 7 North Carolina 34, Boston College 10 Old Dominion 27, Norfolk St. 24 Presbyterian 49, Point (Ga.) 19 Rhodes 35, Centre 14 S. Virginia 44, Bluefield South 18 Samford 34, Wofford 27 Shaw 39, Johnson C. Smith 33 Shenandoah 36, Hampden-Sydney 35 Texas Lutheran 35, Mississippi College 32 Texas Southern 23, Grambling St. 17, OT Towson 48, Richmond 32 Tulane 14, Tulsa 7 Tuskegee 36, Kentucky St. 7 UCF 62, UConn 17 Union (Ky.) 24, Kentucky Christian 17 Virginia St. 34, Lincoln (Pa.) 14 Virginia-Wise 18, W. Virginia St. 10 W. Carolina 27, Elon 24, OT WV Wesleyan 38, West Liberty 21 Washington & Lee 42, Bridgewater (Va.) 13 Wesley 20, Menlo 13 Westminster (Pa.) 7, Bethany (WV) 6 William & Mary 17, James Madison 7 Wingate 41, Tusculum 33 Winston-Salem 40, Livingstone 0 MIDWEST Albion 28, Alma 24 Ashland 27, Malone 14 Aurora 47, Concordia (Ill.) 33 Baker 13, Missouri Valley 10, OT Baldwin-Wallace 28, Capital 12 Ball St. 42, Akron 24 Benedictine (Ill.) 34, Wis. Lutheran 28, OT Benedictine (Kan.) 38, Culver-Stockton 13 Bethel (Minn.) 41, Gustavus 17 Buena Vista 34, Loras 0 Buffalo 41, Kent St. 21 CSU-Pueblo 51, Black Hills St. 17 Carleton 42, St. Olaf 37 Carroll (Wis.) 37, Grinnell 0 Case Reserve 21, Trinity (Texas) 17 Cent. Missouri 51, Northeastern St. 7 Central 22, Luther 12 Chadron St. 31, NM Highlands 24 Concordia (Moor.) 47, Augsburg 20 Concordia (St.P.) 28, Wayne (Neb.) 24 Concordia (Wis.) 45, Lakeland 28 Crown (Minn.) 20, Mac Murray 6 DePauw 23, Allegheny 7 Doane 28, Concordia (Neb.) 7 Drake 23, Valparaiso 10 E. Kentucky 31, SE Missouri 7 Earlham 21, Anderson (Ind.) 20 Elmhurst 20, Millikin 7 Evangel 38, Graceland (Iowa) 24 Ferris St. 30, Michigan Tech 27 Findlay 48, Lake Erie 27 Fort Hays St. 45, Lincoln (Mo.) 35 Franklin 64, Rose-Hulman 14 Friends 46, Bethany (Kan.) 20 Glenville St. 20, Notre Dame Coll. 16 Grand Valley St. 23, Northwood (Mich.) 17 Grand View 35, St. Ambrose 21 Greenville 45, Iowa Wesleyan 26 Hanover 25, Defiance 21 Heidelberg 49, Muskingum 21 Illinois College 48, Knox 24 Illinois St. 28, South Dakota 14 Illinois Wesleyan 30, Wheaton (Ill.) 19 Iowa 17, Northwestern 10, OT Jamestown 16, Valley City St. 13 John Carroll 47, Ohio Northern 0 Kansas St. 35, West Virginia 12 Kansas Wesleyan 38, Bethel (Kan.) 34 Lake Forest 17, Cornell (Iowa) 10 Marietta 50, Wilmington (Ohio) 22 Martin Luther 35, Minn.-Morris 32 Mayville St. 42, Presentation 33 Michigan St. 42, Illinois 3 Mid-Am Nazarene 44, Avila 30 Minn. Duluth 31, Bemidji St. 21 Minn. St.-Mankato 44, Winona St. 10 Minn. St.-Moorhead 48, Mary 41 Minnesota 34, Nebraska 23 Minot St. 20, Minn.-Crookston 19 Monmouth (Ill.) 31, Lawrence 7 Morningside 67, Briar Cliff 0 Mount St. Joseph 41, Manchester 27 Mount Union 48, Otterbein 0 N. Dakota St. 56, Indiana St. 10 N. Illinois 59, E. Michigan 20 N. Michigan 33, Wayne (Mich.) 21 NW Missouri St. 43, Missouri Southern 7 Nebraska-Kearney 28, SW Baptist 14 North Central (Ill.) 72, Carthage 20 Northwestern (Iowa) 48, Dordt 10 Northwestern (Minn.) 36, Westminster (Mo.) 21 Ohio 41, Miami (Ohio) 16 Oklahoma St. 58, Iowa St. 27 Olivet Nazarene 20, Lindenwood (Ill.) 13 Ottawa, Kan. 82, Southwestern (Kan.) 21 Peru St. 51, Cent. Methodist 24 Pittsburg St. 34, Missouri Western 14 Ripon 40, Beloit 14 Robert Morris-Chicago 28, St. Francis (Ind.) 24 Rockford 34, Maranatha Baptist 13 S. Dakota St. 37, N. Iowa 34, 2OT S. Dakota Tech 69, Dakota St. 25 Simpson (Iowa) 41, Coe 38, 2OT St. Francis (Ill.) 20, Marian (Ind.) 6 St. Josephs (Ind.) 31, McKendree 13 St. Scholastica 38, Eureka 25 St. Thomas (Minn.) 43, Hamline 7 St. Xavier 12, William Penn 6 Sterling 40, St. Mary (Kan.) 13 Tabor 19, McPherson 7 Taylor 21, Siena Heights 7 Toledo 28, Bowling Green 25 Trinity (Ill.) 32, Waldorf 12 Truman St. 27, Missouri S&T 7 Urbana 41, Fairmont St. 5 Wabash 27, Oberlin 10 Walsh 30, Tiffin 29 Wartburg 22, Dubuque 15 Washburn 44, Lindenwood (Mo.) 35 Washington (Mo.) 7, Macalester 0 William Jewell 19, Quincy 17 Wis.-Eau Claire 13, Wis.-River Falls 6 Wis.-LaCrosse 28, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 21 Wis.-Platteville 59, Wis.-Stout 35 Wis.-Whitewater 17, Wis.-Oshkosh 14 Wittenberg 38, Kenyon 7 SOUTHWEST Ark.-Monticello 22, S. Nazarene 19 Austin 45, Hendrix 38 Henderson St. 45, Harding 30 Langston 53, Oklahoma Baptist 7 Mary Hardin-Baylor 63, Hardin-Simmons 7 Ouachita 34, Arkansas Tech 24 Rice 45, UTEP 7 SMU 59, Temple 49 SW Assemblies of God 42, Okla. Panhandle St. 35 Sam Houston St. 44, Northwestern St. 10 Texas A&M 56, Vanderbilt 24 W. Texas A&M 90, McMurry 57 FAR WEST Adams St. 41, W. New Mexico 20 Azusa Pacific 24, Cent. Washington 17 Colorado Mines 27, Mesa St. 10 E. Oregon 45, Montana Tech 30 E. Washington 42, Montana 37 Fort Lewis 10, Western St. (Col.) 9 Montana St. 34, UC Davis 17 Pacific 21, Chicago 6 Portland St. 14, North Dakota 10 Rocky Mountain 45, Dickinson St. 7 S. Utah 19, Idaho St. 9 San Diego 42, Butler 14 Southern Cal 19, Utah 3 Whitworth 33, Puget Sound 14 College FootballSCORES

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NATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 B5 NFL standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA New England520.714152127 N.Y. Jets430.571134162 Miami330.500135140 Buffalo340.429159178 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis520.714187131 Tennessee340.429145146 Houston250.286122194 Jacksonville070.00076222 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati520.714148135 Baltimore340.429150148 Cleveland340.429131156 Pittsburgh240.333107132 West WLTPctPFPA Kansas City7001.00016981 Denver610.857298197 San Diego430.571168144 Oakland240.333105132 NFC East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 430.571200155 Philadelphia340.429169196 Washington240.333152184 N.Y. Giants160.143126216 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans510.833161103 Carolina430.57117096 Atlanta 240.333153157 Tampa Bay070.000100163 North WLTPctPFPA Green Bay420.667168127 Detroit 430.571186167 Chicago430.571213206 Minnesota150.167132181 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 610.857191116 San Francisco520.714176135 St. Louis340.429156184 Arizona340.429133161 Thursdays Game Carolina 31, Tampa Bay 13 Todays Games Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Buffalo at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Miami at New England, 1 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. San Francisco vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Washington at Denver, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m. Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis, San Diego, Tennessee Mondays Game Seattle at St. Louis, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31 Cincinnati at Miami, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3 Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m. Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at New England, 4:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y. Giants, San Francisco Monday, Nov. 4 Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m.AFC leadersWeek 8 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt P. Manning, DEN2892072565253 P. Rivers, SND2491842132155 Locker, TEN15294104781 Dalton, CIN2491641924116 Luck, IND2241361574103 Roethlisberger, PIT215143165575 Pryor, OAK13889106155 Tannehill, MIA219133157797 Manuel, BUF1508598553 Ale. Smith, KAN250145157074 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD J. Charles, KAN1355614.16246 A. Foster, HOU1215424.48231 Ry. Mathews, SND1104464.05201 Moreno, DEN954134.3525t8 F. Jackson, BUF863804.42595 Chr. Johnson, TEN1153663.18230 B. Powell, NYJ903664.07271 Spiller, BUF903624.0254t1 T. Richardson, IND1063333.14162 Ridley, NWE783204.10203 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD And. Johnson, HOU4858412.2420 An. Brown, PIT4754811.7452 Edelman, NWE464559.9442 Cameron, CLE4551511.4536 Welker, DEN4447410.8338 A.. Green, CIN4361914.482t5 Decker, DEN4262714.9613 A. Gates, SND4249711.856t2 De. Thomas, DEN4161014.978t5 Ke. Wright, TEN4043310.8321 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Doss, BAL 1526717.882t1 Benjamin, CLE2024612.379t1 Edelman, NWE2124311.6380 Holliday, DEN1921711.481t1 McCluster, KAN3134911.389t1 Kerley, NYJ 121089.0240 An. Brown, PIT9748.2400 Hilton, IND 141107.9230 Reynaud, TEN181357.5350 P. Adams, OAK8597.4300 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Holliday, DEN1034934.9105t1 Q. Demps, KAN929933.2570 Thigpen, MIA1232126.8440 K. Martin, HOU2154826.1490 F. Jones, PIT1025925.9420 D. Reed, IND1127625.1310 Br. Tate, CIN1332024.6320 Reynaud, TEN1535523.7400 C. Gates, NYJ920923.2360 Blount, NWE1023123.1290 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts J. Charles, KAN862048 Moreno, DEN880048 Ju. Thomas, DEN808048 Welker, DEN 808048 Cameron, CLE606036 Royal, SND 606036 A.. Green, CIN505030 F. Jackson, BUF550030 De. Thomas, DEN505030 Bernard, CIN422024 Kicking PATFGLGPts M. Prater, DEN37-3711-115370 Gostkowski, NWE14-1418-195468 Vinatieri, IND18-1815-175263 Folk, NYJ 12-1216-164860 Novak, SND18-1814-165060 J. Tucker, BAL15-1515-175060 D. Carpenter, BUF14-1415-165559 Succop, KAN19-1912-145155 Suisham, PIT9-914-144851 Bironas, TEN16-1611-144749NFC leadersWeek 8 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt M. Ryan, ATL2441711922133 A. Rodgers, GBY2201431906134 Brees, NOR2371571958145 Romo, DAL2651812010155 C. Newton, CAR2021311552125 R. Wilson, SEA1871151489114 M. Stafford, DET2901782129154 Cutler, CHI2251461658127 S. Bradford, STL2621591687144 Vick, PHL13271118552 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD L. McCoy, PHL1416854.8641t3 Lynch, SEA1385784.19436 Gore, SNF1275474.3134t5 Forte, CHI1165334.59556 A. Peterson, MIN1155114.4478t5 De. Williams, CAR1144774.18271 A. Morris, WAS914725.1945t3 D. Martin, TAM1274563.59281 D. Murray, DAL914284.70413 Re. Bush, DET984264.35391 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD B. Marshall, CHI4654011.7415 D. Bryant, DAL4256913.5796 V. Jackson, TAM4162315.259t4 Ju. Jones, ATL4158014.181t2 Cruz, NYG 4059114.870t4 Garcon, WAS4046611.7442 De. Jackson, PHL3761016.561t5 J. Graham, NOR3759316.056t6 Witten, DAL3538811.1273 Gonzalez, ATL3536910.5253 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Dw. Harris, DAL1321216.386t1 Sherels, MIN812715.986t1 Hester, CHI 912013.381t1 G. Tate, SEA1922812.0330 Hyde, GBY 89311.6230 Page, TAM 161479.2400 Sproles, NOR151248.3280 Dam. Johnson, PHL10797.9210 Spurlock, DET181287.1570 Ginn Jr., CAR11766.9120 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD C. Patterson, MIN1347536.5105t1 Dw. Harris, DAL1035135.1900 Hester, CHI2161529.3800 D. Johnson, PHL1538525.7330 B. Cunningham, STL1229924.9320 Ginn Jr., CAR1127224.7380 D. Wilson, NYG922224.7310 Sproles, NOR816120.1240 C. Thompson, WAS816020.0280 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Lynch, SEA 761042 Forte, CHI 660038 D. Bryant, DAL606036 Ve. Davis, SNF606036 J. Graham, NOR606036 Cal. Johnson, DET606036 A. Peterson, MIN651036 B. Marshall, CHI505032 Fauria, DET 505030 Gore, SNF 550030 Kicking PATFGLGPts Hauschka, SEA19-1916-175167 Crosby, GBY18-1814-165260 Hartley, NOR17-1714-164859 Henery, PHL17-1714-184859 Gould, CHI21-2212-135857 Akers, DET21-2111-145354 D. Bailey, DAL21-2111-135354 Gano, CAR20-2010-105350 P. Dawson, SNF21-219-124448 Zuerlein, STL15-1511-114848 NFL StatsCENTRAL Detroit hosts Dallas in prime NFC clash Associated PressNow Jason Campbell, No. 20 in the starting quarterbacks parade in Cleveland, gets his chance. His first mission: trying to beat the undefeated Chiefs. In Kansas City. Hardly an enviable task for the nine-year veteran and 2005 first-round pick of the Redskins who has bounced around the NFL. The Browns are his fourth team, and he is their third starter this season, after Brandon Weeden and now-injured Brian Hoyer. Its an opportunity to go out there and just get back to the game and just having fun, Campbell said. Obviously, we want to go win games and do the best we can. But at the same time we understand were a growing football team and our goal and mission every week is to go out and win games. The one thing we cant forget is just to get back to having fun. The Chiefs (7-0) havent made it fun for any opponents this season. Theyre the only remaining perfect team because their defense is opportunistic, sack-crazy and, well, so darn good. Clevelands defense is pretty staunch as well, and has sacks from 13 players, tied for the most in the league. But its nine takeaways are 10 fewer than Kansas Citys, and the Chiefs have two of the NFLs leading sackmasters in linebackers Justin Houston (10) and Tamba Hali (nine). You go in every week respecting every opponent, linebacker Derrick Johnson said, but at the same time, we dont really care who plays as long as we execute our defensive scheme. The last time Campbell started, he was with the Bears and they lost 32-7 to the 49ers last season. That doesnt bode well for Cleveland (3-4). Elsewhere today, its Washington at Denver, Dallas at Detroit, the New York Jets at Cincinnati, Miami at New England, Buffalo at New Orleans, Pittsburgh at Oakland, Green Bay at Minnesota, Atlanta at Arizona, the New York Giants at Philadelphia and San Francisco against Jacksonville at London in the second international game of the season. Monday night, its Seattle at St. Louis. Off this week are Baltimore (3-4), Chicago (4-3), Houston (2-5), Indianapolis (5-2), San Diego (4-3) and Tennessee (3-4).Panthers 31, Buccaneers 13In Tampa, Cam Newton threw two touchdown passes and ran for another score to lead Carolina over winless Tampa Bay. The Panthers (4-3) won for the fourth time in five games following an 0-2 start. Theyve won three straight, with Newton throwing for 667 yards, six TDs and no interceptions. The Bucs (0-7), one of two NFL teams yet to win, have dropped the first seven games in a season for the seventh time in franchise history. Theyve lost 12 of 13 dating to last season, and some fans showed up at Raymond James Stadium carrying signs and wearing paper bags over their heads urging that secondyear coach Greg Schiano be fired. Washington (2-4) at Denver (6-1) Redskins coach Mike Shanahan returns to Denver, where he led the Broncos to 146 wins and two Super Bowl titles in his 14 seasons in charge. The Broncos are planning a short video tribute for Shanahan, who said he expects a warm reception: I dont think I did anything wrong to get booed. I didnt leave. They fired me. Denver comes off its first defeat in Peyton Mannings emotional return to Indianapolis, and he missed some practice time this week with a sore ankle. Neither defense has done much this season, so a shootout seems likely. Dallas (4-3) at Detroit (4-3) Two more pretty good offenses, and the Cowboys showed plenty of defense in shutting down Philadelphia last week. Whether that lasts could decide the winner at Ford Field. Lions QB Matthew Stafford is a Dallas guy and would like nothing more than a second straight win over his hometown team. Stafford said his family members have become Lions fans, but not all of his friends have done so. They want me to have a really good game and lose it in the end, he said. New York Jets (4-3) at Cincinnati (5-2) Two teams that have used special teams for some special wins. Three of New Yorks victories have come off the foot of Nick Folk, whos hit all 16 field goal attempts thus far. The last two Bengals wins were clinched by former Jets kicker Mike Nugent, including a 54-yarder to win at Detroit last Sunday. The Jets have won four in a row and nine of the past 10 against Cincinnati. The last matchup at Paul Brown Stadium was a Jets playoff win in 2009. Miami (3-3) at New England (5-2) Miami won its first three games, but has slumped badly since, with the biggest problem an inability to protect QB Ryan Tannehill. Hes been sacked an absurd 26 times, and the Patriots have the Jones Gang defensive linemen Chandler and Chris Jones who can get after the quarterback. So can Miamis Cameron Wake, and New Englands inconsistency on offense has been a season-long story. Still, the Patriots have won six straight against the Dolphins. Buffalo (3-4) at New Orleans (5-1) Well rested after a bye, the Saints look to put behind them their only loss a painful, last-second defeat at Foxborough and secure the NFC South they pretty much are running away with. And heres something scary: Three Saints players had their first career TDs at New England, RBs Khiry Robinson and Travaris Cadet, and WR Kenny Stills. So New Orleans is finding more offensive threats? One of Buffalos main offensive threats, running back C.J. Spiller, is hobbled. Pittsburgh (2-4) at Oakland (2-4) Just Win, Baby vs. The Steel Curtain. Oh, for those days. As their records show, neither team has a vintage Raiders or Steelers squad. Indeed, Oakland hasnt been a playoff factor since it lost in the Super Bowl after the 2002 season. But there are signs of life on both sides. The Raiders have a decent running game, play the run well defensively, and have a promising if raw quarterback in Terrelle Pryor. They have lost the past 10 games coming out of the bye, however, getting outscored 271-139. The Steelers have won their past two games and their defense has come alive, forcing their first two turnovers. But their offense is next-to-last in red zone TDs with six in 16 trips. Green Bay (4-2) at Minnesota (1-5) The QB carousel spins in Minnesota Christian Ponder, who seemed to have one foot out the door, now will have both feet behind center with Josh Freeman showing concussion symptoms. No such worries at the position for the Packers as Aaron Rodgers makes do with a shrinking cast of wideouts, and turns them into stars. Jarrett Boykin could be next as he comes off a career-high eightcatch, 103-yard, one-TD game. Adrian Peterson is struggling because Minnesotas line cant open holes and there is little passing attack. But he tends to dominate the Packers and had 409 yards rushing in two meetings in 2012. Seattle (6-1) at St. Louis (3-4), Monday night With Sam Bradford gone for the season with a wrecked knee, journeyman Kellen Clemens gets the call at quarterback for the Rams. Sounds similar to Clevelands situation this week. Seattles rugged defense is primed, having not played since Oct. 17, and its 19 takeaways are tied for the league lead with KC. Marshawn Lynch keys an aggressive running game and is second in the NFL in rushing with 578 yards. Atlanta (2-4) at Arizona (3-4) The Falcons snapped a three-game slide last week, but they are bangedup, especially on offense. Yet Matt Ryan was the NFCs top performer in the win over Tampa Bay, and WR Harry Douglas emerged with seven catches for a career-best 149 yards with Julio Jones and Roddy White absent. If Arizona WR Larry Fitzgerald catches four passes Sunday, he will be the youngest player with 800 career receptions at 30 years, 57 days. Fitzgerald has caught a TD pass against every NFC team except Atlanta. New York Giants (1-6) at Philadelphia (3-4) The Giants got off the schneid on Monday night against the woeful Vikings, but dont mistake that for a turnaround. They remain injury-depleted, especially in the backfield, and lost center David Baas for the season from an underachieving line. If that line can give Eli Manning some time, he can clean up his act he was not intercepted in the victory, the first time he didnt throw a pick all season. As Nick Foles recovers from a concussion, the Eagles were faced with using either Michael Vick, coming off a hamstring injury sustained in a win over New York, or rookie Matt Barkley at quarterback. Regardless, look for running back LeSean McCoy to get the ball often. San Francisco (5-2) vs. Jacksonville (0-7) at London Another game with little intrigue for the Londoners to ponder. At least theres a team with a victory on hand, unlike last month when Minnesota and Pittsburgh played at Wembley. The 49ers won in Nashville, then flew to England rather than head back to California. Staying on the road has worked well for them before, and they werent facing anyone as weak as the Jaguars back then. Associated PressKansas City safety Eric Berry and the Chiefs are the lone undefeated team left in the NFL this season. Kansas City takes on Cleveland looking to improve to 8-0 overall.

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B6SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Prizes to be awarded in three age groups. Prize packages will include: Two tickets to rodeo and gift package.Name: Address: City: Phone: Age: Prizes will be awarded in age categories from 4 years to 12 years. Entries must be received no later than Nov. 8, 2013. Citrus County 4-H Office, 3650 Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461 Nov. 22-23, 2013 8 p.m. (Gates open at 5:30 p.m.)Citrus County Fairgrounds Inverness, FL Best-record rarity Rare for teams with top marks to meet in World Series Associated PressST. LOUIS The teams with the best records in each league used to meet in the World Series every year. Now its a rarity. Boston and St. Louis are the first since 1999, when the New York Yankees swept Atlanta. You definitely have to be hot and play good baseball, maybe for a little bit longer, Boston pitcher Jake Peavy said before his Game 3 start Saturday night. From 1903 through 1968, the top teams had to meet in the World Series. There were no playoffs. Then the AL voted in May 1968 to split into divisions the following year when the Kansas City Royals and Seattle Pilots joined to create a 12-club league. While the NL was adding the Montreal Expos and San Diego Padres, it initially refused to start a playoff. It would be a contradiction of baseball history and tradition to divide the league and then see a team that finished fourth or fifth in percentage playing in the World Series, NL President Warren Giles said at the time. Two months later, the NL gave in when owners met again in Houston after the All-Star game at the Astrodome. The two division winners would meet in a league championship series, initially best-of-five and then expanded to best-of-seven starting in 1985. In the 25 years of a four-team postseason, the World Series featured the top teams in each league just nine times. Then in September 1993, a year after Bud Selig became acting commissioner, owners voted to split each league into three divisions the following year and add another round of playoffs, a best-of-five division series. The postseason would double to eight teams. The vote was 27-1, with Texas Rangers owner George W. Bush the future president the lone dissenter. I made my arguments and went down in flames, Bush said. History will prove me right. After a one-year delay caused by the 7 1/2-month players strike, the expanded playoffs began in 1995, when teams played a 144-game schedule because of the walkout. The top teams met that October, with Atlanta defeating Cleveland in six games. It didnt happen again until 1999. And after that until this year, the second after the playoffs expanded to 10 teams with the addition of a second wild card in each league. Thats another manifestation of how tough it is, Selig said this week. Selig defends his system, pointing out fewer teams make the MLB playoffs than in the other major leagues (12 of 32 in the NFL, 16 of 30 in the NBA and NHL). Some refer to the postseason as tournament baseball. Playing well at the right time is more important that excellence and consistency over the long haul. The 2001 Seattle Mariners were the biggest casualty. They went 116-46 during the regular season for a .716 winning percentage, the best in the major leagues since the 1954 Indians went 116-46 (.721). Seattle lost the ALCS to the Yankees in five games. Doesnt matter if you won 85 to get in the playoffs or 185 to get in the playoffs. Its how you finish, said Aaron Sele, the loser in New Yorks clincher. With the advent of the one-game, winner-take-all wild-card playoff, winning divisions has taken on more urgency. For more than a decade, the main difference between division winner and wild card was home-field advantage. But now that the postseason is a monthlong event, the hurdles to get a ring are many. Just reaching the World Series is a major accomplishment, maybe more so than it was from 1903-68. Getting here and whats it taken to get here with a great team and a great group of guys, you see just how hard it is to win the World Series, Peavy said. You really understand the preparation, the will of not just a few guys, not just a handful of guys it has to be an organizational philosophy that youre going to win the World Series. Its got to be a team and a group of guys that just refuse to quit and all put their efforts together as a team to be on top. Associated PressSt. Louis Cardinals relief pitcher Trevor Rosenthal reacts after saving Game 2 of the World Series against the Boston Red Sox on Thursday in Boston. The Cardinals won 4-2 to tie the series at 1-1. Associated PressNFL Commissioner Roger Goodell smiles as he is interviewed on stage during an NFL fan rally Saturday in Trafalgar Square, London. The San Francisco 49ers will play the Jacksonville Jaguars today at Wembley Stadium in London. Associated PressLONDON NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said the NFLs overseas success doesnt mean the Super Bowl is crossing the Atlantic or that the league is going back to continental Europe. Goodell said the expansion from two to three NFL regular season games starting next season has the league exploring how to continue growing its International Series brand. More games could come to London, which will need a franchise before it can even dream of hosting the Super Bowl. And that is some time away. We dont have a timetable for (a London franchise). We want to continue building interest, and if it continues to go well we believe a franchise could be here. The Super Bowl wont be played anywhere where we dont have a franchise, Goodell said. Right now, our focus is on the U.K. since the European fans can get here. We want to build on our success here, and whether it leads to a permanent franchise or not, then we can see. What happens here will dictate that. The NFL created a European league in the 1990s that had teams based in the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, and Spain, before it folded in 2007. Goodell said demand from NFL teams to play in London was more than it could handle, and that a game could be held in Sunday prime-time hours next year. Monday and Thursday night games in London have been ruled out, as has holding preseason games or the Pro Bowl overseas. Goodell applauded the Jacksonville Jaguars for embracing the International Series, with the Florida-based team signed up to play four regular season home games at Wembley Stadium over four years. The first is today against the San Francisco 49ers. Jacksonville is an interesting experiment. I think fans there see that its good for their community, that its putting Jacksonville on a global stage, Goodell said while addressing some Jaguars fans complaints about losing one home game over these four seasons. Whenever there is going to be change, there is going to be resistance to change. Goodell met with a selection of NFL fans alongside 49ers great Joe Montana and former Jaguars offensive lineman Tony Boselli on Saturday. The enthusiasm of overseas NFL fans was palpable inside the Grand Ballroom of the Landmark Hotel, with a scattering of NFL team jerseys in the audience. NFLs Goodell cautious about success in London

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Dumb as a box of rocks? Suddenly, the Citrus County Commission has become the laughingstock of local governments in the state of Florida. While the self-mutilation of the five-member board might make for humorous high drama on the courthouse square, the damage to the countys reputation is real. This will cost taxpayers money and it will result in lost opportunities for the county. For the truth is, no one wants to do business with a fool. Newly elected commissioner Scott Adams has been the instigator of the turmoil and he apparently has no idea how to turn it off. His key goal appears to be to make his fellow commissioners, and the county staff, look bad. Some degree of turmoil is good for government. Those in elected positions should always be forced to justify their decisions and answer questions from the public. But Commissioner Adams has taken the turmoil to a new level of absurdity. Adams is suffering from two recent thumps to the head by state investigative agencies that proclaimed his charges of official corruption were unfounded. In one case before the state ethics commission, the county is now responsible for paying the $8,476 in legal fees that Commissioner Rebecca Bays incurred fighting the charges levied by Adams. When faced with the $8,476 waste of the taxpayers money at a meeting on Tuesday, Adams became unglued. He blamed everyone but himself and then accused his fellow board members of either being dumb as a box of rocks or being corrupt. Thats not much of a choice. He got into a hateful personal exchange with outgoing County Attorney Richard Wesch and suggested that Lee County Weschs new employer was going to be sorry it hired him. The key corruption allegation evolves around the county landfill. When the independent state attorney investigated the corruption allegation, it found that none existed. Adams responded by blasting the state attorneys office and claiming it was part of the big conspiracy. See WINDOW/ Page C3 Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW Section CSUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Amy MeekGUEST COLUMN Hopefulness is a long way from hopelessness. Hopeful people see the world through a lens that sees endless possibilities and opportunities. They radiate positive energy and excitement. Theyre overjoyed, the world is their oyster, they are giddy! I love being around people who are hopeful! Today, I was with two very hopeful people. Jessica and Ashley are two Citrus County women who have been participating in the United Way Learn to Earn program. I first met them in January at Withlacoochee Technical Institute as GED students. Through a special grant from the Black Diamond foundation, United Way was able to provide Jessica and Ashley with the resources they needed to earn their high school equivalency diploma. We broke down barriers for them to be able to get to school and stay in school. In May, we joyfully watched them walk across the Curtis Peterson Auditorium stage to receive their diplomas, dressed in green caps and gowns, with smiles so big they shined like beacons. That night we awarded them with scholarships to attend a postsecondary program at WTI to become patient care assistants. Today, we celebrated with them again as they received certificates and pins that tell the world that they are qualified and ready to dutifully care for patients in our community. The hopefulness in their eyes was contagious. Their futures are bright! I had the opportunity to speak with them after the ceremony. Jessica is the mother of 7-year-old twins and she was moved to tears when she spoke about the future and what it holds for her sweet family. She loves to tell about their tremendous academic success and how proud she is of them. Jessica is considering attending a program at CF to further her medical career. Jessica and Ashley: Hopeful, willing and successful See HOPE/ Page C3 Associated PressThe storage tank, bottom, is where workers detected water dripping from the top at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant at Okum a town in Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. A string of mishaps this year at Japans crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was swamped by a tsunami in 2011, is raising doubts about the operators ability to tackle the crisis and prompting concern that another disaster could be in the making. First floods, then fires, now humans. As Tokyo Electric Power Co. attempts to repair the damage done to the disabled Fukushima power plant, things only get messier.NUCLEAR INSTABILITYMARIYAMAGUCHI Associated PressTOKYOWORKERS OVERFILL A TANK, SPILLING RADIOACTIVE WATER ON THE GROUND.Another mistakenly pushes a button, stalling a pump for a vital cooling system. Six others get soaked with toxic water when they remove the wrong pipe. All over the course of one week in October. A string of mishaps this year at the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was swamped by a tsunami in 2011, is raising doubts about the operators ability to tackle the crisis and prompting concern that another disaster could be in the making. See NUCLEAR/ Page C3

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Page C2SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 Inverness fire tax yes or no?The seemingly confrontational presentation by Jeff Dawsy, Joe Meek and Richard Wesch at the city of Inverness City Council meeting Tuesday, Oct. 15, regarding the citys accepting the proposed fire MSBU tax was a bit disconcerting. Their insistent demand the city accept the countys new MSBU fire protection program for the collection of nonad valorem fire protection assessments, they stated, was on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, or as they let it be known: If you dont join, we are taking our fire trucks and apparatus and leaving town, which certainly didnt sit very well with those in attendance. Now, lets be realistic. We all pay the fire service tax already, and this fire MSBU is on top of that. You can give it all of the fancy names that you want, but it is in reality a major additional tax on the citizens, and both the small and large businesses within the city limits. Yes, the proposed $54 tax on homeowners isnt an enormous amount of money, unless you are struggling financially, which a lot of people in the city are, but the fire tax on the office or retail building owners can be staggering, who in one form or another will have to pass this extra cost on to their renters. This will then either increase their cost of doing business, or lower whatever profits they may make, and may very well put some of those small businesses out of business, which you can easily see we already have in many of our empty shopping centers. Lets face it, small businesses are the lifeblood of this community, but if you make the cost of doing business so great and onerous, the businesses who are just squeaking by will go out of business. Does that benefit anyone? We want the community to prosper, otherwise there will be no real reason to come to this beautiful downtown area, because it will have become a ghost town, and all of the hard work and money expended by the city to upgrade, enhance, and revive the city will be for naught. A disturbing caveat that was pointed out at the meeting by the city attorney is if the city opts into this fire tax program, the county, in concert with the sheriff, can increase the fire millage rate that is charged anytime they want and the city cant do a thing about it. So the city of Inverness government and city council members and all of its citizens have a major decision to make: Do we want to open up our citys checkbook, which holds all of our hardearned tax dollars, andgive the county a blank check to pay for our fire protection (whichwe are paying for already), or do we want to go it alone, and do it ourselves? As a longtime business owner in downtown Inverness, I for one would love to see that happen. Now is the time for the city manager, the city council members and everyone involved to take a long, hard, realistic look at what makes sense. Its going to take a lot of hard work, and smart thinking and planning, with maybe even a few fervent prayers thrown in for good measure, but it can be done.Winston C. Perry Homosassa After 16 wasted days and billions of dollars in economic damage, the Republicans finally folded their tattered circus tent and voted to re-open our government last week. Moderates in the party lamented that the ending was predictable, the political wreckage immeasurable and absolutely nothing was gained by the shutdown. National polls showed approval ratings for Congress ranging from only 8 percent to 10 percent. From Oct. 4 to 6, Public Policy Polling surveyed 502 registered voters, Democrats, Republicans and independents. Disgust and revulsion prevailed across the board. Toenail fungus, hemorrhoids, cockroaches and dog poop all scored higher in popularity than Congress. Miley Cyrus, Honey Boo Boo and Vladimir Putin scored lower. Undeterred by their dismal standing with the public, 18 senators and 144 House members all Republicans still voted against ending the shutdown and raising the debt ceiling to prevent a catastrophic default. The losing contingent included Sen. Marco Rubio, who has cemented his status as a prancing lapdog for the tea party crazies. He is cleverly positioning himself to fill the intellectual void left by Michelle Bachmann, whos retiring from the House. GOP strategists would be wise to dissect the poll results that gave such a decisive edge to common toenail-fungus, also known as onychomycosis. According to Public Policys website, 44 percent of respondents had a more favorable view of the unsightly infection than of Congress, 41 percent said Congress wasnt as awful and 15 percent were undecided. Voters older than 65 favored toenail fungus by a solid margin of 45 to 39 percent, while voters 18 to 29 were evenly split, so to speak. Interestingly, those 30 to 45 years old had a higher opinion of Congress than of onychomycosis. Possibly this is because theyre just reaching the age when foot hygiene seems more important. The same poll showed that 53 percent of those surveyed held hemorrhoids in higher esteem than Congress, although there was a partisan gap. Democrats and independents overwhelmingly said Congress was worse than hemorrhoids, while GOP voters gave Congress a slight edge. (It should be noted that respondents werent asked if theyd had any personal experience with either rectal disorders or Ted Cruz.) On a somewhat positive note, Congress fared slightly better in the poll when compared with cockroaches, although the hardy insects were still more popular by a 44-42 percent spread. By contrast, generic dog doo beat out the politicians by a whopping 47 to 40 percent. About 13 percent of those polled were undecided, which probably means theyre cat owners. Despite such rancid numbers, a cluster of Toe Fungus Republicans in the Florida delegation voted to continue the government shutdown and initiate a national default. Youll want to hang on to this list, in case any of these geniuses ever decide to run for statewide office: Jeff Miller, a real-estate agent in Chumuckla; Steve Southerland from Panama City; Ron DeSantis from Ponte Vedra Beach; Dennis Ross, a Lakeland lawyer; and Ted Yoho, a Gainesville large-animal veterinarian and tea party tool whos been in Washington 10 whole months. Then theres John Mica from Winter Park; Bill Posey, an antiObama birther from Rockledge; Tom Rooney, from Tequesta; Richard Nugent, a former sheriff of Hernando County; and Trey Radel, an ex-TV reporter and improv comedian from Fort Myers. At least Radel admits to being a comedian. The others have no excuse. Here, as is true around the country, many of the Toe Fungus Republicans hail from conservative, skillfully gerrymandered districts, and they have little risk of losing their seats in next years midterm elections. The biggest casualty of the shutdown is the national GOP its hopes for recapturing the White House poleaxed once again by the partys radical right wing. Already a few tea party action groups have threatened retribution against Republican lawmakers who put the country first and voted to stop the madness. If GOP leaders are looking for a bright side to the Public Policy survey, heres one: Congress scored much higher with people than Anthony Weiner, the former Democratic representative from New York, failed mayoral candidate and serial sexter. Also, the Ebola virus is still more unpopular than members of Congress. So is Lindsey Lohan, Charlie Manson and heroin. So theyve got that going for them.Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132. I never made a decision in my life that wasnt one hundred per cent selfish.John Updike, The Centaur, 1963 Congress: Worse than toe fungus CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief CMH boards cant linger at crossroads The two boards that have spent millions of public dollars waging governance war over Citrus Memorial Health System finally were able to agree: The chosen bidder is Hospital Corporation of America. The next step is deciding whether the hospital should be sold or leased to HCA. If you havent paid attention to the many hospital-related meetings lately, well sum it up for you: The board members led, of course, by their always-present attorneys now are locked in a new tug-of-war. One board wants to sell, one wants to lease. The boards each contributed two members to a joint committee charged with studying the advantages and disadvantages of each option, and make a recommendation back to their boards for a decision. This gang of four has set meetings for every Monday through the end of November. Another month of this? Really? If the boards had been listening, they would have gotten the message already: This community wants the hospital sold ASAP so HCA can focus quickly on making badly-needed investments in facilities and staff, restoring stability to the CMH family, and becoming a valued community member. Hospital employees say it in public meetings. Physicians and medical group representatives say it in public meetings. Citizens say it in public meetings. Audiences applaud when this option is recommended. In the Chroniclesrecent online poll, 78 percent of respondents favored a sale. Its clear: No one wants the people responsible for this ongoing turmoil to have anything more to do with Citrus Memorial The current fuss presents no surprise: its still about power and money. A lease would keep the Citrus County Hospital Board intact as the hospital systems landlord. And regardless of the transaction type, the looming issues now surround who will control the proceeds and how those monies will be handled. One positive note is that opinion seems to be coalescing around the ideas of placing the proceeds into a trust, with no spending for at least a year, and forming an independent community board to oversee the disposition of funds. At the most recent Board of County Commissioners meeting, current chair Joe Meek was designated as the BOCCs representative to the transaction process. In our view, the county commission should be part of this process. Commissioners are, unlike members of either hospitalrelated board, elected by and accountable to county residents. Commissioners also agreed to have the county attorneys office look into the BOCCs options and possible role in connection with the hospital transaction. It just makes sense to get an independent opinion rather than relying for guidance on attorneys for the combatants. One of those attorneys sees himself as the spinmeister and ringmaster; the other has failed to clearly or convincingly lay out the facts for his board members or the public. Whats the bottom line? The boards need to make a decision together, and soon. The deciding factor must be whats in the best interest of the entire community, not individuals with special interests. They owe it to the community to preserve and protect our health resources. Board members must promote repair and rebuilding from the damage their feuding has caused, and do it now, while we have a willing bidder ready to take on the job. THE ISSUE:Its decision time in the Citrus Memorial saga.OUR OPINION:Boards must act now and act in the communitys best interests. LETTERto the Editor Abusing the systemI live in a rental-assisted apartment. I heard neighbors talking about going to Daystar for food. Sounds sad, doesnt it? These same people spent the entire weekend running around drinking and smoking for hours on end instead of buying food for their children. You talk about using the system. This is sad. Toys or tools?This is in response to the Sound Off Dawsy wastes money. As the gap between the have and the have-nots increases, youre going to be glad Dawsy has all these what you call toys helping to defend the public.Crab logicSome crab boats can bring in hundreds of pounds of claws and a recreational diver can bring in 2 gallons of claws. Well, that really sounds fair, doesnt it?Serving utilitiesI think we should change the name of the PSC, Public Service Commission, to the USC, the Utilities Service Commission.The 411 on 411To the person who had to pay $1.50 for calling 411: Theres a toll-free number you can use. Its 1-800FREE411. Try that and you wont be charged for it. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE CRUNCH TIME Carl HiaasenOTHER VOICES

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COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 C3 The home Cheryl and I first shared as newlyweds was at 909 Mitchell St., Dade City, Fla. Mitchell Street wasnt really a street at all: It was a dead-end, 200-yard-long lime rock-covered lane on the outskirts of town that intersected with State Road 41. There were houses on both sides, and this tiny settlement was completely surrounded by orange groves. Nowadays, we will go back to Dade City from time to time, but when we do, we usually go into town from north to south on U.S. 301, not from west to east on State Road 41. A family health circumstance has caused us to go there on several occasions during the past couple of weeks, and, based on the location of the hospital, we have chosen the west-to-east route using State Road 41. In doing so, we couldnt help noticing the sign for Mitchell Street. It brought back memories, very pleasant memories. On one recent afternoon, we chose to drive down Mitchell Street and check it out. It is still just as it was 47 years ago, a lime rock-covered dead-end lane. There are still houses on both sides and the entire area is still surrounded by orange groves. Quaint. Lovely. It was the same as it was when Cheryl and I were there as little more than a girl and a boy spreading our wings and beginning to fly as a married couple. I was pleased to see that the entire neighborhood seems to be well-maintained and that the house at No .909 is in very good shape. I really couldnt tell for sure whether the original dwelling had been refurbished and remodeled or whether someone had simply replaced it in its entirety. We stopped to take a closer look, and ultimately, I concluded that the original structure remains, but it has been quite handsomely brought into the 21st century. Our minds can play tricks on us, and while looking at the house, just for a moment, I thought I could smell freshly baked blueberry muffins. Then I remembered. Back during our first year together, each Thursday evening, I attended banking-related classes. When I would finally arrive home at 10 oclock or so, Id open the door and the aroma of freshly baked blueberry muffins would waft its way to my nose while my eyes would find Cheryl. Our grocery budget was limited, but she was consistently able to find the dime it cost for a box of muffin mix and she would have this special treat, along with a glass of milk either fresh or reconstituted powdered milk waiting for me when I came in. 909 Mitchell St. and blueberry muffins. Life doesnt get any better.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. 909 Mitchell St. and blueberry muffins Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE Ashley is a young woman with endless opportunities in front of her. She eventually wants to return to school to become an EMT. The two have obviously become close friends. They are proud of each other and proud of themselves. The hopeful qualities of todays events are immeasurable. But the quantitative effects are both measurable and impressive. In January, without a high school education, these two young women were on target to earn approximately $13,000 each, annually. The pay scale for a PCA ranges between $10 to $14 per hour, meaning they could potentially earn $30,000 a year! Plus more when you consider shift differential, overtime, etc. Collectively, these positive futures could have a $34,000 annual impact on Citrus County. Its encouraging to know that by investing donor dollars into programs that truly address the root cause of social need, we can see real, lasting change. When we invest in people who are willing and committed to improving their own lives, the results are simply awesome. Jessica and Ashley were both so appreciative of the support they received from United Way, but as I quickly reminded them, it was their willingness to improve and their dedication that really made it all happen. Right now, our United Way is uniting community agencies like the Early Learning Coalition, We Care Food Pantry, CASA, the Boys & Girls Clubs, Catholic Charities and several others to layer up their services to radically impact the lives of those in our community who are willing to change their lives. We know that adults who commit to going back to school face financial barriers. By bringing together all of our efforts, we can make a bigger difference. Adult students who are confident that their children are in a safe, positive learning environment and are assured that there will be plenty of food at home; are better able to concentrate at school. Our collective efforts will strengthen our collective results. Our community needs to rally behind people like Jessica and Ashley, people who have big dreams and the drive to achieve them. Your commitment to United Way is a part of reaching better days in Citrus County. Because of the generosity of our donors, we are more hopeful today than yesterday. Hopefulness is a long way from hopelessness. Hopefulness sounds a lot better, dont you agree?Amy Meek is CEO of United Way of Citrus County. It cant be lost on taxpayers that Adams is part owner of his own private landfill in Sumter County and just recently wooed away the business of the city of Inverness. That action will cost the taxpayers of the county. Why is it that so much of Adams time is spent complaining about the county landfill? Can the commissioner not see the obvious conflict of interest that exists? Again, in truth, Adams is probably correct that the county landfill in Lecanto can be run more efficiently. But his credibility gets nailed by independent voters who question his long-term intent. Is he trying to improve the county landfills operations, or close it down so the trash can be moved to his private business? Its OK that a private business wooed away the business of Inverness, but is it OK for a county commissioner to be part of the mix? If this was Commissioner Dennis Damato complaining about construction quality and trying to win business for his private company or commissioner Rebecca Bays complaining about insurance costs and claiming her private business could do a better job, the regular county critics would be howling with outrage. The ethics commission complaint filed by Adams against Bays documents how the commissioner is just trying to make others look bad as opposed to dealing with the problem. Adams actually voted to appoint Mike Bays, his fellow commissioners husband, to the countrys enterprise board. Adams asked Wesch if the appointment was OK and the lawyer gave him the thumbs-up. Two weeks later Adams said he went to an ethics class for new commissioners and learned the appointment was not OK. Instead of returning to the commission and Wesch to inform them of his discovery, Adams immediately went to the state ethics commission to file an official complaint. He could have resolved the problem by pointing staff to the information he learned. Instead, he played a fun game of gotcha and tried to get Commissioner Bays in trouble. The ethics commission rejected the charges because Mike Bays stepped down and never attended a single meeting. The charade cost Commissioner Bays $8,400, and by law the county is liable to pay the bill. Taxpayers should not be fooled by this stuff. While its fun to hate politicians at all levels of government, its not fun to see our county turned inside out. Staff morale is in the basement. Key leaders (like Wesch) are seeking jobs in other locations because they dont want to deal with the nonsense. And people who might want to do business here are not going to be impressed by this level of official foolishness. Commissioner Adams is fond of reminding everyone that he is very wealthy and a terrific businessperson, and that he wouldnt accept such poor performance from his employees. The commissioner needs to listen to his own words. His combative behavior and constant criticism of everyone around him should not be tolerated in private business or any level of government. There is plenty of value to some of the insights that Scott Adams could lend to county government. But his techniques are destructive to process and the people who try to operate within it. Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan @chronicleonline.com. Worried Japanese regulators are taking a more hands-on approach than usual. They met with Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials this week to discuss how to prepare for a typhoon that could dump heavy rain on Fukushima. And Nuclear Regulation Authority Chairman Shinichi Tanaka has scheduled a Monday meeting with Tokyo Electrics president to seek solutions to what he says appear to be fundamental problems. Human error is mostly to blame, as workers deal with a seemingly unending stream of crises. Tanaka said earlier this month the repeated silly mistakes are a sign of declining morale and sense of responsibility. The operator, known as TEPCO, acknowledged a systemic problem in a recent report: Workers under tight deadlines tend to cut corners, making mistakes more likely; at times, they dont fully understand their assignment or procedures. The utility has been losing experienced workers as they reach their radiation exposure limits, and hundreds of others are quitting jobs seen as underpaid given the difficulty and health risks. Regulators have urged the plant to have enough supervisors to oversee the workers on site; TEPCO says it has added staff and is ensuring proper field-management. Some of this years mishaps:Oct. 20 to 21: Heavy rains wash contaminated storm water over protective barriers around storage tanks at six locations before workers finish setting up additional pumps and hoses to remove the water.Oct. 9: Six workers remove the wrong pipe, dousing themselves with highly radioactive water. TEPCO says exposure for the workers, who were wearing facemasks with filters, hazmat suits and raingear, is negligible. An estimated 7 tons of water almost overflows the barrier around it.Oct. 7: A worker mistakenly presses a stop button during a power switchboard check, stalling a pump and cooling-water supply to the Unit 1 reactor for a split second. A monitoring device for Units 1 and 2 and a building ventilator also fail briefly until backup power kicks in.Oct. 2: Workers overfill a storage tank for radioactive water, spilling about 110 gallons. The workers were trying to maximize capacity amid the plants water storage crunch. Most of the spill is believed to have reached the sea via a nearby ditch.Oct. 1: About five tons of contaminated rainwater overflows when workers pump it into the wrong tank, most of it seeping into the ground.Sept. 27: A piece of rubber lining mistakenly left inside a water treatment unit clogs it up, causing it to fail hours after it resumed a test-run following repairs. The fragment is removed, and the unit returned to testing.Sept. 19: A firefighting water pipe is damaged during debris removal, and 80 gallons of non-radioactive water spurt out. The same day, TEPCO provides Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with a hazmat suit for a plant visit with the wrong Japanese character for his family name on the nametag. Spotting the mistake halfway through the tour, an apparently displeased Abe peels the sticker off.Sept. 12: A water treatment machine overflows, leaking about 18 gallons of contaminated water, when a worker doing unrelated work nearby inadvertently shuts a valve.Aug. 19: A patrolling worker finds a massive pool of contaminated water spilling out of a protective barrier around a storage tank. TEPCO later concludes an estimated 300 tons escaped unnoticed over several weeks.April 4: A worker pushes the wrong button on a touch panel, temporarily stopping one of three water treatment units during a pre-operation test. Humans arent always to blame. A rat sneaked into an outdoor power switchboard on March 18, causing a short circuit and blackout lasting 30 hours in some areas. Four nuclear fuel storage pools lost cooling, but power was restored before a meltdown. A few weeks later, workers caused another short-circuit while installing anti-rat nets, leaving one of the fuel storage pools without cooling for several hours. NUCLEARContinued from Page C1 WINDOWContinued from Page C1 HOPEContinued from Page C1 Ways to help clean the waterOn Thursday, Oct. 24, the KBAM (Kings Bay Adaptive Management) group had a great end-of-the-year project moving the final crop of hyacinths and water lettuce from the stormwater pen on Cutler Spur by the post office to the KBAM Corral in the lagoon between Parker Island and the USFWS Refuge on Kings Bay Drive. The weather was great, and so were the volunteers who had a great time, albeit was tough work. All said they would be back next time. The KBAM project is helping to slowly prove these floating aquatic plants will shade the cloudy waters underneath them, clouded with algae, and at the same time ingest the nutrients in the waters that the algae feeds on, including Lyngbya, enabling the water column to clear. One Rake at a Time is doing a fab job removing the algae, but it cant be stopped from coming back until the nutrient level is lowered, and these floating plants should do that. The nutrients come from excess lawn and plant and farming fertilizers and improperly maintained septic tanks. Did you know that hyacinths and water lettuce are used in some sewer plant ponds to remove the nutrients from the waste waters before the water is released? There is documentation from China and other countries that these aquatic plants, when released to ponds and lakes that are green with algae bloom pollution can clear the water in weeks. The plants have to be removed or they would die, releasing everything they took up back into the waters to turn green again. We have Mother Natures removal system here. Either the plants float down the river to the Gulf where they eventually die, or they get eaten by the manatees. To the rumor folks, a manatees digestive system is extremely long and by the time they evacuate whats left there are very few nutrients, so no redepositing. There are nutrients in the bottom substrate of our waters too, referred to by some as muck. But if this substrate is roughly disturbed releasing a lot of nutrients, we could see here what happened in the Indian River Lagoon, an algae bloom turning the waters green, killing the fishes and the vegetation and in Indian River, more than 100 manatees and they still dont know how. So for next year, come and help the KBAM project and learn about it and help us do it. And walk gently and play lightly on the bottoms of the Bay so you dont release the nutrients from the substrate until we have something floating around there to eat em up. To me, science is simple: Use the tools Mother Nature has furnished and we will have clear waters so the native plants have the sunshine to grow. Keep your boats slow so you dont prop-dredge the plants emerging from the bottom. The seeds and plants are down there. They just need the sunshine and a little tender concern and care to grow again. Use native plants in your yard that take little water, and conserve water every chance you get. Our spring flows in Kings Bay are down some 30 precent. Its like a firefighter trying to put out a fire with 30 percent less water. At full flow the springs of Kings Bay can flush a lot of the nutrients out of here. And send a thanks to the KBAM volunteers, The One Rake at a Time volunteers and all the folks who care enough to conserve water so we will always have water to drink, and our beautiful, full-flowing springs.Helen Spivey Crystal RiverVolunteer to help veteransWe need to understand the meaning of governance. Whether it be at the local level or the state level or the national level, it is important to understand the reason why some issues move slowly. At the local level those ordinances affect all of us personally, at the state level they have significant impact when they affect us on a county level, and when it is nationally, as with our Congress, they take small steps to make sure they dont make catastrophic mistakes that will affect all of us, at least that is what they have tried to do in the past. It has come to my attention that Congress is afraid to make decisions. Those members have shut down the government to try to make the point that they are afraid to pay for all the laws they have passed, and yet, they, the Congressmen, are still being paid. There is something terribly wrong with what is happening with our governing in Washington. I dont need to tell you about all the public employees that are getting IOUs to continue to work, nor do I need to tell you about the lack of the Veterans benefits to families that have lost their loved ones to war and the benefits to help bury them. I plan to volunteer my services to the Veterans Clinic here in Hernando to help veterans receive their benefits. I did it for my 89-year-old dad in Massachusetts, a DAV veteran, and I plan to help anyone who needs help here in Hernando. As I find this situation intolerable for our local veterans seeking assistance, I invite all of you that read this letter to the editor, to help our fellow veterans, and volunteer to help them as well. We here in Citrus County have always told our representatives in Washington what is important to us, and our families. We have the largest percentage of veterans in any county in the state and it is important for our representatives in Congress to represent us and all the other veterans in the country. Please join the effort. Im sure we can help our veterans here at home and maybe elsewhere in the state.Suzan Franks Hernando OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com Letters toTHE EDITOR

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Do the hokey pokeyI sincerely wonder if anybody else has thought about the fact that when you see these pictures of our county commissioners in the paper, regardless of what the activity is, they are all lined up in their favorite rotation, almost like a bunch of robots. Is there any reason that they cant move around?Keep sale proceeds from commissionersThis call concerns the proposed sale of the hospital in Inverness. I would normally favor the sale for cash. However, there is no way that I trust the county commissioners with the proceeds from this sale. They have shown time and time again, they are tax-and-spend Democrats pretending to be Republicans in order to be elected or stay in office. An exception I would make would be to put the funds in an untouchable trust account with only the interest or dividends available for county use. I would also exclude the school board use of any of the funds from the sale.Were being drainedInteresting article on water use permits (Oct. 12). In the article, it lists many things to obtain an application for water withdrawal. Well, in the past year, Swiftmud has approved all of these permits for withdrawal and they are clearly in violation of A, B, C, D and probably E. Everybody knows the aquifer is being drawn down, theres less fresh water coming out of the springs, the rivers are becoming salt and were going to kill the goose that laid the golden egg, all in the name of greed and nobody has the courage to stand up and say enoughs enough. Detecting the textingAs of Oct. 1 in the state of Florida, its illegal to be texting and driving. Whos the person that came up with this great rule? You have to get stopped by something else and then the officer says you were texting too. I say, No, I was dialing a number, its totally different.God bless that womanI would like to thank the woman who found my purse in the Walmart shopping cart. My heart almost stopped when I realized what I had done after I left. I went back and some woman had turned it in. I am grateful and realize there are more honest people than not and God bless the woman who turned it in.The dope on the DollarAnybody out there tell me why the Family Dollar in Beverly Hills is not open yet? Stop tailgating There needs to be something done about these rude, inconsiderate people tailgating. I dont care if its the people that give out the drivers licenses, or the police need to comment about something, or the car manufacturers need to develop something. I mean this is wrong. Somebodys going to get hurt real bad. I mean its Saturday 11 oclock in the morning and theyre tailgating. You got bikers going the speed limit and you still got some car just a couple car lengths behind him going 60 mph.Ever the shillsI wonder if the Chronicle has the audacity to really start reporting whats going on. You always report the stuff thats coming from Beverly Hills when, in all actuality, its less than a football field from Terra Vista or Citrus Hills or where the high influential people with a better income of the people who live in Beverly Hills live. But you always want to put in the paper its Beverly Hills. The actual address, why dont you say where its from? Its from Terra Vista. Its right across the street. We could put a football field and youre in Terra Vista from Gus Golden Gym instead of always painting Beverly Hills the bad place it is.County organizational chart, pleaseIn todays newspaper (Oct. 13), I was reading the editorial section and Roger Krieger wrote a wonderful letter on how the county administrators constantly reorganizing. I think it would be very helpful to both his assistants and the commissioners if the newspaper would publish an organizational chart of just how this county runs under Brad (Thorpe) and I think it would clear up a bunch of issues and everybody would either feel much better about the county administration or understand that there are serious problems. Halloween canceledWell, happy Halloween, little kiddies. Just wanted to inform you there will be no trick-ortreating on our street in Sugarmill Woods. With all the break-ins and all the coyotes, its far too dangerous. Maybe well have better luck next year.Gift card scamJust want to report this of what happened to me today about five minutes ago. I received a card through the mail in my name and my address and everything, telling me that I have received $100 in gift savings which is good at Walmart or Target. They gave me a number to call. I called. They asked me for my age. I gave them the wrong age. I said I was 50 and then they wanted the date of my birth and thats when I asked them, Why do you need the date? They didnt answer me; they just hung up. So all I know is, this is a fraud. I just thought Id let you know. Maybe you can put it in the newspaper. SoundOFF C4SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMENTARY 000G4UL 3 678910 13 14 15 16 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 26 25 24 23 22 28 21 20 27 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Sunday Saturday 2 1Columbus Day Halloween30 31 29National Boss Day Sweetest Day 000GG0BOct 26 & 27 Sat: 10 am-6 am & Sun: Noon 5 pmCity of Inverness Great American Cooter Fest Block PartyLiberty Park, InvernessContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext. 1304Oct 27 2:30 pmNature Coast Community Band Veterans Appreciation Concert, NCCBCornerstone Baptist Church InvernessContact Phone: 352-795-7000Oct 27 7:30 am 10 amCity of Inverness Great American Cooter Triathlon Wallace Brooks Park, Inverness Contact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext. 1304Oct 28 5:30 pm-7:30 pmAgricultural Alliance of Citrus County Movember Shave-Off/Kick Off PartyHistoric Courthouse, InvernessContact Phone: 352-795-8344Nov 1 7 pmVeterans Appreciation Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee Salute to VeteransCrystal River MallContact Phone: 941-544-7470Nov 2 4 pm-11 pmRotary Kings Bay 6th Annual Stone Crab JamDowntown streets of Crystal River General Admission: $5Contact Phone: 352-425-0093Nov 2 & 3 6 pmHomosassa Lions Club A Sentimental Journey8408 W Homosassa Trail, Homosassa Springs $15 For Dinner & ShowContact Phone: 352-212-1014 For ReservationsNov 2 & 3 6 pmFestival of the Arts/City of Inverness Festival of the Arts Downtown Inverness FreeContact Phone: 614-519-2843Nov 2 6 pmSeven Rivers Regional Medical Center Kings Bay 5KHunter Springs Park, Crystal River Entrance Fee: $25-$30Contact Phone: 352-795-8344Nov 2 5 pmVoices For Children of NC FL, Inc. Trivia Challenge #4American Legion, 10730 Highway 41, Dunnellon Entrance Fee: $25.00Contact Phone: 352-484-0319 Ext. 3Nov 2 5 pmInverness Elks Lodge # 2522 Rockin the LakeThe Elks Lodge, 3580 E. Lemon St., Hernando, behind Ace Entrance Fee: $15.00 pp Contact Phone: 352-419-5625Nov 2 11 amNature Coast Friends of Blues, Inc. Blues n Bar B Que10466 W, Yulee Dr., Homosassa Entrance Fee: $15.00 Pre-Sale $20.00 at DoorContact Phone: 352-628-9411Nov 2 9 am 1 pmCity of Inverness Inverness Farmers Market Inverness Government Center FreeContact Phone: 352.726.2611 Ext. 1304 As part of the Citrus County Chronicles partnership with The Festival of the Arts, local high school students decorated 8 newspaper boxes that will be displayed during the Festival of The Arts scholarship social and festival. As part of Art Outside the Box, you can vote online for your favorite painted newspaper box. Online voting runs from October 21 through November 3, 2013. On November 4, the first, second and third place winners will be announced. All of the painted boxes will be placed throughout Citrus County. Crest School Citrus High School Citrus High School Lecanto High School Lecanto High School Lecanto High School Crystal River High School Crystal River High School 000GCPZ

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DEAR BRUCE: I was very ill in 2010 and got way behind on credit card bills. I tried paying the minimum amounts that were due, but without being able to work, I got way behind. I planned to go bankrupt, but it hasnt been sitting well with me. My husband passed away a few months ago, and I got a very small insurance payment. After the funeral and other expenses, I now have about $9,000 left. All the credit card companies want to make offers of smaller amounts to settle. I own my house outright. I really dont want to go bankrupt. Do you think there is any way to get a loan from a bank or a line of credit using the house, and paying the settlement amounts of the credit cards? Will a bank refuse to go for that with my credit score being in bad shape? P .R., via email DEAR P.R.: I certainly sympathize with your situation. Generally speaking, thats what bankruptcy is all about. Unhappily, you waited a little bit too long. Had you filed for bankruptcy while your husband was still alive, and before there was an insurance settlement, there is little question that the bankruptcy See MONEY/ Page D3 BUSINESSSection DSUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports MONDA YWASHINGTON Federal Reserve releases industrial production for September, 9:15 a.m. Eastern; National Association of Realtors releases pending home sales index for September, 10 a.m. W EDNES DA YWASHINGTON ADP employment survey for October, 8:15 a.m.; Labor Department releases Consumer Price Index for September; and Federal Reserve policymakers meet to set interest rates. THURS DA YWASHINGTON Labor Department releases weekly jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the mortgage company, releases weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m. Both sides agree: No major budget deal in sight ANDREWTAYLOR Associated PressWASHINGTON On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There wont be a grand bargain on the budget. Instead, the Wisconsin Republican and the Nevada Democrat both say the best Washington can do in this bitterly partisan era of divided government is a small-ball bargain that tries to take the edge off of automatic budget cuts known as sequestration. Official Capitol Hill negotiations start next week, but Ryan and Reid both weighed in Thursday to tamp down any expectations that the talks might forge a large-scale agreement where several previous high-level talks have failed. Long-standing, entrenched differences over taxes make a large-scale budget pact virtually impossible, according to lawmakers, their aides and observers who will be monitoring the talks. Republicans say they simply wont agree to any further taxes atop the 10year, $600 billion-plus tax increase on upper-income earners that President Barack Obama and Democrats muscled through Congress in January. Without higher taxes, Democrats say they wont yield to cuts in benefit programs like Medicare. If we focus on some big, grand bargain then were going to focus on our differences, and both sides are going to require that the other side compromises some core principle and then well get nothing done, Ryan, who chairs the House Budget Committee, Oil hovers above $97 after recent losses NEW YORK The price of oil hovered above $97 a barrel Friday, consolidating mild gains after two weeks of losses sparked by high supplies and patchy global economic growth. By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark U.S. crude for December delivery was up 30 cents at $97.41 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract, which rose 25 cents to $97.11 on Thursday, is down nearly 5 percent over the past two weeks. Brent crude, a benchmark for international crude also used by U.S. refineries, was down 8 cents at $106.91 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London. Markets OK despite big slide in Nikkei LONDON Financial markets outside of Japan were lackluster Friday at the end of a week thats seen the S&P 500 and Germanys DAX post record highs and the dollar fall to near two-year lows against the euro. In Tokyo, the benchmark Nikkei index slid 2.8 percent to 14,088.19 as the dollar fell below its 200-day average of 97.30 yen. In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares was flat at 6,714, little affected by news that the British economy grew at a quarterly rate of 0.8 percent in the third quarter. Elsewhere in Europe, Germanys DAX was 0.1 percent lower at 8,975, having earlier risen to an all-time high of 9,010.65, which was the first time it has ever breached the 9,000 mark. The CAC-40 in France was 0.4 percent lower at 4,261. ome say the money should provide research to develop preventative measures and treatments for cancer. Others say the money should be used for patients in need who cannot afford even a drive to the doctor. We fall in both categories, said Robyn Liska, executive director of the American Cancer Society chapter in Tampa. Eighty percent of money raised through Relays for Life is spent either on research or goes back into the community for programs to aid cancer patients in need, she said. Those programs include resource rooms, which provide supplies, such as wigs and soft bras and are staffed by volunteers. The American Cancer Society has a resource room at Citrus Memorial hospital. Another program is called Road to Recovery, where volunteers drive patients to doctor visits or for treatment. One of the biggest concerns is how do we get patients from point A to point B? Liska said. The Road to Recovery provides thousands of trips. The American Cancer Society is also provides free lodging for patients and caregivers who qualify at its Hope Lodges; the two used by Citrus residents are in Gainesville and Tampa. In 2012 we housed over 40 Citrus County patients and caregivers in a Hope Lodge, Liska said. The Hope Lodges have housed about 29 Citrus County patients and caregivers so far this year. Mike Wright Staff writer Every year the springtime Relays for Life attract people who want to support their friends and loved ones who are cancer victims. The relays bring teams of volunteers, often associated with businesses or community organizations, which raise money through pledges to participate in the 18-hour walk. Thousands of dollars are raised for the American Cancer Society. And where does the money go? Did you know? Death rates from breast cancer have dropped 34 percent since 1990.In January 2012, about 2.9 million women in the U.S. had a history of breast cancer. The American Cancer Society funds $86 million for 220 research projects. The projects include:Establishing new treatments to counteract triple negative breast cancers that do not respond to chemotherapy.Evaluating whether genetic factors are associated with breast cancer risks.Exploring new treatments involving immune system cells.In-house, surveillance-based research on populations of breast-cancer patients is used to monitor trends and statistics.Studies to determine factors that lead to a good quality of life after diagnosis of breast cancer. 2014 Citrus County Relays for Life:April 4 for Inverness/Lecanto at Citrus High SchoolApril 25 for Dunnellon/Crystal River at Crystal River High School Credit card bills pile up when sick See FUNDS/ Page D3 See BUDGET/ Page D3

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D2 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. In honor and memory of Tom CorcoranCitrus County Continuity of Care held a Celebration of Life for Tom Corcoran. The Ambassadors presented his wife, Chrissy, with a Lifetime Ambassador Award at the event.Tune into Chamber ChatChamber Chat guest the week of Nov. 3 to hear from presenters from Fire Up Citrus! And what has happened since sharing their ideas with the community. FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS Member news and eventsOct. 29 Movember Shave-Off/Kick-Off Party, Old Citrus County Courthouse Square, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 29 United Way event: Earn it! Keep it! Save it! Budget workshop at 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Visit Citrus Unitedway.org for more information and registration. Oct. 30 Tampa Bay Senior Expo presented by the Tampa Bay Times at the Gulfview Square Mall, 9409 U.S. 19, Port Richey. Free admission and parking. Nov. 1 to 20 Citrus United Basket/Arbor Trail Rehab Food Drive. Please donate can food and boxed goods to Arbor Trail Rehab and Skilled Nursing Center at 611 Turner Camp Rd., Inverness or call 352-637-1130 for more information. Nov. 2 Annual Blues and Barbecue Festival in old Homosassa from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring music from Franc Roberts, the Eve Shaw Band, Cool Corporate Cats and the Pitbulls of Blues Band. Call 352-628-1081 for $15 tickets in advance, profits support local youth music education and Susan Mitchell. Nov. 2 First annual Casting for the Cure fishing tournament presented by Nurses on Call. Starts at 7:30 a.m. at McRaes of Homosassa 5300 S. Cherokee Way. Call 352-777-1302. The Chamber welcomes new members with ribbon-cuttings Get Involved in MovemberThe Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County wants to see you, your spouse, your co-workers, your golf or fishing buddies or anyone you know growing a Mo (short for moustache) in November. If you, your business or your friends would like to join the Movember Citrus County team or if youd just like to donate, visit us.movember.com/team/1007301. To stay in the know about the Mo, go to Facebook.com/MovemberCitrus. Movember Citrus County would like to thank their media sponsors: Citrus County Chronicle, Citrus 95/Classic Hits The Fox and Hometown Values. The inaugural Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Race is set for Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Lake Hernando Park, 3699 E. Orange Drive, and Hernando. Build your own team Saturday, Nov. 16 Corporate sponsored teams: $1,000 registration entry fee Community, nonprofit and club teams: $500 registration entry fee (special inaugural event pricing!) All necessary equipment included.Sponsorships availableCalling all food and craft vendors: Vendor special rate: $50 for business booth and $25 for nonprofit booth More information and registration: http://www.lakehernando dragonboat.com 813-426-3544 Christine@highfivedragonboats.com One of Citrus Countys best traditions the EDC Barbecue was a great success. This event welcomed more than 700 folks to the M&B Diary in Lecanto. The barbecue closed out the month of festivities celebrating Industry Appreciation Month. The EDC and Chamber would like to thank the barbecues presenting sponsor Sibex, volunteers and all who came out to the event.Industry Appreciation Month Sponsors: Duke Energy Workforce Connection Health & Wellcare Services of Florida Insurance Resources & Risk Management Specialty Gems Sibex Crystal Automotive Hometown Values College of Central Florida Citrus 95.3 Job Site Services Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Insight Credit Union F.D.S. Disposal, Inc. EDC BBQ a big success Back row, from left: Ellen Bishop; Jeffrey Rubin; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Jackie Weeks; Carol Keadle; Andrea Thompson; Eileen Tate; Ed Murphy. Front row, from left: Shelly Glenn; Jarneshah Cunningham; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Marion T. Chirayath, MD; Sunil Gandhi, MD, FACP; Gustavo A. Fonseca, MD; V. UpenderRao, MD, FACP; Jimmie T. Smith; Marie Chapman; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Diana Seijas; Debbie Jones; Barbara Remener; Crystal Mathis; and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers. AMERICAN TACTICAL FIREARMS Back row, from left: Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Joan Hoffman; Natalie Peters; Dixie and Robyn Hollins; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George. Middle row, from left: Hanna and Phillip Peters with daughter Natalie; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County. Front row, from left: Jonah and Jesse Hoffman. Dragon Boat Festival set for Nov. 16

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 D3 Traditionally Citrus County has had three Relays for Life at each of the countys public high schools. In 2014, the events are being consolidated somewhat. Inverness and Lecanto will share one relay at Citrus High School, and Dunnellon will share a relay with Crystal River at Crystal River High School. Both relays are in April. In 2011 the Citrus County relays raised $207,000. While final figures werent available, the 2012 relay raised an estimated $168,000, she said. Liska said fund-raising amounts fluctuate, but she hopes that consolidating three relays into two in 2014 will reduce the cancer societys costs while increasing donations and interest. Liska said the cancer society stands firm in its hope of easing the impact cancer has on patients and caregivers. Thats why we stay focused on helping the most people with the most focused services, she said. We aim at reaching the most and saving lives, which is our ultimate goal. would have been approved. The fact that you have $9,000 left after settling the funeral and other expenses could present some problems. Regardless of the source of the funds, the strong likelihood is that the courts would want you to settle at least most of that money before bankruptcy was allowed. I understand you are reluctant to go bankrupt, and since the credit card companies are willing to make a deal, see what kind of offer you can get, maybe 10 percent to 15 percent on the dollar. It may very well be that you could settle the bills with the $9,000 and not have to consider bankruptcy. You didnt indicate how much debt you are in. In the event that the amount is substantially over the $9,000, you should really consider consulting a bankruptcy attorney, but the reality is you are going to give up most of the $9,000. DEAR BRUCE: You have said that one can get a 6 percent to 8 percent return on an investment. I would like to know how to do that since I have read and been told by a financial adviser that one can only rely on a 4 percent return for retirement. What strategy do you suggest to get your yield? M.B., via email DEAR M.B.: I have said consistently that I believe it is not unreasonable to expect a 6 percent to 8 percent annual income on my investments. I have been achieving that for many, many years. Not every year. I had losing years, as well. But over the long haul, the average has been 7 percent and in many years considerably higher. There is no secret, but its necessary to take a certain degree of risk. Overall, the stock market has consistently given me those types of returns by investing in conservative, dividend-paying companies. There are going to be years when all of the conservative investments in the world are not going help. In the years 2008 to 2011, there were a lot of companies that lost value and others that failed to increase. But you will notice that if you kept all of your investments that went in the toilet during the 2008-2009 period, in most cases you will have recovered your investment with a substantial profit. The question is, are you prepared to take a certain degree of risk? If your instructions to your adviser are that you are absolutely risk-adverse, then even 4 percent is a difficult number to achieve. In my view, conservative, strong American companies are here and will remain here. Properly invested, the type of return I suggested is not unreasonable. DEAR BRUCE: Our daughter went to school to be a veterinarian assistant. Her student loan rate was 3 percent. Three years later, her student loans increased to 6.5 percent and 7 percent. She now pays $200 per month, interest only, because its all she can afford. She says that she cannot even think about marriage and starting a family when she is in debt. She owes about $35,000. She is very frustrated, and so are we in watching her struggle. When the government took over these loans, the rate doubled. Is this how we take care of our young people and encourage schooling to get ahead? The only encouraging thing we have heard is that after 30 years, her unpaid balance would be forgiven. By that time, she will have paid $72,000. N.B., via email DEAR N.B.: I can understand and sympathize with your daughters situation. I have no notion as to how much money she had to borrow, as opposed how much she wished to borrow rather than work, when she was in school, but the fact remains that she now owes about $35,000. That she cant even think about marriage is distressing, however I dont necessarily agree. As to the family, that is a different matter. Were she to get an extra job, over and above her regular job, at $5,000 a year, she could unload her debt in five years or so. With her skills, this shouldnt be a difficult thing to find. There are many veterinary practices that work on weekends and pay substantial wages to folks who are willing to put in those weekend hours. She also might be able to find a lower interest rate. I am no expert in that regard, but I can certainly suggest that she talk to the finance people at her school. They may be able to help her. Lets face it, she got herself in this situation because she wanted to better herself and she has a $35,000 investment in herself. You didnt indicate how much she earns, but as a young person, if she puts in six or seven days a week, she should be able to dispose of that loan in a reasonable amount of time. The fact that many kids are doing it is testimony that it can be done. DEAR BRUCE: I have a pipe dream and would like your opinion on the idea. We own our own home, worth about $450,000. We have an IRA with $50,000, savings of $60,000 and $150,000 in the stock market. Our income is $55,000 a year. As you are well aware, the stock market is not all that stable. I am wondering if we should sell our stocks and purchase a vacation home near one of our sons. One lives in Sacramento, Calif., and one in Sparks, Nev. We would probably use the vacation property on several long weekends. Our visits now are only on weekends, and we stay at their homes. I am 87 years old and my wife is 85. We have no debt other than utilities and living expenses. R.R., via email DEAR R.R.: You say you have a pipe dream? I dont find it a pipe dream. If you want to buy a vacation home, I have no problem with that. But I dont think its the wisest thing to do from a financial point of view. You say stocks are not all that stable. I consistently point out that if you invest in conservative, dividend-paying companies, then the stock market can be one of the best places to have your investments grow. That being observed, at your respective ages of 87 and 85, purchasing a vacation home doesnt seem to be the best choice. On the other side of that, there is no reason in the world why, in either the Sacramento or Sparks areas, you couldnt find an attractive and useful vacation property to rent. You wouldnt have the responsibility of upkeep, and as a practical matter, how many years are you going to be able to go out and vacation? I think you should start the vacation immediately, but I would consider leasing a home rather than purchasing one. Send questions to bruce@bruce williams.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. FUNDSContinued from Page D1 MONEYContinued from Page D1 said in an interview Thursday. So we arent focusing on a grand bargain because I dont think in this divided government youll get one. In an interview Thursday with Nevada public radio station KNPR, Reid, the Senate majority leader, agreed that a large-scale grand bargain wasnt in the cards. They have their mind set on doing nothing, nothing more on revenue, and until they get off that kick, theres not going to be a grand bargain, Reid said. Were just going to have to do something to work our way through sequestration. Ryan, his partys vice presidential nominee a year ago, and Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray, D-Wash., are two of the key congressional figures in the talks. They both say theyre seeking common ground between the sharply different Republican and Democratic budgets. Common ground, however, is a much different concept than compromise. It involves finding ideas upon which they can agree rather than compromising principles such as Republican opposition to tax increases or the unwillingness by many Democrats to consider cutting future Social Security benefits by decreasing the annual cost-of-living adjustments. Instead of a broad agreement encompassing tax hikes and structural curbs on the growth of benefit programs like Medicare and Medicaid, Ryan says hes seeking a smaller, more achievable objective. The talks, he said, also will focus on alleviating another upcoming round of automatic spending cuts and replacing them with longer-term cuts. Sequestration mostly hits so-called discretionary spending, the money approved by Congress each year to run agency operations. Ryan wants to cut autopilot-like spending on entitlement programs like Medicare to ease sequestrations effects on both the Pentagon and domestic programs. I think we all agree that theres a smarter way to cut spending than sequestration, Ryan said. If I can reform entitlement programs where the savings compound annually ... that is more valuable for reducing the debt than a one-time spending cut in discretionary spending. The White House and Democrats are pressing to include new revenue from closing tax loopholes and infrastructure spending to boost the economy. Even if we do not have the big grand bargain, if you were to have a medium deal or small deal, those deals could have permanent loophole closures and permanent mandatory savings that would help our permanent long-term fiscal situation, senior White House official Gene Sperling told a business group Friday. The automatic spending cuts are required because a 2011 deficit-reduction supercommittee failed to reach an agreement. The cuts would carve $91 billion from the day-to-day budgets of the Pentagon and domestic agencies in 2014 compared with the spending caps set by a 2011 budget deal. The Pentagon would absorb almost 60 percent of the cuts. Republicans are looking at a bushel basket of cuts to Medicare health care providers contained in Obamas budget. They also have voiced support for curbing Social Security costof-living adjustments, an idea Obama has backed, but only in the context of a broader deal in which Republicans would allow tax increases. That proposal wont fly in the current talks. There are also several supercommittee ideas like curbing Postal Service cost overruns, making federal workers contribute more to their pensions and raising premiums on higher-income Medicare beneficiaries. Democrats, meanwhile, are wary of using cuts to Medicare and other entitlement programs to ease cuts in the defense budget. Negotiators still might explore curbing generous military retirement, health care and prescription drug benefits as a way to restore cuts to readiness and procurement of weapons systems. Congressional Democrats and the White House, rightly in my view, dont want to use domestic entitlement cuts to offset easing or eliminating the defense side of sequestration on top of the nondefense discretionary side, said Robert Greenstein, president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. BUDGETContinued from Page D1 000GELL Voting period Nov. 3-15. View the entries at. www.chronicleonline.com/halloweenphotos Please no inappropriate entries they will rejected. CHILDRENS ENTRY WITH THE MOST VOTES WINS PETS ENTRY WITH THE MOST VOTES WINS $100 Gift Certificate Dirty Dogs Salon $40 Gift Certificate Dans Clam Stand $ 140 VALUE 4 Tickets Homosassa Wildlife Park $50 Gift Certificate Manatee Lanes $20 Gift Certificate The General Store $ 120 VALUE ENTER NOW! Submit Favorite Halloween Photos of Children & Pets Deadline Nov. 2 WIN PRIZES IN EACH CATEGORY 000GC42

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D4SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBUSINESS Black Diamond Ranch taps group to help with expansion Special to the ChronicleLECANTO Black Diamond Ranch Golf Club has engaged Pipeline Marketing Group to assist with design and ongoing implementation of its membership marketing strategy. Pipeline Marketing Group is a full-service sales and marketing firm specializing in private clubs and lifestyle brands. Based in Los Angeles, Calif., Pipeline has worked with several prestigious brands including The Riviera Country Club (Pacific Palisades, Calif.), Pebble Beach Resorts (Monterey, Calif.), The Crosby National (Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.) and Ibis Golf and Country Club (West Palm Beach, Fla). Pipeline Marketing Group was brought in to ensure that Black Diamond was taking a professional, educated approach to communicating the clubs overall image to prospective members. Pipeline has years of experience working with clubs like Black Diamond specifically to increase member levels. Pipeline Marketing Group has recruited former Black Diamond Director of Membership, Kerry Rosselet, to once again spearhead the membership marketing efforts on behalf of the club. Ms. Rosselet previously served as firector of membership at Black Diamond from August 2008 to February 2013, and has returned as the primary onsite resource for Pipeline. As we contemplate our membership marketing strategy, we must consider how to best leverage not only the clubs physical attributes, but also the incredible sense of pride, community and belonging that our members have created here at Black Diamond Ranch, said Doug Egly, general manager of Black Diamond Ranch. In order to generate additional awareness and ultimately recruit new members to the club, we must be able to clearly define and communicate our message to prospective members, and Pipeline is an integral part of this strategy. Convenient to both Tampa Bay/St. Petersburg and Orlando, Black Diamond Ranch is quietly situated in the Nature Coast of Florida. An exclusive residential community when built out will feature approximately 795 homes with many outstanding select home sites to choose from. New Homes are being constructed daily and a small offering of previously constructed homes are available to preview. Black Diamond has been rated the No. 1 Golf Community in Florida by both Golfweek and Florida Golf Magazine. The 45 holes of private Tom Fazio-designed golf include the breathtaking Quarry Course which is consistently ranked among the best courses in the United States and is registered on many golfers bucket lists. We are thrilled to be involved with such an amazing private club community, commented Shannon Herschbach, principal at Pipeline Marketing Group. Black Diamond is extremely dedicated to delivering a superior member experience and is eager to find more effective ways to communicate what they are all about world class golf in an exclusive, nature coast community. We are very excited to help develop and implement a marketing strategy that will clearly communicate the Black Diamond story to prospective members. Tranzons Saturley elected VP of NAA board of directors Lecorn obtains state certification Thomas W. Saturley, CAI, a principal at Tranzon Driggers, was elected vice president of the National Auctioneers Association Board of Directors. A co-founder of Tranzon, one of the largest real estate auction companies in the country and president of Tranzon Auction Properties in Portland, Maine, Mr. Saturley was installed at the NAA International Conference & Show in Indianapolis on July 18. He attended the conference with Jon Barber, president, and Walt Driggers, VP of Tranzon Driggers and also a cofounder of Tranzon. Tom is licensed to conduct auctions in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont and also licensed to sell real estate in Maine, New Hampshire and Colorado. He was a practicing attorney in Maine and New Hampshire and served as an assistant attorney general for the state of Maine. Special to the Chronicle Bausch completes service training Debra Dee M. Lecorn, customer service representative with Benefit Advisors, Inc. has successfully completed the state of Floridas 2-15 Resident Life, Health, and Variable Annuity License exam. The 2-15 Resident License allows an individual to represent a health maintenance organization or, as to health insurance only, an insurer transacting health insurance, insurance against loss through sickness or accidental bodily injury. She can also represent an insurer as to life insurance and annuity contracts, including agents appointed to transact life insurance, fixed-dollar annuity contracts, or variable contracts by the same insurer. Annuity contracts, including, but not limited to, fixed or variable annuity contracts; the granting of endowment benefits, additional benefits in event of death or dismemberment by accident or accidental means, additional benefits in the event of the insureds disability; and optional modes of settlement of proceeds of life insurance. Special to the Chronicle Marie Rausch, a senior registered service associate in the Crystal River office of Raymond James & Associates Inc. recently completed the Financial Planner Series for Small Business, according to Patrick Daxon, vice president of Ramond James Wealth, Retirement & Portfolio Solutions group. The Financial Planner Series is a professional development program that focuses on retirement planning, income and estate tax planning, risk management and investment options for small-business owners and executives. Rausch has been employed with Raymond James for 26 years in the Crystal River office. Special to the Chronicle 000FVGP Log on today 000G9F6 000G9F6 chronicleonline.com your news. anywhere. anytime. BREAKING NEWS 000G9F6

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER27,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.com To place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time637549 0 0 0 8 X G Z For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 Tax Accountant2-5 yrs. Business Tax Exp. ,CPA preferred Qualified Persons Send Resume to Cpa.resume.search@ gmail.com Tax Manager5 yrs. Business Tax Experience w/ CPA firm, CPA preferred Qualified Persons Send Resume to Cpa.resume.search @gmail.com Key Training Centerhas positions available in group home setting. Assist adults with disabilities in daily living. HS Diploma/ GED req. Apply in person at 5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto FL 34461 *E.O.E.* CLEANERSReliable, Energetic Individual/Couple Retirees Welcome ServiceMaster 352-726-4555 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Exp. Metal & TPO Roofersmust have tools and transportation 352-726-7006 Now Hiring: OTR Class A CDL DriversNew Pay Package and $1500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Call today for details 1-888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net POOL/ MAINTENANCE TECH PART / FULL TIMEPick up application -Spruce Creek Preserve-SR 200 Dunnellon Monday-Thursday 9:00am-3:00pm. see Julie RESIDENTIALELECTRICIANSMust have 5 years exp. Current on Codes & DF, Trim and Rough. Call (352) 746-6825 or Apply in person S & S Electric 2692 W Dunnellon Rd, Dunnellon Alarm Installation & Service TechSecurity system & CCTV Tech with a minimum of 3 yrs exp. Fax resume: 352-563-5690 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 EXPERIENCED PLUMBERSAll phases, Valid Florida license req. Pd Holidays & Vac. Apply: 102 W. Main St, downtown Inverness or call (352) 860-1973 General Technicianposition available at automotive repair shop, full time position with benefits. To inquire contact 352-447-3174 between 8:30a-5p. Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Eagle Buick GMC, Incis in need of an Exp. Automotive Parts Consultant Minimum 2yrs experience preferred. Great opportunity for one to find a career path, and earn a great living. Very productive repair facility and a professional environment with plenty of growth potential. Military applicants welcomed. Benefits. drug free workplace Application Available @ Eagle Buick GMC IncSend Resume:Fax (352) 564-0400 Email robbcole @ eagle buickgmc.com Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Hiring LPNs & CNAs, PRN Fax Resume to 352-527-1290 or Apply in Person at: Superior Residences, 4865 W Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto 34461. HIRING: PT, PTA, RN, OTFlorida Homecar e Specialists (352) 794-6097 LPNThe Dermatology Center in Inverness and The Villages is now hiring an LPN full time. Having a home address between these 2 locations is a significant plus. Mon-Fri 8-5, Call for details 637-1310, ext. 202 Derm Experience a plus but not req. Fax Resume T o: 352-637-0788 or Mail 931 S. US hwy 41 Inverness,FL 34450 Medical Assistants NeededWith Phlebotomy and Front Office Skills for offices in Dunnellon and Inglis locations. Fax Resume to: 352-465-7576 or Email to: srideven@ yahoo.com The First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River, FL seeks aChoir DirectorThe principle function of the job is to plan and develop music for all worship activities. Director is required to have piano/ /organ skills. Candidates must have5 to 10 years in church sacred music. Sendresume to: Church Administrator, First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River, FL, 1501 SE Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34429. Email is: fpccr01@gmail. com. Cooks & ServersApply Fishermans Restaurant 12311 E Gulf to Lake (352) 637-5888 Closed Mon. & Tues Skyview Restaurant At Citrus Hills Is SeekingExperienced P/T Servers Cooks Bartender Hostess DishwasherCALL 352 746 6727 Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p For Application Appointment Aquatic Plant TechnicianAnnouncement #13-61 Broad technical and manual work spraying or mechanically removing aquatic vegetation from County waterways. Ability to safely operate airboats, kicker boats, automotive and spray equipment. High school diploma or GED certificate required. Must possess or be able to obtain within six months of employment a Department of Agriculture Pesticide Applicator License with Aquatic endorsement. Must possess a valid Florida Driver License. $11.09 hourly to start Excellent benefits. Full time position working 4-10 hour days, Monday Thursday. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, November 1, 2013 EOE/ADA. Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 ARNP or PARNFull & Part TimeMAw/Phlebotomy Skills FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALIST/Details at www.flcancer.com ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF REHAB SERVICESLife Care Center of Citrus County in Lecanto Full-time leadership position available. Must be a licensed physical, occupational or speech therapist with a bachelors or masters degree from an accredited program. We offer competitive salary and great benefits in a team-oriented environment. Heather Langley 888-712-8551 941-554-0537 Fax 3325 W. Jerwayne ln Lecanto, FL 34461 Heather_Langley @LCCA.com Visit us: LCCA.com EOE/M/F/V/D 43732 CNAS, HHAS & Homemaker CompanionLevel 2 background check required, CPR certified & prior employment verification. Apply in Person: Health Matters 4225 Rachael Blvd Spring Hill (352) 597-4084 DENTAL INSURANCE COORDINATORF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com Dental Receptionist or AssistantPosition for motivated professional with ref. and exp. Established cosmetic practice. Fax resume to 352-795-2235 FRONT DESKF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com FRONT DESK SPECIALISTPart time for Busy Office. Only those w/front desk, health care exp. considered. Computer & Insurance exp. needed. EMAIL RESUME T O: billingdept@ nbccdro.com Fulltime Certified DentalAssistantCall 352-746-0330 Ask for Vicki Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! Floral Queen size Sleep Sofa, needs legs (352) 400-5174 lv. msg Free Firewood 352-794-3368 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 Brown Miniature Horse. white color on face, feet. Escaped from pen 1 0/22 in the Highlands area off 581 (352) 400-8909 Lost 9/8/13 Tri-Colored Beagle. Male, Neutered, Weighs 40 lbs. Needs medical attention.Special needs pet. Last seen on N. Lee St. Beverly Hills. Has been sighted on S. Harrison. Please call 352-249-3107 or 352-476-3140. We miss him terribly and want him to come home. Lost Female Yorkie on Oct. 20th, Tanglewood area on Hartwood Lane Heartbroken owner grieving (352) 634-0307 Found 2 female Tan Pit Bull BalckLab Mix, Found Cardinal St. Lecanto 727-947-0347 Found Bible Intersection of Hwy 41 S. & 44 E. Near Burger King. (352) 208-4236 Found Jack Russell Male, Saturday 19th white w/ brown Turner camp, Inverness (352) 464-0200 FOUND KITTEN Corner of E. Glenn St. and S. Smith Ave. Inverness (352) 726-4111 Found, Friendly Loving Kitten off 495 in Crystal River 1 month ago Call to Identify (352) 228-2494 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 MAHI MAHI FILLETS $8 per lb, Can Deliver (352) 613-0930 Animal Services Clerk TypistCasual, on call position Answer phones, data entry, performs adoptions and owner claims; process owner surrenders and strays; completing forms, faxing and ebridging; process citations and bite reports; high customer interaction in person and via telephone. Must be at least 18 years of age. $8.70 hourly. Casual labor applications may be completed on line at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us and returned to Citrus County Human Resources Department. 3600 W Sovereign Path Lecanto, Florida 34461. This position is open until filled. EOE/ADA. Toms Pinochle Club Looking for a few good players to fill in on Thurs nights. Single or couples. If interested please call 352-527-9632. I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads FORD F-350 Diesel, Super cab, low mi, VG cond. 6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000 after5:00 352-634-2054 Gas Fireplace, no vent. Incl. oak cabinet with mantel, raised hearth & logs, fluted sides, etc. $300. 352-341-3083 SPA-N-A-BOX Portable spa w/ cover & chem. Seats 4; 280 Gal. Like New, Retail value $1100, asking $600 (352) 690-2198 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Sugarmill WoodsSun 11/2 8:30a-2:30p Lots of collectibles, furniture. For info call 845-505-7333. Also various art, some framed and prints unframed. For art info call 352-238-5447 18 Blair Ct, Homosassa TOYOTA2000 Avalon, $2000, leather seats, needs minor work. Call after 5:00 pm 352-634-2054 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 2 Pitt Mixed Puppies 3 months old brother & sister Brindle in color (352) 464-5983 Come SeePretty Gunmetal Gray, Male Cat needing nice, loving home (352) 746-1904 Female Shepherd/ Malamute mix. 7 yrs, Loves people, needs to be only pet. Spayed, updated on shots. Free to good home(352) 860-0540 fertilizer horse manure mixed with pine shavings great for gardens or mulch. U load and haul 3526289624 Five KITTENS Really cute 6 wks old male & female 3 orange, 1 beige, 1 calico(352) 628-2178 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER27,2013D 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000G7RHwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 11/1/13LIC#CC1327656 0 0 0 G 7 R R TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000G8E6 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000GD46RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP SWIMMMING POOLS 000GDYC GREGS MARCITE, INC. 352-746-5200LICENSED & INSURED Exposed Aggregate FREE ESTIMATES COMPLETE REMODELCPC1458160 CC#2636 Shotcrete $45/yd. Decks Tile Pavers ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000GEBG Stand Alone Generator Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000GGVW Copes Pool & Pavers One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000G67F 000GA TVLa w n Spri nkler Not W orki ng?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000GE51 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000GAEA 000G82K6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 Services from A-Z Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience 746-2445 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in: Aluminum Rescreen Work, Storm Doors, Garage Screen Doors, Window Screens, Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch Ceilings, Pressure Washing, Int./Ext. Painting, Regrout Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing, Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten Wood Repairs... You Name it I probably do it! HANDYMAN Complete Handyman Services000G8YZ 000GG9N WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill 000GGDGAlways A Fair PriceCASHforSCRAP CrystalRivMetalRe4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire METAL RECYCLING ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding Local, Call Robert 352-302-2220 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A+ Remodel/Renovate Kitch/Bath/RE Prep. Refs/Ins/15yrs locaI 352 220-3844. crc#1327710 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1 397 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 GREGS MARCITE Florida Gem, Diamond Brite Marcite, FREE EST. 746-5200 Lic.#C2636 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Design/Installation Trim*Weed*Mulch Cleaup*Maintenance We plant year round lisc/ins 352-465-3086 Andersen Lawn Care Reliable,Affordable, Quality Guaranteed 352-453-6005 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 11/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Home/Office Cleaning Catered to your needs, reliable & exper., lic./ins. Bonded 352-345-9329 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Find Guaranteed, Local A/C Sales & Installation Pros! 800-763-7108 Air Conditioner Sales, Service and Installation. All pros are pre-screened and relentlessly reviewed! Call now for a no obligation estimate! 800-763-7108 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Compete Tree Service Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked (352) 344-2696 FALL SPECIAL Seasoned 4x8 stack. Delivered & Stacked $70 (352) 637-6641 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Handyman services, int & ext maintenance & repairs. Northern quality, Southern prices. (352)537-4144 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Bs Marina & CampgroundYankeetown Deep Water & Covered Boat Slips352-447-5888 Do You Need Help with everyday needs? CALL NANCY (352) 201-7880 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips (352) 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.comSome pets sell right away. Others take a little more time.640981B Chinese Lanterns 1 large, 2 sm, elec. Concrete $150 Weed wacker. Electric good condition $75 (352) 503-6902 RIDING MOWER Pro line Automatic 48 deck, 24 HP, $600 (352) 746-7357 CHAIN SAWS: Electric 14$25 & gas 18$35. Both run but need attention. $50 for both OBO. 352-637-2647 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds 8x11Ivory Wool Feizy Rug $50. (352) 527-2729 VINTAGE DESK & CHAIR. Maple. 33 x 53. Very nice condition. $70. 527-1239 VINTAGE ROCKING CHAIR. Maple. 40. Nice condition. $45. 527-1239 ENTERTAINMENT CABINETdoor front holds up to 27TV inside any size on top $50 563-1073 HUTCH. 36 X 18 X 69 high. Medium color wood. Excellent condition. $100.... 527-1239 King Poster Bed Cherry, w/out mattress, exc. cond. $350.(352) 513-5415 LIVING RM OR FAM RM SET Green wicker, sofa, loveseat,chair, ottoman, end & cocktail tables. Incls cushions. Exc Cond. $750 (352) 382-2939 LOVESEAT LAZYBOY Mauve fabric w/incliners VERY NICE! Non smoke $60. APPT: 352-621-0175 MATTRESS 2 Twin mattress & box springs. 6 mo. old. Exc cond, like new. $125 each set (352) 746-2154 OAK TRIPLE DRESSER w/ mirror and 5 drawer chest. Great cond. $300/set. or $175 ea. Will deliver (352) 249-1031 Queen Mattress Set, frame linens & spread, spare room set, like new $200. (352) 382-1918 RECLINER GREEN FABRIC Used, very good condition. $40.00 (352)257-4076 Sofa, blue w/white polka dot, matching pillows, $250. 2 matching Maple barstools w/cushions $225.(352) 513-5415 SOLDBEDROOM SET. Chest, dresser & night stand. Maple. Nice condition. $200. SOLDDINING ROOM TABLE, 6 chairs & hutch. Pecan. 66x42, with 2 leaves 90. $250. TV CABINETw/swivel top, all wood-black, space for receiver, enclosed storage. $25 352-382-4616 2 LEATHER STRESSLESS CHAIRS WITH FOOTSTOOL2 stressless chair Great condition 200.00 each 352-464-1006 36PATIOTABLEAND 4 CHAIRS 36patio table and 4 chairs $ 100.00 352-601-1718 Armoire, Mahagony, 1 drawer, oval glass in doors, 36H, 37W, 19D, $100. (352) 382-7960 Bedroom Set 5 pc. full size $150 Kitchen Set, Table w/ 4 swivel chairs $125.(352) 634-1489 BEDROOM SET Calif King 4 poster bed w/ Box spring, end table,dresser & lamp. Ivory, $450 obo (352) 344-4178 BEDROOM SET Fancy King bed, 2 night stands & large dresser. large dresser with mirror and drawers cherry wood $500 352-464-1006 BEDROOM SET FRENCH PROVINCIAL. Dresser, chest & night stand. Off white/gold. Nice condition. $150. 527-1239 California King w/ white headboard 4 post & box spring, good quality $250 (352) 621-1664 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 CORNER COMPUTER DESK file drawer,printer shelf,5wide. $50 very nice 563-1073 DINING ROOM TABLE, 6 chairs & hutch. Pecan. 66x42, with 2 leaves 90. $250. 527-1239 DOUBLE RECLINING LEATHER LOVE SEAT Tan leather double reclining ,very nice 400.00 352-464-1006 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds 27TV ROMOTE DOES NOTWORK $25 good picture 563-1073 SUB WOOFER 10 powered 200 Watt,BIC sub Woofer $100. 352-328-0069 YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 140 WATTS 2 9 60 WATTS 1 5 80 WATTS $90 3352-613-0529 BATH CABINET36 WHITE-NOTOPOR FAUCET$60 (32) 527-8993 BATH CABINET36 WHITE W/MARBLE TOP/SINK & FAUCET $100 (352) 527-8993 DOOR WHITE MASONITE-2 X 6 W/HANDLE/HINGES$60 (352) 527-8993 KOHLERTOILET WHITE ELONGATED$75 (352) 527-8993 SINK Sink with Moen faucet and spray. Great shape $30.00. 613-4279 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 SOLDBUNK HAYFEEDER. Freestanding hay rack/bunk feeder. $140. 3 PERSON SWING-WITHAWNING excellent cond. converts to hammock, sofa, cot $75 330-618-9761 HAMMOCK SWINGExcellent condition. Converts to hammock, lounger, sofa bench. $100 352-503-6111 COMPUTER DESK. Corner style. Oak formica. 54 x 54 x 51H. $65. 527-1239. COMPUTER DESK. Washed oak formica finish. 24D x 53H. $60. 527-1239. FLAT FILE Safco, steel, 5 drawers 53 3/8W, 16 1/2H 41 1/2D, beige. Very good cond. $525. Sits on 30 H sturdy wood frame. Frame is free to buyer. (352) 621-8053 4 DELTAJOINTER $80.call Dave 352-621-0286 CAR BUFFER/POLISHER Random Orbit,10 Buffer Polisher, Like new, In Box, $25 352-382-0069 Craftsman 10 Table Saw $125.00 Craftsman Radial Arm Saw $125.00 352-419-2064 before 7 Craftsman 10 Table Saw $125.00 Craftsman Radial Arm Saw $125.00 352-419-2064before 7 MAKITACHOPSAW WORKS FINE ONLY 65.00 OBO 352 464 0316 PAINTSPRAYGUN Hi pressure, Chicago Tools, Brand new,Ext. mix, siphon feed. $10.00 (352)257-4076 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HAND HELD HEAVYDUTY METALINVERNESS 419-5981 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-745-2645 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Electric Range, GE Self Cleaning, Radiant white, $100. Kenmore Electric Dryer, white, $100. (352) 586-1848 GE Refrigerator white, side by side, 18 cu. ft., water/ice/crushed, $350. As is firm (352) 270-4087 GOOD DRYER $100 Works great with 90 warranty Call or text Leonard @ 352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER$100 Works great with 90 day warranty Call or text Leonard @ 352-364-6504 REFRIGERATOR Kenmore Side by side 24 CF $300 Kenmore 700 Commercial Dryer, elec, $100 (352) 212-5779 REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, Gently used 29 w, 60 h, 30 d, white $175.00 (352) 527-1801 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 SOLDWASHERAND DRYER Whirlpool commercial quality super capacity, white, clean, great shape. $250.00 WASHER & DRYER and dishwasher, exc. cond., $140 each (352) 344-8971 Washer & Dryer kenmore, white $100 ea. Good cond. can deliver for fee (678) 617-5560 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Cond, 60 dayGuar.FreeDelivery/ set up. 352 263-7398 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com COO COO CLOCK Very old clock with deer antlers and various animals works 199.00 352-464-1006 1958 CHEVYHUBCAPS set of 2 Chevy Impala Hubcaps, Center Flags, good condition,$40. 352-382-0069 SPA-N-A-BOX Portable spa w/ cover & chem. Seats 4; 280 Gal. Like New, Retail value $1100, asking $600 (352) 690-2198

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D10SUNDAY,OCTOBER27,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 376-1027 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: D & B Enterprise located at 3879 N. Tamarisk Ave, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465, in the County of CITRUS intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Dept. of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Inverness, FL., this 18th day of October, 2013. /S/ Donald Christian Schaefer and Bonnie Larsen. Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, October 27 2013. 373-1027 SUCRN 11-6 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc. will meet on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 at 5:00 pm at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days before the meeting. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, October 27, 2013. 371-1027 SUCRN Elig. To Vote PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address: Nicole Cupak 2440 W Jonquil Dr Citrus Springs, FL 34434 You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747. Susan Gill Citrus County Supervisor of Elections 120 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 27, 2013. 376-1027 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 14TH day of November 2013 at the Citrus County Transit Center, 1300 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34460 Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit, 1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630. NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes) JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, October 27, 2013. 372-1027 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has intent to sell the vehicle(s) below under FloridaStatutes 713.78.The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the premises where said vehicle(s) have been stored and are located at Adams 24 Hr Towing, 4212 W Hwy 44, Lecanto, FL34461. DOS: 11-07-13@8AM 1999 MERC VIN# 2MEFM74W3XX736155 2005 VOLK VIN# 3VWRK69M65M020359 DOS:11-09-13@8AM 1999 FORD VIN# 1FAFP6538XK178772 Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale, cash only.All vehicles are sold as is and must be removed at the time of sale. All sales are subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and the obligated party. October 27, 2013 375-1027 SUCRN 11/8 Lien Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE SUPERIOR TOWING/ C&M TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicle(s) on 11/8/2013, 9:00am at 2157 NE Jacksonville Rd, Ocala, FL34470 pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Superior Towing /C&M Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 1FMZU67KX5UB77902 2005 FORD 1FUYSSEBXYPA16806 2000 FREIGHTLINER 1GRAA9629TB164649 1996 GREAT DANE 4V4NC9TH9CN544639 2012 VOLVO October 27, 2013 Liquidation Sale Out For Business RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 1 owner $3,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2007, Escape, XLS $7,950. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2003, Wrangler, 4 cyc., 5 speed, soft top, $9,950 352-341-0018 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLER2012Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 DODGE03, Grand Caravan Fully loaded, dual sliding drs. 35mpg, V6, Perf. cond., garaged New tires, Crystal Riv. $3,700. (727) 207-1619 HONDA02, Silverwing, 600cc, auto trans, new front tire, 23,159 miles, great shape, $3,200. obo 352-897-4108 HONDA 1988 GOLDWING TRIKE Clean, well kept $11,995 352-201-2014 352-513-5141 FORD F-350 Diesel, Super cab, low mi, VG cond. 6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000 after5:00 352-634-2054 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 Liquidation Sale Out For Business RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 MERCURY2001, Grand Marquis, great cond. cold air, leather int., 93k miles $4,500. (352) 422-5622 MERCURY98 Grand Marquis 56,200 mi. senior owned, garaged, great cond. $4700. See at 9472 S. US 19 across from Sugarmill Publix OLDSMOBILE1998Achieva runs & looks good, cold air. $1200 firm Lve msg 352-364-3009 SATURN1994, 4 Dr, good cond very low miles, great MPG, $2100 obo (352) 287-5993 SATURN1999, S11, 4 door, low miles, extra clean, 1 owner $3,250. 352-341-0018 TOYOTA2000 Avalon, $2000, leather seats, needs minor work. Call after 5:00 pm 352-634-2054 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $27,900 obo 352-513-4257 CORVETTE1999 Coup, Silver w/ Black, 6 spd, loaded, extras, 14k mi, $25,000 (352) 513-4427 Dodson 280 ZX1979 Antique 2 Door Coupe $5000 (352) 257-3261 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE2500, crew cab, hemi eng., 88k mi. 5th whl. hitch $14,900. 04 FORD F250, Super cab, 86k mi. $12,900. Like New FORD Crew cab, Lariat, 112k mi., $8,900 DAKOT A Crew cab, 119k mi. sharp $6,900. DAKOT A Reg. cab., 89K mi $5,900.(352) 726-2494 DODGE2002 Dakota 2002 Dodge Dakota quad cab sport 164,000 miles clean title! $4000 firm. (352)-795-9878 FORD2004 F350, S uper Cab dually diesel, low miles new tires, full warranty til 4/1/14, clean truck, over 2k in extras, nice cond! $15,900 (352) 564-2756 FLEETWOOD TERRY, 27 ft, 12ft slide out new awning & new hitch, extra clean, non smoking, extras $9,000, 352-341-7703 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Rockwood 2011 MiniLite, Travel Trailer 20 ft Power Slide-out, Like New $9995 firm (352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 CAR DOLLY2011 Custom built. Too many features to list. $1,000. Phone 734-664-8692 Running Boards, Ford Equipment. For 250 S.D Ext Cab. Type 2 tubular. Like New $250 (352) 628-1783 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Liquidation Sale Out For Business RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 Wanted to buy: HATCHBACK 2011 or newer, Power everything plus XM radio(352) 513-5291 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt LT 4door, power windows, locks, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLER2004 Sebring Lxi convertible, dark green/tan top all the toys new brakes. good shape $3200.00 352-364-2375 DODGE 98 Caravan mini van, 7 psg. runs great, looks good. asking $1675. (352) 637-2588 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2011 Mustang Premium coupe, V6, Automatic transmission, 27,000 miles. Very good condition. $16,900. Please call: 352-726-2595 SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $500 Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 4HP Evinrude,outboard runs perfect $300 (352) 628-7818 Auto Pilot, Raymarine Sportspilot up to 30 ft, like new, $600 (352) 601-3656 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 14,ALUM BOATW/9.9 ENGINE, GALV TRAIL. XLNTSHAPE. $900. 352-256-8488 COBIACC, 17.5 Ft., 100H, Yamaha, 4 strk, Great Shape $6,700. obo (813)-244-3945 EVENRUDE 199817 Polar Boat, 90 hp Salt Water Series, Center Console $4895 352-201-2014, 352-513-5141 GHEENEE2003,13 8hp,Suzuki motor.exc. cond. $2000.(630) 334-7366 MIRROCRAFT14FT, Aluminum Boat 35HP, Evinrude, elec. start, w/ trailer $900 (352) 628-7818 Polar1995 17Fiberglass, 75HPyamaha motor, good condition $4000 (352) 341-2036 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com ALLEGRO BAY, M37 Motor Home Fully restored in 2011, New michelin tires, good cond. $10,500 obo,352-274-8664 FLEETWOOD95 Flair, Class A 22 ft, 50k mi. Very Good cond MUST SEE $12,000 (352) 628-6643 DUTCHMAN 30 ft classic trailer. W/ tongue, ready for travel. $1200 (352) 419-5028 KEYSTONESpringdale 2005 Model 298-BHL super slide out, awning, tandem axle, coupling hitch anti sway bars, 30 amp hkup. Asking $9,500 or will consider shallow water boat as trade, (352) 503-9133 before 9pm Need a JOB?#1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Urban Suburban Hair StudiowelcomesKATIE FLYERSpecialty: Up-dos, Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting. Paul Mitchell certified. Stop in and say hello! Call to make your reservation today. 352-637-0777 826 S US Hwy 41 From Cutting Edge to Care Free LILLYLilly, a 6-y.o. female bulldog mix, white w/black ears, beautiful, friendly girl, weighs 36 lbs. Heartworm-negative & housebrkn. She loves treats & sits on command, came to the shelter as a stray. Very affectionate, wants to be by your side. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 Petea 1-year-old mostly white terrier/?hound mix, Heartworm negative & housebroken. Came to the shelter because his family could no longer afford him. A very gentle, well-behaved dog, walks very well on a leash & gets along with other dogs. Weighs 51 lbs. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. SETHSeth is a 1-y.o. Retriever mix, very stunning coloring, soft beautiful coat. Sits on command, takes treats gently. Friendly w/people & other dogs. Loves rope toys & belly rubs. Eager to please & will make a great family pet. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. Honda 3 wheeler 1984 5 sp. Hi/low, new tires, $450 obo or trade; New 26 Schwin 49 CC, Motorized Bike. $450 obo or trade (352) 447-6139 Summit Climbing Deer Stand, good condition $125.00 352-419-2064 Two Mens Bycycles Both 26 and like new. 8 speed Monogoose $175, Break Point Pro $125 (352) 503-6902 WOMENS BICYCLE SCHWINN collegiate 3 SPEED 26 ASKING $99.00 (352) 746-9483 DIAMOND ENGAGEMENTRING 1/2 carat, beautiful color and clarity, high quality, no chips $1200 obo 201-7305 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 New Client Offer For YouTake 20% off First VisitANue SalonHair Skin Nails 1916 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida (Corner of Turkey Oak and Hwy. 19-Near Mall) 352-563-2110 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment 4 WHEELED WALKER 4 WHEELED WALKER with seat and brakes. only 75.00 352 464 0316 AUTO-GO SCOOTER FAAapproved folding scooter w/hitch mounted ramp. Can be used as power walker. $300.00 352-527-0942 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER both have adjustable legs only 20.00 each 352 464 0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOTRESTS GREATSHAPE ONLY100.00 352 464 0316 SAFETYBATHTUB GRAB BAR it clamps to the side of the tub 25.00 352 464 0316 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 NEW & RARE ACOUSTIC GUITAR SOLID TOP, GOLD GROVERS $100 352-601-6625 NEW FLAWLESS 5 STRING RESONATOR BANJO, SET UPAND READYHALF PRICE @ $100 352-601-6625 NEW OSCAR SCHMIDT WHITE ACOUSTIC GUITAR AQUAMOPTRIM $100 352-601-6625 NEWKUSTOMAMP WITH REVERB, OVERDRIVE & 12 SPEAKER $70 352-601-6625 OLD SCHOOL ELECTRIC GUITAR ANDAMPW/12 SPEAKER&REVERB $100 352-601-6625 FENDER STYLE MINI BASS POLYSTRINGS PREAMPW/PIEZO FULLSIZE SOUND! $75 352-601-6625 LES PAULSTYLE ELECTRIC GUITAR 2 HUMMBUCKINGS AGED MAHOGANY $75 352-601-6625 SUMPPUMP1/6/HP Flotec FPOS1250X Brand new, never used. $40.00 (352)257-4076 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 VACUUM SHARP 1300W Upright, Exceptional suction, quite, used. $25.00 (352)257-4076 EXERCISE BIKE good shape. all electronics. only 100.00 352 464 0316 352 464 0316 MANUALTREADMILL nearly new 75.00 352 464 0316 1 MENS & 1 WOMENS 26 BICYCLES Avalon 7 speed,aluminum frames only used a few hours. $50 each, both $90. Phone 352 3410736 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ-Go Golf Cartexcellent condition, has headlights exc. batteries w/ charger $1500 (352) 527-3125 Fishing Gear 2 polls and Tackle $125; Tools-various prices. 2 Car Ramps $50 for both. (352) 503-6902 CHRISTMASTREE 9Artifical Blue Spruce Tree/Lights $75 352-249-4451 CONCERTSHIRTTaylor Swift Red Tour with matching armband, large, brand-new, ($10) 352-613-7493 CONCERTTICKETS 2 Justin Moore, sat. 11/9, St.Augustine amphitheater, both for ($25) 352-212-1596 COSTUME JEWELRY4 necklaces, 1 pair earings, 3 watches, all for ($10) 352-613-7493 Craftsman, 27 Ton hydraulic log splitter $900. obo 50 lb thrust 12 V, 36 or 42 shaft, Trolling motor used once $150. (352) 560-3019 Cuisinart Food Processor little pro DLC-10 $25 Fiesta Gas BBQ Grill $30 (352) 746-7977 DISH SATELLITE Dish satellite with tripodnew, never used. $50.00 352-382-4616 DOG CRATE XLARGE Soft Side NEW Heavy duty for BIG dogs Pd $300.Ask $100. 352-270-3909 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 Gas Fireplace, no vent. Incl. oak cabinet with mantel, raised hearth & logs, fluted sides, etc. $300. 352-341-3083 HARLEYSTOCK EXHAUSTPIPES NEARLY NEW FITS 1350-1450 SLIDE ON 100.00 obo. 352 464 0316 Kirby Upright Self Propell Vac. Sweeper W/all attahments Incl. Rug Shampooer Very Good Cond. $249. Phone 341-0302 (If no answer Please leave message.) KITCHEN BAR TOP, Corian, black. angled one piece 56 x56. Bar countertop wide. $40 352-382-4616 LARGE COFFEE TABLE beautiful glass coffee table (42x30) on ceramic Florida Cougar $75. 352-419-6644 LARGE MIRROR Beautiful gold trimmed mirror (41x61) 3 Ovals/in one mirror/w gold trim $75 352-419-6644 MOTORBIKE HELMET Hardly used, good condition, green/ black/ white color, $30 (352)465-1616 Noritake China Pattern is Asian Dream, Service for 12 $200. firm (352) 489-3264 ROCKING DOLL CRADLE OAK $75 CAN E-MAILDIMENSIONS AND PHOTOS INVERNESS 419-5981 SMALLELECTRIC SMOKER LITTLE CHIEF works great for fish or jerkey only 60.00 352 464 0316 TRANSFER SWITCH AND GENERATOR Cutler-Hammer CH10EGEN3060 transfer switch (8 120V ckts plus 1 240V ckt) and Generac 4000XL(4000 watts) generator $350 for both. Inverness 726-1083 VINTAGE PROJECTIONTABLE $55 ACME PROJEK CAN E-MAILPHOTOS INVERNESS 419-5981 WOMENS BLACK RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 EUROPEAN SIZE 43LINVERNESS 419-5981 CHROME CLOTHES RACK, 4 arms for displaying, excellent condition, $40, (352) 465-1813 WEEDEATER Bolens BL150, 31CC gas, 17 cut, great shape, ($30) 352-212-1596 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 INVERNESSFri, Sat, Sun, 8a to 3p clothing, electronics, household, misc. 1103 Jones Ave. WHIRLPOOL Electric range, smooth ceramic cook top, self cleaning, exc cond, bisque, $250 352-201-0093 InvernessWhole House full of furniture & accessories tools, bikes, call (484) 547-9549 MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 Sugarmill WoodsSun 11/2 8:30a-2:30p Lots of collectibles, furniture. For info call 845-505-7333. Also various art, some framed and prints unframed. For art info call 352-238-5447 18 Blair Ct, Homosassa 2 GIRLS WINTER JACKETS LARGE $15 EACH 352-613-0529 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS 36X30 & 2 LARGE CASUAL SHIRTS $20 352-613-0529 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING 3 SETS SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6 & 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 & 5/6 $35 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $6 EACH 352-613-0529 GALLERYJACKET FOR WOMEN Hardly used,reversible,cheetah print, small,good condition,$20 (352)465-1616 GIRLS WINTER CLOTHING 4 JEANS 1 PANTS 5 SHIRTS 2 pajama sets & 2 hoodies $55 352-613-0529 LEATHER JACKETS Brown Mens, Lg.-R Womens black-SM.-R $25. each 352-382-0069 !!! 225/75R -16 !!! Goodyear light truck tire GREATSHAPE ONLY 60.00 352 464 0316 3 DOUBLE ROLLS FLORALWALLCOVERING $25 PREPASTED VINYL165 SQ FT 419-5981 8 x 10 Used Lark Shed for SaleAsking $1,550 delivery included (352) 860-0111 23 UNFINISHED WOOD HEARTS/ TEDDYBEARS/ BUNNIES $25 419-5981 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BOOTS womens tan work size 7, black dress size 7 1/2, good shape, both for ($5) 352-613-7493 Ceramic Supplies, Molds & Kiln with accessories. $500 Call for appointment (352) 897-4899 CHARCOALGRILL KINGSFORD 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 CHRISTMASTREE 9Ariifical Blue Spruce Tree/Lights $75 352-249-4451

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 D11 *Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pic tures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13. NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371 Crystal River Nick Nicholas S.R. 44 Crystal River Mall U.S. 19 U.S. 98 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Visit Us Online www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Anna Cruz Salesperson of the Month 2011 FORD RANGER XCAB One owner. $18,950 2011 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 5.8L V8, leather. $26,950 2012 HONDA ACCORD EX-L Leather, sunroof, one owner. $16,950 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS Leather. $14,950 2005 FORD F150 V8, Auto, Flareside. $8,950 2011 BMW-128 CONV. Leather. $25,950 2012 CHEVY MLIBU LT Sunroof, leather. $16,950 2006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED Auto, low miles. $19,950 2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED Warranty. $24,950 2007 FORD FOCUS 40,000 miles $7,950 2004 JEEP LIBERTY One owner, monroof, leather. $7,950 2011 FORD FOCUS Economy Car. $12,950 2012 FORD ESCAPE 5 speed, std trans, 1 owner. $14,950 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT Leather, 3rd row seating. $31,950 2011 FORD FOCUS $15,950 2010 FORD MUSTANGE CONV. Leather, Auto $17,950 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID 33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GPR1244 $20,950 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 30,000 Miles. GP1632 $16,950 2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT 305 V8. G3T205A $27,950 2013 FORD ESCAPE SE 20,000 miles, sunroof. GT1691 $23,450 2010 FORD TAURUS LTD Leather, moon roof, 1 owner. GP1684 $22,950 2013 FORD FLEX With Eco Boost. GP3059A $26,450 2009 LINCOLN MKS Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1681 $24,950 2010 LINCOLN MKX Leather, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1653 $26,950 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 10,000 miles, leather, 1 owner. G4C008A $23,950 1. 9 % Relax, Its Covered. 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage** 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** Formerly Gulf Coast Ford APR for 60 months 2007 KIA SPORTAGE LX Auto, Keyless Entry. $10,950 $21,690 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,340 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -900 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,750 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . -1,000 *Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualificati ons and complete details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership. 2008 SCION XD One owner $9,950 2010 LINCOLN MKZ One owner. G3T235A $22,950 NEW 2013 F150 XL MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,055 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,056 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . . . -500 $25,499 NEW 2013 ESCAPE SE 000GFWK G3T157 G3T074

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D12SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GFRT

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E16SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GFZI 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscountycentury21.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPEN SUNDAY SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR OVER 37 YEARS. HOW MUCH IS YOUR HOME WORTH? Call T oday For A F ree Market Analysis! SUPER LOCATION MAINTENANCE FREE LIFESTYLE This 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage villa in community near Whispering Pines Park. Minutes to shopping, dining, medical. MLS #702929 ASKING $55,900 Pat Davis (352)212-7280 View listing at http: www.c21patdavis.com INVERNESS 7 LAKES AREA 2911 S. SKYLINE DRIVE, INVERNESS Custom built oversized house 2 bed, 2 bath, 2 car gar. pool house on lake front .53 acres. All rooms and garage extra large. 2014 Liv area. New paint and carpet. Pool patio screened (28x40). MLS #700947 $159,000 David Kurtz cell 954-383-8786 Off:352-726-6668 CUSTOM BUILT, ONE OWNER HOME 2/2/2 PLUS 840 sq. ft. storage/workshop area. Spacious living room with wood-burning fireplace. Florida room opens onto platform deck. Open plan with beautiful views. Choice, in-town location just minutes from bike trail, shopping, medical, etc. MLS #359522 ASKING $149,800 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listing: www.c21patdavis.com PRICED RIGHT! Move-in ready, well maintained 3 bdrm/2 bath home with 2 car garage. Almost 1800 sq. ft. of living space. Roof & AC replaced in 2007. Original owners. Corner lot with driveway onto Rector Street. Short Sale. MLS #703805 ASKING $74,000 Contact Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072 or 352-726-6668 Inverness, large, 2 BR, 2 bath City water and separate well for irrigation LR, FR & DR, screen porch Fenced rear yard, storage shed MLS# 706172 ASKING $85,000 Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387 GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY This home bring the outdoors in. Immaculate 2/2/2 split plan. 2 master suites. Great room, formal dining. Beautiful views from every room. Very open and inviting. Nice office and spacious utility/laundry room. Perfect for fisherman/golfer. Short cart ride to clubhouse and course. Spotless and move-in ready. MLS #705498 ASKING $158,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280. View listings: www.c21patdavis.com KENSINGTON 4 BED, 3 BATH! Over 1 acre featuring a new kitchen & granite tops. Open floor plan and huge backyard. ONLY $162,000 Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 Lake Panasoffkee, 2BR house Separate man cave w/pool table Fenced, boat house Great for owners that love to fish MLS#702710 REDUCED $98,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 201-9871 www.CitrusCountySold.com SNOW BIRD SPECIAL: This home is se t up for a loving couple or par t timers. L ots of decks surround this home to enjoy Florida s great winte r weather real hardw ood floors, upgrades thru ou t, close to the lak e and seller will owner finance. $67 ,500 Call me, Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866 FULLY EQUIPPED RES TAURANT FOR SALE! 27 00 SF CBS Rest aurant 150 +/S eats 30 + Parking Spaces .55 Ac res Commercial Signage High visibility subject located at the corner of 486 and 44 MLS #7 05544 OFFERED AT $32 5,000 Call Elias G. Kirallah for more information at 352-400-2635 BETTER THAN NEW! NOT T OO BIG and NOT T OO SMALL, JUST RIGHT! This 3/2/2 has ce ramic tile in all living ar eas. Open floor p lan is light, bright and clean as a whistle. Nicely landscaped and r eady to move into. Built in 2 005. MLS # 7 05592 JUST REDUCED TO $99,000 Call Doris Miner 352-422-4627 OPEN WA TERFRONT 3/2/2 W ith caged, inground pool/spa. Golf course community Easy cart ride to clubhouse. Ceiling to floor window s in LR provide panoramic lak efront views. Ov ersized caged lanai featuring heated pool & spa provide a pe rfect ente rt ainment area. C ove red boathouse and full prope rty length seaw all comple te this per fect F lorida-livingpictur e MLS #7 03689 ASKING $188,900 Pa t Da vis 352-21 2-7280 View listing at: www.c21pa tdavis.com $1 95,000 SUBJECT T O BANK APPROV AL C ommercial r estaur ant many possibilities zoned comme rcial, H ighw ay 4 1 frontage main dining room, lounge and confe rence room 4000 sq. ft buildling Call Mar y Parsons 3 52-634-12 73 3BR, 2 bath 2 Lots and shed 1 Car garage Mostly furnished MLS #7 04996 $8 7,900 Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 352-21 2-341 0 www.CitrusCountySold.com O n the O aks golf course 3BR, 2 bath pool home F ir eplace open living S p lit plan, 1/2 half acr e MLS #7 06097 $200,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-21 2-341 0 www.CitrusCountySold.com 2BR, 2 bath + den Florida room, furnishings Large shed, spotless Motivated seller MLS #704344 $49,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com COUNTR Y COT TA GE Nestled in the w oods but close to town, sits an awesome home on approx. 2 ac res. Built in 2 003 with too many nice featur es to note so you hav e to call me to see it you will not be disappointed. T urn key horse se tup, paddocks, stalls, pastur e, fenced and c ross fenced. MLS #7 061 61 ASKING $1 49,900 Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866 to view CELINA HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath and 2 car gar age,p lus a pool/spa on a 1/2 acr e. Open floor plan with eat-in kitchen, and Florida room. Dual-pane, ene rgy-efficienct window s, central w ater Only minu tes to all conveniences. MLS #7 027 06 $160,000 Call Jim Morton 422-21 73 to see this lov ely home A GREAT L OCATION for a doctor s of fice or medical lab next to the hospital. 3 Examination rooms, nurses st ation, doctors of fice and storage p lus ample parking spaces ar e only a few of the amenities offe red. MLS #354432 ASKING $188,000 Call Jim Morton 422-21 73 to see this office space JUST LISTED! N EW LISTING N EW LISTING CANAL SHORT SALE OPEN HOUSE 12-3 PM DEEP IN THE FOREST PRIMEVAL Bu t on a pav ed road! A total of fiv e acr es aw aits, for camping, building horses; conv enient location in Heather wood and to the Inte rstate. MLS #7 028 75 NEWLY PRICED A T $44,900 Ask for Marilyn Booth 637-490 4 WA TERFRONT WAT ERFRONT REDUCED STUNNING CRYS TAL RIVER WA TERFRONT HOME Spacious 4bed/2.5bath/6 car gar age! 5,500 sq. f t. tot al 3,700 sq. ft living. Heated saltw ater pool and boat lif t included. GREAT BUY $459,000 AND LOOKING FOR OFFERS. MLS #703 130 Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 REDUCED REDUCED HOMEFRONT Section ESUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEREALESTATEGUIDE INSIDESikorskis AtticPAGE E4 ON THE COVER:ELEVATED RESPONSE, E8HOME AND GARDEN:WALKABLE PLANTS, E12REAL ESTATE:SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS A house in Toms River, N.J., in the process of being elevated to comply with new federal flood insurance regulations.Associated Press

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013E15 E2SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1101 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com 000GFZH ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: REALTY ONE RARE COUNTRY JEWEL Fenced 1.5 ACRES Granite Counters Oak Cabinets GAS Range! 50 X 11 Screened Porch 2-Car Garage HUGE SALT WATER POOL w/WATERFALL NICE QUIET STREET!! 3/2/1 Mobile Home Fantastic Elec. FP Huge Family Room Kit. w/Lg. Pantry 1.24 ACRE Lot Attached Carport Close to River Really Nice Deck! ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net ENJOY THE MAGNIFICENT VIEWS Black Creek & St. Martins River 3/2/2 Carport Beautiful Sunsets Gorgeous FP in Great Room 2 Sea Walls on Property Boathouse and Dock Elevator for Easy Access Hurricane Shutters! JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: team@citrusrealty.com JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200 Email: JenniferStoltz@remax.net www.CitrusCountyHomes.com KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828 Ad Code #1043 Email: kim@kimdevane.com RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663 www.ronmcevoy.remax.com Certified Distressed Property Expert GEILA gala ENGLISH 352-249-6961 Email: g.english@remax.net www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com MARTHA SATHER ( 352) 212-3929 Email: martha.sather@remax.net LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net RICHARD VENTICINQUE 352-422-2180 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR PRODUCER Email: richardv@remax.net www.citruscounty-florida-realestate.com MLS #705449 $595,000 $595,000 $595,000 (352) 637-2828 Enter house #14207 WATERFRONT MULTI-GENERATIONAL HOME! Single home set-up for 2 separate living areas. Each side with full kitchen. One side has 2BRs, 2 baths, fireplace and loft. Other side has 1BR, 1 Bath, morning room, large living room and its own entrance. Large corner lot with big wrap around deck. 15 MIMOSA CT. E. Sugarmill Woods! Looking for more space? Family growing? This 4/3/2 with 2,368 of living space and built in 2008 could be your next home. Steal of a deal! Directions : CR 480/Oak Park Blvd. to Cactus St., Right on Iberis Ct., to right on Mimosa Ct. E. OAKWOOD VILLAGE AFFORDABLE HOME 2 BR, 1 BATH 1-Car Garage Open Floor Plan Cathedral Ceiling Screened Porch Living & Family Rooms All Appliances New CARPET 8131 N. MALTESE DR., CITRUS SPRINGS 4/2/2 w/Office Open Split Floor Plan Formal Dining Rm. Great Rm. & Master Open to Lanai Eat-In Kitchen Lg./Rooms & Lots of Storage Space Huge Great Room Surrounded by Nice Homes BREATHTAKING SUNSETS! Great Custom Built 2/2 Stilt Home With Direct Gulf Access. Many Upgraded Features Include Cathedral Ceiling Living Areas Overlooking The Water & Nature, Mexican Tile Thru, Solid Oak Kitchen Cabinets, Tile Counters, Stainless Appliances, French Doors, Plantation Blinds, Riprap Seawall, Irrigation, 140 Ft. Boardwalk To Floating Dock. Old Florida Ambiance! A Perfect Retreat! GOLD CREST BUILT, original owner, 3/2/2 split plan pool home on 2.78 acres. Screened entry, formal LR w/trey ceiling and sliders to pool, fam. rm., formal dining area, kit. has breakfast bar, breakfast nook, lg. pantry, roll-out drawers, pass-through window to lanai, lots of cabinets & counter space. Master with trey ceiling, his & hers walk-in closets, garden tub, dual sinks & vanity. Both guest rooms have walk-in closets, guest/ pool bath w/skylight, ceiling fans, plant shelves, sec sys. & neutral colors throughout, large lanai w/vinyl sliders for heating or cooling. Private backyard has small pond and sitting area, shed with power, carport for extra parking & much more. 715 E. SAVOY ST., KENSINGTON ESTATES Beautiful 3BR/2BA/3CG on 1 ACRE Great Rm./Dining Rm./Office Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area Enclosed Florida Rm. Wood/Tile/Carpet Flooring Deck/Gazebo/Fire Pit Citrus Hills Social Membership SUGARMILLS WOODS 3/2/2 Caged Pool Garage w/Screen Enclosure Solid Surface Counters Beautiful Tile Flooring 1st Green of Southern Woods L ECANTO (352) 637-2828 Enter house #20 MLS #706091 $123,900 $123,900 $123,900 HERNANDO! (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1628 MLS #702915 $79,900 $79,900 $79,900 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #1004 MLS #703763 $190,000 $190,000 $190,000 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD. BEVERLY HILLS 4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM Beautifully Maintained Many Extras MLS #703418 $269,900 $269,900 $269,900 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #4200 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 8180 N. HILLVIEW CIR. CITRUS SPRINGS 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2005 Great Location/Lot Many Upgrades, All Appliances Neutral Tile Living RM + Family RM Ready For New Owners MLS #704443 $139,900 $139,900 $139,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #8180 5384 N. ELK CAM BLVD T ODA Y 12 4 PM Stunning 2007 Builders showcase award-winning home! Priced 45% below replacement VALUE!! O PE N HO US E TO DA Y! O PE N HO US E TO DA Y! OPEN HOUSE T ODA Y! OPEN HOUSE T ODA Y 12-3PM MLS #705695 $144,000 $144,000 $144,000 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #4182 BEVERL Y HILLS MLS #706139 $59,900 $59,900 $59,900 $149,900 $149,900 $149,900 MLS #706056 NEW ON MARKET 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #8131 $299,900 $299,900 $299,900 MLS #705547 MLS #705034 $219,000 $219,000 $219,000 PRICE RED UCED! MLS #703834 $184,900 $184,900 $184,900 OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11-3PM 7696 N. LAZY TRAIL, CRYSTAL RIVER 4.87 PRIVATE ACRES Energy Efficient 3BR/2BA/2CG Open Kitchen w/Silestone Counters Enclosed Lanai Fenced & Cross-Fenced for Animals 12 x 28 Workshop OPEN HOUSE T ODA Y 11-3PM MLS #703583 $214,900 $214,900 $214,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1241 $164,900 $164,900 $164,900 PRICE LOWERED!!! BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net CITRUS HILLS CU ST OM B UI LT 3B R/2BA HO ME. LO TS O F EX TR AS IN T HIS ONE. FO RMA L D INING RO OM PLUS A NO OK. FAMI LY WITH P ER GO FL OO RI NG, MAS TER SU ITE WITH GARD EN TUB, DUAL SI NK S AND A W ALK-IN C LO SET A TO TAL OF 2 ,7 90 SQ FT U NDE R ROOF MLS #705299 $179,900 $179,900 $179,900 SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com LOVE THE KITCHEN! 3 Bedroom/2Bath/2-Car Garage Energy Efficient New Floors New Appliances New Lennox AC New Water Treatment All for the low, low price of $94,500! MLS #704399 $94,500 $94,500 $94,500 INVERNESS PINE RIDGE CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net MO TIVA TEDBRING YOUR OFFER Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005 mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area, covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All appliances, window treatments and some furnishings are included. MLS #M704319 $74,900 $74,900 $74,900 REDUCED OVER $4,000 Hunting/Fishing Camp 6 Acres, surrounded by timberland, easy access from paved rd Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. living room & AC Downstairs, Lrg. Kit., bath & bedroom, Good Hunting. Backs up to Golf Ammock Hunting Clb. Jimmy 352-302-4268 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW T O LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HERNANDORent to Own 1/2 Office, AC, Hwy 200 352-344-3084 HERNANDORent to Own 4/2, ac, hwy 200, $875. mo. 352-344-3084 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience 352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2 bath with fireplace, sauna, and garage. 2 acres w/fruit trees, garden ready. 352-422-7136 HERNANDO 2 bedroom. 2 bath. DW,own lot, new carport & screened front & back porch, workshop, new AC,55+, only $55 mo. Assoc fee, clubhouse & pool. Very good condition. $67,000 call 813 464 9858 117 S Lunar Terrace 2 bedroom 2 bath Florida RM Garage & Carport Updated. Clean $74,900 MUSTSEE Owner Financing W/$2500 Down 352-344-9290 FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM Inverness highlands 2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath. $62,000 2 car garage Fenced yard. 352-476-0581 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM 2005 MEADOWCREST (Fox Hollow) BEAUTY. 3/2/2 Lg Split BR, Cul-d-sac.See pics @ www.forsalebyowner .co m #23967875 Call 724-813-8624. AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Connell Heights 4/2/2 Pool Home, Spacious, FP, fenced back yd. custom built 2005, Great Location $195k 352-422-7077 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE For Sale By Owner 2BR, 1BA, Corner Lot Located in Old Homosassa, just minutes from Boat ramp and Canoe/Kayak rentals. On one of the most scenic rivers in Florida, Updated kitchen, SS appls., pine Hardwood flrs./ tiles, roof 3 yrs. old. Fenced yard, fruit trees, new scrn. in back porch, Handyman special. Many more extras, $45,000. Call for appointment (352) 422-8092 TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL ? CALLME T ODAY HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorWANT IT SOLDHouse not selling? Behind in payment s? Upside down in mortgage? CALL ME I can help Phyllis Strickland TROPIC SHORES REALTY. 352-613-3503-cell 352-419-6880-Office Get Results in the homefront classifieds! BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments Forest Lake, Hernando 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5 Acres, Fenced. Many extras including 24x36 Shop/garage. Sun Room with Wood Burning Stove. Fruit trees. 2 8x10 Storage Sheds. Security System. See ad on 4SaleByOwner for pictures. 352 726-7755 I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda W attCustomer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Your W orldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com 3 BR, 3 BA, Condo 2100 sq. ft., Furnished, Carport, Citrus Hills on Hartford $119,000. Call 352-419-5268 Inverness, Regency Park 2/2 Condo, fireplace, 1st floor, community pool, club house $49,000 352-637-6993 Banks Loss is YOUR GAIN. 50-300+ acres adjoining Cumberland Trail Park. Big Timber Creeks, Hunting, Perfect for Cabins! Starting at $1,500/acre Call 877-282-4409. Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres! Just $89,900. Bring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x 436 Six day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1,175.00. Yours today for only $389.00! You SA VE 67 percent. PLUS One-week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-985-1463 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Vacation water front property. $5k down, $1200 month 1/1, Sawgrass Landing. $10k down $1900/mo, 2/2 condo. Casa Rio. Lease options avail. Call Lisa Vandeboe 352-634-0129 0wner/Broker YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties NORTH GEORGIA Long Flowing Creek Property, Secluded on culdesac. Perfect retreat near Oktoberfest in Helen, GA. Utilities in place ready to build for $29,900. 1-877-717-8992 ext591 Streamfr ont Land Bargain! 1.7 acr e wooded corner parcel in Blue Ridge Mtns. 390 on crystal clear stream, Natural year-r ound spring. Paved road, municipal water, utilities, mild restrictions RV friendly. Was $69,900 now, $27,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 63 Tweet T weet Tweet www.twitter .com/citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips Followus Need a JOB? www.chronicleonline.com ClassifiedsEmployment source is...

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HomeFront BRIEFPlant workshops to be offered A free gardening workshop will be offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and 19 at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. Material hardiness zones are a critical factor in the proper selection of sustainable plants. This workshop introduces participants to criteria to consider when selecting materials, their placement in the landscape and potential frost protection encouraged to reduce material loss. A free gardening workshop will be offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. Winter is a great time to plan and prepare garden projects for the upcoming milder season. Garden planning, estimating cost and garden clean-outs are important topics to consider when outdoor work is delayed. These topics will be discussed during this presentation. ERA agents soar to new heightsERA American Realty and Investments is pleased to announce that Donna L. Earling has recently joined ERA American Realty and Investments. Donna will work in the companys Inverness office specializing in residential sales. Donna has resided in Citrus County full-time since January. In her spare time she enjoys music, art, dancing, and gardening. She loves to travel and enjoys playing with her two dogs. Contact Donna at the Inverness office at 352-726-5855. ERA is also proud to announce the latest production levels achieved by its associates. Coleen FatoneAnderson has surpassed the $1 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. She can be reached at the Inverness office at 352-726-5855. Jeanne Gaskill has surpassed the $2 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. She can be reached at the Beverly Hills office at 352746-3600. ERA Suncoast Realty is proud to announce that Rod Kenner has surpassed the $4 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. He can be reached at the Crystal River office by calling 352-795-6811. ERA is proud to recognize the achievements of these fine real estate professionals.RE/MAX agents continue to excelThe associates and staff of RE/MAX Realty One are pleased to congratulate three of their agents for passing the $3 million mark in sales volume this year. Linda Meahl, Dianne MacDonald and Geila English have all surpassed this significant milestone in sales. Linda is a Realtor in the Inverness RE/MAX office. Dianne works out of the Crystal River office and Geila is in the Central Ridge office located on Lecanto. RE/MAX International also has a special award for agents who excel in sales production each year.Its called the 100 percent club. Three local RE/MAX Realty One agents qualified for the award this year. Ellie Sutton, Tony Viggiano and Wayne Hemmerich have each posted high enough commission income to qualify. The brokers and staff of RE/MAX would like recognize and congratulate these agents for their achievements. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013E3 E14SUNDAY, OCTOBER27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. Jason Gaffney Realtor 287-9022 302-3179 746-6700 Jackie Gaffney Realtor 000GGKA wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com A HOUSE SOLD Name! OAK RIDGE 102 W. HONEY PALM LP. 3/2/2 Huntington featuring double-door entry, new interior paint, new tile, new carpet. New stainless steel appliances. Eat-in kitchen, gas fireplace, formal LR/DR, 25 x 35 expanded screened lanai. Workshop area in garage with built-in cabinets. Roof in 09. Gorgeous view of park. $144,900 OAKWOOD VILLAGE 726 W COLBERT CT. Brittney is my name and I am beautiful. 3/2/2, remodeled kitchen with island, 10 x 13 master bath, walk-in closet, new sink faucets, new appliances, roof May 12, H A/C 5 years. Beautiful tiled designer entry. Call for private viewing. Come see for yourself. $119,0 00 CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty INC CALL Roy Bass TODAY Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com 000GGRS BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL Sugar mill Woods 4BR/3BA. Over 3000 sq. ft. of living. $150,000 MLS#702836 BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 2BR/1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch. Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852 IMMACULA TE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL 2BR/2BA unit in Regency Park. Move in condition. $53,500 MLS#705999 BANK OWNED-CR YSTAL RIVER, FL 3BR/2BA pool home in Connell Heights. Fireplace, Fenced yard. $92,500 MLS#705675 000G7AR BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 1 bedroom, 1 bath @$395 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! FLORAL CITYRent to Own 3/2 Lg. DW, On Canal to Lake & River, $3,500 dwn $400 mo (352) 726-9369 HOMOSASSA3/2 on 490 near 19, lrg lot, Sale or Rent, Zone MDR, $475. mo + Ref. No Pets, 352-628-3019 LECANTO2/1 $510/mo. LG yard 352-464-3159 LECANTO2/2, Doublewide $550. (352) 212-9682 LECANTOLeisure Acres 3/2 SW, water & garbage inc. application & bckgrnd req. $600. mo. (352) 628-5990 3 BR, 2BA, Attached screen rm & carport 55+ park. Lot rent $235 includes water & trash pickup, great for snowbird or elderly person $12,500. (352) 212-4265 HOMOSASSADrastically reduced! Was asking $74,000 now asking $59,900. Illness forces sale. 3/2 ,1 acres, 95% remodeled, 16x16 workshop. (352) 621-0192 NEVER LIVED IN REPO!2013, 28x56, 3/2 Their loss is your gain! Delivered & set up with AC, steps & skirting. Use your old trade-only $487.46/ mo. W.A.C. Call 352-621-9182 NICE HOME ON ACREFenced yard, 1500 sq. ft., 3/2 home in new cond. with 2 x6 construction. New appliances, carpet, paint, new decks & tile flooring. I can finance. $3,500. dwn $394.80/mo. P & I W.A.C. W e have land & home pkgs $59,900 to $69,900 352-621-9181 RENTERS WANTEDWhy rent when you can own? We can put you in your own home. Credit problems o.k. As low as $2,000. down& only $105/ wk. Call for more info & locations. Call 352-621-3807 USED HOMES/ REPOSDoublewides From $8,500. Singlewides From $3,500. New inventory daily We buy used homes (352) 621-9183 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 12X60 MOBILE HOME + 16x20 addition, 2BR, 1BA, 80x200 lot with10x12 shed. 6 appliances incl. $31,500. (352) 344-9565 A Must See! Very Clean! 2/2/1 w/ workshop. acre fenced 5350 W Cinn Ridge, Lecanto. See Pics @ www.infotube.net #254988 (352) 228-4282 Castle Lake Park INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt scnd lanai, steel roof, caged inground pool, 1 acre, no HOA fees, $69k (352) 238-4521 Homosassa` 2BR,1BA furnished, enclosed lanai, carport, 2 sheds, cyclone fence, 1/2 acre,$21,500 352-628-3899 INVERNESS 2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre, enclosed scr sun rm, laundry rm, 1-car gar carport, shed $34,000. (352) 419-5013 Crystal River 2bd/2ba double-wide with Sun Room in Crystal River Village $20,500. or lease to buy. Pls call Dell Nora at 352-795-7161 Inverness 55+ 2Br/1Ba CHA, price reduced to $5,000.352-419-6644 2BR/1Ba CHA, lots of extras. Price reduced for quick sale. 341-1237 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $15,000 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $270 mo, incl water, sewer trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 Lecanto2/2, 55+ Senior Park $11,500, furn. lot rent $245. incl. trash & water (219) 929-8909 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 CASTRO REALTY & Property Management Inc333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 Chassahowitzka2/2/1 $600. mo. 7735 W. Tropical Ln. A g ent (352) 382-1000 Get Results in the homefront classifieds! RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000GGA5 www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com HOMOSASSA 59 CinaberryCir. . . . . . . . . . . . $750SMW villa 2/2/1 on golf course incl. lawn 2278 S. Sandburg Pt. . . . . . . . $5002/1 duplex available soon!INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY 1304 Claymore St. (INV) . . . $1,1003/2/2 pool home 1 block from Rails to Trails 7530 S. Duval Island (FC) . . . $1,1003/2 lakefront home with a beautiful viewCRYSTAL RIVER 9200 N. Perseus Ter.. . . . . . . . $6503/2 nice DW split plan on 1 acre 9469 W.Wisconsin Ct. . . . . . . $6502/2 nice 2-story condo coming soon!BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS 87 S. Adams (BH) . . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5/1 newly remodeled with Florida room 7699 N. Maltese Dr. (CS) . . . . . $8003/2/2 nice newer home 1,254 sq. ft. J.W.MORTON PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC.1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL000GFZM Jennif er F udge Cheryl S cruggs Pr oper t y Manager / R e alt o rAs s o ciat e s 3 5 2 7 2 6-9010 CALLING ALL OWNERS NEED A GOOD TENANT?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! INVERNESS HOMES BEVERLY HILLS HOMES 3/2/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 2/2/1 Duplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$600 2/1 Duplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$525 2/1.5 Townhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 2/1/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 HOMOSASSA HOMES 3/2 Doublewide . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000 CRYST ALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 CRYST AL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. (352) 628-2815 ALEXANDER REALEST ATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Income Restricts Apply Inverness Heron Wood 352-726-3476 Lecanto Magnolia Village 352-746-0373 Crystal River Nature Walk 352-563-0890 TTY1-800-955-877 1 CRYST AL RIVERLg. 2/1, W/D hookup, water, trash & lawn. included $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 INVERNESS1/1 near CM Hospital $475 incld water/garb $950 moves you in 352-422-2393 INVERNESS CANDLEWOOD COURT APAR TMENTS 2 Bedrm., 1 BathRental Assistance Available CALL 352-344-1010 MON. WED. THURS 8A-12P & 1P-5P 307 Washington Ave. Inverness Fl.Equal Housing Opportunity Get Results in the homefront classifieds! RIVER REACH APAR TMENTSFall Into Savings RENTAL ASSIST ANCE AV AILABLE *Select Units2151 N. River Reach Circle Crystal RiverFl(352) 795-8024TDD Hearing Impaired number:1-800-955-8771 Outside storage Front / back porches Onsite laundry cntr Resident Community Room Mnthly pest control years of age or older, handicap/ disabled, regar dless of age, with or without children.This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. SEABREEZE MANORSenior Citizens, Disabled or Handicapped. Rent based on income.Applications now accepted for 1 & 2 Bedrm.units with carpeting, custom cabinets, central air & heat, stove, refrigerator & additional outside storage with patio. 37 Seabreeze Dr., Inglis. Call (352) 447-0277-TDD Ventura V illage Apartments3580 E. Wood Knoll Lane, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-6349 Now Accepting Applications. Full Handicap unit available Central H/A Storage;Carpet Laundry Facilities; On Site Mgmt Elderly (62+) Handicap/Disabled With or without children 1Bedroom $406; 2 Bedrooms $ 446 TDD# 800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer. CRYST ALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apt s. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water ,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 LECANTO1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. incl Non Smk, $550/mo. 352-628-3501 Sugarmill W oods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Income Restricts Apply Inverness Heron Wood 352-726-3476 Lecanto Magnolia Village 352-746-0373 Crystal River Nature Walk 352-563-0890 TTY1-800-955-877 1 CRYST AL RIVERFully Furnished Studio Efficiency w/ equip ped kit. All util., cable, Internet, & cleaning provided. $599.mo 352-586-1813 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLISCharming furn or unfurn effic./cottage, all utilities incld. $595 no smoking 352-422-2994 BEVERLY HILLS1/1, Remodeled, C/H/A $515.mo 352-302-4057 BEVERLY HILLS2 poss 3/1/1 + carport $600. 352-464-2514 CRYST AL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM HERNANDORent to Own 1/2 Office, AC, Hwy 200 352-344-3084 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Income Restricts Apply Inverness Heron Wood 352-726-3476 Lecanto Magnolia Village 352-746-0373 Crystal River Nature Walk 352-563-0890 TTY1-800-955-877 1 Crystal Rivermodern 2/2, 1500 sq.ft on 10 acres grass pasture w/horse barn. 5 miles from downtown Crystal River off of Citrus Ave. (Hwy 495 and 488) Lease for 10 yrs & it will be yours! Rent $1000 per month. call Larry Hough, Manager 352-795-2240 HERNANDORent to Own 4/2, ac, hwy 200, $875. mo. 352-344-3084 INVERNESS3/2 Carport, $625. mo Call (561) 248-8391 INVERNESS3/2/1, Avail 11/22, sunroom, fenced yar d, appd pets w/ addl fees, $775/mo + sec & 1st. 352-697-2195 Inverness3/2/2 $800. mo + sec. no smk/pets 726-1875 Inverness3/2/2, caged heated pool/spa, privacy fence. Includes pool Serv. $900/mo.F/L/S (352) 726-1069 INVERNESSCountry Living on large acre lot. 3 bd. 2 ba home. Garden area, fenced area. Well & septic so no water bill! $595. 352-476-4964 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 Near Anna Jo Rd. By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 INVERNESSLarge 2/2/1, Avail 11/1 fenced yard,appd pets w/ addl fees $725 /mo + sec,1st. 352-697-2195 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESSWater front home for rent -Attractive 2/2/1 newly refurbished with brand new premium appliances. Great room with glass doors overlooking bluestone patio and the Lake Henderson chain waterfront. Nearby the FL Trail, the quaint town of Inverness and grea